Need advice- 9" with no tooling - do I keep it?


Agent
 

Hi folks,

Hoping for some advice from the collective wisdom here.  Bought a 9" model A some time back, and I'm just now getting to the point where I have the time to do a rebuild (replace wicks, clean, paint, ect.  Unit is a 1941 according to the serial.  I live in the southeast and the problem is machines are not as plentiful and I was impatient and bought a unit that was not well equipped with tooling.  Lantern tool post, 3 Jaw check and a few cutters.  The Ways are ok, It is a running machine, and for what it is, its not bad. I'm starting to have second thoughts, since a quality tool post and 4 jaw chuck will likely set me back a grand right off the bat.  Should I bail and look for a lathe with a decent amount of tooling and accessories, or just collect as I go and realize over time it will cost more to outfit the unit?  I paid $500 for the lathe, so at this point I can recoup my investment, but once I start to outfit I will pass the point of no return.  


Nick Jonkman
 

If the ways are good and you got a good 3 jaw chuck then you got a bargain. Now you can outfit with accessories that you want and the quality that you want. Mine cost me $1200.00 and I got a 3jaw with only one set of jaws and and old 4 jaw which I seldom use. Also had halve of a taper attachment. I bought a good tool post set and drill chuck for the tail stock. For another $500.00 you can get a lot of what you need as you need it.

Nick

On 2021-12-13 4:26 p.m., Agent via groups.io wrote:
Hi folks,

Hoping for some advice from the collective wisdom here.  Bought a 9" model A some time back, and I'm just now getting to the point where I have the time to do a rebuild (replace wicks, clean, paint, ect.  Unit is a 1941 according to the serial.  I live in the southeast and the problem is machines are not as plentiful and I was impatient and bought a unit that was not well equipped with tooling.  Lantern tool post, 3 Jaw check and a few cutters.  The Ways are ok, It is a running machine, and for what it is, its not bad. I'm starting to have second thoughts, since a quality tool post and 4 jaw chuck will likely set me back a grand right off the bat.  Should I bail and look for a lathe with a decent amount of tooling and accessories, or just collect as I go and realize over time it will cost more to outfit the unit?  I paid $500 for the lathe, so at this point I can recoup my investment, but once I start to outfit I will pass the point of no return.  


eddie.draper@btinternet.com
 

You can make a 4 way toolpost out of a block of solid steel, drill it to take a bolt that fits the compound slide T slot, clamp it down where a tool post fits, stick an end mill in the chuck and make repeated passes to cut the grooves for the turning tools, then drill & tap some tool retaining screw holes.


Sorry, the only similar bodge for a 4 jaw chuck that comes to mind at present is something from a very old text book, which consisted only of a face plate with 4 lugs fixed to it and 2 bolts threaded through each to bear upon the workpiece. Not sure I'd trust that for much work myself.


Can't speak for the US of A, but ebay UK frequently has second hand lathe chucks on it. You can use your lathe to make a backplate for one.


Incidentally, a 14.5" x 6' SB will be finishing on ebay UK in about 17 hours from now. First glance, looks pretty good.


https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/304252114165?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2060353.m1438.l2649


Eddie




------ Original Message ------
From: "Agent via groups.io" <markerichoffman@...>
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Sent: Monday, 13 Dec, 21 At 21:26
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] Need advice- 9" with no tooling - do I keep it?

Hi folks,

Hoping for some advice from the collective wisdom here. Bought a 9" model A some time back, and I'm just now getting to the point where I have the time to do a rebuild (replace wicks, clean, paint, ect. Unit is a 1941 according to the serial. I live in the southeast and the problem is machines are not as plentiful and I was impatient and bought a unit that was not well equipped with tooling. Lantern tool post, 3 Jaw check and a few cutters. The Ways are ok, It is a running machine, and for what it is, its not bad. I'm starting to have second thoughts, since a quality tool post and 4 jaw chuck will likely set me back a grand right off the bat. Should I bail and look for a lathe with a decent amount of tooling and accessories, or just collect as I go and realize over time it will cost more to outfit the unit? I paid $500 for the lathe, so at this point I can recoup my investment, but once I start to outfit I will pass the point of no return.


Bill in OKC too
 

You can get a decent AXA-clone toolpost from Amazon, Shars,  CDCO tools, or a number of other places for under $250. You can make a Van Norman style tool post yourself on the lathe. 

I got a 6" 4-jaw from Shars a couple of years ago for under $150. Was looking at import chucks on Amazon and eBay. Could get a decent 3 or 4-jaw chuck 6 or 8 inch, for under $250 with backplate, or under $150  without. Not as nice as a Buck, but not as costly, either. You can make a faceplate and clamp stuff to it to turn it without a chick, if needed. You can spend a zillion dollars, bit you don't have to. Do you need a $1000 chuck on a $500 lathe? Are you making aircraft or rocket parts? It's up to you.

I have a 10" Atlas, a heavy 10L, also vintage 1941, and a 12x20 import 3-in-1 machine. I'll be using an assortment of backplates and adapters to let me use my assortment of chucks on the various machines.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Monday, December 13, 2021, 03:26:59 PM CST, Agent via groups.io <markerichoffman@...> wrote:


Hi folks,

Hoping for some advice from the collective wisdom here.  Bought a 9" model A some time back, and I'm just now getting to the point where I have the time to do a rebuild (replace wicks, clean, paint, ect.  Unit is a 1941 according to the serial.  I live in the southeast and the problem is machines are not as plentiful and I was impatient and bought a unit that was not well equipped with tooling.  Lantern tool post, 3 Jaw check and a few cutters.  The Ways are ok, It is a running machine, and for what it is, its not bad. I'm starting to have second thoughts, since a quality tool post and 4 jaw chuck will likely set me back a grand right off the bat.  Should I bail and look for a lathe with a decent amount of tooling and accessories, or just collect as I go and realize over time it will cost more to outfit the unit?  I paid $500 for the lathe, so at this point I can recoup my investment, but once I start to outfit I will pass the point of no return.  


Agent
 

Thanks Nick.  The 3 Jaw is Cushman with the SB logo on it, the Ways have a very slight ridge you can just detect with your fingernail, but you can tighten the saddle down and move it all the way down to the tailstock, I have not put a mic on yet.  I would probably invest in an AXA toolpost and I haven't researched 4 jaw chucks yet.


Mel Gross
 

How do you know the ways are good? Just by looking? The condition of old ways are variable. Assuming they are acceptable for what you want to do, then looking around for another bargain with tooling isn’t worthwhile. If you find one, you’ll likely pay as much for it as this one, plus any tooling you might buy. I’ve seen these for $1,200 with a pair of chucks, a toolpost and maybe a center rest, sometimes. Truth is, you’ll likely never use the center rest.

Are you intending to cut screws? If so, then that’s what’s important. Does it have what you need for that?

melgross


On Dec 13, 2021, at 4:27 PM, Agent via groups.io <markerichoffman@...> wrote:

Hi folks,

Hoping for some advice from the collective wisdom here.  Bought a 9" model A some time back, and I'm just now getting to the point where I have the time to do a rebuild (replace wicks, clean, paint, ect.  Unit is a 1941 according to the serial.  I live in the southeast and the problem is machines are not as plentiful and I was impatient and bought a unit that was not well equipped with tooling.  Lantern tool post, 3 Jaw check and a few cutters.  The Ways are ok, It is a running machine, and for what it is, its not bad. I'm starting to have second thoughts, since a quality tool post and 4 jaw chuck will likely set me back a grand right off the bat.  Should I bail and look for a lathe with a decent amount of tooling and accessories, or just collect as I go and realize over time it will cost more to outfit the unit?  I paid $500 for the lathe, so at this point I can recoup my investment, but once I start to outfit I will pass the point of no return.  


David Flower
 

Your post reminded me that a decade ago I paid $525 for a 14 1/2 x 8', difference being it came with almost every option South Bend had available. However, it too came with a lantern tool post. Had been sitting in a corner unused for over 30 years.  As I have used it over the years, in addition to buying a quick change tool post (Phase II), I bought two new chucks and quite a few cutters (I also added, with some effort, a DRO).  It is not very likely you will stumble on a South Bend with what you are looking for for significantly less than $1500. I am thinking if the ways are good, what you have is a keeper. And the next $1000 you spend will get you exactly what you want, vs. what someone else chose.


Agent
 

Thanks guys, this is what I needed to hear, I'm overthinking and letting my OCD get the best of me.  


Sam
 

$500 for an A is a stupid good deal.
I paid $500 just buying a few parts.


Now use the other $1500 you saved to buy what you need when you need it.


On Mon, Dec 13, 2021 at 4:58 PM David Flower <david@...> wrote:
Your post reminded me that a decade ago I paid $525 for a 14 1/2 x 8', difference being it came with almost every option South Bend had available. However, it too came with a lantern tool post. Had been sitting in a corner unused for over 30 years.  As I have used it over the years, in addition to buying a quick change tool post (Phase II), I bought two new chucks and quite a few cutters (I also added, with some effort, a DRO).  It is not very likely you will stumble on a South Bend with what you are looking for for significantly less than $1500. I am thinking if the ways are good, what you have is a keeper. And the next $1000 you spend will get you exactly what you want, vs. what someone else chose.


Todd
 

 Buy a CDCO import chuck and an Ebay wedge style axa tool post with the 5 pc holder set and don't look back !


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Sam <i.am.sam.sam.i.am2008@...>
Sent: Monday, December 13, 2021 5:44 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Need advice- 9" with no tooling - do I keep it?
 
$500 for an A is a stupid good deal.
I paid $500 just buying a few parts.


Now use the other $1500 you saved to buy what you need when you need it.

On Mon, Dec 13, 2021 at 4:58 PM David Flower <david@...> wrote:
Your post reminded me that a decade ago I paid $525 for a 14 1/2 x 8', difference being it came with almost every option South Bend had available. However, it too came with a lantern tool post. Had been sitting in a corner unused for over 30 years.  As I have used it over the years, in addition to buying a quick change tool post (Phase II), I bought two new chucks and quite a few cutters (I also added, with some effort, a DRO).  It is not very likely you will stumble on a South Bend with what you are looking for for significantly less than $1500. I am thinking if the ways are good, what you have is a keeper. And the next $1000 you spend will get you exactly what you want, vs. what someone else chose.


jordie Field
 

Plenty of stuff out there….even in your neck of the woods…. Question is…..what will you be doing on it??  How much will you use it???  All obvious Q’s and A’s….  You decide what is best for you


On Dec 13, 2021, at 3:26 PM, Agent via groups.io <markerichoffman@...> wrote:

Hi folks,

Hoping for some advice from the collective wisdom here.  Bought a 9" model A some time back, and I'm just now getting to the point where I have the time to do a rebuild (replace wicks, clean, paint, ect.  Unit is a 1941 according to the serial.  I live in the southeast and the problem is machines are not as plentiful and I was impatient and bought a unit that was not well equipped with tooling.  Lantern tool post, 3 Jaw check and a few cutters.  The Ways are ok, It is a running machine, and for what it is, its not bad. I'm starting to have second thoughts, since a quality tool post and 4 jaw chuck will likely set me back a grand right off the bat.  Should I bail and look for a lathe with a decent amount of tooling and accessories, or just collect as I go and realize over time it will cost more to outfit the unit?  I paid $500 for the lathe, so at this point I can recoup my investment, but once I start to outfit I will pass the point of no return.  


Rick
 
Edited

I agree with Todd.  CDCO has nice quality AXA tool posts for short money.  Search Bostar AXA on eBay, that’s CDCO’s brand.  I have one on my 9A, and one on my SB13.  I use them  on both lathes, and made a spacer for the AXA on my 13 so the tool height is the same on both.

I also don’t think you need a 6” 3 jaw chuck on a 9” lathe, a 5” is probably a better choice.  I would avoid buying a used 3 jaw chuck on eBay, as a lot of them are really worn out.  You can get some pretty decent import 3 jaw chucks that work well inexpensively.


Agent
 

I'm a complete newbie folks, first lathe.  Over the years, most of the "projects" I've needed a lathe for have been simple turning projects, reducing the OD of round stock or needing to drill holes in the center of round stock, so basic functions.  I think a 4 jaw, decent tool post and a tailstock mounted drill chuck would handle 75% of what I need.  I appreciate all the suggestions 


mike allen
 

        I bought my QCTP from these folks several years back & have been very happy with it . I took it apart & re-clocked the handle & all is well . MY 6 jaw 6" chuck was a Sanou I bought from these folks & it has been serving me well for several years now . 6" 3 jaw with removable soft jaws & backplate was under $ 200 . https://cme-tools.myshopify.com/


    animal

On 12/13/2021 1:26 PM, Agent via groups.io wrote:
Hi folks,

Hoping for some advice from the collective wisdom here.  Bought a 9" model A some time back, and I'm just now getting to the point where I have the time to do a rebuild (replace wicks, clean, paint, ect.  Unit is a 1941 according to the serial.  I live in the southeast and the problem is machines are not as plentiful and I was impatient and bought a unit that was not well equipped with tooling.  Lantern tool post, 3 Jaw check and a few cutters.  The Ways are ok, It is a running machine, and for what it is, its not bad. I'm starting to have second thoughts, since a quality tool post and 4 jaw chuck will likely set me back a grand right off the bat.  Should I bail and look for a lathe with a decent amount of tooling and accessories, or just collect as I go and realize over time it will cost more to outfit the unit?  I paid $500 for the lathe, so at this point I can recoup my investment, but once I start to outfit I will pass the point of no return.  


mike allen
 

        forgot the link for the tool post     http://www.cdcotools.com/

        animal

On 12/13/2021 7:05 PM, mike allen wrote:

        I bought my QCTP from these folks several years back & have been very happy with it . I took it apart & re-clocked the handle & all is well . MY 6 jaw 6" chuck was a Sanou I bought from these folks & it has been serving me well for several years now . 6" 3 jaw with removable soft jaws & backplate was under $ 200 . https://cme-tools.myshopify.com/


    animal

On 12/13/2021 1:26 PM, Agent via groups.io wrote:
Hi folks,

Hoping for some advice from the collective wisdom here.  Bought a 9" model A some time back, and I'm just now getting to the point where I have the time to do a rebuild (replace wicks, clean, paint, ect.  Unit is a 1941 according to the serial.  I live in the southeast and the problem is machines are not as plentiful and I was impatient and bought a unit that was not well equipped with tooling.  Lantern tool post, 3 Jaw check and a few cutters.  The Ways are ok, It is a running machine, and for what it is, its not bad. I'm starting to have second thoughts, since a quality tool post and 4 jaw chuck will likely set me back a grand right off the bat.  Should I bail and look for a lathe with a decent amount of tooling and accessories, or just collect as I go and realize over time it will cost more to outfit the unit?  I paid $500 for the lathe, so at this point I can recoup my investment, but once I start to outfit I will pass the point of no return.  


Glen Ruch
 

I agree with the points David makes, and would amplify . . .

Keep all the old parts, that you upgrade e.g. lantern tool post, when replaced with a QCTP.  If/when you decide to sell the lathe, keep the newer tooling.  Most likely it will be usable on the replacement lathe.  My guess when you bought the current lathe the original owner kept back most of the tooling he wanted to move to another machine.

Regards

On 12/13/21 16:57, David Flower wrote:
Your post reminded me that a decade ago I paid $525 for a 14 1/2 x 8', difference being it came with almost every option South Bend had available. However, it too came with a lantern tool post. Had been sitting in a corner unused for over 30 years.  As I have used it over the years, in addition to buying a quick change tool post (Phase II), I bought two new chucks and quite a few cutters (I also added, with some effort, a DRO).  It is not very likely you will stumble on a South Bend with what you are looking for for significantly less than $1500. I am thinking if the ways are good, what you have is a keeper. And the next $1000 you spend will get you exactly what you want, vs. what someone else chose.


ken campbell
 

Whoa ! ...  first of all, you don't need an axa QC tool post to do most anything you are going to make 1 or 2 of on a 9 inch.  i ran a 9 Logan for 3 years and made runs of a few dozen when starting my business.  never missed a QC .   after a little practice it only takes a minute to set your lantern cutter ... and you can buy used lantern tooling cutters for about nothing dollars.

for learning or making 95 per cent of anything at all non-production,  you can also learn a whole lot by grinding those cheap tool bits yourself.

buy yourself a decent, but not necessarily expensive ... tool grinder. the shaft size should be standard for stones from a tooling house, then you can add wire brushes and polishing wheels as desired.

you won't need a 4 jaw unless you are doing odd shaped parts or finishing demanding parts made in another machine.  so i would save that money for other tooling as you need it for that exact job.

check your 3 jaw before you get discouraged.  plenty of you-tubes on this.   a 3 jaw with 0.004 runout isn't too bad ... you just have to start with 0.005 oversize stock ( g ) .  your part will finish true.

*******************
and of course, ... there is the " kid with new toy "  factor .. we all know you are going to be picking up on a whim all the gadgets you think would be cool for your new machine... heh ...  i am retired after 40 years of machining ... and i still watch ebay for gadgets for my SB13 ... ! ... sometimes i even find one i don't already have two of already or more rarely one i actually need ... 

ken



Agent
 

Glen,

Thanks, yes I will keep the lantern tool post.  The lathe was acquired from a gentleman that acquired it from a high school shop class.  He already had a heavy ten, so he didn't need another lathe.  Being a school shop lathe, I believe the "mileage" to be low, but with more "dings" from dropped chucks and the like.  It also has the ugliest John Deer green and yellow paint I have ever seen


Bill in OKC too
 

I'm not a professional machinist. But I have learned that a QCTP is very useful. Particularly when you have very limited shop time. Once you have all your dozens of tool holders set up, anyway. :) There are things you can do with a QCTP that can't be done, or done as easily, with a lantern-style toolpost. And vice versa. Some things are easier with the lantern style. You should have both. 

You only need a 4-jaw independent-jaw chuck if you're going to be turning square or octagon stock, or you need more accuracy than your 3-jaw allows. It takes a couple of minutes to adjust a piece of stock in a 4-jaw so there is little or no runout.  Though it's easier with a collet chuck and collets for round stock, and some types of collets will take square or hex stock. They're another thing you can spend big money on. :)

You can get by with next to nothing, but it is more fun if you have every tool known to man. From my experience, I can tell you that it's cheaper to buy stuff as you find you need it. Not that that's how I did it for most of my stuff...  ;)

If you're not already a machinist, play with what you have and figure out what you need for what you want to do. Get the tools you need for a particular project. Or make them yourself. I've done some of each. I got an Atlas TH42 a few years ago. First things I bought it were a 4-jaw chuck & a QCTP. I had to make a rocker for the lantern post, as it was missing.  The only lathe I don't currently have a 4-jaw for is my SB Heavy 10L. It's a restoration project. Once it's running, which may be several years yet, it will get one of each. And it's own toolholders! :) I've even bought a 4-jaw for the Unimat. I consider them essential if you don't have a collet chuck and a good set of collets. Naturally, YMMV. :)

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Tuesday, December 14, 2021, 10:01:14 AM CST, ken campbell <deltainc@...> wrote:


Whoa ! ...  first of all, you don't need an axa QC tool post to do most anything you are going to make 1 or 2 of on a 9 inch.  i ran a 9 Logan for 3 years and made runs of a few dozen when starting my business.  never missed a QC .   after a little practice it only takes a minute to set your lantern cutter ... and you can buy used lantern tooling cutters for about nothing dollars.

for learning or making 95 per cent of anything at all non-production,  you can also learn a whole lot by grinding those cheap tool bits yourself.

buy yourself a decent, but not necessarily expensive ... tool grinder. the shaft size should be standard for stones from a tooling house, then you can add wire brushes and polishing wheels as desired.

you won't need a 4 jaw unless you are doing odd shaped parts or finishing demanding parts made in another machine.  so i would save that money for other tooling as you need it for that exact job.

check your 3 jaw before you get discouraged.  plenty of you-tubes on this.   a 3 jaw with 0.004 runout isn't too bad ... you just have to start with 0.005 oversize stock ( g ) .  your part will finish true.

*******************
and of course, ... there is the " kid with new toy "  factor .. we all know you are going to be picking up on a whim all the gadgets you think would be cool for your new machine... heh ...  i am retired after 40 years of machining ... and i still watch ebay for gadgets for my SB13 ... ! ... sometimes i even find one i don't already have two of already or more rarely one i actually need ... 

ken



eddie.draper@btinternet.com
 

Bill,


I use a 4 jaw more than a 3 jaw. In addition to the obvious uses for square or octagon bar, it is used for holding anything irregular and even round objects that need machining off centre. A typical example of the last named is an eccentric for a steam engine. Our big Broadbent only has a 4 jaw that doubles as a faceplate, and I've struck the 3 jaw off my wish list having now lived with it since 2007. If push comes to shove, I can hold a 3 jaw off one of our other lathes in the 4 jaw, bringing the benefit of being able to centre it properly.


So far, nobody has mentioned turning between centres. That is the most basic operation, but is absolutely wonderful for machining anything that needs lots of trial fits such as something that is assembled with a shallow taper. No worries about setting things back running true no matter how many times you take it off the machine. Also for machining long tapers if you don't have a TTA and you have to offset the tailstock. It is absolutely essential to turn railway axles between centres.


Eddie




------ Original Message ------
From: "Bill in OKC too via groups.io" <wmrmeyers@...>
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, 14 Dec, 21 At 17:39
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Need advice- 9" with no tooling - do I keep it?

I'm not a professional machinist. But I have learned that a QCTP is very useful. Particularly when you have very limited shop time. Once you have all your dozens of tool holders set up, anyway. :) There are things you can do with a QCTP that can't be done, or done as easily, with a lantern-style toolpost. And vice versa. Some things are easier with the lantern style. You should have both.

You only need a 4-jaw independent-jaw chuck if you're going to be turning square or octagon stock, or you need more accuracy than your 3-jaw allows. It takes a couple of minutes to adjust a piece of stock in a 4-jaw so there is little or no runout. Though it's easier with a collet chuck and collets for round stock, and some types of collets will take square or hex stock. They're another thing you can spend big money on. :)

You can get by with next to nothing, but it is more fun if you have every tool known to man. From my experience, I can tell you that it's cheaper to buy stuff as you find you need it. Not that that's how I did it for most of my stuff... ;)

If you're not already a machinist, play with what you have and figure out what you need for what you want to do. Get the tools you need for a particular project. Or make them yourself. I've done some of each. I got an Atlas TH42 a few years ago. First things I bought it were a 4-jaw chuck & a QCTP. I had to make a rocker for the lantern post, as it was missing. The only lathe I don't currently have a 4-jaw for is my SB Heavy 10L. It's a restoration project. Once it's running, which may be several years yet, it will get one of each. And it's own toolholders! :) I've even bought a 4-jaw for the Unimat. I consider them essential if you don't have a collet chuck and a good set of collets. Naturally, YMMV. :)

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Tuesday, December 14, 2021, 10:01:14 AM CST, ken campbell <deltainc@...> wrote:


Whoa ! ... first of all, you don't need an axa QC tool post to do most anything you are going to make 1 or 2 of on a 9 inch. i ran a 9 Logan for 3 years and made runs of a few dozen when starting my business. never missed a QC . after a little practice it only takes a minute to set your lantern cutter ... and you can buy used lantern tooling cutters for about nothing dollars.

for learning or making 95 per cent of anything at all non-production, you can also learn a whole lot by grinding those cheap tool bits yourself.

buy yourself a decent, but not necessarily expensive ... tool grinder. the shaft size should be standard for stones from a tooling house, then you can add wire brushes and polishing wheels as desired.

you won't need a 4 jaw unless you are doing odd shaped parts or finishing demanding parts made in another machine. so i would save that money for other tooling as you need it for that exact job.

check your 3 jaw before you get discouraged. plenty of you-tubes on this. a 3 jaw with 0.004 runout isn't too bad ... you just have to start with 0.005 oversize stock ( g ) . your part will finish true.

*******************
and of course, ... there is the " kid with new toy " factor .. we all know you are going to be picking up on a whim all the gadgets you think would be cool for your new machine... heh ... i am retired after 40 years of machining ... and i still watch ebay for gadgets for my SB13 ... ! ... sometimes i even find one i don't already have two of already or more rarely one i actually need ...

ken