QCTP


G K
 

Hey All,

I've got a SB9c.  Looking for project ideas to refine my minimal skills.  How about a QCTP?

I understand that you can buy an adequate QCTP for $150-$200, but shouldn't we try to make what we need with the tools we have?

I've done a bit of scouring on the web, and have seem some ideas, but nothing that seems to fit the 9" that needs to be made given one additional caveat.  No Mill!  I have assembled a milling attachment that I can use on the SB, but that the extent on my milling capabilities.  Ideally, I would prefer to work in aluminum due to the ease of machining, but I am guessing that steel would be better for this endeavor.

Thoughts, suggestions, advice?

Let the ridicule begin.

Thanks,

Greg


Bill in OKC too
 

Look at the 7x Mini-Lathe sites for a Van Norman style QCTP. Mert Baker popularized them for the 7x machines some years ago. You'll need to make it taller since yours is a 9" lathe, but you can do all the work on the lathe, though a milling attachment will help.

I can't see ridiculing someone for wanting to learn more about using a fine and useful tool. I started with 7x10 Mini-Lathe. It's not nearly as nice a tool, but still usable. I do have better lathes now, an Atlas TH42 that works pretty well or it's age. Got a SB Heavy 10L that needs a lot of work, but will be nice one of these days. And about everything I learned on the other lathes will apply to the 10L once it is usable.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


Aphorisms to live by:
SEMPER GUMBY!
Improvise, Adapt, and Overcome.
Physics doesn't care about your schedule.
The only reason I know anything is because I've done it wrong enough times to START to know better



On Tuesday, January 11, 2022, 05:18:39 PM CST, G K via groups.io <bug_hunter2000@...> wrote:


Hey All,

I've got a SB9c.  Looking for project ideas to refine my minimal skills.  How about a QCTP?

I understand that you can buy an adequate QCTP for $150-$200, but shouldn't we try to make what we need with the tools we have?

I've done a bit of scouring on the web, and have seem some ideas, but nothing that seems to fit the 9" that needs to be made given one additional caveat.  No Mill!  I have assembled a milling attachment that I can use on the SB, but that the extent on my milling capabilities.  Ideally, I would prefer to work in aluminum due to the ease of machining, but I am guessing that steel would be better for this endeavor.

Thoughts, suggestions, advice?

Let the ridicule begin.

Thanks,

Greg


eddie.draper@btinternet.com
 

Greg et al,


4 way toolposts are relatively quick & easy to make on the lathe they are intended for, and don't even need a milling slide attachment, but do need a milling cutter of a size bigger than the height of your biggest (intended) tool.


Mount a square block of steel centrally in the chuck, face and bore same to accept the size of bolt that will be used for holding down the toolpost. You may additionally need to make the bolt or stud to suit whatever the arrangements are on your compound slide, T slot or tapped hole.


Clamp the square block down as though it is a toolpost, with one side parallel to the cross slide travel. It may be a good idea to mount it slightly higher than when in normal use by sticking a thin plate under it, no more than say 1/4 the diameter of the cutter. Mount milling cutter in 3 jaw or collet chuck.


Make repeated passes to cut a slot across of sufficient depth to accept the full width of your tools. Repeat on the other 3 sides.


Drill and tap 8 holes for tool retaining screws.


Fit 8 screws and mount to lathe.


Mount most commonly used tools and shim to centre height.


Repeat as often as required. You will probably want one for right handed normal facing, turning, parting, screwcutting tools, another for the corresponding boring tools of various sizes and even a narrow LH turning & facing tool. I actually have 4 for my Myford at home and 2 for the SB 14.5" at the railway.


The following make good shim stock:

Broken or blunt hacksaw blades (who doesn't have plenty of those?) with the set ground off, decrepit steel tape measures, and offcuts from fabrication jobs. If a tool is very small, another small tool under it can work. If working on very small diameters, you might choose to abolish a set of feeler gauges for precision centring. If you need to take a tool out to make space for another, keep it with its set of shims in a small box, bag, etc. If you're not trying to make a living at it, a QCTP is an expensive luxury, with the money better spent elsewhere.


"Quick change" then just consists of swapping toolposts. We have a Dixon QCTP on the Colchester lathe at the railway, and the productivity advantage gained from slightly quicker tool setting times is very minor. The Colchester is in fact more productive, but only because it has a 7HP 3 ph motor and geared headstock cf the SB's 1.5 or 2 HP single phase and flat belt drive.


Eddie




------ Original Message ------
From: "G K via groups.io" <bug_hunter2000@...>
To: "SouthBendLathe" <southbendlathe@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, 11 Jan, 22 At 23:18
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] QCTP

Hey All,

I've got a SB9c. Looking for project ideas to refine my minimal skills. How about a QCTP?

I understand that you can buy an adequate QCTP for $150-$200, but shouldn't we try to make what we need with the tools we have?

I've done a bit of scouring on the web, and have seem some ideas, but nothing that seems to fit the 9" that needs to be made given one additional caveat. No Mill! I have assembled a milling attachment that I can use on the SB, but that the extent on my milling capabilities. Ideally, I would prefer to work in aluminum due to the ease of machining, but I am guessing that steel would be better for this endeavor.

Thoughts, suggestions, advice?

Let the ridicule begin.

Thanks,

Greg


wmrmeyers@gmail.com
 

A few links for the Van Norman style QCTP I mentioned:

if this guy can make one on the junk heap lathe he has, you should have NO problem! ;)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJHDSY7tZ8c

This one isn't actually a Van Norman style, and it would need some milling, but may give you some ideas, and it's based on one designed for the 9" South Bend lathes.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8d7xY4UNGAg
This is the source of h is inspiration. Plans are $6, no kit of materials available. Though you should look at the rest of his site. http://mlatoolbox.com/MLA-23.html

Ralph Patterson is a name in the mini-lathe community, and has given me permission to upload all of his materials to my mini-lathes group, including the drawings for his version of the Van Norman QCTP. https://groups.io/g/Mini-Lathes/files/Ralph%20Patterson%20Mini-Lathe%20and%20metalworking%20projects%21/RalphPattersonML/ralph_patterson_qctp.pdf

I am pretty sure you need to be a member to download from the group, but I'd be happy to send you (and anyone else interested) an invite. A lot of stuff for the mini-lathes will scale up a bit and be useful, or at least give you an idea about how to do something you might want to do on your lathe, and I've got most of Ralph's designs on the site. And membership is free.

Here's a link to the Mert Baker inspired version a guy in New Zealand made, with decent photos. It's VERY similar to Ralph's design, but Ralph's lacks the wide flange on the bottom of the tool post. https://aardvark.co.nz/pjet/qctp.shtml

You can make your own, probably from scrap you have or can get easily, and all it costs is time, and a little effort. Bruce said it took him about 4 hours to make his, and most of that was turning the wide flange. If you start with a smaller column, you don't need to do that. And the point of having a QCTP is that you can have multiple tool holders set up and ready to drop in, already set on the lathe's centerline. That is easier to do on an Aloris-type, like my AXA clone, or the MLA23, but it's not all the difficult on the Van Norman.

Though you can buy an AXA clone like mine from Amazon for $160 or so, not counting tax. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002YPDQ4G Making your own is good practice. I bought mine (for $130 or so in 2015) when I got my Atlas TH42. When I get the 10L running, I can move it over there, or see about making a copy. Or I could buy a Multifix clone. I'm a lot better machinist, now, so I could make my own, too. Van Norman style or otherwise.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.) 

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)

On Tuesday, January 11, 2022, 05:18:39 PM CST, G K via groups.io <bug_hunter2000@...> wrote:


Hey All,

I've got a SB9c.  Looking for project ideas to refine my minimal skills.  How about a QCTP?

I understand that you can buy an adequate QCTP for $150-$200, but shouldn't we try to make what we need with the tools we have?

I've done a bit of scouring on the web, and have seem some ideas, but nothing that seems to fit the 9" that needs to be made given one additional caveat.  No Mill!  I have assembled a milling attachment that I can use on the SB, but that the extent on my milling capabilities.  Ideally, I would prefer to work in aluminum due to the ease of machining, but I am guessing that steel would be better for this endeavor.

Thoughts, suggestions, advice?

Let the ridicule begin.

Thanks,

Greg


G K
 

Bill,

Thanks a lot for completing the research project for me, and sending me all of these links and information.  Now time to digest it all.  I will go down the DIY trail now.  If it does not turn out well, or if in the future I go to a AXA Clone, then it goes on the scrap pile.  As you said, all it takes is a few dollars of steel and time, and that I have a lot of .

Thanks again.  As questions arise in my decision process, I may be posting more questions.

Have a great day!

Greg

On Wednesday, January 12, 2022, 07:52:35 AM CST, wmrmeyers@... <wmrmeyers@...> wrote:


A few links for the Van Norman style QCTP I mentioned:

if this guy can make one on the junk heap lathe he has, you should have NO problem! ;)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJHDSY7tZ8c

This one isn't actually a Van Norman style, and it would need some milling, but may give you some ideas, and it's based on one designed for the 9" South Bend lathes.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8d7xY4UNGAg
This is the source of h is inspiration. Plans are $6, no kit of materials available. Though you should look at the rest of his site. http://mlatoolbox.com/MLA-23.html

Ralph Patterson is a name in the mini-lathe community, and has given me permission to upload all of his materials to my mini-lathes group, including the drawings for his version of the Van Norman QCTP. https://groups.io/g/Mini-Lathes/files/Ralph%20Patterson%20Mini-Lathe%20and%20metalworking%20projects%21/RalphPattersonML/ralph_patterson_qctp.pdf

I am pretty sure you need to be a member to download from the group, but I'd be happy to send you (and anyone else interested) an invite. A lot of stuff for the mini-lathes will scale up a bit and be useful, or at least give you an idea about how to do something you might want to do on your lathe, and I've got most of Ralph's designs on the site. And membership is free.

Here's a link to the Mert Baker inspired version a guy in New Zealand made, with decent photos. It's VERY similar to Ralph's design, but Ralph's lacks the wide flange on the bottom of the tool post. https://aardvark.co.nz/pjet/qctp.shtml

You can make your own, probably from scrap you have or can get easily, and all it costs is time, and a little effort. Bruce said it took him about 4 hours to make his, and most of that was turning the wide flange. If you start with a smaller column, you don't need to do that. And the point of having a QCTP is that you can have multiple tool holders set up and ready to drop in, already set on the lathe's centerline. That is easier to do on an Aloris-type, like my AXA clone, or the MLA23, but it's not all the difficult on the Van Norman.

Though you can buy an AXA clone like mine from Amazon for $160 or so, not counting tax. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002YPDQ4G Making your own is good practice. I bought mine (for $130 or so in 2015) when I got my Atlas TH42. When I get the 10L running, I can move it over there, or see about making a copy. Or I could buy a Multifix clone. I'm a lot better machinist, now, so I could make my own, too. Van Norman style or otherwise.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.) 

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)
On Tuesday, January 11, 2022, 05:18:39 PM CST, G K via groups.io <bug_hunter2000@...> wrote:


Hey All,

I've got a SB9c.  Looking for project ideas to refine my minimal skills.  How about a QCTP?

I understand that you can buy an adequate QCTP for $150-$200, but shouldn't we try to make what we need with the tools we have?

I've done a bit of scouring on the web, and have seem some ideas, but nothing that seems to fit the 9" that needs to be made given one additional caveat.  No Mill!  I have assembled a milling attachment that I can use on the SB, but that the extent on my milling capabilities.  Ideally, I would prefer to work in aluminum due to the ease of machining, but I am guessing that steel would be better for this endeavor.

Thoughts, suggestions, advice?

Let the ridicule begin.

Thanks,

Greg


Bill in OKC too
 

Greg, I've sent you an email from my mini-lathes group inviting you to join, so you can look at the link there, and download it if it interests you. Feel free to email me, too. wmrmeyers (AT) gmail (dot) com, (AT) yahoo (dot) com, or (AT) sbcglobal (Dot) net

I can recommend a lot of books on machining, et cetera. Many of them are free as PDF's on archive.com, or Google Books. I've been playing for about 48 years, after a class my senior year of high school, with out access to machine tools until 2008 when I got my mini-lathe, and the wife told me to quit griping about how hard it was to learn to do the stuff I'd done in high school in late 2014, and take another class. Started that in February 2015, and been going very part time ever since. Teacher says I'm turning into a decent machinist. I still screw up my projects too, and have to redo them. I call that "practice." ;) Though I have some better tools now, it wasn't the mini-lathe that was my major problem. It was not knowing how to hold the measuring tools correctly and developing a feel for the right amount of pressure to use when measuring to get the right results. I am not an expert machinist, but I do know a thing or two about learning how to do stuff.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)

Aphorisms to live by:
SEMPER GUMBY!
Improvise, Adapt, and Overcome.
Physics doesn't care about your schedule.
The only reason I know anything is because I've done it wrong enough times to START to know better


On Wednesday, January 12, 2022, 08:05:55 AM CST, G K via groups.io <bug_hunter2000@...> wrote:


Bill,

Thanks a lot for completing the research project for me, and sending me all of these links and information.  Now time to digest it all.  I will go down the DIY trail now.  If it does not turn out well, or if in the future I go to a AXA Clone, then it goes on the scrap pile.  As you said, all it takes is a few dollars of steel and time, and that I have a lot of .

Thanks again.  As questions arise in my decision process, I may be posting more questions.

Have a great day!

Greg


clive_foster@talk21.com
 
Edited

Historically QC systems were based around providing screw height adjustment to accommodate cutting tip height changes as tools were reground without faffing around with shims in block type posts. Inevitably a somewhat complex system needing accurate manufacture to work well and enough holders to keep a good selection of tools ready to go. I share 16 Dickson T2 holders between two lathes and sometimes could use more! DIY or bought in such kit comes at a certain price in time, money or both which isn't that attractive to normal, impecunious, folk.

2 or 4 way block tool posts are relatively easy to make. Either machined from solid or, as I have done, screwed and glued together. Standard steel plate sections top and bottom with a lump of alloy bar in between. I tapped the alloy bar right through and used countersunk hex socket screws top and bottom backed up by a loctite structural adhesive. Built up is arguably a little weaker than milling but no expensive milling cutter needed and its easy to make a few more blocks as and when. Using such blocks as quasi QC systems is relatively easy on a SouthBend because the slot in the tool post is the right size to take a simple built up Tee nut made from two standard sections of bar screwed and glued together so its not hard to make tool post block sets complete with tee nut, stuff and top nut / lever that can easily be slid on and off the compound slide. I worked this way back in my SouthBend 9" and Heavy 10 driving days finding it adequately satisfactory despite never coming up with a decent way of automatically aligning the block's in the same place every time. I had 4 slot block but now consider 2 slots would be more satisfactory overall. I rarely used more than two tools due to the porcupine effect. Triangular, three side blocks may be best of all as porcupine effect is minimal and, according to messrs Holbrook, the non 90° angles make cranked tooling unnecessary. 

These days the ready availability of diet indicators at affordable prices along with colour coded plastic shim has drawn the teeth of the shimming hassle making interchangeable block tool posts much more attractive. With a permanently set up device comprising an indicator with elephants foot probe on a suitable stand the cutting height of reground tools can be directly measured off the machine. A small selection of sheet and plate in various thicknesses cut to size, plus some sections of de-toothed hacksaw blade suffices to get close to the right height with only a couple of pieces leaving colour coded plastic shim to fill the final gap.

Carbide insert tooling is now quite affordable and becoming more common in the home shop which further reduces the need for screw height adjustment in a QC system as inserts and shanks are accurately made so fitting a new insert doesn't alter the edge height.

Wanting something with better repeatability I devised a system based on a rotating tool post stud affixed to a clamped in, full width Tee nut. The the rotating stud was to be cross drilled for a tommy bar tool holding block fitted with a hollow castellated nut able to accommodate the tommy bar in the spaces. Once the nut and tool post drilling were bought into line rotating the tool post stud and tommy bar would unwind the nut until the tool block was clamped into position. Around a third to half of a turn back releases the tommy bar so it can be withdrawn and the block change over. My design also had provision for locating pin so blocks could retain alignment when switched. As with the Dickson system the pin could be pulled up if some random angular setting was required.

The attached PDF is a tided up concept sketch. 

I never got round to building it as my workshop equipment plans changed dramatically when a good offer for my Heavy 10 came along at the same time as a Smart & Brown 1024 VSL being available within pick up range at a "wallet comes out smoking" price. Pretty much a straight swop! The 1024 came with Dickson holders so no need for DIY.

Clive


mike allen
 

        Pdfdrive dot com is also a good source for such reading material .

        animal

On 1/12/2022 7:09 AM, Bill in OKC too via groups.io wrote:
Greg, I've sent you an email from my mini-lathes group inviting you to join, so you can look at the link there, and download it if it interests you. Feel free to email me, too. wmrmeyers (AT) gmail (dot) com, (AT) yahoo (dot) com, or (AT) sbcglobal (Dot) net

I can recommend a lot of books on machining, et cetera. Many of them are free as PDF's on archive.com, or Google Books. I've been playing for about 48 years, after a class my senior year of high school, with out access to machine tools until 2008 when I got my mini-lathe, and the wife told me to quit griping about how hard it was to learn to do the stuff I'd done in high school in late 2014, and take another class. Started that in February 2015, and been going very part time ever since. Teacher says I'm turning into a decent machinist. I still screw up my projects too, and have to redo them. I call that "practice." ;) Though I have some better tools now, it wasn't the mini-lathe that was my major problem. It was not knowing how to hold the measuring tools correctly and developing a feel for the right amount of pressure to use when measuring to get the right results. I am not an expert machinist, but I do know a thing or two about learning how to do stuff.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)

Aphorisms to live by:
SEMPER GUMBY!
Improvise, Adapt, and Overcome.
Physics doesn't care about your schedule.
The only reason I know anything is because I've done it wrong enough times to START to know better

On Wednesday, January 12, 2022, 08:05:55 AM CST, G K via groups.io <bug_hunter2000@...> wrote:


Bill,

Thanks a lot for completing the research project for me, and sending me all of these links and information.  Now time to digest it all.  I will go down the DIY trail now.  If it does not turn out well, or if in the future I go to a AXA Clone, then it goes on the scrap pile.  As you said, all it takes is a few dollars of steel and time, and that I have a lot of .

Thanks again.  As questions arise in my decision process, I may be posting more questions.

Have a great day!

Greg


Keith Douglass
 

I have a SB 10K and made the MLA-23 quick change toolpost this summer with plans from Metal Lathe Accessories.  I’ve been very happy with it so far, and feel it has saved me considerable time during turning operations over using the lantern-style toolpost.  I do have a small milling machine which made its construction easier, but the original prototype was made using just a lathe and the notes that come with the plans provide guidance with setup, etc.  So far I’ve made seven 1/4” holders, a cross-drilling attachment, and am currently working on a cutoff tool holder and a 1/4” boring bar holder.  This is definitely more work than other options, but it allows for adjustment without the need for shims, and can therefore also be transferred between lathes of similar dimensions if needed.

-Keith

Image.jpegImage.jpegImage.jpeg


G K
 

Keith,

Looks like some excellent work.  I understand you most likely used your mill to cut the dovetails, but what direction was included with the plans relative to cutting them with a lathe alone?

Thanks,

Greg

On Wednesday, January 12, 2022, 07:16:58 PM CST, Keith Douglass <keith_douglass@...> wrote:


I have a SB 10K and made the MLA-23 quick change toolpost this summer with plans from Metal Lathe Accessories.  I’ve been very happy with it so far, and feel it has saved me considerable time during turning operations over using the lantern-style toolpost.  I do have a small milling machine which made its construction easier, but the original prototype was made using just a lathe and the notes that come with the plans provide guidance with setup, etc.  So far I’ve made seven 1/4” holders, a cross-drilling attachment, and am currently working on a cutoff tool holder and a 1/4” boring bar holder.  This is definitely more work than other options, but it allows for adjustment without the need for shims, and can therefore also be transferred between lathes of similar dimensions if needed.

-Keith

Image.jpegImage.jpegImage.jpeg


Bill in OKC too
 

Very nice work, Keith. I may do that instead of another AXA clone. A copy of the plans are $6. Not too bad.

Thanks for showing your work!

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


Aphorisms to live by:
SEMPER GUMBY!
Improvise, Adapt, and Overcome.
Physics doesn't care about your schedule.
The only reason I know anything is because I've done it wrong enough times to START to know better


On Wednesday, January 12, 2022, 07:16:58 PM CST, Keith Douglass <keith_douglass@...> wrote:


I have a SB 10K and made the MLA-23 quick change toolpost this summer with plans from Metal Lathe Accessories.  I’ve been very happy with it so far, and feel it has saved me considerable time during turning operations over using the lantern-style toolpost.  I do have a small milling machine which made its construction easier, but the original prototype was made using just a lathe and the notes that come with the plans provide guidance with setup, etc.  So far I’ve made seven 1/4” holders, a cross-drilling attachment, and am currently working on a cutoff tool holder and a 1/4” boring bar holder.  This is definitely more work than other options, but it allows for adjustment without the need for shims, and can therefore also be transferred between lathes of similar dimensions if needed.

-Keith

Image.jpegImage.jpegImage.jpeg


mike allen
 

Pretty sharp ! What did you use to cut the ball on top of the
tool post lock nut ?

    thanks

        animal

On 1/12/2022 5:08 AM, Keith Douglass wrote:
I have a SB 10K and made the MLA-23 quick change toolpost this summer
with plans from Metal Lathe Accessories.  I’ve been very happy with it
so far, and feel it has saved me considerable time during turning
operations over using the lantern-style toolpost.  I do have a small
milling machine which made its construction easier, but the original
prototype was made using just a lathe and the notes that come with the
plans provide guidance with setup, etc.  So far I’ve made seven 1/4”
holders, a cross-drilling attachment, and am currently working on a
cutoff tool holder and a 1/4” boring bar holder.  This is definitely
more work than other options, but it allows for adjustment without the
need for shims, and can therefore also be transferred between lathes
of similar dimensions if needed.

-Keith


Keith Douglass
 

Thanks all.  I can’t remember specifically which method I used to turn the ball for the locking bolt. I have a ball turning attachment that came with my lathe which replaces the cross slide, but it requires a lot of overhang due to the design so I rarely use it.  I generally use the method of taking several cuts with a cutoff tool to the correct point, and then filing down the ridges.  This method is outlined in Guy Lautard’s “The Machinist’s Bedside Reader” (volume 1 on page 72), and I’m sure in several other resources.  I cheat and use a program from the site below that does all of the calculations for me.  The site is an excellent resource for most of the problems I’ve run into requiring the calculation of dimensions and I would highly recommend it.

https://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz/#shop

I used this method to machine the profile for the drill chuck in my cross-drilling attachment:


Keith Douglass
 

Greg, Andy (the proprietor of Metal Lathe Accessories) shows the use of a milling attachment to cut the dovetails.  I hope he would be OK with me sharing a picture from his instructions.  He’s been a excellent person to work with and I have several of his kits lined up to work on over the next few years.






 


Dave Eggebraaten (AF5IA)
 

Beautiful work!!!


E A
 

Dave Eggebraaten… unusual name…
Friend from Florida married someone with that same name.

On Jan 13, 2022, at 10:12 AM, Dave Eggebraaten (AF5IA) <eggebraa10@...> wrote:

Beautiful work!!!






G K
 

Hey Guys,

Been a while.  Based on your-all input, this is my shot at a QCTP.  Still working on a parting tool, an a knurling tool holder, and probably another larger boring bar.  Not he best photo (I am by no means a photographer), but you get the idea.

Greg


Bill in OKC too
 

Well, one thing you know for sure, you're a better and more practiced machinist today than you were a few weeks ago. They all look good from here, and I hope they work as well as they look! And if not, you can always do it again, and make it better! In the mean time, enjoy the fruit of your labor!

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)

Aphorisms to live by:
SEMPER GUMBY!
Improvise, Adapt, and Overcome.
Physics doesn't care about your schedule.
The only reason I know anything is because I've done it wrong enough times to START to know better

On Monday, February 21, 2022, 04:15:44 PM CST, G K via groups.io <bug_hunter2000@...> wrote:

Hey Guys,

Been a while.  Based on your-all input, this is my shot at a QCTP.  Still working on a parting tool, an a knurling tool holder, and probably another larger boring bar.  Not he best photo (I am by no means a photographer), but you get the idea.

Greg


Keith Douglass
 

They look great!  I almost made one of an almost identical design from plans published by George Carlson before stumbling across the MLS website.  I like that to tool holders are relatively simple to make so adding more to your collection won’t be a huge project if needed.

http://www.homemetalshopclub.org/projects/toolpost/toolpost.html


G K
 

On Monday, February 21, 2022, 04:29:15 PM CST, Keith Douglass <keith_douglass@...> wrote:


They look great!  I almost made one of an almost identical design from plans published by George Carlson before stumbling across the MLS website.  I like that to tool holders are relatively simple to make so adding more to your collection won’t be a huge project if needed.

http://www.homemetalshopclub.org/projects/toolpost/toolpost.html