Topics

how do I clean and polish a lathe bed


Matt R
 

I had started cleaning my 16/24 with a small hand stone. It was working great but the stone quickly abraded away. The finish I got is great. All of the high spots, rust and oil staining were taken care of. What kind of stone did I have? Had it in a drawer forever so I have  no idea what grade or type of stone it was. It was grey and about 6x1x1/4 in dimension.


Jim_B
 

Stones, in general, are No-no’s. 
CI is very porous.  The grit, no matter how you clean it, will imbed in the pores and accelerate future wear. 
There is an exception. 3m White scrubbing pads  
I believe your grey stone was silicone carbide. Very bad because as it brakes down the particles are sharp. The material in the 3M White sort of dulls down naturally. 

Try to do a really good cleaning job on what you did. 

-8
Jim B,

On Jul 28, 2020, at 8:59 PM, Matt R <mrissmiller@...> wrote:

I had started cleaning my 16/24 with a small hand stone. It was working great but the stone quickly abraded away. The finish I got is great. All of the high spots, rust and oil staining were taken care of. What kind of stone did I have? Had it in a drawer forever so I have  no idea what grade or type of stone it was. It was grey and about 6x1x1/4 in dimension.

--
Jim B


Jim_B
 

Here is an old message from Dennis Turk on how he polishes his restorations. 
Look at the second to last paragraph. 


How Dennis Turk Polishes Lathe Parts.

 

Hi Rick

 

You may have seen some of my lathe restorations and what I do for hand wheels and hand cranks is this.  First I remove the bat handle from the hand wheel. I have soft aluminum jaws in my bench vice that I can hang onto the bat handle with.  Then by twisting I work the bat handle off the hand wheel.  Next using my cordless drill motor I work the bat handle against my 8 inch medium and fine scotch bright deburing wheels.  Then I go to big Bertha monster buffer and polish the bat handle.  Then using an arbor made of a bolt and nut I mount the hand wheel on the arbor and again using my drill motor I work the hand wheel rim.   if its badly rust pitted or bad nicks and dings I have a little one inch wide belt sander.(cheap kind) that I smooth out the hand wheel rim with.  Then again I go to the deburing wheels and then to the cloth buffer.  I do use red and green polishing compound on the cloth wheel.

 

Most of you guys will not have all these tools but as I am always restoring something over the years I have collected all the tools that work well.  Total time to polish a bat handle and hand wheel once the bat handle has been removed is about five to six minutes.  Ya get good at it if you do it a lot like I have.

 

Now if your bat handle is damaged or broken you can remove what is left by carefully sawing what is left of the bat handle off very close to the hand wheel rim.  Next file or sand as flat as you can what is left in the hand wheel.  Now center punch what is left of the bat handle so you can center drill and then drill and tap for a 10-32 thread.  Now using a good quality socket head cap screw you can jack what is left of the bat handle out of the hand wheel.  Not to worry about were to get a new one because McMaster Carr as well as MSC stock bat handles in the sizes that SB Dalton Sheldon as well as Champion used on there lathes.  the pattern of the bat handle has not changed in over a 100 years so you can get exact replacements.  If the hole in your hand wheel is oversized or the bat handle is not a snug press fit use some 635 locketight or equivalent to hold it in place.  

 

I do the same thing for cross feed and compound counterbalanced hand cranks.  Some times these can be a real bugger to work on so be carful.  Use leather gloves when your buffing and polish the best you can.  I usually cant get the bat handles out of the hand cranks so I just cut them off jack them out what is left and after polishing the large center section I install new bat handles.  The replacements will have a different luster to them than what you get with your buffer so I always polish even a new bat handle so the finish is the same..  When your polishing the center section of the hand crank it helps to use a rod that has been turned down so its a snug fit in the lead screw bore and about six inches long.  this is a nice handle to keep a little better control of a small hand crank.

 

So there you have what I have used for years.

 

As to bed ways I use white scotch bright pad as well as 0000 steel wool and also us an aluminum polish like Simichrome.  its a lot of work but you can bring a nice luster back to your bed ways without really removing any material.  You may rub off a tenth or so but your lathe wont know the difference.  On the machined surfaces I use the same thing as I did with the bed but I may also use my fine deburing wheel to bring back a luster or that newly machined look to the part.  I try very hard not to change the surface finish that was originally machined onto the part.  Again the deburing wheels work wonders on rusty or badly stained cone pulleys and also the sides of gears but never the teeth.  I only use my very fine wire brush wheel on gear teeth.  What I have again is mounted on big Bertha and like the cloth buffing wheel is a 12 diameter .004 wire size wire wheel.  These are very soft and dont scratch.  If you use anything with heavier wire size than .003 to .004 you will badly scratch the original surface and you will lose the original machining marks.

 

Now if someone is better with words than I am put this info in the file section for others to read later.

 

Turk

 


Jim B


Rogan Creswick
 

In case anyone else is wondering what a "bat handle" is called in a parts catalog: "push-on tapered lever handle"


On Wed, Jul 29, 2020 at 9:22 AM Jim_B <jim@...> wrote:
Here is an old message from Dennis Turk on how he polishes his restorations. 
Look at the second to last paragraph. 


How Dennis Turk Polishes Lathe Parts.

 

Hi Rick

 

You may have seen some of my lathe restorations and what I do for hand wheels and hand cranks is this.  First I remove the bat handle from the hand wheel. I have soft aluminum jaws in my bench vice that I can hang onto the bat handle with.  Then by twisting I work the bat handle off the hand wheel.  Next using my cordless drill motor I work the bat handle against my 8 inch medium and fine scotch bright deburing wheels.  Then I go to big Bertha monster buffer and polish the bat handle.  Then using an arbor made of a bolt and nut I mount the hand wheel on the arbor and again using my drill motor I work the hand wheel rim.   if its badly rust pitted or bad nicks and dings I have a little one inch wide belt sander.(cheap kind) that I smooth out the hand wheel rim with.  Then again I go to the deburing wheels and then to the cloth buffer.  I do use red and green polishing compound on the cloth wheel.

 

Most of you guys will not have all these tools but as I am always restoring something over the years I have collected all the tools that work well.  Total time to polish a bat handle and hand wheel once the bat handle has been removed is about five to six minutes.  Ya get good at it if you do it a lot like I have.

 

Now if your bat handle is damaged or broken you can remove what is left by carefully sawing what is left of the bat handle off very close to the hand wheel rim.  Next file or sand as flat as you can what is left in the hand wheel.  Now center punch what is left of the bat handle so you can center drill and then drill and tap for a 10-32 thread.  Now using a good quality socket head cap screw you can jack what is left of the bat handle out of the hand wheel.  Not to worry about were to get a new one because McMaster Carr as well as MSC stock bat handles in the sizes that SB Dalton Sheldon as well as Champion used on there lathes.  the pattern of the bat handle has not changed in over a 100 years so you can get exact replacements.  If the hole in your hand wheel is oversized or the bat handle is not a snug press fit use some 635 locketight or equivalent to hold it in place.  

 

I do the same thing for cross feed and compound counterbalanced hand cranks.  Some times these can be a real bugger to work on so be carful.  Use leather gloves when your buffing and polish the best you can.  I usually cant get the bat handles out of the hand cranks so I just cut them off jack them out what is left and after polishing the large center section I install new bat handles.  The replacements will have a different luster to them than what you get with your buffer so I always polish even a new bat handle so the finish is the same..  When your polishing the center section of the hand crank it helps to use a rod that has been turned down so its a snug fit in the lead screw bore and about six inches long.  this is a nice handle to keep a little better control of a small hand crank.

 

So there you have what I have used for years.

 

As to bed ways I use white scotch bright pad as well as 0000 steel wool and also us an aluminum polish like Simichrome.  its a lot of work but you can bring a nice luster back to your bed ways without really removing any material.  You may rub off a tenth or so but your lathe wont know the difference.  On the machined surfaces I use the same thing as I did with the bed but I may also use my fine deburing wheel to bring back a luster or that newly machined look to the part.  I try very hard not to change the surface finish that was originally machined onto the part.  Again the deburing wheels work wonders on rusty or badly stained cone pulleys and also the sides of gears but never the teeth.  I only use my very fine wire brush wheel on gear teeth.  What I have again is mounted on big Bertha and like the cloth buffing wheel is a 12 diameter .004 wire size wire wheel.  These are very soft and dont scratch.  If you use anything with heavier wire size than .003 to .004 you will badly scratch the original surface and you will lose the original machining marks.

 

Now if someone is better with words than I am put this info in the file section for others to read later.

 

Turk

 


Jim B


druid_noibn
 

Hi,

Thank you - one needs to be a wordsmith today <smile>

Kind regards,
John aka DBN


George Meinschein
 

Now I get it!  Bat, as in baseball bat. I was thinking the kind of bat that zips around at night and couldn't imagine how that is associated with the handle shape.  Ok, you can now return to your regular programming. 

Thanks,
George H. Meinschein, P.E.

Meinschein Engineering Consultants, LLC
150 Brittany Drive
Freehold, NJ 07728-1500

Email: george.meinschein@...
Direct Dial: 732-409-0778
Cell: 732-580-1736
Fax: 732-358-0369
www.meinscheinengineering.com

   

On Wed, Jul 29, 2020, 2:09 PM druid_noibn via groups.io <druid_noibn=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi,

Thank you - one needs to be a wordsmith today <smile>

Kind regards,
John aka DBN


Jim_B
 

Many of our newer members are probably wondering who is "Dennis Turk”

He was a long time member who has a PASSION fro PERFECTLY  restoring old machinery. 
Many were South Bend but he hals has a love for Daltons. 

He owns a machine tool company in Washington State. 
Here is a pictorial of some of his many projects. 


Each one is a priceless Gem. 


On Jul 29, 2020, at 6:36 PM, George Meinschein <bustedguns@...> wrote:

Now I get it!  Bat, as in baseball bat. I was thinking the kind of bat that zips around at night and couldn't imagine how that is associated with the handle shape.  Ok, you can now return to your regular programming. 

Thanks,
George H. Meinschein, P.E.

Meinschein Engineering Consultants, LLC
150 Brittany Drive
Freehold, NJ 07728-1500

Email: george.meinschein@...
Direct Dial: 732-409-0778
Cell: 732-580-1736
Fax: 732-358-0369
www.meinscheinengineering.com

   

On Wed, Jul 29, 2020, 2:09 PM druid_noibn via groups.io <druid_noibn=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi,

Thank you - one needs to be a wordsmith today <smile>

Kind regards,
John aka DBN



Jim B.





--
Jim B


Bill in OKC too
 

I try not to use superlatives in describing other people's work, but Dennis Turk deserves one. He does fantabulous work!  I wanted to link to some photos of his work but couldn't find them. Thanks!

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Wednesday, July 29, 2020, 05:50:21 PM CDT, Jim_B <jim@...> wrote:


Many of our newer members are probably wondering who is "Dennis Turk”

He was a long time member who has a PASSION fro PERFECTLY  restoring old machinery. 
Many were South Bend but he hals has a love for Daltons. 

He owns a machine tool company in Washington State. 
Here is a pictorial of some of his many projects. 


Each one is a priceless Gem. 


On Jul 29, 2020, at 6:36 PM, George Meinschein <bustedguns@...> wrote:

Now I get it!  Bat, as in baseball bat. I was thinking the kind of bat that zips around at night and couldn't imagine how that is associated with the handle shape.  Ok, you can now return to your regular programming. 

Thanks,
George H. Meinschein, P.E.

Meinschein Engineering Consultants, LLC
150 Brittany Drive
Freehold, NJ 07728-1500

Email: george.meinschein@...
Direct Dial: 732-409-0778
Cell: 732-580-1736
Fax: 732-358-0369
www.meinscheinengineering.com

   

On Wed, Jul 29, 2020, 2:09 PM druid_noibn via groups.io <druid_noibn=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi,

Thank you - one needs to be a wordsmith today <smile>

Kind regards,
John aka DBN



Jim B.





--
Jim B


Dora Tamilta
 

Hi Matt
Got the Hendey off the trailer and into the garage, and have started to clean it up. Lets just say that it has a "fine patina" of old oil/grease, chips, and dirt on it. Seems to run ok, but not the cleanest thing around! Which brings me to my question; Whats the best way to clean up a dirty lathe?

Guessing a pressure washer would not be a good idea... I started off with some mineral spirits and an old brush. Was gonna use a rag, but all those chips make that seem like a bad idea on the hands. My "plan" is to do a couple mineral spirit wipedowns, then use a degreaser on the painted surfaces, sand and repaint as needed to get a decent finish - not gonna be a show piece, but I want it to look good and protect the metal...

As for the machined surfaces, was going to use scotchbrite to clean them up, then add a light coat of oil to protect them.

Once its clean, I'll flush and refill all the fluids, replace felts, etc.
Dora


Jim_B
 

I do not recommend any sanding. 
These machines were painted with lead based paint. It could be very dangerous. You would need good respirators. 
Chemical or (my preference) electrolytic stripping is better. 
It’s hard to get old style strippers and some find the new “SAFE” strippers leave a lot to be desired. 
For large parts try oven cleaner as a stripper. Wear face mask and gloves. Also very good ventilation. 

Smaller sections use electrolytic stripping. Much safer. Google it. 
It uses washing soda. 
It removes rust oil grease and paint. 
Have a can of primer ready. The parts tend to rust instantly after cleaning. 


-8
Jim B,

On Aug 2, 2020, at 1:55 PM, Dora Tamilta via groups.io <doratamilta@...> wrote:

Hi Matt
Got the Hendey off the trailer and into the garage, and have started to clean it up. Lets just say that it has a "fine patina" of old oil/grease, chips, and dirt on it. Seems to run ok, but not the cleanest thing around! Which brings me to my question; Whats the best way to clean up a dirty lathe?

Guessing a pressure washer would not be a good idea... I started off with some mineral spirits and an old brush. Was gonna use a rag, but all those chips make that seem like a bad idea on the hands. My "plan" is to do a couple mineral spirit wipedowns, then use a degreaser on the painted surfaces, sand and repaint as needed to get a decent finish - not gonna be a show piece, but I want it to look good and protect the metal...

As for the machined surfaces, was going to use scotchbrite to clean them up, then add a light coat of oil to protect them.

Once its clean, I'll flush and refill all the fluids, replace felts, etc.
Dora

--
Jim B


Andrei
 

I have had decent results with the safe stripper from home depot. It cleaned some old south bend parts to the metal with only 2 applications. Left it overnight, wrapped tightly in a garbage bag so it did not dry out. Overkill? Dunno.

Typos are courtesy of autocorrect.


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Jim_B <jim@...>
Sent: Sunday, August 2, 2020 2:20:01 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] how do I clean and polish a lathe bed
 
I do not recommend any sanding. 
These machines were painted with lead based paint. It could be very dangerous. You would need good respirators. 
Chemical or (my preference) electrolytic stripping is better. 
It’s hard to get old style strippers and some find the new “SAFE” strippers leave a lot to be desired. 
For large parts try oven cleaner as a stripper. Wear face mask and gloves. Also very good ventilation. 

Smaller sections use electrolytic stripping. Much safer. Google it. 
It uses washing soda. 
It removes rust oil grease and paint. 
Have a can of primer ready. The parts tend to rust instantly after cleaning. 


-8
Jim B,

On Aug 2, 2020, at 1:55 PM, Dora Tamilta via groups.io <doratamilta@...> wrote:

Hi Matt
Got the Hendey off the trailer and into the garage, and have started to clean it up. Lets just say that it has a "fine patina" of old oil/grease, chips, and dirt on it. Seems to run ok, but not the cleanest thing around! Which brings me to my question; Whats the best way to clean up a dirty lathe?

Guessing a pressure washer would not be a good idea... I started off with some mineral spirits and an old brush. Was gonna use a rag, but all those chips make that seem like a bad idea on the hands. My "plan" is to do a couple mineral spirit wipedowns, then use a degreaser on the painted surfaces, sand and repaint as needed to get a decent finish - not gonna be a show piece, but I want it to look good and protect the metal...

As for the machined surfaces, was going to use scotchbrite to clean them up, then add a light coat of oil to protect them.

Once its clean, I'll flush and refill all the fluids, replace felts, etc.
Dora

--
Jim B


glenn brooks
 

I use Safeway “Spray and Wash” in green squirt bottles. These new household ecological friendly formulations are the best ever for removing dried machine oils.  Spray it on, let soak for a few minutes. Scrub, scrape off. Repeat a couple of times if necessary.  It’s very mild on exposed skin and doesn’t strip the finish.

So, No need to strip the original paint in order to just clean it up. 

I cleaned up and repainted an old 18” x8’ Cincinnati tray top lathe in Hawaii last year that ran in the Doyle Pineapple cannery in Honolulu for 60 years, using a variety of solvents. Turned out thenSpray and Wash treatment was the best to cut through the accumulation of 60 years accumulation of oil, swarf and dirt. 

Glenn 


On Aug 2, 2020, at 11:22 AM, Andrei <calciu1@...> wrote:

I have had decent results with the safe stripper from home depot. It cleaned some old south bend parts to the metal with only 2 applications. Left it overnight, wrapped tightly in a garbage bag so it did not dry out. Overkill? Dunno.

Typos are courtesy of autocorrect.


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Jim_B <jim@...>
Sent: Sunday, August 2, 2020 2:20:01 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] how do I clean and polish a lathe bed
 
I do not recommend any sanding. 
These machines were painted with lead based paint. It could be very dangerous. You would need good respirators. 
Chemical or (my preference) electrolytic stripping is better. 
It’s hard to get old style strippers and some find the new “SAFE” strippers leave a lot to be desired. 
For large parts try oven cleaner as a stripper. Wear face mask and gloves. Also very good ventilation. 

Smaller sections use electrolytic stripping. Much safer. Google it. 
It uses washing soda. 
It removes rust oil grease and paint. 
Have a can of primer ready. The parts tend to rust instantly after cleaning. 


-8
Jim B,

On Aug 2, 2020, at 1:55 PM, Dora Tamilta via groups.io <doratamilta@...> wrote:

Hi Matt
Got the Hendey off the trailer and into the garage, and have started to clean it up. Lets just say that it has a "fine patina" of old oil/grease, chips, and dirt on it. Seems to run ok, but not the cleanest thing around! Which brings me to my question; Whats the best way to clean up a dirty lathe?

Guessing a pressure washer would not be a good idea... I started off with some mineral spirits and an old brush. Was gonna use a rag, but all those chips make that seem like a bad idea on the hands. My "plan" is to do a couple mineral spirit wipedowns, then use a degreaser on the painted surfaces, sand and repaint as needed to get a decent finish - not gonna be a show piece, but I want it to look good and protect the metal...

As for the machined surfaces, was going to use scotchbrite to clean them up, then add a light coat of oil to protect them.

Once its clean, I'll flush and refill all the fluids, replace felts, etc.
Dora

--
Jim B


Mark R. Jonkman
 

I’ve had good luck with citrus strip - I’ve used that and a pressure washer to do the big parts. The big thing is get grease and oil off first then strip. Scrapper and wire brush after using citrus strip works well for little parts. If your doing the job in a single day you can probably clean most of the lathe before masking and priming. But if you have to split it up your going to have to prime what you get done in a session. It will take a coupe coats of citrus strip to get it all the paint off. It also depends on how many coats of paint it’s had since it left the factory.

Mark


On Aug 2, 2020, at 2:22 PM, Andrei <calciu1@...> wrote:

I have had decent results with the safe stripper from home depot. It cleaned some old south bend parts to the metal with only 2 applications. Left it overnight, wrapped tightly in a garbage bag so it did not dry out. Overkill? Dunno.

Typos are courtesy of autocorrect.


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Jim_B <jim@...>
Sent: Sunday, August 2, 2020 2:20:01 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] how do I clean and polish a lathe bed
 
I do not recommend any sanding. 
These machines were painted with lead based paint. It could be very dangerous. You would need good respirators. 
Chemical or (my preference) electrolytic stripping is better. 
It’s hard to get old style strippers and some find the new “SAFE” strippers leave a lot to be desired. 
For large parts try oven cleaner as a stripper. Wear face mask and gloves. Also very good ventilation. 

Smaller sections use electrolytic stripping. Much safer. Google it. 
It uses washing soda. 
It removes rust oil grease and paint. 
Have a can of primer ready. The parts tend to rust instantly after cleaning. 


-8
Jim B,

On Aug 2, 2020, at 1:55 PM, Dora Tamilta via groups.io <doratamilta@...> wrote:

Hi Matt
Got the Hendey off the trailer and into the garage, and have started to clean it up. Lets just say that it has a "fine patina" of old oil/grease, chips, and dirt on it. Seems to run ok, but not the cleanest thing around! Which brings me to my question; Whats the best way to clean up a dirty lathe?

Guessing a pressure washer would not be a good idea... I started off with some mineral spirits and an old brush. Was gonna use a rag, but all those chips make that seem like a bad idea on the hands. My "plan" is to do a couple mineral spirit wipedowns, then use a degreaser on the painted surfaces, sand and repaint as needed to get a decent finish - not gonna be a show piece, but I want it to look good and protect the metal...

As for the machined surfaces, was going to use scotchbrite to clean them up, then add a light coat of oil to protect them.

Once its clean, I'll flush and refill all the fluids, replace felts, etc.
Dora

--
Jim B


Andrei
 

Just for cleaning off grease, walmart purple power works well

Typos are courtesy of autocorrect.


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of glenn brooks <brooks.glenn@...>
Sent: Sunday, August 2, 2020 2:36:19 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] how do I clean and polish a lathe bed
 
I use Safeway “Spray and Wash” in green squirt bottles. These new household ecological friendly formulations are the best ever for removing dried machine oils.  Spray it on, let soak for a few minutes. Scrub, scrape off. Repeat a couple of times if necessary.  It’s very mild on exposed skin and doesn’t strip the finish.

So, No need to strip the original paint in order to just clean it up. 

I cleaned up and repainted an old 18” x8’ Cincinnati tray top lathe in Hawaii last year that ran in the Doyle Pineapple cannery in Honolulu for 60 years, using a variety of solvents. Turned out thenSpray and Wash treatment was the best to cut through the accumulation of 60 years accumulation of oil, swarf and dirt. 

Glenn 


On Aug 2, 2020, at 11:22 AM, Andrei <calciu1@...> wrote:

I have had decent results with the safe stripper from home depot. It cleaned some old south bend parts to the metal with only 2 applications. Left it overnight, wrapped tightly in a garbage bag so it did not dry out. Overkill? Dunno.

Typos are courtesy of autocorrect.


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Jim_B <jim@...>
Sent: Sunday, August 2, 2020 2:20:01 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] how do I clean and polish a lathe bed
 
I do not recommend any sanding. 
These machines were painted with lead based paint. It could be very dangerous. You would need good respirators. 
Chemical or (my preference) electrolytic stripping is better. 
It’s hard to get old style strippers and some find the new “SAFE” strippers leave a lot to be desired. 
For large parts try oven cleaner as a stripper. Wear face mask and gloves. Also very good ventilation. 

Smaller sections use electrolytic stripping. Much safer. Google it. 
It uses washing soda. 
It removes rust oil grease and paint. 
Have a can of primer ready. The parts tend to rust instantly after cleaning. 


-8
Jim B,

On Aug 2, 2020, at 1:55 PM, Dora Tamilta via groups.io <doratamilta@...> wrote:

Hi Matt
Got the Hendey off the trailer and into the garage, and have started to clean it up. Lets just say that it has a "fine patina" of old oil/grease, chips, and dirt on it. Seems to run ok, but not the cleanest thing around! Which brings me to my question; Whats the best way to clean up a dirty lathe?

Guessing a pressure washer would not be a good idea... I started off with some mineral spirits and an old brush. Was gonna use a rag, but all those chips make that seem like a bad idea on the hands. My "plan" is to do a couple mineral spirit wipedowns, then use a degreaser on the painted surfaces, sand and repaint as needed to get a decent finish - not gonna be a show piece, but I want it to look good and protect the metal...

As for the machined surfaces, was going to use scotchbrite to clean them up, then add a light coat of oil to protect them.

Once its clean, I'll flush and refill all the fluids, replace felts, etc.
Dora

--
Jim B


eddie.draper@btinternet.com
 

If you were in the UK I would not hestitate to recomend the miracle juice known as "Elbow Grease".  (Yes, honest.  If you don't believe me, Google it and you will find it even has a Safety Data Sheet.) 

When a coach has been imediately next to my steam loco, with the chimney next to it, it is covered in stuff that paraffin (BS2869 class C1 -oil for burning in lamps and flueless room heaters, probably known as kerosene in the USA, although we reserve that word for class C2, 28 second gas oil for central heating burners) won't shift.

(Apologies for rambling.)  Spray Elbow Grease on and watch the muck run off even without agitation.  I have also used it on the ceiling of a greasy spoon cafe kitchen refurb and it even shifts that with a couple of wipes, ready for paint.

(No commercial interest in Elbow Grease, just a worshipper.)

Eddie

On Sunday, 2 August 2020, 19:45:49 BST, Andrei <calciu1@...> wrote:


Just for cleaning off grease, walmart purple power works well

Typos are courtesy of autocorrect.


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of glenn brooks <brooks.glenn@...>
Sent: Sunday, August 2, 2020 2:36:19 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] how do I clean and polish a lathe bed
 
I use Safeway “Spray and Wash” in green squirt bottles. These new household ecological friendly formulations are the best ever for removing dried machine oils.  Spray it on, let soak for a few minutes. Scrub, scrape off. Repeat a couple of times if necessary.  It’s very mild on exposed skin and doesn’t strip the finish.

So, No need to strip the original paint in order to just clean it up. 

I cleaned up and repainted an old 18” x8’ Cincinnati tray top lathe in Hawaii last year that ran in the Doyle Pineapple cannery in Honolulu for 60 years, using a variety of solvents. Turned out thenSpray and Wash treatment was the best to cut through the accumulation of 60 years accumulation of oil, swarf and dirt. 

Glenn 


On Aug 2, 2020, at 11:22 AM, Andrei <calciu1@...> wrote:

I have had decent results with the safe stripper from home depot. It cleaned some old south bend parts to the metal with only 2 applications. Left it overnight, wrapped tightly in a garbage bag so it did not dry out. Overkill? Dunno.

Typos are courtesy of autocorrect.


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Jim_B <jim@...>
Sent: Sunday, August 2, 2020 2:20:01 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] how do I clean and polish a lathe bed
 
I do not recommend any sanding. 
These machines were painted with lead based paint. It could be very dangerous. You would need good respirators. 
Chemical or (my preference) electrolytic stripping is better. 
It’s hard to get old style strippers and some find the new “SAFE” strippers leave a lot to be desired. 
For large parts try oven cleaner as a stripper. Wear face mask and gloves. Also very good ventilation. 

Smaller sections use electrolytic stripping. Much safer. Google it. 
It uses washing soda. 
It removes rust oil grease and paint. 
Have a can of primer ready. The parts tend to rust instantly after cleaning. 


-8
Jim B,

On Aug 2, 2020, at 1:55 PM, Dora Tamilta via groups.io <doratamilta@...> wrote:

Hi Matt
Got the Hendey off the trailer and into the garage, and have started to clean it up. Lets just say that it has a "fine patina" of old oil/grease, chips, and dirt on it. Seems to run ok, but not the cleanest thing around! Which brings me to my question; Whats the best way to clean up a dirty lathe?

Guessing a pressure washer would not be a good idea... I started off with some mineral spirits and an old brush. Was gonna use a rag, but all those chips make that seem like a bad idea on the hands. My "plan" is to do a couple mineral spirit wipedowns, then use a degreaser on the painted surfaces, sand and repaint as needed to get a decent finish - not gonna be a show piece, but I want it to look good and protect the metal...

As for the machined surfaces, was going to use scotchbrite to clean them up, then add a light coat of oil to protect them.

Once its clean, I'll flush and refill all the fluids, replace felts, etc.
Dora

--
Jim B


Rogan Creswick
 

I've been trying (unsuccessfully) to strip the paint off a ~1940s south end with citristrip, and it does not appear to work well on lead-based paint. 

Quinn (blondihacks) has a video that supports this, too.  If you have lead based paint, you'll want to use something else.

It does very slightly soften the outer layers, but not enough to make much of a difference.  It took something like 6 applications, and lots of scraping.

On Sun, Aug 2, 2020, 12:06 PM eddie.draper@... via groups.io <eddie.draper=btinternet.com@groups.io> wrote:
If you were in the UK I would not hestitate to recomend the miracle juice known as "Elbow Grease".  (Yes, honest.  If you don't believe me, Google it and you will find it even has a Safety Data Sheet.) 

When a coach has been imediately next to my steam loco, with the chimney next to it, it is covered in stuff that paraffin (BS2869 class C1 -oil for burning in lamps and flueless room heaters, probably known as kerosene in the USA, although we reserve that word for class C2, 28 second gas oil for central heating burners) won't shift.

(Apologies for rambling.)  Spray Elbow Grease on and watch the muck run off even without agitation.  I have also used it on the ceiling of a greasy spoon cafe kitchen refurb and it even shifts that with a couple of wipes, ready for paint.

(No commercial interest in Elbow Grease, just a worshipper.)

Eddie

On Sunday, 2 August 2020, 19:45:49 BST, Andrei <calciu1@...> wrote:


Just for cleaning off grease, walmart purple power works well

Typos are courtesy of autocorrect.


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of glenn brooks <brooks.glenn@...>
Sent: Sunday, August 2, 2020 2:36:19 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] how do I clean and polish a lathe bed
 
I use Safeway “Spray and Wash” in green squirt bottles. These new household ecological friendly formulations are the best ever for removing dried machine oils.  Spray it on, let soak for a few minutes. Scrub, scrape off. Repeat a couple of times if necessary.  It’s very mild on exposed skin and doesn’t strip the finish.

So, No need to strip the original paint in order to just clean it up. 

I cleaned up and repainted an old 18” x8’ Cincinnati tray top lathe in Hawaii last year that ran in the Doyle Pineapple cannery in Honolulu for 60 years, using a variety of solvents. Turned out thenSpray and Wash treatment was the best to cut through the accumulation of 60 years accumulation of oil, swarf and dirt. 

Glenn 


On Aug 2, 2020, at 11:22 AM, Andrei <calciu1@...> wrote:

I have had decent results with the safe stripper from home depot. It cleaned some old south bend parts to the metal with only 2 applications. Left it overnight, wrapped tightly in a garbage bag so it did not dry out. Overkill? Dunno.

Typos are courtesy of autocorrect.


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Jim_B <jim@...>
Sent: Sunday, August 2, 2020 2:20:01 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] how do I clean and polish a lathe bed
 
I do not recommend any sanding. 
These machines were painted with lead based paint. It could be very dangerous. You would need good respirators. 
Chemical or (my preference) electrolytic stripping is better. 
It’s hard to get old style strippers and some find the new “SAFE” strippers leave a lot to be desired. 
For large parts try oven cleaner as a stripper. Wear face mask and gloves. Also very good ventilation. 

Smaller sections use electrolytic stripping. Much safer. Google it. 
It uses washing soda. 
It removes rust oil grease and paint. 
Have a can of primer ready. The parts tend to rust instantly after cleaning. 


-8
Jim B,

On Aug 2, 2020, at 1:55 PM, Dora Tamilta via groups.io <doratamilta@...> wrote:

Hi Matt
Got the Hendey off the trailer and into the garage, and have started to clean it up. Lets just say that it has a "fine patina" of old oil/grease, chips, and dirt on it. Seems to run ok, but not the cleanest thing around! Which brings me to my question; Whats the best way to clean up a dirty lathe?

Guessing a pressure washer would not be a good idea... I started off with some mineral spirits and an old brush. Was gonna use a rag, but all those chips make that seem like a bad idea on the hands. My "plan" is to do a couple mineral spirit wipedowns, then use a degreaser on the painted surfaces, sand and repaint as needed to get a decent finish - not gonna be a show piece, but I want it to look good and protect the metal...

As for the machined surfaces, was going to use scotchbrite to clean them up, then add a light coat of oil to protect them.

Once its clean, I'll flush and refill all the fluids, replace felts, etc.
Dora

--
Jim B


mike allen
 

        try soaking a part in the degreaser from Dollar Tree  , it has worked great for me for years . ya may have to let it soak for some time on stubborn parts . it's safe stuff to use too

        animal

On 8/2/2020 6:26 PM, Rogan Creswick wrote:
I've been trying (unsuccessfully) to strip the paint off a ~1940s south end with citristrip, and it does not appear to work well on lead-based paint. 

Quinn (blondihacks) has a video that supports this, too.  If you have lead based paint, you'll want to use something else.

It does very slightly soften the outer layers, but not enough to make much of a difference.  It took something like 6 applications, and lots of scraping.

On Sun, Aug 2, 2020, 12:06 PM eddie.draper@... via groups.io <eddie.draper=btinternet.com@groups.io> wrote:
If you were in the UK I would not hestitate to recomend the miracle juice known as "Elbow Grease".  (Yes, honest.  If you don't believe me, Google it and you will find it even has a Safety Data Sheet.) 

When a coach has been imediately next to my steam loco, with the chimney next to it, it is covered in stuff that paraffin (BS2869 class C1 -oil for burning in lamps and flueless room heaters, probably known as kerosene in the USA, although we reserve that word for class C2, 28 second gas oil for central heating burners) won't shift.

(Apologies for rambling.)  Spray Elbow Grease on and watch the muck run off even without agitation.  I have also used it on the ceiling of a greasy spoon cafe kitchen refurb and it even shifts that with a couple of wipes, ready for paint.

(No commercial interest in Elbow Grease, just a worshipper.)

Eddie

On Sunday, 2 August 2020, 19:45:49 BST, Andrei <calciu1@...> wrote:


Just for cleaning off grease, walmart purple power works well

Typos are courtesy of autocorrect.


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of glenn brooks <brooks.glenn@...>
Sent: Sunday, August 2, 2020 2:36:19 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] how do I clean and polish a lathe bed
 
I use Safeway “Spray and Wash” in green squirt bottles. These new household ecological friendly formulations are the best ever for removing dried machine oils.  Spray it on, let soak for a few minutes. Scrub, scrape off. Repeat a couple of times if necessary.  It’s very mild on exposed skin and doesn’t strip the finish.

So, No need to strip the original paint in order to just clean it up. 

I cleaned up and repainted an old 18” x8’ Cincinnati tray top lathe in Hawaii last year that ran in the Doyle Pineapple cannery in Honolulu for 60 years, using a variety of solvents. Turned out thenSpray and Wash treatment was the best to cut through the accumulation of 60 years accumulation of oil, swarf and dirt. 

Glenn 


On Aug 2, 2020, at 11:22 AM, Andrei <calciu1@...> wrote:

I have had decent results with the safe stripper from home depot. It cleaned some old south bend parts to the metal with only 2 applications. Left it overnight, wrapped tightly in a garbage bag so it did not dry out. Overkill? Dunno.

Typos are courtesy of autocorrect.


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Jim_B <jim@...>
Sent: Sunday, August 2, 2020 2:20:01 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] how do I clean and polish a lathe bed
 
I do not recommend any sanding. 
These machines were painted with lead based paint. It could be very dangerous. You would need good respirators. 
Chemical or (my preference) electrolytic stripping is better. 
It’s hard to get old style strippers and some find the new “SAFE” strippers leave a lot to be desired. 
For large parts try oven cleaner as a stripper. Wear face mask and gloves. Also very good ventilation. 

Smaller sections use electrolytic stripping. Much safer. Google it. 
It uses washing soda. 
It removes rust oil grease and paint. 
Have a can of primer ready. The parts tend to rust instantly after cleaning. 


-8
Jim B,

On Aug 2, 2020, at 1:55 PM, Dora Tamilta via groups.io <doratamilta@...> wrote:

Hi Matt
Got the Hendey off the trailer and into the garage, and have started to clean it up. Lets just say that it has a "fine patina" of old oil/grease, chips, and dirt on it. Seems to run ok, but not the cleanest thing around! Which brings me to my question; Whats the best way to clean up a dirty lathe?

Guessing a pressure washer would not be a good idea... I started off with some mineral spirits and an old brush. Was gonna use a rag, but all those chips make that seem like a bad idea on the hands. My "plan" is to do a couple mineral spirit wipedowns, then use a degreaser on the painted surfaces, sand and repaint as needed to get a decent finish - not gonna be a show piece, but I want it to look good and protect the metal...

As for the machined surfaces, was going to use scotchbrite to clean them up, then add a light coat of oil to protect them.

Once its clean, I'll flush and refill all the fluids, replace felts, etc.
Dora

--
Jim B


b roberts
 

I have found that a degeaser, such as 'Jizer' or its equivalent, which is washed off with water can be very effective, once you have removed the heavier greasy deposits.
It is marketed in the UK and Europe, but there bound to be equally good equivalents worldwide.
After sanding or etching and before applying any paint, a wipe over with standard cellulose thinners, or isopropyl alcohol, ensures that there are no contaminants to spoil the paint finish.

Good luck with the project.

Brian


Richard Wanke
 

I used Easy Off oven cleaner on my old South Bend. Sprayed it on, let it work for 10 minutes or so, then used a wire brush to easily take off the paint, followed by a wipe down with rags. Worked great.

On Aug 2, 2020, at 9:26 PM, Rogan Creswick <creswick@...> wrote:

I've been trying (unsuccessfully) to strip the paint off a ~1940s south end with citristrip, and it does not appear to work well on lead-based paint. 

Quinn (blondihacks) has a video that supports this, too.  If you have lead based paint, you'll want to use something else.

It does very slightly soften the outer layers, but not enough to make much of a difference.  It took something like 6 applications, and lots of scraping.

On Sun, Aug 2, 2020, 12:06 PM eddie.draper@... via groups.io <eddie.draper=btinternet.com@groups.io> wrote:
If you were in the UK I would not hestitate to recomend the miracle juice known as "Elbow Grease".  (Yes, honest.  If you don't believe me, Google it and you will find it even has a Safety Data Sheet.) 

When a coach has been imediately next to my steam loco, with the chimney next to it, it is covered in stuff that paraffin (BS2869 class C1 -oil for burning in lamps and flueless room heaters, probably known as kerosene in the USA, although we reserve that word for class C2, 28 second gas oil for central heating burners) won't shift.

(Apologies for rambling.)  Spray Elbow Grease on and watch the muck run off even without agitation.  I have also used it on the ceiling of a greasy spoon cafe kitchen refurb and it even shifts that with a couple of wipes, ready for paint.

(No commercial interest in Elbow Grease, just a worshipper.)

Eddie

On Sunday, 2 August 2020, 19:45:49 BST, Andrei <calciu1@...> wrote:


Just for cleaning off grease, walmart purple power works well

Typos are courtesy of autocorrect.


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of glenn brooks <brooks.glenn@...>
Sent: Sunday, August 2, 2020 2:36:19 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] how do I clean and polish a lathe bed
 
I use Safeway “Spray and Wash” in green squirt bottles. These new household ecological friendly formulations are the best ever for removing dried machine oils.  Spray it on, let soak for a few minutes. Scrub, scrape off. Repeat a couple of times if necessary.  It’s very mild on exposed skin and doesn’t strip the finish.

So, No need to strip the original paint in order to just clean it up. 

I cleaned up and repainted an old 18” x8’ Cincinnati tray top lathe in Hawaii last year that ran in the Doyle Pineapple cannery in Honolulu for 60 years, using a variety of solvents. Turned out thenSpray and Wash treatment was the best to cut through the accumulation of 60 years accumulation of oil, swarf and dirt. 

Glenn 


On Aug 2, 2020, at 11:22 AM, Andrei <calciu1@...> wrote:

I have had decent results with the safe stripper from home depot. It cleaned some old south bend parts to the metal with only 2 applications. Left it overnight, wrapped tightly in a garbage bag so it did not dry out. Overkill? Dunno.

Typos are courtesy of autocorrect.


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Jim_B <jim@...>
Sent: Sunday, August 2, 2020 2:20:01 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] how do I clean and polish a lathe bed
 
I do not recommend any sanding. 
These machines were painted with lead based paint. It could be very dangerous. You would need good respirators. 
Chemical or (my preference) electrolytic stripping is better. 
It’s hard to get old style strippers and some find the new “SAFE” strippers leave a lot to be desired. 
For large parts try oven cleaner as a stripper. Wear face mask and gloves. Also very good ventilation. 

Smaller sections use electrolytic stripping. Much safer. Google it. 
It uses washing soda. 
It removes rust oil grease and paint. 
Have a can of primer ready. The parts tend to rust instantly after cleaning. 


-8
Jim B,

On Aug 2, 2020, at 1:55 PM, Dora Tamilta via groups.io <doratamilta@...> wrote:

Hi Matt
Got the Hendey off the trailer and into the garage, and have started to clean it up. Lets just say that it has a "fine patina" of old oil/grease, chips, and dirt on it. Seems to run ok, but not the cleanest thing around! Which brings me to my question; Whats the best way to clean up a dirty lathe?

Guessing a pressure washer would not be a good idea... I started off with some mineral spirits and an old brush. Was gonna use a rag, but all those chips make that seem like a bad idea on the hands. My "plan" is to do a couple mineral spirit wipedowns, then use a degreaser on the painted surfaces, sand and repaint as needed to get a decent finish - not gonna be a show piece, but I want it to look good and protect the metal...

As for the machined surfaces, was going to use scotchbrite to clean them up, then add a light coat of oil to protect them.

Once its clean, I'll flush and refill all the fluids, replace felts, etc.
Dora

--
Jim B




Andrei
 

Great tip, Richard. 

I will keep Easy Off in mind. I had some pieces where the paint was super stubborn to remove. 

Thanks,
Andrei


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Richard Wanke <r.wanke@...>
Sent: Monday, August 3, 2020 8:32 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] how do I clean and polish a lathe bed
 
I used Easy Off oven cleaner on my old South Bend. Sprayed it on, let it work for 10 minutes or so, then used a wire brush to easily take off the paint, followed by a wipe down with rags. Worked great.

On Aug 2, 2020, at 9:26 PM, Rogan Creswick <creswick@...> wrote:

I've been trying (unsuccessfully) to strip the paint off a ~1940s south end with citristrip, and it does not appear to work well on lead-based paint. 

Quinn (blondihacks) has a video that supports this, too.  If you have lead based paint, you'll want to use something else.

It does very slightly soften the outer layers, but not enough to make much of a difference.  It took something like 6 applications, and lots of scraping.

On Sun, Aug 2, 2020, 12:06 PM eddie.draper@... via groups.io <eddie.draper=btinternet.com@groups.io> wrote:
If you were in the UK I would not hestitate to recomend the miracle juice known as "Elbow Grease".  (Yes, honest.  If you don't believe me, Google it and you will find it even has a Safety Data Sheet.) 

When a coach has been imediately next to my steam loco, with the chimney next to it, it is covered in stuff that paraffin (BS2869 class C1 -oil for burning in lamps and flueless room heaters, probably known as kerosene in the USA, although we reserve that word for class C2, 28 second gas oil for central heating burners) won't shift.

(Apologies for rambling.)  Spray Elbow Grease on and watch the muck run off even without agitation.  I have also used it on the ceiling of a greasy spoon cafe kitchen refurb and it even shifts that with a couple of wipes, ready for paint.

(No commercial interest in Elbow Grease, just a worshipper.)

Eddie

On Sunday, 2 August 2020, 19:45:49 BST, Andrei <calciu1@...> wrote:


Just for cleaning off grease, walmart purple power works well

Typos are courtesy of autocorrect.


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of glenn brooks <brooks.glenn@...>
Sent: Sunday, August 2, 2020 2:36:19 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] how do I clean and polish a lathe bed
 
I use Safeway “Spray and Wash” in green squirt bottles. These new household ecological friendly formulations are the best ever for removing dried machine oils.  Spray it on, let soak for a few minutes. Scrub, scrape off. Repeat a couple of times if necessary.  It’s very mild on exposed skin and doesn’t strip the finish.

So, No need to strip the original paint in order to just clean it up. 

I cleaned up and repainted an old 18” x8’ Cincinnati tray top lathe in Hawaii last year that ran in the Doyle Pineapple cannery in Honolulu for 60 years, using a variety of solvents. Turned out thenSpray and Wash treatment was the best to cut through the accumulation of 60 years accumulation of oil, swarf and dirt. 

Glenn 


On Aug 2, 2020, at 11:22 AM, Andrei <calciu1@...> wrote:

I have had decent results with the safe stripper from home depot. It cleaned some old south bend parts to the metal with only 2 applications. Left it overnight, wrapped tightly in a garbage bag so it did not dry out. Overkill? Dunno.

Typos are courtesy of autocorrect.


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Jim_B <jim@...>
Sent: Sunday, August 2, 2020 2:20:01 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] how do I clean and polish a lathe bed
 
I do not recommend any sanding. 
These machines were painted with lead based paint. It could be very dangerous. You would need good respirators. 
Chemical or (my preference) electrolytic stripping is better. 
It’s hard to get old style strippers and some find the new “SAFE” strippers leave a lot to be desired. 
For large parts try oven cleaner as a stripper. Wear face mask and gloves. Also very good ventilation. 

Smaller sections use electrolytic stripping. Much safer. Google it. 
It uses washing soda. 
It removes rust oil grease and paint. 
Have a can of primer ready. The parts tend to rust instantly after cleaning. 


-8
Jim B,

On Aug 2, 2020, at 1:55 PM, Dora Tamilta via groups.io <doratamilta@...> wrote:

Hi Matt
Got the Hendey off the trailer and into the garage, and have started to clean it up. Lets just say that it has a "fine patina" of old oil/grease, chips, and dirt on it. Seems to run ok, but not the cleanest thing around! Which brings me to my question; Whats the best way to clean up a dirty lathe?

Guessing a pressure washer would not be a good idea... I started off with some mineral spirits and an old brush. Was gonna use a rag, but all those chips make that seem like a bad idea on the hands. My "plan" is to do a couple mineral spirit wipedowns, then use a degreaser on the painted surfaces, sand and repaint as needed to get a decent finish - not gonna be a show piece, but I want it to look good and protect the metal...

As for the machined surfaces, was going to use scotchbrite to clean them up, then add a light coat of oil to protect them.

Once its clean, I'll flush and refill all the fluids, replace felts, etc.
Dora

--
Jim B