9" Taper Attachment - Update


david pennington
 

Hi, Folks,

The taper attachment is now installed and operational. There's just one major task left to do. (After I'm completely satisfied, I'll drill the dowel holes into the carriage.)

In the factory method of installation, the clamping bracket is the last thing to be connected. It has two little holes in the top and was supplied with a block of babbitt. The final step was to melt the babbitt and to pour it into one of the holes.

Since my attachment came off of another lathe, it will not surprise anyone that the fit of the clamp is off by a little bit--0.02" or so--so that it binds at one end of the travel. There's no question that I need to melt the existing babbitt and let it run out. The question is whether to attempt to re-pour the babbitt or to use some "modern" material, such as J-B Weld. 

Your thoughts, as usual, will be much appreciated.

BTW - the pin with the knurled top, that was cotter-keyed into the clamping bracket, is a perfect fit for the screw hole in the cross-slide, and vice versa. I continue to be impressed with how well the SB folks thought things out.

I'm also amused at some of the design details, for example, the spacing of the two threaded holes in the clamping block is in fractional inches.

Dave

David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado
720-442-3744


On Monday, June 21, 2021, 10:17:53 AM MDT, david pennington <davidwpennington@...> wrote:


Hi, Folks,

I have a taper attachment that is missing a minor part and a couple of bolts and washers. I've "finally" decided to complete it and to install it on my 1946 9C. (The missing piece is a simple steel block with a tapped hole to clamp the fixed end bracket to the lathe bed. I figure 2" x 2.3" x 0.5" should do it.)

I've looked at several videos on Youtube, including Tubalcain's TIPS 561. He showed an exploded parts page.

There is a pin on the fixed end bracket. I cannot figure out its function.

A. Anyone got the SB literature on this thing?

B. Do we have a library somewhere? I've never tried to access it.

Thanks,

Dave

David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado
720-442-3744


Sam
 

On Tue, Aug 17, 2021 at 12:05 PM david pennington via groups.io <davidwpennington=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi, Folks,

The taper attachment is now installed and operational. There's just one major task left to do. (After I'm completely satisfied, I'll drill the dowel holes into the carriage.)

In the factory method of installation, the clamping bracket is the last thing to be connected. It has two little holes in the top and was supplied with a block of babbitt. The final step was to melt the babbitt and to pour it into one of the holes.

Since my attachment came off of another lathe, it will not surprise anyone that the fit of the clamp is off by a little bit--0.02" or so--so that it binds at one end of the travel. There's no question that I need to melt the existing babbitt and let it run out. The question is whether to attempt to re-pour the babbitt or to use some "modern" material, such as J-B Weld. 

Your thoughts, as usual, will be much appreciated.

BTW - the pin with the knurled top, that was cotter-keyed into the clamping bracket, is a perfect fit for the screw hole in the cross-slide, and vice versa. I continue to be impressed with how well the SB folks thought things out.

I'm also amused at some of the design details, for example, the spacing of the two threaded holes in the clamping block is in fractional inches.

Dave

David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado
720-442-3744


On Monday, June 21, 2021, 10:17:53 AM MDT, david pennington <davidwpennington@...> wrote:


Hi, Folks,

I have a taper attachment that is missing a minor part and a couple of bolts and washers. I've "finally" decided to complete it and to install it on my 1946 9C. (The missing piece is a simple steel block with a tapped hole to clamp the fixed end bracket to the lathe bed. I figure 2" x 2.3" x 0.5" should do it.)

I've looked at several videos on Youtube, including Tubalcain's TIPS 561. He showed an exploded parts page.

There is a pin on the fixed end bracket. I cannot figure out its function.

A. Anyone got the SB literature on this thing?

B. Do we have a library somewhere? I've never tried to access it.

Thanks,

Dave

David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado
720-442-3744


Bill in OKC too
 

David, you can buy Babbitt metal from Rotometals.com, or possibly at a junk yard, where it often winds up in with the lead. Pretty sure JB Weld won't work if it really needs Babbitt. Stuff isn't cheap new, about $28-35/pound, but for what you need, a pound is probably all you need. Instructions on how to pour it are on their website, too. There are other places to get it, that's just the one easiest for me to send you.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)

On Tuesday, August 17, 2021, 11:05:32 AM CDT, david pennington via groups.io <davidwpennington=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:





Hi, Folks,
The taper attachment is now installed and operational. There's just one major task left to do. (After I'm completely satisfied, I'll drill the dowel holes into the carriage.)
In the factory method of installation, the clamping bracket is the last thing to be connected. It has two little holes in the top and was supplied with a block of babbitt. The final step was to melt the babbitt and to pour it into one of the holes.
Since my attachment came off of another lathe, it will not surprise anyone that the fit of the clamp is off by a little bit--0.02" or so--so that it binds at one end of the travel. There's no question that I need to melt the existing babbitt and let it run out. The question is whether to attempt to re-pour the babbitt or to use some "modern" material, such as J-B Weld.
Your thoughts, as usual, will be much appreciated.
BTW - the pin with the knurled top, that was cotter-keyed into the clamping bracket, is a perfect fit for the screw hole in the cross-slide, and vice versa. I continue to be impressed with how well the SB folks thought things out.
I'm also amused at some of the design details, for example, the spacing of the two threaded holes in the clamping block is in fractional inches.
Dave
David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado720-442-3744









On Monday, June 21, 2021, 10:17:53 AM MDT, david pennington <davidwpennington@yahoo.com> wrote:





Hi, Folks,
I have a taper attachment that is missing a minor part and a couple of bolts and washers. I've "finally" decided to complete it and to install it on my 1946 9C. (The missing piece is a simple steel block with a tapped hole to clamp the fixed end bracket to the lathe bed. I figure 2" x 2.3" x 0.5" should do it.)
I've looked at several videos on Youtube, including Tubalcain's TIPS 561. He showed an exploded parts page.
There is a pin on the fixed end bracket. I cannot figure out its function.
A. Anyone got the SB literature on this thing?
B. Do we have a library somewhere? I've never tried to access it.
Thanks,
Dave
David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado720-442-3744


david pennington
 

Thanks, Bill. 

In this case, the babbitt merely freezes the location of the rod connecting the clamp to the main body of the taper attachment within the clamp itself.

I can probably salvage the babbitt that runs out, as far as that goes.

David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado
720-442-3744


On Tuesday, August 17, 2021, 12:39:43 PM MDT, Bill in OKC too via groups.io <wmrmeyers@...> wrote:


David, you can buy Babbitt metal from Rotometals.com, or possibly at a junk yard, where it often winds up in with the lead. Pretty sure JB Weld won't work if it really needs Babbitt. Stuff isn't cheap new, about $28-35/pound, but for what you need, a pound is probably all you need. Instructions on how to pour it are on their website, too. There are other places to get it, that's just the one easiest for me to send you.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)












On Tuesday, August 17, 2021, 11:05:32 AM CDT, david pennington via groups.io <davidwpennington=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:





Hi, Folks,
The taper attachment is now installed and operational. There's just one major task left to do. (After I'm completely satisfied, I'll drill the dowel holes into the carriage.)
In the factory method of installation, the clamping bracket is the last thing to be connected. It has two little holes in the top and was supplied with a block of babbitt. The final step was to melt the babbitt and to pour it into one of the holes.
Since my attachment came off of another lathe, it will not surprise anyone that the fit of the clamp is off by a little bit--0.02" or so--so that it binds at one end of the travel. There's no question that I need to melt the existing babbitt and let it run out. The question is whether to attempt to re-pour the babbitt or to use some "modern" material, such as J-B Weld.
Your thoughts, as usual, will be much appreciated.
BTW - the pin with the knurled top, that was cotter-keyed into the clamping bracket, is a perfect fit for the screw hole in the cross-slide, and vice versa. I continue to be impressed with how well the SB folks thought things out.
I'm also amused at some of the design details, for example, the spacing of the two threaded holes in the clamping block is in fractional inches.
Dave
David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado720-442-3744









On Monday, June 21, 2021, 10:17:53 AM MDT, david pennington <davidwpennington@...> wrote:





Hi, Folks,
I have a taper attachment that is missing a minor part and a couple of bolts and washers. I've "finally" decided to complete it and to install it on my 1946 9C. (The missing piece is a simple steel block with a tapped hole to clamp the fixed end bracket to the lathe bed. I figure 2" x 2.3" x 0.5" should do it.)
I've looked at several videos on Youtube, including Tubalcain's TIPS 561. He showed an exploded parts page.
There is a pin on the fixed end bracket. I cannot figure out its function.
A. Anyone got the SB literature on this thing?
B. Do we have a library somewhere? I've never tried to access it.
Thanks,
Dave
David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado720-442-3744









david pennington
 

The melting points I've seen are in the 700-800 deg F range. 

The point I did not bring up has to do with the paint. I cannot reasonably expect the factory paint to withstand that temperature, can I? If true, then I should make a point of removing all paint before applying heat to melt the babbitt.

David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado
720-442-3744


On Tuesday, August 17, 2021, 12:43:57 PM MDT, david pennington via groups.io <davidwpennington@...> wrote:


Thanks, Bill. 

In this case, the babbitt merely freezes the location of the rod connecting the clamp to the main body of the taper attachment within the clamp itself.

I can probably salvage the babbitt that runs out, as far as that goes.

David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado
720-442-3744


On Tuesday, August 17, 2021, 12:39:43 PM MDT, Bill in OKC too via groups.io <wmrmeyers@...> wrote:


David, you can buy Babbitt metal from Rotometals.com, or possibly at a junk yard, where it often winds up in with the lead. Pretty sure JB Weld won't work if it really needs Babbitt. Stuff isn't cheap new, about $28-35/pound, but for what you need, a pound is probably all you need. Instructions on how to pour it are on their website, too. There are other places to get it, that's just the one easiest for me to send you.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)












On Tuesday, August 17, 2021, 11:05:32 AM CDT, david pennington via groups.io <davidwpennington=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:





Hi, Folks,
The taper attachment is now installed and operational. There's just one major task left to do. (After I'm completely satisfied, I'll drill the dowel holes into the carriage.)
In the factory method of installation, the clamping bracket is the last thing to be connected. It has two little holes in the top and was supplied with a block of babbitt. The final step was to melt the babbitt and to pour it into one of the holes.
Since my attachment came off of another lathe, it will not surprise anyone that the fit of the clamp is off by a little bit--0.02" or so--so that it binds at one end of the travel. There's no question that I need to melt the existing babbitt and let it run out. The question is whether to attempt to re-pour the babbitt or to use some "modern" material, such as J-B Weld.
Your thoughts, as usual, will be much appreciated.
BTW - the pin with the knurled top, that was cotter-keyed into the clamping bracket, is a perfect fit for the screw hole in the cross-slide, and vice versa. I continue to be impressed with how well the SB folks thought things out.
I'm also amused at some of the design details, for example, the spacing of the two threaded holes in the clamping block is in fractional inches.
Dave
David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado720-442-3744









On Monday, June 21, 2021, 10:17:53 AM MDT, david pennington <davidwpennington@...> wrote:





Hi, Folks,
I have a taper attachment that is missing a minor part and a couple of bolts and washers. I've "finally" decided to complete it and to install it on my 1946 9C. (The missing piece is a simple steel block with a tapped hole to clamp the fixed end bracket to the lathe bed. I figure 2" x 2.3" x 0.5" should do it.)
I've looked at several videos on Youtube, including Tubalcain's TIPS 561. He showed an exploded parts page.
There is a pin on the fixed end bracket. I cannot figure out its function.
A. Anyone got the SB literature on this thing?
B. Do we have a library somewhere? I've never tried to access it.
Thanks,
Dave
David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado720-442-3744









Bill in OKC too
 

The Rotometals site I mentioned earlier states the pouring temperatures are 645-915 degrees F. Melting points are around 450 degrees F, but they need to be hotter to pour properly. 

Yes, I think you'll need to remove the old paint, probably better before you pour. 

You could probably use plumbers solder if it's just fixing the part in place, but unless you already have the solder  it would also probably be cheaper to do it correctly. 

I've got a Heavy 10L for restoration, and managed to scrounge/trade/buy Babbitt, plumbers bar solder,  ingots of lead wheel weights, linotype, & chunks of lead pipe. I'm going to try to do it right.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Tuesday, August 17, 2021, 01:51:46 PM CDT, david pennington via groups.io <davidwpennington@...> wrote:


The melting points I've seen are in the 700-800 deg F range. 

The point I did not bring up has to do with the paint. I cannot reasonably expect the factory paint to withstand that temperature, can I? If true, then I should make a point of removing all paint before applying heat to melt the babbitt.

David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado
720-442-3744


On Tuesday, August 17, 2021, 12:43:57 PM MDT, david pennington via groups.io <davidwpennington@...> wrote:


Thanks, Bill. 

In this case, the babbitt merely freezes the location of the rod connecting the clamp to the main body of the taper attachment within the clamp itself.

I can probably salvage the babbitt that runs out, as far as that goes.

David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado
720-442-3744


On Tuesday, August 17, 2021, 12:39:43 PM MDT, Bill in OKC too via groups.io <wmrmeyers@...> wrote:


David, you can buy Babbitt metal from Rotometals.com, or possibly at a junk yard, where it often winds up in with the lead. Pretty sure JB Weld won't work if it really needs Babbitt. Stuff isn't cheap new, about $28-35/pound, but for what you need, a pound is probably all you need. Instructions on how to pour it are on their website, too. There are other places to get it, that's just the one easiest for me to send you.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)












On Tuesday, August 17, 2021, 11:05:32 AM CDT, david pennington via groups.io <davidwpennington=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:





Hi, Folks,
The taper attachment is now installed and operational. There's just one major task left to do. (After I'm completely satisfied, I'll drill the dowel holes into the carriage.)
In the factory method of installation, the clamping bracket is the last thing to be connected. It has two little holes in the top and was supplied with a block of babbitt. The final step was to melt the babbitt and to pour it into one of the holes.
Since my attachment came off of another lathe, it will not surprise anyone that the fit of the clamp is off by a little bit--0.02" or so--so that it binds at one end of the travel. There's no question that I need to melt the existing babbitt and let it run out. The question is whether to attempt to re-pour the babbitt or to use some "modern" material, such as J-B Weld.
Your thoughts, as usual, will be much appreciated.
BTW - the pin with the knurled top, that was cotter-keyed into the clamping bracket, is a perfect fit for the screw hole in the cross-slide, and vice versa. I continue to be impressed with how well the SB folks thought things out.
I'm also amused at some of the design details, for example, the spacing of the two threaded holes in the clamping block is in fractional inches.
Dave
David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado720-442-3744









On Monday, June 21, 2021, 10:17:53 AM MDT, david pennington <davidwpennington@...> wrote:





Hi, Folks,
I have a taper attachment that is missing a minor part and a couple of bolts and washers. I've "finally" decided to complete it and to install it on my 1946 9C. (The missing piece is a simple steel block with a tapped hole to clamp the fixed end bracket to the lathe bed. I figure 2" x 2.3" x 0.5" should do it.)
I've looked at several videos on Youtube, including Tubalcain's TIPS 561. He showed an exploded parts page.
There is a pin on the fixed end bracket. I cannot figure out its function.
A. Anyone got the SB literature on this thing?
B. Do we have a library somewhere? I've never tried to access it.
Thanks,
Dave
David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado720-442-3744









david pennington
 

The upside to J-B Weld is it's room temp and quick.

The downside to J-B Weld is it's awfully hard for the next guy--or me, if I mess up--to remove. :)

I like playing with molten metal...

David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado
720-442-3744


On Tuesday, August 17, 2021, 01:29:10 PM MDT, Bill in OKC too via groups.io <wmrmeyers@...> wrote:


The Rotometals site I mentioned earlier states the pouring temperatures are 645-915 degrees F. Melting points are around 450 degrees F, but they need to be hotter to pour properly. 

Yes, I think you'll need to remove the old paint, probably better before you pour. 

You could probably use plumbers solder if it's just fixing the part in place, but unless you already have the solder  it would also probably be cheaper to do it correctly. 

I've got a Heavy 10L for restoration, and managed to scrounge/trade/buy Babbitt, plumbers bar solder,  ingots of lead wheel weights, linotype, & chunks of lead pipe. I'm going to try to do it right.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Tuesday, August 17, 2021, 01:51:46 PM CDT, david pennington via groups.io <davidwpennington@...> wrote:


The melting points I've seen are in the 700-800 deg F range. 

The point I did not bring up has to do with the paint. I cannot reasonably expect the factory paint to withstand that temperature, can I? If true, then I should make a point of removing all paint before applying heat to melt the babbitt.

David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado
720-442-3744


On Tuesday, August 17, 2021, 12:43:57 PM MDT, david pennington via groups.io <davidwpennington@...> wrote:


Thanks, Bill. 

In this case, the babbitt merely freezes the location of the rod connecting the clamp to the main body of the taper attachment within the clamp itself.

I can probably salvage the babbitt that runs out, as far as that goes.

David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado
720-442-3744


On Tuesday, August 17, 2021, 12:39:43 PM MDT, Bill in OKC too via groups.io <wmrmeyers@...> wrote:


David, you can buy Babbitt metal from Rotometals.com, or possibly at a junk yard, where it often winds up in with the lead. Pretty sure JB Weld won't work if it really needs Babbitt. Stuff isn't cheap new, about $28-35/pound, but for what you need, a pound is probably all you need. Instructions on how to pour it are on their website, too. There are other places to get it, that's just the one easiest for me to send you.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)












On Tuesday, August 17, 2021, 11:05:32 AM CDT, david pennington via groups.io <davidwpennington=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:





Hi, Folks,
The taper attachment is now installed and operational. There's just one major task left to do. (After I'm completely satisfied, I'll drill the dowel holes into the carriage.)
In the factory method of installation, the clamping bracket is the last thing to be connected. It has two little holes in the top and was supplied with a block of babbitt. The final step was to melt the babbitt and to pour it into one of the holes.
Since my attachment came off of another lathe, it will not surprise anyone that the fit of the clamp is off by a little bit--0.02" or so--so that it binds at one end of the travel. There's no question that I need to melt the existing babbitt and let it run out. The question is whether to attempt to re-pour the babbitt or to use some "modern" material, such as J-B Weld.
Your thoughts, as usual, will be much appreciated.
BTW - the pin with the knurled top, that was cotter-keyed into the clamping bracket, is a perfect fit for the screw hole in the cross-slide, and vice versa. I continue to be impressed with how well the SB folks thought things out.
I'm also amused at some of the design details, for example, the spacing of the two threaded holes in the clamping block is in fractional inches.
Dave
David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado720-442-3744









On Monday, June 21, 2021, 10:17:53 AM MDT, david pennington <davidwpennington@...> wrote:





Hi, Folks,
I have a taper attachment that is missing a minor part and a couple of bolts and washers. I've "finally" decided to complete it and to install it on my 1946 9C. (The missing piece is a simple steel block with a tapped hole to clamp the fixed end bracket to the lathe bed. I figure 2" x 2.3" x 0.5" should do it.)
I've looked at several videos on Youtube, including Tubalcain's TIPS 561. He showed an exploded parts page.
There is a pin on the fixed end bracket. I cannot figure out its function.
A. Anyone got the SB literature on this thing?
B. Do we have a library somewhere? I've never tried to access it.
Thanks,
Dave
David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado720-442-3744









Bill in OKC too
 

Hot metal! Yeah!

I have the Illion book on rebuilding the South Bend 10" & up lathes, which should have info on pouring Babbitt for those, the David Gingery book on pouring Babbitt, and the Magnolia book on Babbitt. Should be able to figure it out eventually. Also have melting pots & ladles. 

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Tuesday, August 17, 2021, 02:49:42 PM CDT, david pennington via groups.io <davidwpennington@...> wrote:


The upside to J-B Weld is it's room temp and quick.

The downside to J-B Weld is it's awfully hard for the next guy--or me, if I mess up--to remove. :)

I like playing with molten metal...

David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado
720-442-3744


On Tuesday, August 17, 2021, 01:29:10 PM MDT, Bill in OKC too via groups.io <wmrmeyers@...> wrote:


The Rotometals site I mentioned earlier states the pouring temperatures are 645-915 degrees F. Melting points are around 450 degrees F, but they need to be hotter to pour properly. 

Yes, I think you'll need to remove the old paint, probably better before you pour. 

You could probably use plumbers solder if it's just fixing the part in place, but unless you already have the solder  it would also probably be cheaper to do it correctly. 

I've got a Heavy 10L for restoration, and managed to scrounge/trade/buy Babbitt, plumbers bar solder,  ingots of lead wheel weights, linotype, & chunks of lead pipe. I'm going to try to do it right.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Tuesday, August 17, 2021, 01:51:46 PM CDT, david pennington via groups.io <davidwpennington@...> wrote:


The melting points I've seen are in the 700-800 deg F range. 

The point I did not bring up has to do with the paint. I cannot reasonably expect the factory paint to withstand that temperature, can I? If true, then I should make a point of removing all paint before applying heat to melt the babbitt.

David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado
720-442-3744


On Tuesday, August 17, 2021, 12:43:57 PM MDT, david pennington via groups.io <davidwpennington@...> wrote:


Thanks, Bill. 

In this case, the babbitt merely freezes the location of the rod connecting the clamp to the main body of the taper attachment within the clamp itself.

I can probably salvage the babbitt that runs out, as far as that goes.

David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado
720-442-3744


On Tuesday, August 17, 2021, 12:39:43 PM MDT, Bill in OKC too via groups.io <wmrmeyers@...> wrote:


David, you can buy Babbitt metal from Rotometals.com, or possibly at a junk yard, where it often winds up in with the lead. Pretty sure JB Weld won't work if it really needs Babbitt. Stuff isn't cheap new, about $28-35/pound, but for what you need, a pound is probably all you need. Instructions on how to pour it are on their website, too. There are other places to get it, that's just the one easiest for me to send you.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)












On Tuesday, August 17, 2021, 11:05:32 AM CDT, david pennington via groups.io <davidwpennington=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:





Hi, Folks,
The taper attachment is now installed and operational. There's just one major task left to do. (After I'm completely satisfied, I'll drill the dowel holes into the carriage.)
In the factory method of installation, the clamping bracket is the last thing to be connected. It has two little holes in the top and was supplied with a block of babbitt. The final step was to melt the babbitt and to pour it into one of the holes.
Since my attachment came off of another lathe, it will not surprise anyone that the fit of the clamp is off by a little bit--0.02" or so--so that it binds at one end of the travel. There's no question that I need to melt the existing babbitt and let it run out. The question is whether to attempt to re-pour the babbitt or to use some "modern" material, such as J-B Weld.
Your thoughts, as usual, will be much appreciated.
BTW - the pin with the knurled top, that was cotter-keyed into the clamping bracket, is a perfect fit for the screw hole in the cross-slide, and vice versa. I continue to be impressed with how well the SB folks thought things out.
I'm also amused at some of the design details, for example, the spacing of the two threaded holes in the clamping block is in fractional inches.
Dave
David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado720-442-3744









On Monday, June 21, 2021, 10:17:53 AM MDT, david pennington <davidwpennington@...> wrote:





Hi, Folks,
I have a taper attachment that is missing a minor part and a couple of bolts and washers. I've "finally" decided to complete it and to install it on my 1946 9C. (The missing piece is a simple steel block with a tapped hole to clamp the fixed end bracket to the lathe bed. I figure 2" x 2.3" x 0.5" should do it.)
I've looked at several videos on Youtube, including Tubalcain's TIPS 561. He showed an exploded parts page.
There is a pin on the fixed end bracket. I cannot figure out its function.
A. Anyone got the SB literature on this thing?
B. Do we have a library somewhere? I've never tried to access it.
Thanks,
Dave
David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado720-442-3744









david pennington
 

Nice library.

I'll practice on something before I do my pour.

-------- Original message --------
From: "Bill in OKC too via groups.io" <wmrmeyers@...>
Date: 8/17/21 14:25 (GMT-07:00)
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 9" Taper Attachment - Update

Hot metal! Yeah!

I have the Illion book on rebuilding the South Bend 10" & up lathes, which should have info on pouring Babbitt for those, the David Gingery book on pouring Babbitt, and the Magnolia book on Babbitt. Should be able to figure it out eventually. Also have melting pots & ladles. 

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Tuesday, August 17, 2021, 02:49:42 PM CDT, david pennington via groups.io <davidwpennington@...> wrote:


The upside to J-B Weld is it's room temp and quick.

The downside to J-B Weld is it's awfully hard for the next guy--or me, if I mess up--to remove. :)

I like playing with molten metal...

David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado
720-442-3744


On Tuesday, August 17, 2021, 01:29:10 PM MDT, Bill in OKC too via groups.io <wmrmeyers@...> wrote:


The Rotometals site I mentioned earlier states the pouring temperatures are 645-915 degrees F. Melting points are around 450 degrees F, but they need to be hotter to pour properly. 

Yes, I think you'll need to remove the old paint, probably better before you pour. 

You could probably use plumbers solder if it's just fixing the part in place, but unless you already have the solder  it would also probably be cheaper to do it correctly. 

I've got a Heavy 10L for restoration, and managed to scrounge/trade/buy Babbitt, plumbers bar solder,  ingots of lead wheel weights, linotype, & chunks of lead pipe. I'm going to try to do it right.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Tuesday, August 17, 2021, 01:51:46 PM CDT, david pennington via groups.io <davidwpennington@...> wrote:


The melting points I've seen are in the 700-800 deg F range. 

The point I did not bring up has to do with the paint. I cannot reasonably expect the factory paint to withstand that temperature, can I? If true, then I should make a point of removing all paint before applying heat to melt the babbitt.

David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado
720-442-3744


On Tuesday, August 17, 2021, 12:43:57 PM MDT, david pennington via groups.io <davidwpennington@...> wrote:


Thanks, Bill. 

In this case, the babbitt merely freezes the location of the rod connecting the clamp to the main body of the taper attachment within the clamp itself.

I can probably salvage the babbitt that runs out, as far as that goes.

David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado
720-442-3744


On Tuesday, August 17, 2021, 12:39:43 PM MDT, Bill in OKC too via groups.io <wmrmeyers@...> wrote:


David, you can buy Babbitt metal from Rotometals.com, or possibly at a junk yard, where it often winds up in with the lead. Pretty sure JB Weld won't work if it really needs Babbitt. Stuff isn't cheap new, about $28-35/pound, but for what you need, a pound is probably all you need. Instructions on how to pour it are on their website, too. There are other places to get it, that's just the one easiest for me to send you.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)












On Tuesday, August 17, 2021, 11:05:32 AM CDT, david pennington via groups.io <davidwpennington=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:





Hi, Folks,
The taper attachment is now installed and operational. There's just one major task left to do. (After I'm completely satisfied, I'll drill the dowel holes into the carriage.)
In the factory method of installation, the clamping bracket is the last thing to be connected. It has two little holes in the top and was supplied with a block of babbitt. The final step was to melt the babbitt and to pour it into one of the holes.
Since my attachment came off of another lathe, it will not surprise anyone that the fit of the clamp is off by a little bit--0.02" or so--so that it binds at one end of the travel. There's no question that I need to melt the existing babbitt and let it run out. The question is whether to attempt to re-pour the babbitt or to use some "modern" material, such as J-B Weld.
Your thoughts, as usual, will be much appreciated.
BTW - the pin with the knurled top, that was cotter-keyed into the clamping bracket, is a perfect fit for the screw hole in the cross-slide, and vice versa. I continue to be impressed with how well the SB folks thought things out.
I'm also amused at some of the design details, for example, the spacing of the two threaded holes in the clamping block is in fractional inches.
Dave
David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado720-442-3744









On Monday, June 21, 2021, 10:17:53 AM MDT, david pennington <davidwpennington@...> wrote:





Hi, Folks,
I have a taper attachment that is missing a minor part and a couple of bolts and washers. I've "finally" decided to complete it and to install it on my 1946 9C. (The missing piece is a simple steel block with a tapped hole to clamp the fixed end bracket to the lathe bed. I figure 2" x 2.3" x 0.5" should do it.)
I've looked at several videos on Youtube, including Tubalcain's TIPS 561. He showed an exploded parts page.
There is a pin on the fixed end bracket. I cannot figure out its function.
A. Anyone got the SB literature on this thing?
B. Do we have a library somewhere? I've never tried to access it.
Thanks,
Dave
David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado720-442-3744









wlw19958
 

Hi There,

Have you ever cast bullets before?  If so, you can use the same lead/tin/antimony
alloy for your pour. 

You don't need tin or copper based Babbitt because this isn't going to be a bearing
for a rotating shaft.  Lead base will work fine and melt at a lower temperature (around
450°F).

Don't use JB Weld.  It is a fine epoxy but if you don't get it right, it is going to be a
problem getting it back out. 

I don't think your paint will be harmed that much when pouring but you got to get
the old Babbitt out first and there you will need enough heat to melt it and the old
Babbitt may have a higher melting point.  So, cleaning the paint off at the lower
end would probably be a good idea. 

Once you have it ready for the pouring of Babbitt, seal the ends with a paper gasket
washer between the metal washers that go on either side of the bracket to provide
a better seal.  You can remove them later.

Make sure that both holes on top are clear.  One hole you will pour the Babbitt in
and other is a vent to let the air out.  Once you see Babbitt start coming out the
vent, you can stop your pour. 

Let us know how it comes out!

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


mike allen
 

I've heard mention of  " Moglace " for a task like this

        animal

On 8/17/2021 11:39 AM, Bill in OKC too via groups.io wrote:
David, you can buy Babbitt metal from Rotometals.com, or possibly at a junk yard, where it often winds up in with the lead. Pretty sure JB Weld won't work if it really needs Babbitt. Stuff isn't cheap new, about $28-35/pound, but for what you need, a pound is probably all you need. Instructions on how to pour it are on their website, too. There are other places to get it, that's just the one easiest for me to send you.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)












On Tuesday, August 17, 2021, 11:05:32 AM CDT, david pennington via groups.io <davidwpennington=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:





Hi, Folks,
The taper attachment is now installed and operational. There's just one major task left to do. (After I'm completely satisfied, I'll drill the dowel holes into the carriage.)
In the factory method of installation, the clamping bracket is the last thing to be connected. It has two little holes in the top and was supplied with a block of babbitt. The final step was to melt the babbitt and to pour it into one of the holes.
Since my attachment came off of another lathe, it will not surprise anyone that the fit of the clamp is off by a little bit--0.02" or so--so that it binds at one end of the travel. There's no question that I need to melt the existing babbitt and let it run out. The question is whether to attempt to re-pour the babbitt or to use some "modern" material, such as J-B Weld.
Your thoughts, as usual, will be much appreciated.
BTW - the pin with the knurled top, that was cotter-keyed into the clamping bracket, is a perfect fit for the screw hole in the cross-slide, and vice versa. I continue to be impressed with how well the SB folks thought things out.
I'm also amused at some of the design details, for example, the spacing of the two threaded holes in the clamping block is in fractional inches.
Dave
David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado720-442-3744









On Monday, June 21, 2021, 10:17:53 AM MDT, david pennington <davidwpennington@yahoo.com> wrote:





Hi, Folks,
I have a taper attachment that is missing a minor part and a couple of bolts and washers. I've "finally" decided to complete it and to install it on my 1946 9C. (The missing piece is a simple steel block with a tapped hole to clamp the fixed end bracket to the lathe bed. I figure 2" x 2.3" x 0.5" should do it.)
I've looked at several videos on Youtube, including Tubalcain's TIPS 561. He showed an exploded parts page.
There is a pin on the fixed end bracket. I cannot figure out its function.
A. Anyone got the SB literature on this thing?
B. Do we have a library somewhere? I've never tried to access it.
Thanks,
Dave
David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado720-442-3744







Andrei
 

https://www.moglice.com/


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of mike allen <animal@...>
Sent: Wednesday, August 18, 2021 12:56 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 9" Taper Attachment - Update
 
        I've heard mention of  " Moglace " for a task like this

         animal

On 8/17/2021 11:39 AM, Bill in OKC too via groups.io wrote:
> David, you can buy Babbitt metal from Rotometals.com, or possibly at a junk yard, where it often winds up in with the lead. Pretty sure JB Weld won't work if it really needs Babbitt. Stuff isn't cheap new, about $28-35/pound, but for what you need, a pound is probably all you need. Instructions on how to pour it are on their website, too. There are other places to get it, that's just the one easiest for me to send you.
>
> Bill in OKC
>
> William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)
>
> A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
> butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
> accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
> give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
> problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
> efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
> LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>   On Tuesday, August 17, 2021, 11:05:32 AM CDT, david pennington via groups.io <davidwpennington@...> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
>   Hi, Folks,
> The taper attachment is now installed and operational. There's just one major task left to do. (After I'm completely satisfied, I'll drill the dowel holes into the carriage.)
> In the factory method of installation, the clamping bracket is the last thing to be connected. It has two little holes in the top and was supplied with a block of babbitt. The final step was to melt the babbitt and to pour it into one of the holes.
> Since my attachment came off of another lathe, it will not surprise anyone that the fit of the clamp is off by a little bit--0.02" or so--so that it binds at one end of the travel. There's no question that I need to melt the existing babbitt and let it run out. The question is whether to attempt to re-pour the babbitt or to use some "modern" material, such as J-B Weld.
> Your thoughts, as usual, will be much appreciated.
> BTW - the pin with the knurled top, that was cotter-keyed into the clamping bracket, is a perfect fit for the screw hole in the cross-slide, and vice versa. I continue to be impressed with how well the SB folks thought things out.
> I'm also amused at some of the design details, for example, the spacing of the two threaded holes in the clamping block is in fractional inches.
> Dave
> David W. Pennington
> Denver, Colorado720-442-3744
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>   On Monday, June 21, 2021, 10:17:53 AM MDT, david pennington <davidwpennington@...> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
>   Hi, Folks,
> I have a taper attachment that is missing a minor part and a couple of bolts and washers. I've "finally" decided to complete it and to install it on my 1946 9C. (The missing piece is a simple steel block with a tapped hole to clamp the fixed end bracket to the lathe bed. I figure 2" x 2.3" x 0.5" should do it.)
> I've looked at several videos on Youtube, including Tubalcain's TIPS 561. He showed an exploded parts page.
> There is a pin on the fixed end bracket. I cannot figure out its function.
> A. Anyone got the SB literature on this thing?
> B. Do we have a library somewhere? I've never tried to access it.
> Thanks,
> Dave
> David W. Pennington
> Denver, Colorado720-442-3744
>
>
>  
>
>
>
>
>
>







wlw19958
 

Hi There,

On Wed, Aug 18, 2021 at 09:56 AM, mike allen wrote:
I've heard mention of  " Moglace " for a task like this
I have used Moglice and I like it but I think it wouldn't be a good choice
for this application.  It does come in several forms (one of which is thin
enough to pour) but one still has the problem that it is an epoxy and
removal would be difficult.

Also Moglice is designed for rebuilding or build-up of sliding surfaces like
the ways on a lathe and milling machine.  It works well but it is pricey. 

In the end, it will have the same drawbacks as using JB Weld with the
added price.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Nfwood
 


Remember that you can chip out all of the old babbitt metal from the bearing housing and melt that into your pot so the amount of new babbit metal you will need to replace is that which has been lost.  

A pound of it should be adequate for most lathe bearings.

Nelson W.


-----Original Message-----
From: Andrei <calciu1@...>
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Aug 18, 2021 1:06 pm
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 9" Taper Attachment - Update

https://www.moglice.com/


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of mike allen <animal@...>
Sent: Wednesday, August 18, 2021 12:56 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 9" Taper Attachment - Update
 
        I've heard mention of  " Moglace " for a task like this

         animal

On 8/17/2021 11:39 AM, Bill in OKC too via groups.io wrote:
> David, you can buy Babbitt metal from Rotometals.com, or possibly at a junk yard, where it often winds up in with the lead. Pretty sure JB Weld won't work if it really needs Babbitt. Stuff isn't cheap new, about $28-35/pound, but for what you need, a pound is probably all you need. Instructions on how to pour it are on their website, too. There are other places to get it, that's just the one easiest for me to send you.
>
> Bill in OKC
>
> William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)
>
> A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
> butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
> accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
> give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
> problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
> efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
> LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>   On Tuesday, August 17, 2021, 11:05:32 AM CDT, david pennington via groups.io <davidwpennington@...> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
>   Hi, Folks,
> The taper attachment is now installed and operational. There's just one major task left to do. (After I'm completely satisfied, I'll drill the dowel holes into the carriage.)
> In the factory method of installation, the clamping bracket is the last thing to be connected. It has two little holes in the top and was supplied with a block of babbitt. The final step was to melt the babbitt and to pour it into one of the holes.
> Since my attachment came off of another lathe, it will not surprise anyone that the fit of the clamp is off by a little bit--0.02" or so--so that it binds at one end of the travel. There's no question that I need to melt the existing babbitt and let it run out. The question is whether to attempt to re-pour the babbitt or to use some "modern" material, such as J-B Weld.
> Your thoughts, as usual, will be much appreciated.
> BTW - the pin with the knurled top, that was cotter-keyed into the clamping bracket, is a perfect fit for the screw hole in the cross-slide, and vice versa. I continue to be impressed with how well the SB folks thought things out.
> I'm also amused at some of the design details, for example, the spacing of the two threaded holes in the clamping block is in fractional inches.
> Dave
> David W. Pennington
> Denver, Colorado720-442-3744
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>   On Monday, June 21, 2021, 10:17:53 AM MDT, david pennington <davidwpennington@...> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
>   Hi, Folks,
> I have a taper attachment that is missing a minor part and a couple of bolts and washers. I've "finally" decided to complete it and to install it on my 1946 9C. (The missing piece is a simple steel block with a tapped hole to clamp the fixed end bracket to the lathe bed. I figure 2" x 2.3" x 0.5" should do it.)
> I've looked at several videos on Youtube, including Tubalcain's TIPS 561. He showed an exploded parts page.
> There is a pin on the fixed end bracket. I cannot figure out its function.
> A. Anyone got the SB literature on this thing?
> B. Do we have a library somewhere? I've never tried to access it.
> Thanks,
> Dave
> David W. Pennington
> Denver, Colorado720-442-3744
>
>
>  
>
>
>
>
>
>







wlw19958
 

Hi There,

On Wed, Aug 18, 2021 at 11:48 AM, Nfwood wrote:
A pound of it should be adequate for most lathe bearings.
A pound would be enough to do several of these taper attachment brackets.
If all of the old Babbitt is still there, all one would need is a small amount
(like an ounce or two).  Babbitts use some lead and adding a little more
lead to make-up the difference would be fine (or lead/tin solder or bullet
casting alloy).  Remember, this isn't a bearing.  It is a means of locating
the bracket in relation to the taper attachment. 

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


david pennington
 

Exactly!

I do plan to re-use the babbitt that comes out of the bracket. My cursory inspection suggests that the cavity is presently filled 100%. I believe that even a 75% fill will be sufficient for the purpose, which you accurately describe. If I need to add something to it, I certainly will.

Dave

David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado
720-442-3744


On Wednesday, August 18, 2021, 01:04:56 PM MDT, wlw19958 <wlw-19958@...> wrote:


Hi There,

On Wed, Aug 18, 2021 at 11:48 AM, Nfwood wrote:
A pound of it should be adequate for most lathe bearings.
A pound would be enough to do several of these taper attachment brackets.
If all of the old Babbitt is still there, all one would need is a small amount
(like an ounce or two).  Babbitts use some lead and adding a little more
lead to make-up the difference would be fine (or lead/tin solder or bullet
casting alloy).  Remember, this isn't a bearing.  It is a means of locating
the bracket in relation to the taper attachment. 

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


mike allen
 

        well , then that's that

        animal

On 8/18/2021 11:43 AM, wlw19958 wrote:
Hi There,

On Wed, Aug 18, 2021 at 09:56 AM, mike allen wrote:
I've heard mention of  " Moglace " for a task like this
I have used Moglice and I like it but I think it wouldn't be a good choice
for this application.  It does come in several forms (one of which is thin
enough to pour) but one still has the problem that it is an epoxy and
removal would be difficult.

Also Moglice is designed for rebuilding or build-up of sliding surfaces like
the ways on a lathe and milling machine.  It works well but it is pricey. 

In the end, it will have the same drawbacks as using JB Weld with the
added price.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


comstock_friend
 


John Dammeyer
 

Very interesting.

John

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io [mailto:SouthBendLathe@groups.io] On Behalf Of comstock_friend
Sent: August-19-21 3:23 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 9" Taper Attachment - Update

 

Keith Rucker just did a babbitt YouTube last week:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FxkDXg-6HJg&ab_channel=KeithRucker-VintageMachinery.org

John