moderated Fw: American Machine & Gear Works - metric transposing gears


david pennington
 

Hi, Folks,

Here's the response I got from these folks. 

They've dropped the price, plus they offer a discount to Military/LEO/First Responder.

Dave

David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado
720-442-3744


----- Forwarded Message -----

From: WJR <wjr@...>
To: "davidwpennington@..." <davidwpennington@...>
Sent: Tuesday, June 15, 2021, 09:57:57 AM MDT
Subject: Re: American Machine & Gear Works "1946 South Bend 9C - metric transposing gears"


Sir,

Pardon the delay in response. We just found your email in our spam folder.

That is some great history to be part of! Amazing how far things have come these days.

Our Metric Transposing Gear for SouthBend 9" lathes can be seen on our website's storefront, here -
https://www.thegearmaker.com/product/9a-9b-9c-10k-metric-threading-transposing-gear/

They are $384.95 and are made to work directly and simply. They are a single piece design, with each gear sharing some of the relief that is required for the manufacture of such a compound gear. You can see this in the pictures on our website. Otherwise, yes - same bore, same Pitch, etc...

Please don't hesitate to let us know if you should have any other questions or concerns. We are of course very happy to help.

Thank you.

P.S.,

We do offer a Military/LEO/First Responder discount if you should wish to avail yourself of it. It would save you 10%, bringing the price to $346.46.
 

Best,

WJR

American Machine & Gear Works
Milwaukee, Wisconsin

https://TheGearMaker.com
https://Instagram.com/AmericanMachineAndGear
https://www.FaceBook.com/AmericanMachineAndGear

On 6/13/2021 11:07 PM, Contact Form from American Machine & Gear Works wrote:
From: David Pennington <davidwpennington@...>
Subject: 1946 South Bend 9C - metric transposing gears

Message Body:
Hi, Folks,

I probably can't justify the expense...but, like the bad guy in Dirty Harry, "I gots t' know."

What is your charge for the 127/100 tooth gear?
Bore 5/8ths, DP 18, 3/8ths thick?

BTW - I used to be at Baxter, in the AEDC group that pioneered rapid prototyping in the late '80s, with the first 3D Systems machine. (It would not surprise me if we have mutual acquaintances.)

Thanks!

Dave



Bill in OKC too
 

They also have a metric transposition gearset for the Heavy 10L. Same price as the 9a/b/c &10K. I'm going to have to save some money, and get back to work on my Heavy 10L.

https://www.thegearmaker.com/product/10l-heavy10-metric-threading-transposing-gear/

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)




On Thursday, June 17, 2021, 10:11:53 AM CDT, david pennington via groups.io <davidwpennington@...> wrote:


Hi, Folks,

Here's the response I got from these folks. 

They've dropped the price, plus they offer a discount to Military/LEO/First Responder.

Dave

David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado
720-442-3744


----- Forwarded Message -----
From: WJR <wjr@...>
To: "davidwpennington@..." <davidwpennington@...>
Sent: Tuesday, June 15, 2021, 09:57:57 AM MDT
Subject: Re: American Machine & Gear Works "1946 South Bend 9C - metric transposing gears"


Sir,

Pardon the delay in response. We just found your email in our spam folder.

That is some great history to be part of! Amazing how far things have come these days.

Our Metric Transposing Gear for SouthBend 9" lathes can be seen on our website's storefront, here -
https://www.thegearmaker.com/product/9a-9b-9c-10k-metric-threading-transposing-gear/

They are $384.95 and are made to work directly and simply. They are a single piece design, with each gear sharing some of the relief that is required for the manufacture of such a compound gear. You can see this in the pictures on our website. Otherwise, yes - same bore, same Pitch, etc...

Please don't hesitate to let us know if you should have any other questions or concerns. We are of course very happy to help.

Thank you.

P.S.,

We do offer a Military/LEO/First Responder discount if you should wish to avail yourself of it. It would save you 10%, bringing the price to $346.46.
 

Best,

WJR

American Machine & Gear Works
Milwaukee, Wisconsin

https://TheGearMaker.com
https://Instagram.com/AmericanMachineAndGear
https://www.FaceBook.com/AmericanMachineAndGear

On 6/13/2021 11:07 PM, Contact Form from American Machine & Gear Works wrote:
From: David Pennington <davidwpennington@...>Subject: 1946 South Bend 9C - metric transposing gearsMessage Body:Hi, Folks,I probably can't justify the expense...but, like the bad guy in Dirty Harry, "I gots t' know."What is your charge for the 127/100 tooth gear?Bore 5/8ths, DP 18, 3/8ths thick?BTW - I used to be at Baxter, in the AEDC group that pioneered rapid prototyping in the late '80s, with the first 3D Systems machine. (It would not surprise me if we have mutual acquaintances.)Thanks!Dave


wlw19958
 
Edited

Hi There, 

They look like nice gears.  I am curious about one thing.
They say: "They are ONE PIECE manufacture. Not
assembled from two separate gears."  Why is that
better?  These gears are not subject to that much strain
that would require one piece construction.  It is an un-
necessary expense and must impact the over-all cost. 

The metric transposition gears SBL made were two piece
and I haven't heard of any problems with them.  If done
correctly, it is perfectly acceptable.  Why drive up the cost
of manufacture for an unneeded feature? 

Let's be real here.  These are threading gears; not auto
transmission gears.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb

 


Bill in OKC too
 

Don't know for sure about the SB gears, but the equivalent gears on an Atlas lathe need adapters and such to put them on the lathe. They are available for the Atlas, and it's possible to make your own, but I've not seen anything like them for the SB lathes. Also, AFAIK, the SB Heavy 10L lathes all have a quick-change gear box, and that may complicate things, too. I don't know if these for the 10L will work with the older single-tumbler gear boxes, which is what mine shipped with, and it still needs a lot of work before I need to worry about that at all. By the time I have my shop set up the way I want it, I should be able to cut my own gears, so it may not be a problem. I'll just have to figure out how to make it work.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)




On Thursday, June 17, 2021, 01:14:13 PM CDT, wlw19958 <wlw-19958@...> wrote:


[Edited Message Follows]

Hi There, 

They look like nice gears.  I am curious about one thing.
They say: "They are ONE PIECE manufacture. Not
assembled from two separate gears."  Why is that
better?  These gears are not subject to that much strain
that would require one piece construction.  It is an un-
necessary expense and must impact the over-all cost. 

The metric transposition gears SBL made were two piece
and I haven't heard of any problems with them.  If done
correctly, it is perfectly acceptable.  Why drive up the cost
of manufacture for an unneeded feature? 


Let's be real here.  These are threading gears; not auto
transmission gears.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb

 


Davis Johnson
 

From what I've read, on the 9A, 9B and 9C you shouldn't need anything but the compound gear and maybe a simple spacer if somebody lost the 40 tooth gear. The compound gear replaces the 80 tooth idler gear. Confirmation from actual experience would be nice.

On the 10L I think you might indeed need some sort of bracket. Somebody who knows will probably pipe up.

I've been really tempted by the 3-d printed transposing gears that are available cheaply. I suspect that a good set may outlast my need for metric threads.

Any experiences?

On 6/17/21 2:51 PM, Bill in OKC too via groups.io wrote:
Don't know for sure about the SB gears, but the equivalent gears on an Atlas lathe need adapters and such to put them on the lathe. They are available for the Atlas, and it's possible to make your own, but I've not seen anything like them for the SB lathes. Also, AFAIK, the SB Heavy 10L lathes all have a quick-change gear box, and that may complicate things, too. I don't know if these for the 10L will work with the older single-tumbler gear boxes, which is what mine shipped with, and it still needs a lot of work before I need to worry about that at all. By the time I have my shop set up the way I want it, I should be able to cut my own gears, so it may not be a problem. I'll just have to figure out how to make it work.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)




On Thursday, June 17, 2021, 01:14:13 PM CDT, wlw19958 <wlw-19958@...> wrote:


[Edited Message Follows]

Hi There, 

They look like nice gears.  I am curious about one thing.
They say: "They are ONE PIECE manufacture. Not
assembled from two separate gears."  Why is that
better?  These gears are not subject to that much strain
that would require one piece construction.  It is an un-
necessary expense and must impact the over-all cost. 

The metric transposition gears SBL made were two piece
and I haven't heard of any problems with them.  If done
correctly, it is perfectly acceptable.  Why drive up the cost
of manufacture for an unneeded feature? 


Let's be real here.  These are threading gears; not auto
transmission gears.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb

 


wlw19958
 

Hi There,

On Thu, Jun 17, 2021 at 11:51 AM, Bill in OKC too wrote:
Don't know for sure about the SB gears, but the equivalent gears on an Atlas lathe need adapters and such to put them on the lathe.
I don't know either because my parts books don't show the set-up (they
list the trans-positioning gear set for the 9 Inch and 10K but just the
compound gear and chart). 

I have a 5914 Clausing that I have about 95% of the whole metric
set-up and it indeed uses a completely different banjo assembly
(the 5900 series Clausings use a gearbox that in design, is the
same as the South Bend Lathe single tumbler Heavy Ten).  There
is a set of stud gears that one uses for certain metric thread pitches
(I'm missing one or two of the stud gears but they are 16DP 14.5PA
spur gears which I should be able to pick-up when the time comes).

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Nick Jonkman
 

I have had a set of transposing gears for many years.Don't use them often but they needed no special adapters.. The SB gear chart that goes with them is very clear and the set up works great.

Nick


On 21-06-17 5:19 PM, wlw19958 wrote:
Hi There,

On Thu, Jun 17, 2021 at 11:51 AM, Bill in OKC too wrote:
Don't know for sure about the SB gears, but the equivalent gears on an Atlas lathe need adapters and such to put them on the lathe.
I don't know either because my parts books don't show the set-up (they
list the trans-positioning gear set for the 9 Inch and 10K but just the
compound gear and chart). 

I have a 5914 Clausing that I have about 95% of the whole metric
set-up and it indeed uses a completely different banjo assembly
(the 5900 series Clausings use a gearbox that in design, is the
same as the South Bend Lathe single tumbler Heavy Ten).  There
is a set of stud gears that one uses for certain metric thread pitches
(I'm missing one or two of the stud gears but they are 16DP 14.5PA
spur gears which I should be able to pick-up when the time comes).

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


david pennington
 

My 1942 edition of "How to Run a Lathe" has a picture of the 100/127 transposing gear installed on a change gear lathe. 

The 1966 edition looks like a more modern lathe, but it's not obvious that the gear shown is a 100/127 gear.

Both books have the same chart showing the setup to cut metric threads.

-------- Original message --------
From: Nick Jonkman <njonkman@...>
Date: 6/17/21 17:21 (GMT-07:00)
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Fw: American Machine & Gear Works - metric transposing gears

I have had a set of transposing gears for many years.Don't use them often but they needed no special adapters.. The SB gear chart that goes with them is very clear and the set up works great.

Nick


On 21-06-17 5:19 PM, wlw19958 wrote:
Hi There,

On Thu, Jun 17, 2021 at 11:51 AM, Bill in OKC too wrote:
Don't know for sure about the SB gears, but the equivalent gears on an Atlas lathe need adapters and such to put them on the lathe.
I don't know either because my parts books don't show the set-up (they
list the trans-positioning gear set for the 9 Inch and 10K but just the
compound gear and chart). 

I have a 5914 Clausing that I have about 95% of the whole metric
set-up and it indeed uses a completely different banjo assembly
(the 5900 series Clausings use a gearbox that in design, is the
same as the South Bend Lathe single tumbler Heavy Ten).  There
is a set of stud gears that one uses for certain metric thread pitches
(I'm missing one or two of the stud gears but they are 16DP 14.5PA
spur gears which I should be able to pick-up when the time comes).

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Ondrej Krejci
 

Greetings,

The one-piece advertising may be in response to the move made by larger gear manufacturers to make gears that require adapters instead of making the same gear but with numerous bore sizes, every 1/8" or 1/4", with and without keyways, creating too much inventory.

OK 

On Thursday, June 17, 2021, 07:28:28 PM EDT, david pennington via groups.io <davidwpennington@...> wrote:


My 1942 edition of "How to Run a Lathe" has a picture of the 100/127 transposing gear installed on a change gear lathe. 

The 1966 edition looks like a more modern lathe, but it's not obvious that the gear shown is a 100/127 gear.

Both books have the same chart showing the setup to cut metric threads.

-------- Original message --------
From: Nick Jonkman <njonkman@...>
Date: 6/17/21 17:21 (GMT-07:00)
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Fw: American Machine & Gear Works - metric transposing gears

I have had a set of transposing gears for many years.Don't use them often but they needed no special adapters.. The SB gear chart that goes with them is very clear and the set up works great.

Nick


On 21-06-17 5:19 PM, wlw19958 wrote:
Hi There,

On Thu, Jun 17, 2021 at 11:51 AM, Bill in OKC too wrote:
Don't know for sure about the SB gears, but the equivalent gears on an Atlas lathe need adapters and such to put them on the lathe.
I don't know either because my parts books don't show the set-up (they
list the trans-positioning gear set for the 9 Inch and 10K but just the
compound gear and chart). 

I have a 5914 Clausing that I have about 95% of the whole metric
set-up and it indeed uses a completely different banjo assembly
(the 5900 series Clausings use a gearbox that in design, is the
same as the South Bend Lathe single tumbler Heavy Ten).  There
is a set of stud gears that one uses for certain metric thread pitches
(I'm missing one or two of the stud gears but they are 16DP 14.5PA
spur gears which I should be able to pick-up when the time comes).

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


nzpropnut
 

Bill,

 

The attached photos  and info show the entire package, ex-factory, for the Single Tumbler gearbox Heavy 10 only - my machine is December 1941.

The double tumbler machine uses a different set-up to this - i.e., a different banjo bar and probably some difference with the gear set.

 

Cheers,

Tony Skilton

NZ

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io [mailto:SouthBendLathe@groups.io] On Behalf Of Bill in OKC too via groups.io
Sent: Friday, June 18, 2021 6:51 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Fw: American Machine & Gear Works - metric transposing gears

 

Don't know for sure about the SB gears, but the equivalent gears on an Atlas lathe need adapters and such to put them on the lathe. They are available for the Atlas, and it's possible to make your own, but I've not seen anything like them for the SB lathes. Also, AFAIK, the SB Heavy 10L lathes all have a quick-change gear box, and that may complicate things, too. I don't know if these for the 10L will work with the older single-tumbler gear boxes, which is what mine shipped with, and it still needs a lot of work before I need to worry about that at all. By the time I have my shop set up the way I want it, I should be able to cut my own gears, so it may not be a problem. I'll just have to figure out how to make it work.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)



On Thursday, June 17, 2021, 01:14:13 PM CDT, wlw19958 <wlw-19958@...> wrote:

 

 

[Edited Message Follows]

Hi There, 

They look like nice gears.  I am curious about one thing.
They say: "They are ONE PIECE manufacture. Not
assembled from two separate gears."  Why is that
better?  These gears are not subject to that much strain
that would require one piece construction.  It is an un-
necessary expense and must impact the over-all cost. 

The metric transposition gears SBL made were two piece
and I haven't heard of any problems with them.  If done
correctly, it is perfectly acceptable.  Why drive up the cost
of manufacture for an unneeded feature? 



Let's be real here.  These are threading gears; not auto
transmission gears.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb

 


Bill in OKC too
 

Thank you, Tony! That is enormously helpful! So is the note that the gears are 16DP! That is the same as the change gears on an Atlas, and I can get 3d models of those gears, so could print them!

As of last night, I can get to all my machines. This weekend I hope to get the shop layout set for now,
and then begin an orgy of machine fixing. 

I'll have to build an electrolysis tank to strip the grease, rust, and old paint off the 10L, which shipped in October 1941, so I can get it back together. 

I have the 4-1/2' bed, so I think two of the plastic chemical drums I scavenged from work a couple of years ago will work. Cut the tops out, sew them together with safety wire, cut out a chunk of the side to form a trough, and hang the bed in there from my engine hoist...

I have a plan. I'm getting dangerous!

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USeAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Saturday, June 19, 2021, 06:09:59 AM CDT, nzpropnut <skilton.adscan@...> wrote:


Bill,

 

The attached photos  and info show the entire package, ex-factory, for the Single Tumbler gearbox Heavy 10 only - my machine is December 1941.

The double tumbler machine uses a different set-up to this - i.e., a different banjo bar and probably some difference with the gear set.

 

Cheers,

Tony Skilton

NZ

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io [mailto:SouthBendLathe@groups.io] On Behalf Of Bill in OKC too via groups.io
Sent: Friday, June 18, 2021 6:51 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Fw: American Machine & Gear Works - metric transposing gears

 

Don't know for sure about the SB gears, but the equivalent gears on an Atlas lathe need adapters and such to put them on the lathe. They are available for the Atlas, and it's possible to make your own, but I've not seen anything like them for the SB lathes. Also, AFAIK, the SB Heavy 10L lathes all have a quick-change gear box, and that may complicate things, too. I don't know if these for the 10L will work with the older single-tumbler gear boxes, which is what mine shipped with, and it still needs a lot of work before I need to worry about that at all. By the time I have my shop set up the way I want it, I should be able to cut my own gears, so it may not be a problem. I'll just have to figure out how to make it work.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)



On Thursday, June 17, 2021, 01:14:13 PM CDT, wlw19958 <wlw-19958@...> wrote:

 

 

[Edited Message Follows]

Hi There, 

They look like nice gears.  I am curious about one thing.
They say: "They are ONE PIECE manufacture. Not
assembled from two separate gears."  Why is that
better?  These gears are not subject to that much strain
that would require one piece construction.  It is an un-
necessary expense and must impact the over-all cost. 

The metric transposition gears SBL made were two piece
and I haven't heard of any problems with them.  If done
correctly, it is perfectly acceptable.  Why drive up the cost
of manufacture for an unneeded feature? 



Let's be real here.  These are threading gears; not auto
transmission gears.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb

 


ww_big_al
 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of Bill in OKC too via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, June 19, 2021 7:32 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Fw: American Machine & Gear Works - metric transposing gears

 

Thank you, Tony! That is enormously helpful! So is the note that the gears are 16DP! That is the same as the change gears on an Atlas, and I can get 3d models of those gears, so could print them!

 

As of last night, I can get to all my machines. This weekend I hope to get the shop layout set for now,

and then begin an orgy of machine fixing. 

 

I'll have to build an electrolysis tank to strip the grease, rust, and old paint off the 10L, which shipped in October 1941, so I can get it back together. 

 

I have the 4-1/2' bed, so I think two of the plastic chemical drums I scavenged from work a couple of years ago will work. Cut the tops out, sew them together with safety wire, cut out a chunk of the side to form a trough, and hang the bed in there from my engine hoist...

 

I have a plan. I'm getting dangerous!

 

Bill in OKC

 

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USeAF(Ret.)

 

 

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)

 

 

 

 

On Saturday, June 19, 2021, 06:09:59 AM CDT, nzpropnut <skilton.adscan@...> wrote:

 

 

Bill,

 

The attached photos  and info show the entire package, ex-factory, for the Single Tumbler gearbox Heavy 10 only - my machine is December 1941.

The double tumbler machine uses a different set-up to this - i.e., a different banjo bar and probably some difference with the gear set.

 

Cheers,

Tony Skilton

NZ

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io [mailto:SouthBendLathe@groups.io] On Behalf Of Bill in OKC too via groups.io
Sent: Friday, June 18, 2021 6:51 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Fw: American Machine & Gear Works - metric transposing gears

 

Don't know for sure about the SB gears, but the equivalent gears on an Atlas lathe need adapters and such to put them on the lathe. They are available for the Atlas, and it's possible to make your own, but I've not seen anything like them for the SB lathes. Also, AFAIK, the SB Heavy 10L lathes all have a quick-change gear box, and that may complicate things, too. I don't know if these for the 10L will work with the older single-tumbler gear boxes, which is what mine shipped with, and it still needs a lot of work before I need to worry about that at all. By the time I have my shop set up the way I want it, I should be able to cut my own gears, so it may not be a problem. I'll just have to figure out how to make it work.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)


On Thursday, June 17, 2021, 01:14:13 PM CDT, wlw19958 <wlw-19958@...> wrote:

 

 

[Edited Message Follows]

Hi There, 

They look like nice gears.  I am curious about one thing.
They say: "They are ONE PIECE manufacture. Not
assembled from two separate gears."  Why is that
better?  These gears are not subject to that much strain
that would require one piece construction.  It is an un-
necessary expense and must impact the over-all cost. 

The metric transposition gears SBL made were two piece
and I haven't heard of any problems with them.  If done
correctly, it is perfectly acceptable.  Why drive up the cost
of manufacture for an unneeded feature? 



Let's be real here.  These are threading gears; not auto
transmission gears.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb

 


Bill in OKC too
 

The ones we've been talking about give perfect metric pitches, 0% error, where Adam's gears have a small error. I'm at least intending to make leadscrews over a foot long, so his gears won't help me, and they aren't for my lathe anyway. I've got a 10L. Anyone who only needs a short metric screw would probably do fine with them, though I've seen 3D printed gears for that purpose for under $100 on Ebay. I bought my own 3D printer so I can learn to make my own. Not that I've gotten there yet.;)

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)




On Saturday, June 19, 2021, 06:55:13 AM CDT, ww_big_al <arknack@...> wrote:


Just a FYI. Here is a link for 9A/10K gear set Metric Transposing Gear Set (Metric Change Gears) for Cutting Metric Threads on South Bend 9A and 10K Lathe (monroelawncare.com)

 

Al

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of Bill in OKC too via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, June 19, 2021 7:32 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Fw: American Machine & Gear Works - metric transposing gears

 

Thank you, Tony! That is enormously helpful! So is the note that the gears are 16DP! That is the same as the change gears on an Atlas, and I can get 3d models of those gears, so could print them!

 

As of last night, I can get to all my machines. This weekend I hope to get the shop layout set for now,

and then begin an orgy of machine fixing. 

 

I'll have to build an electrolysis tank to strip the grease, rust, and old paint off the 10L, which shipped in October 1941, so I can get it back together. 

 

I have the 4-1/2' bed, so I think two of the plastic chemical drums I scavenged from work a couple of years ago will work. Cut the tops out, sew them together with safety wire, cut out a chunk of the side to form a trough, and hang the bed in there from my engine hoist...

 

I have a plan. I'm getting dangerous!

 

Bill in OKC

 

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USeAF(Ret.)

 

 

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)

 

 

 

 

On Saturday, June 19, 2021, 06:09:59 AM CDT, nzpropnut <skilton.adscan@...> wrote:

 

 

Bill,

 

The attached photos  and info show the entire package, ex-factory, for the Single Tumbler gearbox Heavy 10 only - my machine is December 1941.

The double tumbler machine uses a different set-up to this - i.e., a different banjo bar and probably some difference with the gear set.

 

Cheers,

Tony Skilton

NZ

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io [mailto:SouthBendLathe@groups.io] On Behalf Of Bill in OKC too via groups.io
Sent: Friday, June 18, 2021 6:51 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Fw: American Machine & Gear Works - metric transposing gears

 

Don't know for sure about the SB gears, but the equivalent gears on an Atlas lathe need adapters and such to put them on the lathe. They are available for the Atlas, and it's possible to make your own, but I've not seen anything like them for the SB lathes. Also, AFAIK, the SB Heavy 10L lathes all have a quick-change gear box, and that may complicate things, too. I don't know if these for the 10L will work with the older single-tumbler gear boxes, which is what mine shipped with, and it still needs a lot of work before I need to worry about that at all. By the time I have my shop set up the way I want it, I should be able to cut my own gears, so it may not be a problem. I'll just have to figure out how to make it work.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)


On Thursday, June 17, 2021, 01:14:13 PM CDT, wlw19958 <wlw-19958@...> wrote:

 

 

[Edited Message Follows]

Hi There, 

They look like nice gears.  I am curious about one thing.
They say: "They are ONE PIECE manufacture. Not
assembled from two separate gears."  Why is that
better?  These gears are not subject to that much strain
that would require one piece construction.  It is an un-
necessary expense and must impact the over-all cost. 

The metric transposition gears SBL made were two piece
and I haven't heard of any problems with them.  If done
correctly, it is perfectly acceptable.  Why drive up the cost
of manufacture for an unneeded feature? 



Let's be real here.  These are threading gears; not auto
transmission gears.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb

 


druid_noibn
 

Hi Bill,

Your need to tweak your last sentence to "Trust me - I have a plan...."

Keep going,
DBN aka John

On Saturday, June 19, 2021, 7:32:49 AM EDT, Bill in OKC too via groups.io <wmrmeyers@...> wrote:


Thank you, Tony! That is enormously helpful! So is the note that the gears are 16DP! That is the same as the change gears on an Atlas, and I can get 3d models of those gears, so could print them!

As of last night, I can get to all my machines. This weekend I hope to get the shop layout set for now,
and then begin an orgy of machine fixing. 

I'll have to build an electrolysis tank to strip the grease, rust, and old paint off the 10L, which shipped in October 1941, so I can get it back together. 

I have the 4-1/2' bed, so I think two of the plastic chemical drums I scavenged from work a couple of years ago will work. Cut the tops out, sew them together with safety wire, cut out a chunk of the side to form a trough, and hang the bed in there from my engine hoist...

I have a plan. I'm getting dangerous!

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USeAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Saturday, June 19, 2021, 06:09:59 AM CDT, nzpropnut <skilton.adscan@...> wrote:


Bill,

 

The attached photos  and info show the entire package, ex-factory, for the Single Tumbler gearbox Heavy 10 only - my machine is December 1941.

The double tumbler machine uses a different set-up to this - i.e., a different banjo bar and probably some difference with the gear set.

 

Cheers,

Tony Skilton

NZ

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io [mailto:SouthBendLathe@groups.io] On Behalf Of Bill in OKC too via groups.io
Sent: Friday, June 18, 2021 6:51 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Fw: American Machine & Gear Works - metric transposing gears

 

Don't know for sure about the SB gears, but the equivalent gears on an Atlas lathe need adapters and such to put them on the lathe. They are available for the Atlas, and it's possible to make your own, but I've not seen anything like them for the SB lathes. Also, AFAIK, the SB Heavy 10L lathes all have a quick-change gear box, and that may complicate things, too. I don't know if these for the 10L will work with the older single-tumbler gear boxes, which is what mine shipped with, and it still needs a lot of work before I need to worry about that at all. By the time I have my shop set up the way I want it, I should be able to cut my own gears, so it may not be a problem. I'll just have to figure out how to make it work.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)



On Thursday, June 17, 2021, 01:14:13 PM CDT, wlw19958 <wlw-19958@...> wrote:

 

 

[Edited Message Follows]

Hi There, 

They look like nice gears.  I am curious about one thing.
They say: "They are ONE PIECE manufacture. Not
assembled from two separate gears."  Why is that
better?  These gears are not subject to that much strain
that would require one piece construction.  It is an un-
necessary expense and must impact the over-all cost. 

The metric transposition gears SBL made were two piece
and I haven't heard of any problems with them.  If done
correctly, it is perfectly acceptable.  Why drive up the cost
of manufacture for an unneeded feature? 



Let's be real here.  These are threading gears; not auto
transmission gears.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb

 


Bill in OKC too
 

Nobody with any sense trusts my plans. I don't even trust my plans. I mean, look where they've brought me!

;)

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)




On Saturday, June 19, 2021, 03:44:29 PM CDT, druid_noibn via groups.io <druid_noibn@...> wrote:


Hi Bill,

Your need to tweak your last sentence to "Trust me - I have a plan...."

Keep going,
DBN aka John

On Saturday, June 19, 2021, 7:32:49 AM EDT, Bill in OKC too via groups.io <wmrmeyers@...> wrote:


Thank you, Tony! That is enormously helpful! So is the note that the gears are 16DP! That is the same as the change gears on an Atlas, and I can get 3d models of those gears, so could print them!

As of last night, I can get to all my machines. This weekend I hope to get the shop layout set for now,
and then begin an orgy of machine fixing. 

I'll have to build an electrolysis tank to strip the grease, rust, and old paint off the 10L, which shipped in October 1941, so I can get it back together. 

I have the 4-1/2' bed, so I think two of the plastic chemical drums I scavenged from work a couple of years ago will work. Cut the tops out, sew them together with safety wire, cut out a chunk of the side to form a trough, and hang the bed in there from my engine hoist...

I have a plan. I'm getting dangerous!

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USeAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Saturday, June 19, 2021, 06:09:59 AM CDT, nzpropnut <skilton.adscan@...> wrote:


Bill,

 

The attached photos  and info show the entire package, ex-factory, for the Single Tumbler gearbox Heavy 10 only - my machine is December 1941.

The double tumbler machine uses a different set-up to this - i.e., a different banjo bar and probably some difference with the gear set.

 

Cheers,

Tony Skilton

NZ

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io [mailto:SouthBendLathe@groups.io] On Behalf Of Bill in OKC too via groups.io
Sent: Friday, June 18, 2021 6:51 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Fw: American Machine & Gear Works - metric transposing gears

 

Don't know for sure about the SB gears, but the equivalent gears on an Atlas lathe need adapters and such to put them on the lathe. They are available for the Atlas, and it's possible to make your own, but I've not seen anything like them for the SB lathes. Also, AFAIK, the SB Heavy 10L lathes all have a quick-change gear box, and that may complicate things, too. I don't know if these for the 10L will work with the older single-tumbler gear boxes, which is what mine shipped with, and it still needs a lot of work before I need to worry about that at all. By the time I have my shop set up the way I want it, I should be able to cut my own gears, so it may not be a problem. I'll just have to figure out how to make it work.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)



On Thursday, June 17, 2021, 01:14:13 PM CDT, wlw19958 <wlw-19958@...> wrote:

 

 

[Edited Message Follows]

Hi There, 

They look like nice gears.  I am curious about one thing.
They say: "They are ONE PIECE manufacture. Not
assembled from two separate gears."  Why is that
better?  These gears are not subject to that much strain
that would require one piece construction.  It is an un-
necessary expense and must impact the over-all cost. 

The metric transposition gears SBL made were two piece
and I haven't heard of any problems with them.  If done
correctly, it is perfectly acceptable.  Why drive up the cost
of manufacture for an unneeded feature? 



Let's be real here.  These are threading gears; not auto
transmission gears.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb