Southbend 9" lathe table in CONCRETE?


Steven Schlegel
 

With all of the discussions about lathe tables, I have to ask:  What is your opinion about making one out of concrete?  I have heard they are very dead (no spring) so makes turning a lot easier.  As I approach putting my 1940 SB 9” A and C lathes into operation, I am planning ahead for the tables.

 

Steven


ww_big_al
 

I don’t know about a lathe table, but I do fill my grinder pedestal stands with either concrete or sand. That dampen vibrations a lot.

Al

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of Steven Schlegel
Sent: Friday, December 27, 2019 11:12 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] Southbend 9" lathe table in CONCRETE?

 

With all of the discussions about lathe tables, I have to ask:  What is your opinion about making one out of concrete?  I have heard they are very dead (no spring) so makes turning a lot easier.  As I approach putting my 1940 SB 9” A and C lathes into operation, I am planning ahead for the tables.

 

Steven


Steven H
 

Here is a photo of what appears to be a concrete lathe bench with an Atlas-Craftsman lathe on top. Not my lathe, just a photo I found on-line some time back. Personally I think it's overkill. But concrete is relatively inexpensive so knock yourself out should you choose to go this route. Good luck.

Regards,
Steven R. Haskell
 

-----Original Message-----
From: ww_big_al <arknack@...>
To: SouthBendLathe <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Dec 27, 2019 3:53 pm
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Southbend 9" lathe table in CONCRETE?

I don’t know about a lathe table, but I do fill my grinder pedestal stands with either concrete or sand. That dampen vibrations a lot.
Al
 
From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of Steven Schlegel
Sent: Friday, December 27, 2019 11:12 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] Southbend 9" lathe table in CONCRETE?
 
With all of the discussions about lathe tables, I have to ask:  What is your opinion about making one out of concrete?  I have heard they are very dead (no spring) so makes turning a lot easier.  As I approach putting my 1940 SB 9” A and C lathes into operation, I am planning ahead for the tables.
 
Steven


david pennington
 

Steve,

I personally love the idea!

The highest precision lathes I know of, which are capable of producing optical surfaces to an accuracy of 1/4 wavelength of light, are mounted on granite slabs. In place of the everyday optical scales, these lathes use laser interferometers. I don't recall the details of the motion control, except it's not lead screws like we have.

I've been toying with making a concrete table for a lab balance for a number of years, as I cannot afford the "synthetic granite" tables widely used in industry.

Back to the SB lathe on concrete: the problem that needs a solution is that of fastening the lathe to the concrete and leveling the lathe--making it turn a true cylinder. 

I have recently gone through the exercise of estimating what I could gain by replacing my 1.5" plywood table with a 3/4" 6061 aluminum plate. I concluded it is entirely doable. The attraction is that it is not hydroscopic. The thing I haven't looked at is what issue is presented by the range of temperatures in my unconditioned garage shop and the difference in temperature coefficient of expansion between steel and aluminum.

I'm interested in your progress if you decide to pursue concrete. If you take a look at engineered stone, like Cambria, Caesarstone, or Silestone, let us know your conclusions.

Dave

David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado
815-382-1994


On Friday, December 27, 2019, 9:12:03 AM MST, Steven Schlegel <sc.schlegel@...> wrote:


With all of the discussions about lathe tables, I have to ask:  What is your opinion about making one out of concrete?  I have heard they are very dead (no spring) so makes turning a lot easier.  As I approach putting my 1940 SB 9” A and C lathes into operation, I am planning ahead for the tables.

 

Steven


Bill in OKC too
 

It would be interesting to test and see what difference, if any, it made in the accuracy of the lathe. 

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Friday, December 27, 2019, 04:17:08 PM CST, Steven H via Groups.Io <stevesmachining@...> wrote:


Here is a photo of what appears to be a concrete lathe bench with an Atlas-Craftsman lathe on top. Not my lathe, just a photo I found on-line some time back. Personally I think it's overkill. But concrete is relatively inexpensive so knock yourself out should you choose to go this route. Good luck.

Regards,
Steven R. Haskell
 

-----Original Message-----
From: ww_big_al <arknack@...>
To: SouthBendLathe <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Dec 27, 2019 3:53 pm
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Southbend 9" lathe table in CONCRETE?

I don’t know about a lathe table, but I do fill my grinder pedestal stands with either concrete or sand. That dampen vibrations a lot.
Al
 
From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of Steven Schlegel
Sent: Friday, December 27, 2019 11:12 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] Southbend 9" lathe table in CONCRETE?
 
With all of the discussions about lathe tables, I have to ask:  What is your opinion about making one out of concrete?  I have heard they are very dead (no spring) so makes turning a lot easier.  As I approach putting my 1940 SB 9” A and C lathes into operation, I am planning ahead for the tables.
 
Steven


mike allen
 

        it would definitely help with some of the rigidity issues with these smaller lathes . & it would keep yer beer a bit colder

        animal

On 12/27/2019 3:10 PM, Bill in OKC too via Groups.Io wrote:
It would be interesting to test and see what difference, if any, it made in the accuracy of the lathe. 

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Friday, December 27, 2019, 04:17:08 PM CST, Steven H via Groups.Io <stevesmachining@...> wrote:


Here is a photo of what appears to be a concrete lathe bench with an Atlas-Craftsman lathe on top. Not my lathe, just a photo I found on-line some time back. Personally I think it's overkill. But concrete is relatively inexpensive so knock yourself out should you choose to go this route. Good luck.

Regards,
Steven R. Haskell
 

-----Original Message-----
From: ww_big_al <arknack@...>
To: SouthBendLathe <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Dec 27, 2019 3:53 pm
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Southbend 9" lathe table in CONCRETE?

I don’t know about a lathe table, but I do fill my grinder pedestal stands with either concrete or sand. That dampen vibrations a lot.
Al
 
From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of Steven Schlegel
Sent: Friday, December 27, 2019 11:12 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] Southbend 9" lathe table in CONCRETE?
 
With all of the discussions about lathe tables, I have to ask:  What is your opinion about making one out of concrete?  I have heard they are very dead (no spring) so makes turning a lot easier.  As I approach putting my 1940 SB 9” A and C lathes into operation, I am planning ahead for the tables.
 
Steven


Bill in OKC too
 

I've spent most of my life moing from one place to another. I'm not sure I'd know what to do with something that wasn't real easy to move. That bench, scaled for my SB heavy 10L, would just about have to be cast in place. Once the several hundred pounds of lathe was placed on it, I don't think it would be movable with the stuff I've got. Might do wonders for my Atlas TH42, though. 

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Friday, December 27, 2019, 06:43:12 PM CST, mike allen <animal@...> wrote:


        it would definitely help with some of the rigidity issues with these smaller lathes . & it would keep yer beer a bit colder

        animal

On 12/27/2019 3:10 PM, Bill in OKC too via Groups.Io wrote:
It would be interesting to test and see what difference, if any, it made in the accuracy of the lathe. 

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Friday, December 27, 2019, 04:17:08 PM CST, Steven H via Groups.Io <stevesmachining@...> wrote:


Here is a photo of what appears to be a concrete lathe bench with an Atlas-Craftsman lathe on top. Not my lathe, just a photo I found on-line some time back. Personally I think it's overkill. But concrete is relatively inexpensive so knock yourself out should you choose to go this route. Good luck.

Regards,
Steven R. Haskell
 

-----Original Message-----
From: ww_big_al <arknack@...>
To: SouthBendLathe <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Dec 27, 2019 3:53 pm
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Southbend 9" lathe table in CONCRETE?

I don’t know about a lathe table, but I do fill my grinder pedestal stands with either concrete or sand. That dampen vibrations a lot.
Al
 
From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of Steven Schlegel
Sent: Friday, December 27, 2019 11:12 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] Southbend 9" lathe table in CONCRETE?
 
With all of the discussions about lathe tables, I have to ask:  What is your opinion about making one out of concrete?  I have heard they are very dead (no spring) so makes turning a lot easier.  As I approach putting my 1940 SB 9” A and C lathes into operation, I am planning ahead for the tables.
 
Steven


harry molwitz
 

Might be tough to move around the shop, I would be certain of the positioning. It also seems to limit storage underneath.

Harry

On Fri, Dec 27, 2019, 6:11 PM Bill in OKC too via Groups.Io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
It would be interesting to test and see what difference, if any, it made in the accuracy of the lathe. 

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Friday, December 27, 2019, 04:17:08 PM CST, Steven H via Groups.Io <stevesmachining=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:


Here is a photo of what appears to be a concrete lathe bench with an Atlas-Craftsman lathe on top. Not my lathe, just a photo I found on-line some time back. Personally I think it's overkill. But concrete is relatively inexpensive so knock yourself out should you choose to go this route. Good luck.

Regards,
Steven R. Haskell
 

-----Original Message-----
From: ww_big_al <arknack@...>
To: SouthBendLathe <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Dec 27, 2019 3:53 pm
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Southbend 9" lathe table in CONCRETE?

I don’t know about a lathe table, but I do fill my grinder pedestal stands with either concrete or sand. That dampen vibrations a lot.
Al
 
From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of Steven Schlegel
Sent: Friday, December 27, 2019 11:12 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] Southbend 9" lathe table in CONCRETE?
 
With all of the discussions about lathe tables, I have to ask:  What is your opinion about making one out of concrete?  I have heard they are very dead (no spring) so makes turning a lot easier.  As I approach putting my 1940 SB 9” A and C lathes into operation, I am planning ahead for the tables.
 
Steven


Bill in OKC too
 

You ain't kidding! Though you could put shelves between the columns. I've seen a photo of one that was cast in one piece, similar to the one Carla described in the PM link someone posted earlier, and it just had a depression for a toe-kick, with maybe a bit of room for knees, too. Probably at least half again as much concrete as the one with the Atlas lathe on it. I'm thinking something like that would run close to half a ton by it's lonesome. I though I had a photo of that, but can't find it. If I ever do, I'll send it to the group. I've been looking for it for years. 

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Friday, December 27, 2019, 07:46:32 PM CST, harry molwitz <harry.molwitz@...> wrote:


Might be tough to move around the shop, I would be certain of the positioning. It also seems to limit storage underneath.

Harry

On Fri, Dec 27, 2019, 6:11 PM Bill in OKC too via Groups.Io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
It would be interesting to test and see what difference, if any, it made in the accuracy of the lathe. 

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Friday, December 27, 2019, 04:17:08 PM CST, Steven H via Groups.Io <stevesmachining=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:


Here is a photo of what appears to be a concrete lathe bench with an Atlas-Craftsman lathe on top. Not my lathe, just a photo I found on-line some time back. Personally I think it's overkill. But concrete is relatively inexpensive so knock yourself out should you choose to go this route. Good luck.

Regards,
Steven R. Haskell
 

-----Original Message-----
From: ww_big_al <arknack@...>
To: SouthBendLathe <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Dec 27, 2019 3:53 pm
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Southbend 9" lathe table in CONCRETE?

I don’t know about a lathe table, but I do fill my grinder pedestal stands with either concrete or sand. That dampen vibrations a lot.
Al
 
From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of Steven Schlegel
Sent: Friday, December 27, 2019 11:12 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] Southbend 9" lathe table in CONCRETE?
 
With all of the discussions about lathe tables, I have to ask:  What is your opinion about making one out of concrete?  I have heard they are very dead (no spring) so makes turning a lot easier.  As I approach putting my 1940 SB 9” A and C lathes into operation, I am planning ahead for the tables.
 
Steven


Vince Beachy <vincebeachy@...>
 

Hey everyone,

New guy here, with some thoughts.  I really like this idea as I have some experience in tying rebar together and making forms.  

If you were to put some sealer on the top and have some channels/gutters could you also make a coolant system built into it?  Thoughts?

Vince

On Fri, Dec 27, 2019, 9:48 PM Bill in OKC too via Groups.Io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
You ain't kidding! Though you could put shelves between the columns. I've seen a photo of one that was cast in one piece, similar to the one Carla described in the PM link someone posted earlier, and it just had a depression for a toe-kick, with maybe a bit of room for knees, too. Probably at least half again as much concrete as the one with the Atlas lathe on it. I'm thinking something like that would run close to half a ton by it's lonesome. I though I had a photo of that, but can't find it. If I ever do, I'll send it to the group. I've been looking for it for years. 

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Friday, December 27, 2019, 07:46:32 PM CST, harry molwitz <harry.molwitz@...> wrote:


Might be tough to move around the shop, I would be certain of the positioning. It also seems to limit storage underneath.

Harry

On Fri, Dec 27, 2019, 6:11 PM Bill in OKC too via Groups.Io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
It would be interesting to test and see what difference, if any, it made in the accuracy of the lathe. 

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Friday, December 27, 2019, 04:17:08 PM CST, Steven H via Groups.Io <stevesmachining=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:


Here is a photo of what appears to be a concrete lathe bench with an Atlas-Craftsman lathe on top. Not my lathe, just a photo I found on-line some time back. Personally I think it's overkill. But concrete is relatively inexpensive so knock yourself out should you choose to go this route. Good luck.

Regards,
Steven R. Haskell
 

-----Original Message-----
From: ww_big_al <arknack@...>
To: SouthBendLathe <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Dec 27, 2019 3:53 pm
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Southbend 9" lathe table in CONCRETE?

I don’t know about a lathe table, but I do fill my grinder pedestal stands with either concrete or sand. That dampen vibrations a lot.
Al
 
From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of Steven Schlegel
Sent: Friday, December 27, 2019 11:12 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] Southbend 9" lathe table in CONCRETE?
 
With all of the discussions about lathe tables, I have to ask:  What is your opinion about making one out of concrete?  I have heard they are very dead (no spring) so makes turning a lot easier.  As I approach putting my 1940 SB 9” A and C lathes into operation, I am planning ahead for the tables.
 
Steven


mike allen
 

        don't see why not

        animal

On 12/27/2019 7:37 PM, Vince Beachy wrote:
Hey everyone,

New guy here, with some thoughts.  I really like this idea as I have some experience in tying rebar together and making forms.  

If you were to put some sealer on the top and have some channels/gutters could you also make a coolant system built into it?  Thoughts?

Vince

On Fri, Dec 27, 2019, 9:48 PM Bill in OKC too via Groups.Io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
You ain't kidding! Though you could put shelves between the columns. I've seen a photo of one that was cast in one piece, similar to the one Carla described in the PM link someone posted earlier, and it just had a depression for a toe-kick, with maybe a bit of room for knees, too. Probably at least half again as much concrete as the one with the Atlas lathe on it. I'm thinking something like that would run close to half a ton by it's lonesome. I though I had a photo of that, but can't find it. If I ever do, I'll send it to the group. I've been looking for it for years. 

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Friday, December 27, 2019, 07:46:32 PM CST, harry molwitz <harry.molwitz@...> wrote:


Might be tough to move around the shop, I would be certain of the positioning. It also seems to limit storage underneath.

Harry

On Fri, Dec 27, 2019, 6:11 PM Bill in OKC too via Groups.Io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
It would be interesting to test and see what difference, if any, it made in the accuracy of the lathe. 

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Friday, December 27, 2019, 04:17:08 PM CST, Steven H via Groups.Io <stevesmachining=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:


Here is a photo of what appears to be a concrete lathe bench with an Atlas-Craftsman lathe on top. Not my lathe, just a photo I found on-line some time back. Personally I think it's overkill. But concrete is relatively inexpensive so knock yourself out should you choose to go this route. Good luck.

Regards,
Steven R. Haskell
 

-----Original Message-----
From: ww_big_al <arknack@...>
To: SouthBendLathe <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Dec 27, 2019 3:53 pm
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Southbend 9" lathe table in CONCRETE?

I don’t know about a lathe table, but I do fill my grinder pedestal stands with either concrete or sand. That dampen vibrations a lot.
Al
 
From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of Steven Schlegel
Sent: Friday, December 27, 2019 11:12 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] Southbend 9" lathe table in CONCRETE?
 
With all of the discussions about lathe tables, I have to ask:  What is your opinion about making one out of concrete?  I have heard they are very dead (no spring) so makes turning a lot easier.  As I approach putting my 1940 SB 9” A and C lathes into operation, I am planning ahead for the tables.
 
Steven


Jim_B
 

The issue I have always had with wood is that it expands and contracts with moisture. 
Different woods at different rates. 
Even the same kind of wood from different trees expand at different rates. Since it only takes a few thousandths of difference to cause twist it must be carefully used in a bench. 
Wood does not expand MUCH along the grain but it still does move. 
I have more than one door that’s tight in the summer and free in the winter. 
You MIGHT improve things if all 6 sides of each piece of wood are painted. 

Plywood is more stable. 
I believe OSB is also good. Perhaps Melamine coated particle board is more stable.  

If the legs are all out of the same blank that would help some. 
I would prefer metal supports, myself. Using Melamine to control chips but not to mount the lathe. 
 
I think cement would be nice BUT once done, you have placed the machine for posterity.   

-8
Jim B,

On Dec 27, 2019, at 6:10 PM, Bill in OKC too via Groups.Io <wmrmeyers@...> wrote:


It would be interesting to test and see what difference, if any, it made in the accuracy of the lathe. 

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Friday, December 27, 2019, 04:17:08 PM CST, Steven H via Groups.Io <stevesmachining@...> wrote:


Here is a photo of what appears to be a concrete lathe bench with an Atlas-Craftsman lathe on top. Not my lathe, just a photo I found on-line some time back. Personally I think it's overkill. But concrete is relatively inexpensive so knock yourself out should you choose to go this route. Good luck.

Regards,
Steven R. Haskell
 

-----Original Message-----
From: ww_big_al <arknack@...>
To: SouthBendLathe <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Dec 27, 2019 3:53 pm
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Southbend 9" lathe table in CONCRETE?

I don’t know about a lathe table, but I do fill my grinder pedestal stands with either concrete or sand. That dampen vibrations a lot.
Al
 
From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of Steven Schlegel
Sent: Friday, December 27, 2019 11:12 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] Southbend 9" lathe table in CONCRETE?
 
With all of the discussions about lathe tables, I have to ask:  What is your opinion about making one out of concrete?  I have heard they are very dead (no spring) so makes turning a lot easier.  As I approach putting my 1940 SB 9” A and C lathes into operation, I am planning ahead for the tables.
 
Steven

--
Jim B


Bill in OKC too
 

What Allan said. ;) Epoxy floor coating would probably work fine for a sealant. Maybe even Thompson's Water Seal. Let me know how it works out! 

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Friday, December 27, 2019, 09:38:15 PM CST, Vince Beachy <vincebeachy@...> wrote:


Hey everyone,

New guy here, with some thoughts.  I really like this idea as I have some experience in tying rebar together and making forms.  

If you were to put some sealer on the top and have some channels/gutters could you also make a coolant system built into it?  Thoughts?

Vince

On Fri, Dec 27, 2019, 9:48 PM Bill in OKC too via Groups.Io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
You ain't kidding! Though you could put shelves between the columns. I've seen a photo of one that was cast in one piece, similar to the one Carla described in the PM link someone posted earlier, and it just had a depression for a toe-kick, with maybe a bit of room for knees, too. Probably at least half again as much concrete as the one with the Atlas lathe on it. I'm thinking something like that would run close to half a ton by it's lonesome. I though I had a photo of that, but can't find it. If I ever do, I'll send it to the group. I've been looking for it for years. 

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Friday, December 27, 2019, 07:46:32 PM CST, harry molwitz <harry.molwitz@...> wrote:


Might be tough to move around the shop, I would be certain of the positioning. It also seems to limit storage underneath.

Harry

On Fri, Dec 27, 2019, 6:11 PM Bill in OKC too via Groups.Io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
It would be interesting to test and see what difference, if any, it made in the accuracy of the lathe. 

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Friday, December 27, 2019, 04:17:08 PM CST, Steven H via Groups.Io <stevesmachining=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:


Here is a photo of what appears to be a concrete lathe bench with an Atlas-Craftsman lathe on top. Not my lathe, just a photo I found on-line some time back. Personally I think it's overkill. But concrete is relatively inexpensive so knock yourself out should you choose to go this route. Good luck.

Regards,
Steven R. Haskell
 

-----Original Message-----
From: ww_big_al <arknack@...>
To: SouthBendLathe <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Dec 27, 2019 3:53 pm
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Southbend 9" lathe table in CONCRETE?

I don’t know about a lathe table, but I do fill my grinder pedestal stands with either concrete or sand. That dampen vibrations a lot.
Al
 
From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of Steven Schlegel
Sent: Friday, December 27, 2019 11:12 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] Southbend 9" lathe table in CONCRETE?
 
With all of the discussions about lathe tables, I have to ask:  What is your opinion about making one out of concrete?  I have heard they are very dead (no spring) so makes turning a lot easier.  As I approach putting my 1940 SB 9” A and C lathes into operation, I am planning ahead for the tables.
 
Steven


eddie.draper@btinternet.com
 

My 3 pennorth on lathe supports and foundations:

What matters most are rigidity, stability of dimensions and damping.  If any of those are already inbuilt in excess into the machine tool, then the other 2 in the support system can be reduced.  Thus, a substantial lathe can be mounted in a ship without its mountings being substantial.

If the lathe (etc.) has to be forced into shape because it is a bit twisted, you need a mounting that is TORSIONALLY stiff.  A single flat plate of anything has minimal torsional stiffness.  A single large hollow section is medium good, but would be much better with internal diagonal braces.  They don't need to be especially heavy.  You will note that the best lathes have diagonals cast into the bed structure.  Thick solid stuff (pretty well anything) is good because it naturally includes the diagonal bracing, and you will note that the concrete bench recenty illustrated has great thickness.  Torsional stiffness is also good for resisting cutting forces.

Stability comes from 3 issues, namely external inputs, temperature change and humidity change.  For example wood is very stable wrt temperature, but goes all over the place with humidity.  Different metals have different coefficients of expansion, ferrous being lower than non- ferrous (as a sweeping generality) and would match the lathe metal better.

Damping is inherent in some materilas and not others.  The simple test is whether you can make a good bell from it!

Finally, note that the stiffness of the job itself has great influence on the tendency to vibrate.

Eddie

On Saturday, 28 December 2019, 04:35:37 GMT, Bill in OKC too via Groups.Io <wmrmeyers@...> wrote:


What Allan said. ;) Epoxy floor coating would probably work fine for a sealant. Maybe even Thompson's Water Seal. Let me know how it works out! 

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Friday, December 27, 2019, 09:38:15 PM CST, Vince Beachy <vincebeachy@...> wrote:


Hey everyone,

New guy here, with some thoughts.  I really like this idea as I have some experience in tying rebar together and making forms.  

If you were to put some sealer on the top and have some channels/gutters could you also make a coolant system built into it?  Thoughts?

Vince

On Fri, Dec 27, 2019, 9:48 PM Bill in OKC too via Groups.Io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
You ain't kidding! Though you could put shelves between the columns. I've seen a photo of one that was cast in one piece, similar to the one Carla described in the PM link someone posted earlier, and it just had a depression for a toe-kick, with maybe a bit of room for knees, too. Probably at least half again as much concrete as the one with the Atlas lathe on it. I'm thinking something like that would run close to half a ton by it's lonesome. I though I had a photo of that, but can't find it. If I ever do, I'll send it to the group. I've been looking for it for years. 

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Friday, December 27, 2019, 07:46:32 PM CST, harry molwitz <harry.molwitz@...> wrote:


Might be tough to move around the shop, I would be certain of the positioning. It also seems to limit storage underneath.

Harry

On Fri, Dec 27, 2019, 6:11 PM Bill in OKC too via Groups.Io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
It would be interesting to test and see what difference, if any, it made in the accuracy of the lathe. 

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Friday, December 27, 2019, 04:17:08 PM CST, Steven H via Groups.Io <stevesmachining=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:


Here is a photo of what appears to be a concrete lathe bench with an Atlas-Craftsman lathe on top. Not my lathe, just a photo I found on-line some time back. Personally I think it's overkill. But concrete is relatively inexpensive so knock yourself out should you choose to go this route. Good luck.

Regards,
Steven R. Haskell
 

-----Original Message-----
From: ww_big_al <arknack@...>
To: SouthBendLathe <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Dec 27, 2019 3:53 pm
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Southbend 9" lathe table in CONCRETE?

I don’t know about a lathe table, but I do fill my grinder pedestal stands with either concrete or sand. That dampen vibrations a lot.
Al
 
From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of Steven Schlegel
Sent: Friday, December 27, 2019 11:12 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] Southbend 9" lathe table in CONCRETE?
 
With all of the discussions about lathe tables, I have to ask:  What is your opinion about making one out of concrete?  I have heard they are very dead (no spring) so makes turning a lot easier.  As I approach putting my 1940 SB 9” A and C lathes into operation, I am planning ahead for the tables.
 
Steven


ww_big_al
 

Just for fun, I looked this up.

The weight of concrete is approximately 150 pounds per cubic foot, or 4,050 pounds per cubic yard. The formula for calculating the weight of concrete is: Length (in feet) x Width (in feet) x Thickness (in inches) /12 x 150 = weight (in pounds).

 

So, a tabletop 6’ x 3’ x 0.3’ (3.5 inches) is ~ 810 lbs. (367kg)

 

Al

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of harry molwitz
Sent: Friday, December 27, 2019 6:46 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Southbend 9" lathe table in CONCRETE?

 

Might be tough to move around the shop, I would be certain of the positioning. It also seems to limit storage underneath.

 

Harry


Roger Bickers
 

A top limited to 3.5" will fail even with rebar. Your top should be at least 6" and would need a double matt of #4 rebar or else the top will sag and flex. 
Youd also need corner bars with 18" tails to join the top and legs together on the end of each matt.
The legs should be 2/3 of the overall size of the top in width to provide sound bearing and support, though I would definitely recommend a rebar cage here also.  

Sounds like overkill to ya? It's not. 

Oh and you'll still have to shim/ level the machine.

Do bother placing your cast iron lathe on aluminum either.. they'll fuse together.

Roger


On Fri, Dec 27, 2019 at 3:53 PM, ww_big_al
<arknack@...> wrote:

I don’t know about a lathe table, but I do fill my grinder pedestal stands with either concrete or sand. That dampen vibrations a lot.

Al

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of Steven Schlegel
Sent: Friday, December 27, 2019 11:12 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] Southbend 9" lathe table in CONCRETE?

 

With all of the discussions about lathe tables, I have to ask:  What is your opinion about making one out of concrete?  I have heard they are very dead (no spring) so makes turning a lot easier.  As I approach putting my 1940 SB 9” A and C lathes into operation, I am planning ahead for the tables.

 

Steven


George Wietor
 

During WWII quite large lathes were built entirely of concrete in the U.S. to
save on iron. Not portable, but effective. George in GR_._,_._,_


Bill in OKC too
 

WWI, also. Copy of an article from 1916 about Lucien Yeoman's' new method of making lathes (relatively) quickly and reducing the requirements for large iron castings is in the new Multimachine group at Groups.io. Copy of his patent is in the same folder. Some cool stuff if you're interested. ;)


Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Saturday, December 28, 2019, 09:40:29 AM CST, George Wietor via Groups.Io <wietorg@...> wrote:


During WWII quite large lathes were built entirely of concrete in the U.S. to
save on iron. Not portable, but effective. George in GR


david pennington
 

Marvelous, Bill!

One of my interests that I've not pursued in any way but thought is the matter of raising the level of available manufacturing technology in countries that lack modern machines.

David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado
815-382-1994


On Saturday, December 28, 2019, 10:18:54 AM MST, Bill in OKC too via Groups.Io <wmrmeyers@...> wrote:


WWI, also. Copy of an article from 1916 about Lucien Yeoman's' new method of making lathes (relatively) quickly and reducing the requirements for large iron castings is in the new Multimachine group at Groups.io. Copy of his patent is in the same folder. Some cool stuff if you're interested. ;)


Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Saturday, December 28, 2019, 09:40:29 AM CST, George Wietor via Groups.Io <wietorg@...> wrote:


During WWII quite large lathes were built entirely of concrete in the U.S. to
save on iron. Not portable, but effective. George in GR


rlm_mcv
 

I feel most people make the mistake of bolting a lathe to a table.  I feel that should be a loose connection.  Otherwise the lathe might be trying to control the twist in the table cause by weather and ground fluctuation. 

On Saturday, December 28, 2019, 8:54:54 AM CST, Roger Bickers via Groups.Io <mr.concrete1964@...> wrote:


A top limited to 3.5" will fail even with rebar. Your top should be at least 6" and would need a double matt of #4 rebar or else the top will sag and flex. 
Youd also need corner bars with 18" tails to join the top and legs together on the end of each matt.
The legs should be 2/3 of the overall size of the top in width to provide sound bearing and support, though I would definitely recommend a rebar cage here also.  

Sounds like overkill to ya? It's not. 

Oh and you'll still have to shim/ level the machine.

Do bother placing your cast iron lathe on aluminum either.. they'll fuse together.

Roger


On Fri, Dec 27, 2019 at 3:53 PM, ww_big_al
<arknack@...> wrote:

I don’t know about a lathe table, but I do fill my grinder pedestal stands with either concrete or sand. That dampen vibrations a lot.

Al

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of Steven Schlegel
Sent: Friday, December 27, 2019 11:12 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] Southbend 9" lathe table in CONCRETE?

 

With all of the discussions about lathe tables, I have to ask:  What is your opinion about making one out of concrete?  I have heard they are very dead (no spring) so makes turning a lot easier.  As I approach putting my 1940 SB 9” A and C lathes into operation, I am planning ahead for the tables.

 

Steven