hand file


Ruth Busch
 

What is a good brand of hand files?   I want to steer clear of foreign stuff.


Nick Andrews
 

Anything made in USA or Switzerland.  I think there are some good ones from France too.  Nicholson is common and sold at big box stores.  I buy all of the files I see at estate sales, unless it's an obvious cheap foreign junker.

On Wed, Apr 13, 2022 at 8:39 AM Ruth Busch via groups.io <jbusch=centurylink.net@groups.io> wrote:
What is a good brand of hand files?   I want to steer clear of foreign stuff.


Andrei
 

good luck with that. the best files are foreign - Grobet and Pferd, but there are other brands that do well. Nicholson were made in USA and used to be great. Now a bunch of their product is made in Mexico and Asia and still it is pretty darn good. You can still find US made stuff, though. 

Are there any other good files? Definitely, you just have to look for them a bit and maybe try them out. There is always someone who is trying to invent a better mouse trap. 

Are the high prices of premium files justified? Not always. If a file is 10x the price of another, but only lasts 4-5x longer, it is not worth it. You might as well get a new file half way through the life expectancy of a file and enjoy it. 


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Ruth Busch via groups.io <jbusch@...>
Sent: Wednesday, April 13, 2022 9:39 AM
To: SouthBendLathe <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] hand file
 
What is a good brand of hand files?   I want to steer clear of foreign stuff.


Bill in OKC too
 

Might not be your best choice, since THE best files are Grobet, and they're foreign-made. Swiss, IIRC. In the USA, Nicholson is good. Found this: https://usamadeproducts.biz/tools-hand-tools-hand-files.html which lists two manufacturers I've never heard of, and one that I didn't know made files, though, so what do I know?

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


Aphorisms to live by:
SEMPER GUMBY!
Improvise, Adapt, and Overcome.
Physics doesn't care about your schedule.
The only reason I know anything is because I've done it wrong enough times to START to know better


On Wednesday, April 13, 2022, 08:39:27 AM CDT, Ruth Busch via groups.io <jbusch@...> wrote:


What is a good brand of hand files?   I want to steer clear of foreign stuff.


Thomas G Brandl
 

I’d probably add Stubbs from England to the list. Especially, the needle files. I do have Aurlue (sp??) Rasp from France. Possibly another make from France. For wood working they are suppose to be excellent. I have used mine. I think they take off wood on gunstocks a bit better than the old Nickelson rasp I have.  $$$ though.

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of Andrei via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, April 13, 2022 9:47 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] hand file

 

EXTERNAL SENDER: This email originated outside of Cummins. Do not click links or open attachments unless you verify the sender and know the content is safe.

 

good luck with that. the best files are foreign - Grobet and Pferd, but there are other brands that do well. Nicholson were made in USA and used to be great. Now a bunch of their product is made in Mexico and Asia and still it is pretty darn good. You can still find US made stuff, though. 

 

Are there any other good files? Definitely, you just have to look for them a bit and maybe try them out. There is always someone who is trying to invent a better mouse trap. 

 

Are the high prices of premium files justified? Not always. If a file is 10x the price of another, but only lasts 4-5x longer, it is not worth it. You might as well get a new file half way through the life expectancy of a file and enjoy it. 


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Ruth Busch via groups.io <jbusch@...>
Sent: Wednesday, April 13, 2022 9:39 AM
To: SouthBendLathe <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] hand file

 

What is a good brand of hand files?   I want to steer clear of foreign stuff.


mike allen
 

      You know that you can get files sharpened     https://boggstool.com/file-%26-rasp-services . I have bought a few new Simonds that seem to be well made .

        animal

On 4/13/2022 6:41 AM, Nick Andrews wrote:
Anything made in USA or Switzerland.  I think there are some good ones from France too.  Nicholson is common and sold at big box stores.  I buy all of the files I see at estate sales, unless it's an obvious cheap foreign junker.

On Wed, Apr 13, 2022 at 8:39 AM Ruth Busch via groups.io <jbusch=centurylink.net@groups.io> wrote:
What is a good brand of hand files?   I want to steer clear of foreign stuff.


Mel Gross
 

Unfortunately, Nicholson isn’t what it used to be. Really, most files are pretty good these days. You skill in using them is just as important as the files themselves.

Mel


On Apr 13, 2022, at 9:39 AM, Ruth Busch via groups.io <jbusch@...> wrote:


What is a good brand of hand files?   I want to steer clear of foreign stuff.


Nelson Collar
 

Nicholson might not be the best around but for my money it is Nicholson!!!
Cheep files are not worth there weight, steer away from the cheep ones. 
Or buy from stores with a good return policy, buy it, test drive it, and return if the drive is not what you want. 
Tools are too expensive to waste your money on junk!
Good luck and may the rest drive save you the BUCKS!
Nelson

On Wednesday, April 13, 2022, 04:00:09 PM EDT, Mel Gross <melgross@...> wrote:





Unfortunately, Nicholson isn’t what it used to be. Really, most files are pretty good these days. You skill in using them is just as important as the files themselves.

Mel



On Apr 13, 2022, at 9:39 AM, Ruth Busch via groups.io <jbusch@...> wrote:


What is a good brand of hand files?   I want to steer clear of foreign stuff.


Jim_B
 

IMHO
As important as the maker is the type of file. Single cut, double cut, bastard, Swiss pattern, are a few.
For many years now, I have been using Swiss pattern with clean edges. I find that the finish I can get is superior to others and the clean edges let me get next to expensive collets without marking them up.


Jim B,

On Apr 13, 2022, at 9:35 PM, Nelson Collar via groups.io <nel2lar@...> wrote:

Nicholson might not be the best around but for my money it is Nicholson!!!
Cheep files are not worth there weight, steer away from the cheep ones.
Or buy from stores with a good return policy, buy it, test drive it, and return if the drive is not what you want.
Tools are too expensive to waste your money on junk!
Good luck and may the rest drive save you the BUCKS!
Nelson





On Wednesday, April 13, 2022, 04:00:09 PM EDT, Mel Gross <melgross@...> wrote:





Unfortunately, Nicholson isn’t what it used to be. Really, most files are pretty good these days. You skill in using them is just as important as the files themselves.

Mel



On Apr 13, 2022, at 9:39 AM, Ruth Busch via groups.io <jbusch@...> wrote:


What is a good brand of hand files? I want to steer clear of foreign stuff.





--
Jim B


wmrmeyers@gmail.com
 

One advantage to Nicholson files (not the only advantage!) is that they are relatively cheap. I bought a 12" Mill Bastard file for my lathes from Home Depot for about $10 or so last year. And another advantage is that they are readily available in the US for anyone who lives near any sort of hardware store. I've heard good things about Pferd files, but I've never laid hands on one, so couldn't say anything useful about them. I have bought a few Grobet files. They are not cheap. They are very good.

One of the things you need to get the best from any manufacturer's files is a decent file card. They are used to clean a file that has "pinned" or gotten clogged up. Chalking them is supposed to reduce or prevent that, but I'd been using files for quite a few years before anyone shared that bit of info with me (since I was young, it may have been not listening, rather than not hearing...) and I could not seem to keep chalk around for the longest time. All the kids but one have grown up and moved out, so I don't really have that excuse anymore. And he doesn't mess with my tools.

It has been mentioned that you can have files sharpened. I've tried the method of bathing them in hydrochloric acid, since I try to buy every file I find at garage sales and swap meets and the like. Last time I did it was probably about 12 or 13 years ago. So far every file I've taken out of the tray I store them in has been much better than when I put it in the acid. They got the acid neutralized, the salts from neutralizing the acid washed very thoroughly off them, and then submerged in WD-40. Or you can send them off to the place Animal or Andrei mentioned, and have it done, and not have to worry about handling the acid and such.

And finally, import files are not always bad. My mother gave me a set of riffler files imported from China back in the 1970's. I don't use them often, but when I do, they work great, and they were seriously cheap. And I've gotten some good work out of other cheap files. If nothing else, you can loan them to people and not cry if they don't always come home.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.) 

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)



On Wednesday, April 13, 2022, 08:35:05 PM CDT, Nelson Collar via groups.io <nel2lar@...> wrote:


Nicholson might not be the best around but for my money it is Nicholson!!!
Cheep files are not worth there weight, steer away from the cheep ones. 
Or buy from stores with a good return policy, buy it, test drive it, and return if the drive is not what you want. 
Tools are too expensive to waste your money on junk!
Good luck and may the rest drive save you the BUCKS!
Nelson 





On Wednesday, April 13, 2022, 04:00:09 PM EDT, Mel Gross <melgross@...> wrote:





Unfortunately, Nicholson isn’t what it used to be. Really, most files are pretty good these days. You skill in using them is just as important as the files themselves.

Mel



> On Apr 13, 2022, at 9:39 AM, Ruth Busch via groups.io <jbusch=centurylink.net@groups.io> wrote:
>
> 
> What is a good brand of hand files?   I want to steer clear of foreign stuff.
>








wmrmeyers@gmail.com
 

Good info, too! And an advantage to getting good files. Though if you buy cheap files you can grind safe edges on them for special purposes, or just because you want to. So another advantage to cheap files. Where it would hurt to do that to a good Nicholson file for a one-time use, it can be a really good idea for a file you didn't spend much money on that will help you do a special job you don't need to do frequently.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.) 

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)



On Wednesday, April 13, 2022, 08:43:36 PM CDT, Jim_B <jim@...> wrote:


IMHO
As important as the maker is the type of file. Single cut, double cut, bastard, Swiss pattern, are a few.
For many years now, I have been using Swiss pattern with clean edges. I find that the finish I can get is superior to others and the clean edges let me get next to expensive collets without marking them up.


Jim B,

> On Apr 13, 2022, at 9:35 PM, Nelson Collar via groups.io <nel2lar=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
>
> Nicholson might not be the best around but for my money it is Nicholson!!!
> Cheep files are not worth there weight, steer away from the cheep ones.
> Or buy from stores with a good return policy, buy it, test drive it, and return if the drive is not what you want.
> Tools are too expensive to waste your money on junk!
> Good luck and may the rest drive save you the BUCKS!
> Nelson
>
>
>
>
>
> On Wednesday, April 13, 2022, 04:00:09 PM EDT, Mel Gross <melgross@...> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> Unfortunately, Nicholson isn’t what it used to be. Really, most files are pretty good these days. You skill in using them is just as important as the files themselves.
>
> Mel
>
>
>
>> On Apr 13, 2022, at 9:39 AM, Ruth Busch via groups.io <jbusch=centurylink.net@groups.io> wrote:
>>
>> 
>> What is a good brand of hand files?  I want to steer clear of foreign stuff.
>>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>


--
Jim B






Sam
 

Simonds, Groge, Pferd,
All foreign made, but good.
The high exchange shipping and so on make these expensive.


Nicholson has been value Engineered, not great, but maybe good enough for the money, easy to buy in stores.
The half round files used to have distal taper, not anymore.  You have to buy a more expensive crossing file to get that now.

Any of the India sourced files I have tried are soft garbage.

Boggs does sharpen, i'ts flat rate on the quantity for them, so fill a flat rate box to ship also.
Makes sense for USA, not other countries.

Find a good industrial supplier, keep in mind a home depot will only sell smooth files
you might be filing all day with that when you really want a coarse bastard.


On Wed, Apr 13, 2022 at 11:07 PM wmrmeyers@... <wmrmeyers@...> wrote:
Good info, too! And an advantage to getting good files. Though if you buy cheap files you can grind safe edges on them for special purposes, or just because you want to. So another advantage to cheap files. Where it would hurt to do that to a good Nicholson file for a one-time use, it can be a really good idea for a file you didn't spend much money on that will help you do a special job you don't need to do frequently.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.) 

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)



On Wednesday, April 13, 2022, 08:43:36 PM CDT, Jim_B <jim@...> wrote:


IMHO
As important as the maker is the type of file. Single cut, double cut, bastard, Swiss pattern, are a few.
For many years now, I have been using Swiss pattern with clean edges. I find that the finish I can get is superior to others and the clean edges let me get next to expensive collets without marking them up.


Jim B,

> On Apr 13, 2022, at 9:35 PM, Nelson Collar via groups.io <nel2lar=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
>
> Nicholson might not be the best around but for my money it is Nicholson!!!
> Cheep files are not worth there weight, steer away from the cheep ones.
> Or buy from stores with a good return policy, buy it, test drive it, and return if the drive is not what you want.
> Tools are too expensive to waste your money on junk!
> Good luck and may the rest drive save you the BUCKS!
> Nelson
>
>
>
>
>
> On Wednesday, April 13, 2022, 04:00:09 PM EDT, Mel Gross <melgross@...> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> Unfortunately, Nicholson isn’t what it used to be. Really, most files are pretty good these days. You skill in using them is just as important as the files themselves.
>
> Mel
>
>
>
>> On Apr 13, 2022, at 9:39 AM, Ruth Busch via groups.io <jbusch=centurylink.net@groups.io> wrote:
>>
>> 
>> What is a good brand of hand files?  I want to steer clear of foreign stuff.
>>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>


--
Jim B






Stephen Bartlett
 

And if a file does not come with a handle, put a handle on it.

One handle for each file, not a changeable handle made to be swapped among files. That is a nuisance and a waste of time.

A cheap turned wood file handle will seriously improve the joy of filing.

Steve Bartlett


Bill in OKC too
 

And you can use copper pipe to make a ferrule to keep the wooden handle from splitting. Golf balls make a good file handles, too. You could even (gasp!) buy handles. My local toolohaulic enabler, Steve's Wholesale Tools sells injection molded file handles a variety of sizes for about $0.79 each. I bought about a dozed of each of four sizes. Once you have more than a couple of files, a way to store them is necessary, too. Some ideas here:

https://www.homemadetools.net/site/search?q=file+storage&Search=

https://www.homemadetools.net/site/search?q=file+rack&Search=



William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


Aphorisms to live by:
SEMPER GUMBY!
Improvise, Adapt, and Overcome.
Physics doesn't care about your schedule.
The only reason I know anything is because I've done it wrong enough times to START to know better


On Thursday, April 14, 2022, 07:32:05 AM CDT, Stephen Bartlett via groups.io <tower.op@...> wrote:


And if a file does not come with a handle, put a handle on it.

One handle for each file, not a changeable handle made to be swapped among files.  That is a nuisance and a waste of time.

A cheap turned wood file handle will seriously improve the joy of filing.

Steve Bartlett






eddie.draper@btinternet.com
 

I suppose you all know that you should keep separate files for steel and brass / bronze? Once a file has been used on steel, it tends to just skid over brassy stuff without cutting. Still works on steel, though.


Eddie


Bill in OKC too
 

If you have a card file, and keep your files clean, it's not so much a problem, if you have only a few files. If you have a bunch of files, it's a great idea to have different files for different materials. And file cards for each material, too. So far, I've mostly worked in steel, so I don't usually have that problem, but I do hope to branch out a bit in my making of stuff, so I am trying to acquire a few more files. I've only got 40 or 50. ;)

Not all of them are handled, yet, either. That despite the fact that I have both a bunch of handles, a few golf balls, and hardwood dowels and copper pipe in several diameters. I'm also lacking in file storage. Most of the files I have are in the same small organizer tray, heavily coated with light machine oil from drowning them in WD-40 after my file sharpening experiment.

My favorite file at work was a 14" flat Mill Bastard file. But they didn't let me take it home when I left there, about two years ago. Haven't found one in that size where I could buy it, yet, though I did get a slightly smaller version at HD last year. I then proceeded to tear up my shop, so it's still in the packaging, out there somewhere. I also collected several 12" files from my school when they cleaned out the classroom and threw a bunch of stuff way. If my back would ease up, I could finish the shop setup and organization a lot faster. Next epidural injection the 26th, it may be better after that. For a while.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


Aphorisms to live by:
SEMPER GUMBY!
Improvise, Adapt, and Overcome.
Physics doesn't care about your schedule.
The only reason I know anything is because I've done it wrong enough times to START to know better


On Thursday, April 14, 2022, 08:28:23 AM CDT, eddie.draper@... via groups.io <eddie.draper@...> wrote:


I suppose you all know that you should keep separate files for steel and brass / bronze? Once a file has been used on steel, it tends to just skid over brassy stuff without cutting. Still works on steel, though.


Eddie


Andrei
 


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Bill in OKC too via groups.io <wmrmeyers@...>
Sent: Thursday, April 14, 2022 10:02 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] hand file
 
If you have a card file, and keep your files clean, it's not so much a problem, if you have only a few files. If you have a bunch of files, it's a great idea to have different files for different materials. And file cards for each material, too. So far, I've mostly worked in steel, so I don't usually have that problem, but I do hope to branch out a bit in my making of stuff, so I am trying to acquire a few more files. I've only got 40 or 50. ;)

Not all of them are handled, yet, either. That despite the fact that I have both a bunch of handles, a few golf balls, and hardwood dowels and copper pipe in several diameters. I'm also lacking in file storage. Most of the files I have are in the same small organizer tray, heavily coated with light machine oil from drowning them in WD-40 after my file sharpening experiment.

My favorite file at work was a 14" flat Mill Bastard file. But they didn't let me take it home when I left there, about two years ago. Haven't found one in that size where I could buy it, yet, though I did get a slightly smaller version at HD last year. I then proceeded to tear up my shop, so it's still in the packaging, out there somewhere. I also collected several 12" files from my school when they cleaned out the classroom and threw a bunch of stuff way. If my back would ease up, I could finish the shop setup and organization a lot faster. Next epidural injection the 26th, it may be better after that. For a while.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


Aphorisms to live by:
SEMPER GUMBY!
Improvise, Adapt, and Overcome.
Physics doesn't care about your schedule.
The only reason I know anything is because I've done it wrong enough times to START to know better


On Thursday, April 14, 2022, 08:28:23 AM CDT, eddie.draper@... via groups.io <eddie.draper@...> wrote:


I suppose you all know that you should keep separate files for steel and brass / bronze? Once a file has been used on steel, it tends to just skid over brassy stuff without cutting. Still works on steel, though.


Eddie


Bill in OKC too
 

Westward is an import from India. "nuff said.

Besides, I want to lay hands on it before I buy. ;)

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


Aphorisms to live by:
SEMPER GUMBY!
Improvise, Adapt, and Overcome.
Physics doesn't care about your schedule.
The only reason I know anything is because I've done it wrong enough times to START to know better


On Thursday, April 14, 2022, 10:19:25 AM CDT, Andrei <calciu1@...> wrote:


Order Westward Mill File, Bastard Cut, Rect, 14 In L, 10Z705 at Zoro.com. Great prices &amp; free shipping on orders over $50 when you sign in or sign up for an account.
www.zoro.com


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Bill in OKC too via groups.io <wmrmeyers@...>
Sent: Thursday, April 14, 2022 10:02 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] hand file
 
If you have a card file, and keep your files clean, it's not so much a problem, if you have only a few files. If you have a bunch of files, it's a great idea to have different files for different materials. And file cards for each material, too. So far, I've mostly worked in steel, so I don't usually have that problem, but I do hope to branch out a bit in my making of stuff, so I am trying to acquire a few more files. I've only got 40 or 50. ;)

Not all of them are handled, yet, either. That despite the fact that I have both a bunch of handles, a few golf balls, and hardwood dowels and copper pipe in several diameters. I'm also lacking in file storage. Most of the files I have are in the same small organizer tray, heavily coated with light machine oil from drowning them in WD-40 after my file sharpening experiment.

My favorite file at work was a 14" flat Mill Bastard file. But they didn't let me take it home when I left there, about two years ago. Haven't found one in that size where I could buy it, yet, though I did get a slightly smaller version at HD last year. I then proceeded to tear up my shop, so it's still in the packaging, out there somewhere. I also collected several 12" files from my school when they cleaned out the classroom and threw a bunch of stuff way. If my back would ease up, I could finish the shop setup and organization a lot faster. Next epidural injection the 26th, it may be better after that. For a while.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


Aphorisms to live by:
SEMPER GUMBY!
Improvise, Adapt, and Overcome.
Physics doesn't care about your schedule.
The only reason I know anything is because I've done it wrong enough times to START to know better


On Thursday, April 14, 2022, 08:28:23 AM CDT, eddie.draper@... via groups.io <eddie.draper@...> wrote:


I suppose you all know that you should keep separate files for steel and brass / bronze? Once a file has been used on steel, it tends to just skid over brassy stuff without cutting. Still works on steel, though.


Eddie


Nick Andrews
 

Not to mention the enjoyment of not stabbing yourself in the palm or wrist while trying to use the thing!  He writes, as he nods and notes that 2/3 of his files do not have handles, even after certain...incidents...

On Thu, Apr 14, 2022 at 7:31 AM Stephen Bartlett via groups.io <tower.op=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:
And if a file does not come with a handle, put a handle on it.

One handle for each file, not a changeable handle made to be swapped among files.  That is a nuisance and a waste of time.

A cheap turned wood file handle will seriously improve the joy of filing.

Steve Bartlett






Nick Andrews
 

I seriously need to do handles for the rest of mine.  They are all stacked more or less in the same toolbox drawer...

I recently used a file card to remove much contamination from a bunch of my estate sale finds.  Really amazing how much better they cut after that!  The cheapo HF file card I had came apart (big surprise, I know) so Amazon brought me another one.  Still more cleaning to do.


On Thu, Apr 14, 2022 at 8:02 AM Bill in OKC too via groups.io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
And you can use copper pipe to make a ferrule to keep the wooden handle from splitting. Golf balls make a good file handles, too. You could even (gasp!) buy handles. My local toolohaulic enabler, Steve's Wholesale Tools sells injection molded file handles a variety of sizes for about $0.79 each. I bought about a dozed of each of four sizes. Once you have more than a couple of files, a way to store them is necessary, too. Some ideas here:

https://www.homemadetools.net/site/search?q=file+storage&Search=

https://www.homemadetools.net/site/search?q=file+rack&Search=



William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


Aphorisms to live by:
SEMPER GUMBY!
Improvise, Adapt, and Overcome.
Physics doesn't care about your schedule.
The only reason I know anything is because I've done it wrong enough times to START to know better


On Thursday, April 14, 2022, 07:32:05 AM CDT, Stephen Bartlett via groups.io <tower.op=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:


And if a file does not come with a handle, put a handle on it.

One handle for each file, not a changeable handle made to be swapped among files.  That is a nuisance and a waste of time.

A cheap turned wood file handle will seriously improve the joy of filing.

Steve Bartlett