Topics

Drill press spindle run out


Phillip Rankin
 

So this happened the other day when a drill bound  a up, and snatched a piece of metal from under my clamp on my drill press. I now have about .013 inches of run out at the end of the spindle. I haven't removed the spindle from the sleeve yet. Anyone been down this road before? Can it be straightened, or would it be easier to find another drill press?


Rogan Creswick
 

I had a drill press that was in that condition, and I sold it for parts, but the buyer was convinced he could straighten it with a press / vice.  I'm sure it's *possible* but I think it would be rather difficult to do.

You may be able to find the spindle / spindle assembly on ebay, though, which would be an easier fix.

--Rogan

On Sun, Dec 22, 2019 at 9:57 AM Phillip Rankin <phillip.rankin1964@...> wrote:
So this happened the other day when a drill bound  a up, and snatched a piece of metal from under my clamp on my drill press. I now have about .013 inches of run out at the end of the spindle. I haven't removed the spindle from the sleeve yet. Anyone been down this road before? Can it be straightened, or would it be easier to find another drill press?


Bill in OKC too
 

Try that again with the the indicator running on the inside of the taper, unless you know you had zero run-out on the outside before your incident. 

I have a Craftsman drill press that was my dad's when I was a kid. My next-youngest brother, who is a 6'8" 300lbs gorilla, bent the quilt on it about 25 years ago. I turned down the end to remove the bent section, and cut & threaded it and a replacement piece to be loctited on and turned to match the taper on the drill chuck. Threaded on and not loctited, run- out was about .003". This was done on my HF 7x10 mini-lathe. I've not completed it yet, as I've got a better lathe, an Atlas TH42, and an SB Heavy 10L restoration project, and a Lewis shaper. I want to use one or the other of those lathes and the shaper to completely remake a quill with an MT2 taper to replace the original. It's still on hold because I also have a much heavier antique drill press already equiped with an MT2 quill. 

Drill presses aren't really precision machine tools, so you may be able to live with it as is. Mine had about .250 of run-out. That just wasn't going to work. If I get too pressed for time and need another drill press fast, I could live with the .003 now, I just want the MT2 socket instead of a JT33 male taper, so I can skip the chuck entirely.

HTH!

Bill in OKC



William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)

Guard your women and children well,
Send These Bastards Back to Hell
We'll teach them the ways of war,
They Won't Come Here Any More
Use your shield and use your head,
Fight till Every One is Dead
Raise the flag up to the sky,
How Many of Them Can We Make Die!

Heather Alexander, March of Cambredth


On Sunday, December 22, 2019, 11:59:15 AM CST, Phillip Rankin <phillip.rankin1964@...> wrote:


So this happened the other day when a drill bound  a up, and snatched a piece of metal from under my clamp on my drill press. I now have about .013 inches of run out at the end of the spindle. I haven't removed the spindle from the sleeve yet. Anyone been down this road before? Can it be straightened, or would it be easier to find another drill press?


fwhite913
 

How is the drill press chuck attached to the spindle- a 33JT , a 2MT or what?.

Try removing the chuck from the spindle and remounting it.

 

 

On 12/22/2019 01:35 PM, Rogan Creswick wrote:

I had a drill press that was in that condition, and I sold it for parts, but the buyer was convinced he could straighten it with a press / vice.  I'm sure it's *possible* but I think it would be rather difficult to do.
 
You may be able to find the spindle / spindle assembly on ebay, though, which would be an easier fix.
 
--Rogan

On Sun, Dec 22, 2019 at 9:57 AM Phillip Rankin <phillip.rankin1964@...> wrote:
So this happened the other day when a drill bound  a up, and snatched a piece of metal from under my clamp on my drill press. I now have about .013 inches of run out at the end of the spindle. I haven't removed the spindle from the sleeve yet. Anyone been down this road before? Can it be straightened, or would it be easier to find another drill press?

 

 


Mark R. Jonkman
 

If you can get it a part then you could try heat straightening it. If you look on YouTube Keith Fenner does a lot of shaft straightening using that technique. Basically you place the shaft on vblocks or roller blocks and with indicator locate the point of bend. Then apply heat at that point then you hit it with cold water to cool it rapidly. I believe you heat the high point then cool it rapidly - the rapid cooling causes the metal to shrink slightly at that point thus shrinking the point of bend thus shortening that area pulling the bend out.

The alternative would be to set it up similarly in a press - shaft on two v-blocks and pressing down at high point.

It would largely depend on where bend is. If it’s at the end where it mounts chuck then probably only option would be to heat straightening.

Or put your machine shop skills to work and make new one - easier said then done depending on your skills and availability of equipment

Mark 


On Dec 22, 2019, at 12:54 PM, Phillip Rankin <phillip.rankin1964@...> wrote:

So this happened the other day when a drill bound  a up, and snatched a piece of metal from under my clamp on my drill press. I now have about .013 inches of run out at the end of the spindle. I haven't removed the spindle from the sleeve yet. Anyone been down this road before? Can it be straightened, or would it be easier to find another drill press?
<VID_20191222_114020442.mp4>


Steven H
 

Try your indicator on the taper shank of the drill just below the end of the spindle nose and see if you get the same reading. Then take the drill out of the spindle and set up an indicator to read on the inside of the spindle taper and see what you get. Good luck.

Steve Haskell


On Dec 22, 2019, at 3:15 PM, Mark R. Jonkman <mark.jonkman@...> wrote:

If you can get it a part then you could try heat straightening it. If you look on YouTube Keith Fenner does a lot of shaft straightening using that technique. Basically you place the shaft on vblocks or roller blocks and with indicator locate the point of bend. Then apply heat at that point then you hit it with cold water to cool it rapidly. I believe you heat the high point then cool it rapidly - the rapid cooling causes the metal to shrink slightly at that point thus shrinking the point of bend thus shortening that area pulling the bend out.

The alternative would be to set it up similarly in a press - shaft on two v-blocks and pressing down at high point.

It would largely depend on where bend is. If it’s at the end where it mounts chuck then probably only option would be to heat straightening.

Or put your machine shop skills to work and make new one - easier said then done depending on your skills and availability of equipment

Mark 


On Dec 22, 2019, at 12:54 PM, Phillip Rankin <phillip.rankin1964@...> wrote:

So this happened the other day when a drill bound  a up, and snatched a piece of metal from under my clamp on my drill press. I now have about .013 inches of run out at the end of the spindle. I haven't removed the spindle from the sleeve yet. Anyone been down this road before? Can it be straightened, or would it be easier to find another drill press?
<VID_20191222_114020442.mp4>


Phillip Rankin
 

Fwhite913, If you watch the video you should notice that there is no chuck involved The drill bit I am using to drive the quill fits the MT2 taper of the quill. 
Phillip R.


Phillip Rankin
 

About a year ago I measured the run out using the same drill bit measured just above the flutes as in this video. Back then run out measured 0.006. now it measures 0.014. I know drill presses aren't precision instruments, and I was okay with 0.006, but 0.014 is way more than I am willing to tolerate.


Phillip Rankin
 

When I find my snap ring pliers I'll investigate this further, but for now I'll turn my attention to family, and Christmas.

Merry Christmas folks
Phillip R.


Bill in OKC too
 

My yahoo mail has apparently been hiding your reply, so I just saw it. More than doubled, though not as bad as what my "little" brother did. You may be able to straighten it, you could do something like I did, replace the entire drill press,  or you could make a complete new quill. On my drill press, I'll need to replace the bearings, too. You may be able to get away with out that, but if you really like that drill press, you may want to go ahead and replace them too. I made do with quite a while with one of the 8" Harbor Freight drill presses, and for most of what I do, could have continued nearly forever that way, but I like my old Craftsman. Among other things, it's the one I learned how to use a drill press with, and I made quite a lot of neat stuff with it as a kid, mostly in wood. It would still work for me in my metalworking, and one of these days, it will, but I've also got a 900lbs monster antique that will handle anything the HF can't do, so it's not as high a priority. Besides, I need to finish fixing the shaper and at least one of the larger lathes to do a good job on the new quill. If you measured that a year ago, I suppose it's also possible the bearings were going bad, and replacing them might fix it, too. Keep us advised on what you decide, and I'll cheer you on, whatever it is. 

Bill in OKC

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)


On Sunday, December 22, 2019, 06:17:17 PM CST, Phillip Rankin <phillip.rankin1964@...> wrote:


About a year ago I measured the run out using the same drill bit measured just above the flutes as in this video. Back then run out measured 0.006. now it measures 0.014. I know drill presses aren't precision instruments, and I was okay with 0.006, but 0.014 is way more than I am willing to tolerate.


Phillip Rankin
 

I acquired the drill press from the side of the road after it took a swim in a flood back in 2016. I had motor hanging out in my garage that was looking for a machine to hang on. So for the price of new bearings, and a switch I had a otherwise free 16 speed floor standing drill press. I have a HF 8" bench drill press as a backup. I am undecided what I'll do with the bigger 16 speed with the bent quill. I like it because I can mount all my MT2 tools in it, but after spending 3 hours trying to straighten the quill I'm thinking the scrap yard might be the best place for that thing.


On Thu, Dec 26, 2019, 3:28 AM Bill in OKC too via Groups.Io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
My yahoo mail has apparently been hiding your reply, so I just saw it. More than doubled, though not as bad as what my "little" brother did. You may be able to straighten it, you could do something like I did, replace the entire drill press,  or you could make a complete new quill. On my drill press, I'll need to replace the bearings, too. You may be able to get away with out that, but if you really like that drill press, you may want to go ahead and replace them too. I made do with quite a while with one of the 8" Harbor Freight drill presses, and for most of what I do, could have continued nearly forever that way, but I like my old Craftsman. Among other things, it's the one I learned how to use a drill press with, and I made quite a lot of neat stuff with it as a kid, mostly in wood. It would still work for me in my metalworking, and one of these days, it will, but I've also got a 900lbs monster antique that will handle anything the HF can't do, so it's not as high a priority. Besides, I need to finish fixing the shaper and at least one of the larger lathes to do a good job on the new quill. If you measured that a year ago, I suppose it's also possible the bearings were going bad, and replacing them might fix it, too. Keep us advised on what you decide, and I'll cheer you on, whatever it is. 

Bill in OKC

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)


On Sunday, December 22, 2019, 06:17:17 PM CST, Phillip Rankin <phillip.rankin1964@...> wrote:


About a year ago I measured the run out using the same drill bit measured just above the flutes as in this video. Back then run out measured 0.006. now it measures 0.014. I know drill presses aren't precision instruments, and I was okay with 0.006, but 0.014 is way more than I am willing to tolerate.


mike allen
 

        here's a post from another group with a guy with drill press woes . I just pasted the whole message so there's some readin to do

        animal

    Found a source for Drill press spindle repair here in North Carolina. I purchased a really nice Buffalo Forge #15 Drill press awhile back off craigslist. It was made in the 1940 -1950's ( like most of us ) and was complete almost perfect condition with the exception of the spindle taper. When I turned it on to test it ran out like a drunken sailor. Since the Press was such excellent condition it ended up magically following me home. The spindles I saw on ebay didn't appear to be in as nice condition as what I had plus I didn't know if they had runout like mine. I was toying with the idea of getting the runout as good as I could then machining a larger #33 taper sleeve and going that route. I had never seen a spindle run out like that, about .014 thousand. 

I was thinking that ebay could be one source for a used spindle and for $ 85.00 couldn't pass it up. ( Buffalo is still in business, the new price for a #15 Drill press is at $2,400 GULP!! ) 
  While I was searching for repair I picked up a mint Rockwell 11-100 & Electro-Mechano high speed precision mini drill press. One can NEVER have too many Drill presses!!
  I searched the net for weeks and found noting out there that I could send it to for repair. I just happened to be searching around  again for Delta drill presses and found this site: hammerscale.com .I called the owner Gary ( 919.906.1000) and he said that repairing the taper & new bearings wouldn't be too difficult. He furthered that he has done many spindle straightening repairs and felt confident that he could bring it back to factory specs ( .0005 -.001 ) He usually charges around $135.00 and that includes a full service, (new quality ABEC bearings and the Taper repair). You can send in your spindle cartridge as a unit and he will deal with the rest and return it to you ready to reinstall usually in 2 weeks. He also has a few original Delta N.O.S. parts and makes new handles, depth stop collars ,etc.
  I stopped by his shop today and had a nice chat with him, he has many Delta presses that he has gone thru and would fit right in with us Valleymetal guys.
    He is expanding his services to include other Delta\Rockwell equipment so keep him in mind.

On 12/26/2019 1:27 AM, Bill in OKC too via Groups.Io wrote:
My yahoo mail has apparently been hiding your reply, so I just saw it. More than doubled, though not as bad as what my "little" brother did. You may be able to straighten it, you could do something like I did, replace the entire drill press,  or you could make a complete new quill. On my drill press, I'll need to replace the bearings, too. You may be able to get away with out that, but if you really like that drill press, you may want to go ahead and replace them too. I made do with quite a while with one of the 8" Harbor Freight drill presses, and for most of what I do, could have continued nearly forever that way, but I like my old Craftsman. Among other things, it's the one I learned how to use a drill press with, and I made quite a lot of neat stuff with it as a kid, mostly in wood. It would still work for me in my metalworking, and one of these days, it will, but I've also got a 900lbs monster antique that will handle anything the HF can't do, so it's not as high a priority. Besides, I need to finish fixing the shaper and at least one of the larger lathes to do a good job on the new quill. If you measured that a year ago, I suppose it's also possible the bearings were going bad, and replacing them might fix it, too. Keep us advised on what you decide, and I'll cheer you on, whatever it is. 

Bill in OKC

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)


On Sunday, December 22, 2019, 06:17:17 PM CST, Phillip Rankin <phillip.rankin1964@...> wrote:


About a year ago I measured the run out using the same drill bit measured just above the flutes as in this video. Back then run out measured 0.006. now it measures 0.014. I know drill presses aren't precision instruments, and I was okay with 0.006, but 0.014 is way more than I am willing to tolerate.


Bill in OKC too
 

OK, so no sentimental attachment, but have you priced a decent drill press recently? Yikes!

Another poster has a suggestion that looks pretty good to bring that one back, at reasonable expense, but it's work you could do yourself, probably. Shaper or mill (or both) would be seriously helpful, but it can be done on the lathe alone, if necessary.

Or you could offer it for free on Craigslist or one or more of the Yahoo or GIO groups. Lots of people with more time than money would love to have it. If you're not too far from Oklahoma City, I'd be interested. ;)

That's how I got my big antique. It still cost me, I had to buy an engine hoist to get the pieces out of my truck, but I've used them both enough to make it worthwhile.

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Thursday, December 26, 2019, 11:32:03 AM CST, Phillip Rankin <phillip.rankin1964@...> wrote:


I acquired the drill press from the side of the road after it took a swim in a flood back in 2016. I had motor hanging out in my garage that was looking for a machine to hang on. So for the price of new bearings, and a switch I had a otherwise free 16 speed floor standing drill press. I have a HF 8" bench drill press as a backup. I am undecided what I'll do with the bigger 16 speed with the bent quill. I like it because I can mount all my MT2 tools in it, but after spending 3 hours trying to straighten the quill I'm thinking the scrap yard might be the best place for that thing.

On Thu, Dec 26, 2019, 3:28 AM Bill in OKC too via Groups.Io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
My yahoo mail has apparently been hiding your reply, so I just saw it. More than doubled, though not as bad as what my "little" brother did. You may be able to straighten it, you could do something like I did, replace the entire drill press,  or you could make a complete new quill. On my drill press, I'll need to replace the bearings, too. You may be able to get away with out that, but if you really like that drill press, you may want to go ahead and replace them too. I made do with quite a while with one of the 8" Harbor Freight drill presses, and for most of what I do, could have continued nearly forever that way, but I like my old Craftsman. Among other things, it's the one I learned how to use a drill press with, and I made quite a lot of neat stuff with it as a kid, mostly in wood. It would still work for me in my metalworking, and one of these days, it will, but I've also got a 900lbs monster antique that will handle anything the HF can't do, so it's not as high a priority. Besides, I need to finish fixing the shaper and at least one of the larger lathes to do a good job on the new quill. If you measured that a year ago, I suppose it's also possible the bearings were going bad, and replacing them might fix it, too. Keep us advised on what you decide, and I'll cheer you on, whatever it is. 

Bill in OKC

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)


On Sunday, December 22, 2019, 06:17:17 PM CST, Phillip Rankin <phillip.rankin1964@...> wrote:


About a year ago I measured the run out using the same drill bit measured just above the flutes as in this video. Back then run out measured 0.006. now it measures 0.014. I know drill presses aren't precision instruments, and I was okay with 0.006, but 0.014 is way more than I am willing to tolerate.


Phillip Rankin
 

Well Bill,
 I am not exactly close to Oklahoma City. Denham Springs, LA is about 650 miles from your abode. I won't spend any more time on the quill, but I will keep an eye out for a replacement. There will be a cheap 14" Chinese donner drill press show up sooner of later. I'm in no hurry. I do more drilling on my lathe than on the drill press, but it is nice to be able to drill a hole in a vertical plane instead of a horizontal plane from time to time.


On Thu, Dec 26, 2019, 1:59 PM Bill in OKC too via Groups.Io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
OK, so no sentimental attachment, but have you priced a decent drill press recently? Yikes!

Another poster has a suggestion that looks pretty good to bring that one back, at reasonable expense, but it's work you could do yourself, probably. Shaper or mill (or both) would be seriously helpful, but it can be done on the lathe alone, if necessary.

Or you could offer it for free on Craigslist or one or more of the Yahoo or GIO groups. Lots of people with more time than money would love to have it. If you're not too far from Oklahoma City, I'd be interested. ;)

That's how I got my big antique. It still cost me, I had to buy an engine hoist to get the pieces out of my truck, but I've used them both enough to make it worthwhile.

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)







m. allan noah
 

I'm sorry, but I missed this- have you actually checked the runout of
the quill, or are you still using the side of the drill shank? If the
latter, are you sure the drill is not bent?

allan

On Thu, Dec 26, 2019 at 10:30 PM Phillip Rankin
<phillip.rankin1964@gmail.com> wrote:

Well Bill,
I am not exactly close to Oklahoma City. Denham Springs, LA is about 650 miles from your abode. I won't spend any more time on the quill, but I will keep an eye out for a replacement. There will be a cheap 14" Chinese donner drill press show up sooner of later. I'm in no hurry. I do more drilling on my lathe than on the drill press, but it is nice to be able to drill a hole in a vertical plane instead of a horizontal plane from time to time.

On Thu, Dec 26, 2019, 1:59 PM Bill in OKC too via Groups.Io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

OK, so no sentimental attachment, but have you priced a decent drill press recently? Yikes!

Another poster has a suggestion that looks pretty good to bring that one back, at reasonable expense, but it's work you could do yourself, probably. Shaper or mill (or both) would be seriously helpful, but it can be done on the lathe alone, if necessary.

Or you could offer it for free on Craigslist or one or more of the Yahoo or GIO groups. Lots of people with more time than money would love to have it. If you're not too far from Oklahoma City, I'd be interested. ;)

That's how I got my big antique. It still cost me, I had to buy an engine hoist to get the pieces out of my truck, but I've used them both enough to make it worthwhile.

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)







--
"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge
of my hand"


Bill in OKC too
 

that is a good question!

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Friday, December 27, 2019, 08:24:48 AM CST, m. allan noah <kitno455@...> wrote:


I'm sorry, but I missed this- have you actually checked the runout of
the quill, or are you still using the side of the drill shank? If the
latter, are you sure the drill is not bent?

allan

On Thu, Dec 26, 2019 at 10:30 PM Phillip Rankin
<phillip.rankin1964@...> wrote:
>
> Well Bill,
>  I am not exactly close to Oklahoma City. Denham Springs, LA is about 650 miles from your abode. I won't spend any more time on the quill, but I will keep an eye out for a replacement. There will be a cheap 14" Chinese donner drill press show up sooner of later. I'm in no hurry. I do more drilling on my lathe than on the drill press, but it is nice to be able to drill a hole in a vertical plane instead of a horizontal plane from time to time.
>
> On Thu, Dec 26, 2019, 1:59 PM Bill in OKC too via Groups.Io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
>>
>> OK, so no sentimental attachment, but have you priced a decent drill press recently? Yikes!
>>
>> Another poster has a suggestion that looks pretty good to bring that one back, at reasonable expense, but it's work you could do yourself, probably. Shaper or mill (or both) would be seriously helpful, but it can be done on the lathe alone, if necessary.
>>
>> Or you could offer it for free on Craigslist or one or more of the Yahoo or GIO groups. Lots of people with more time than money would love to have it. If you're not too far from Oklahoma City, I'd be interested. ;)
>>
>> That's how I got my big antique. It still cost me, I had to buy an engine hoist to get the pieces out of my truck, but I've used them both enough to make it worthwhile.
>>
>> William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)
>>
>>
>> A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
>> butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
>> accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
>> give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
>> problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
>> efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
>> LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>



--
"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge
of my hand"



Bill in OKC too
 

Did you actually check the quill, or just the drill shank? Twist drills are REAL easy to bend, even in the larger sizes, relative to a rod or cylinder of the same diameter. The solution might be as simple as getting a new drill bit. 

Too bad  you're not closer, I could have maybe gotten a great deal on a drill press! ;)  Or at least helped you check it out. 

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Thursday, December 26, 2019, 09:30:29 PM CST, Phillip Rankin <phillip.rankin1964@...> wrote:


Well Bill,
 I am not exactly close to Oklahoma City. Denham Springs, LA is about 650 miles from your abode. I won't spend any more time on the quill, but I will keep an eye out for a replacement. There will be a cheap 14" Chinese donner drill press show up sooner of later. I'm in no hurry. I do more drilling on my lathe than on the drill press, but it is nice to be able to drill a hole in a vertical plane instead of a horizontal plane from time to time.

On Thu, Dec 26, 2019, 1:59 PM Bill in OKC too via Groups.Io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
OK, so no sentimental attachment, but have you priced a decent drill press recently? Yikes!

Another poster has a suggestion that looks pretty good to bring that one back, at reasonable expense, but it's work you could do yourself, probably. Shaper or mill (or both) would be seriously helpful, but it can be done on the lathe alone, if necessary.

Or you could offer it for free on Craigslist or one or more of the Yahoo or GIO groups. Lots of people with more time than money would love to have it. If you're not too far from Oklahoma City, I'd be interested. ;)

That's how I got my big antique. It still cost me, I had to buy an engine hoist to get the pieces out of my truck, but I've used them both enough to make it worthwhile.

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)







Phillip Rankin
 

The twist drill runs straight and true when mounted in my lathe spindle. get your bronc riding saddle ready for the wild ride on the dial indicator. Here are a few videos measuring run-out using three different Chuck's, and the same 4" long 1/2" round bar.


On Fri, Dec 27, 2019, 8:46 AM Bill in OKC too via Groups.Io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Did you actually check the quill, or just the drill shank? Twist drills are REAL easy to bend, even in the larger sizes, relative to a rod or cylinder of the same diameter. The solution might be as simple as getting a new drill bit. 

Too bad  you're not closer, I could have maybe gotten a great deal on a drill press! ;)  Or at least helped you check it out. 

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Thursday, December 26, 2019, 09:30:29 PM CST, Phillip Rankin <phillip.rankin1964@...> wrote:


Well Bill,
 I am not exactly close to Oklahoma City. Denham Springs, LA is about 650 miles from your abode. I won't spend any more time on the quill, but I will keep an eye out for a replacement. There will be a cheap 14" Chinese donner drill press show up sooner of later. I'm in no hurry. I do more drilling on my lathe than on the drill press, but it is nice to be able to drill a hole in a vertical plane instead of a horizontal plane from time to time.

On Thu, Dec 26, 2019, 1:59 PM Bill in OKC too via Groups.Io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
OK, so no sentimental attachment, but have you priced a decent drill press recently? Yikes!

Another poster has a suggestion that looks pretty good to bring that one back, at reasonable expense, but it's work you could do yourself, probably. Shaper or mill (or both) would be seriously helpful, but it can be done on the lathe alone, if necessary.

Or you could offer it for free on Craigslist or one or more of the Yahoo or GIO groups. Lots of people with more time than money would love to have it. If you're not too far from Oklahoma City, I'd be interested. ;)

That's how I got my big antique. It still cost me, I had to buy an engine hoist to get the pieces out of my truck, but I've used them both enough to make it worthwhile.

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)







Phillip Rankin
 


On Fri, Dec 27, 2019, 11:31 AM Phillip Rankin <phillip.rankin1964@...> wrote:
The twist drill runs straight and true when mounted in my lathe spindle. get your bronc riding saddle ready for the wild ride on the dial indicator. Here are a few videos measuring run-out using three different Chuck's, and the same 4" long 1/2" round bar.

On Fri, Dec 27, 2019, 8:46 AM Bill in OKC too via Groups.Io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Did you actually check the quill, or just the drill shank? Twist drills are REAL easy to bend, even in the larger sizes, relative to a rod or cylinder of the same diameter. The solution might be as simple as getting a new drill bit. 

Too bad  you're not closer, I could have maybe gotten a great deal on a drill press! ;)  Or at least helped you check it out. 

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Thursday, December 26, 2019, 09:30:29 PM CST, Phillip Rankin <phillip.rankin1964@...> wrote:


Well Bill,
 I am not exactly close to Oklahoma City. Denham Springs, LA is about 650 miles from your abode. I won't spend any more time on the quill, but I will keep an eye out for a replacement. There will be a cheap 14" Chinese donner drill press show up sooner of later. I'm in no hurry. I do more drilling on my lathe than on the drill press, but it is nice to be able to drill a hole in a vertical plane instead of a horizontal plane from time to time.

On Thu, Dec 26, 2019, 1:59 PM Bill in OKC too via Groups.Io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
OK, so no sentimental attachment, but have you priced a decent drill press recently? Yikes!

Another poster has a suggestion that looks pretty good to bring that one back, at reasonable expense, but it's work you could do yourself, probably. Shaper or mill (or both) would be seriously helpful, but it can be done on the lathe alone, if necessary.

Or you could offer it for free on Craigslist or one or more of the Yahoo or GIO groups. Lots of people with more time than money would love to have it. If you're not too far from Oklahoma City, I'd be interested. ;)

That's how I got my big antique. It still cost me, I had to buy an engine hoist to get the pieces out of my truck, but I've used them both enough to make it worthwhile.

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)







Bill in OKC too
 

What I'd really like to see is a video of the indicator running in the taper of the quill. A chuck that only has .003 runout is a fantastic chuck. But I won't blame you if you don't want to play anymore. There is a very limited amount of shop time available, and the more you spend satisfying my prurient curiosity, the less time you have to do things you want or need to do for yourself. One of the problems of social media is that the denizens can eat up all your time without half trying! Have a Happy New Year!

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Friday, December 27, 2019, 11:37:15 AM CST, Phillip Rankin <phillip.rankin1964@...> wrote:


The twist drill runs straight and true when mounted in my lathe spindle. get your bronc riding saddle ready for the wild ride on the dial indicator. Here are a few videos measuring run-out using three different Chuck's, and the same 4" long 1/2" round bar.

On Fri, Dec 27, 2019, 8:46 AM Bill in OKC too via Groups.Io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Did you actually check the quill, or just the drill shank? Twist drills are REAL easy to bend, even in the larger sizes, relative to a rod or cylinder of the same diameter. The solution might be as simple as getting a new drill bit. 

Too bad  you're not closer, I could have maybe gotten a great deal on a drill press! ;)  Or at least helped you check it out. 

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Thursday, December 26, 2019, 09:30:29 PM CST, Phillip Rankin <phillip.rankin1964@...> wrote:


Well Bill,
 I am not exactly close to Oklahoma City. Denham Springs, LA is about 650 miles from your abode. I won't spend any more time on the quill, but I will keep an eye out for a replacement. There will be a cheap 14" Chinese donner drill press show up sooner of later. I'm in no hurry. I do more drilling on my lathe than on the drill press, but it is nice to be able to drill a hole in a vertical plane instead of a horizontal plane from time to time.

On Thu, Dec 26, 2019, 1:59 PM Bill in OKC too via Groups.Io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
OK, so no sentimental attachment, but have you priced a decent drill press recently? Yikes!

Another poster has a suggestion that looks pretty good to bring that one back, at reasonable expense, but it's work you could do yourself, probably. Shaper or mill (or both) would be seriously helpful, but it can be done on the lathe alone, if necessary.

Or you could offer it for free on Craigslist or one or more of the Yahoo or GIO groups. Lots of people with more time than money would love to have it. If you're not too far from Oklahoma City, I'd be interested. ;)

That's how I got my big antique. It still cost me, I had to buy an engine hoist to get the pieces out of my truck, but I've used them both enough to make it worthwhile.

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)