Patent for 'Face Plate Locking Means'


Steven H
 

Attached is a 1964 South Bend Patent for a means to lock a faceplate to the lathe threaded spindle nose to prevent faceplate (or presumably a chuck) from unthreading when in reverse.

I don't know if South Bend ever put this in production. I have a 1963 South Bend 16" lathe and none of my faceplates or chucks have this feature. Probably because my lathe is a year or more earlier than the May 12, 1964 patent date.

I found this patent on the wswells.com SBL Workshop site. From the wswells.com home page, click on 'Projects', then SBL Patents and the pdf file can be found about half way down the list.

I may get the ambition to experiment on a 'prototype' faceplate someday and try to make this work.

Seems like some brass or plastic tipped set screws around the circumference of the faceplate or chuck hub might get the job done also and be a lot simpler. 

Robert Downs, what feature does your chuck have to prevent coming off in reverse? Photos?


Regards,
Steven R. Haskell
 


Davis Johnson
 

Looks like it works on the same principle as some click-less ratchets or overrunning clutches. The difference is the key to hold the roller to keep where it won't bind when removing the faceplate.

On 10/24/19 1:32 PM, Steven H via Groups.Io wrote:
Attached is a 1964 South Bend Patent for a means to lock a faceplate to the lathe threaded spindle nose to prevent faceplate (or presumably a chuck) from unthreading when in reverse.

I don't know if South Bend ever put this in production. I have a 1963 South Bend 16" lathe and none of my faceplates or chucks have this feature. Probably because my lathe is a year or more earlier than the May 12, 1964 patent date.

I found this patent on the wswells.com SBL Workshop site. From the wswells.com home page, click on 'Projects', then SBL Patents and the pdf file can be found about half way down the list.

I may get the ambition to experiment on a 'prototype' faceplate someday and try to make this work.

Seems like some brass or plastic tipped set screws around the circumference of the faceplate or chuck hub might get the job done also and be a lot simpler. 

Robert Downs, what feature does your chuck have to prevent coming off in reverse? Photos?


Regards,
Steven R. Haskell
 


Scott Highton
 

Just curious on your perspectives here… what’s the difference between this patent and the more simple installation of a set screw (or a double set screw) to hold the plate / chuck onto the spindle?


Scott


john kling
 

I have an old (now unused) Goodell Pratt lathe that holds the threaded adjustment ring in position on the spindle with a set screw that does not go all the way through the end/adjustment ring. I note that this lathe like many of the South Bends has no babbit, brons, ball or taper spindle bearings just the cast iron in the head stock.

On Friday, October 25, 2019, 10:56:18 AM EDT, Scott Highton <scott@...> wrote:


Just curious on your perspectives here…  what’s the difference between this patent and the more simple installation of a set screw (or a double set screw) to hold the plate / chuck onto the spindle?


Scott


Ondrej Krejci
 

Somebody at South Bend Lathe was bored and decided to take out a roller ratchet patent for keeping threaded attachments on spindles in case of sudden braking or reversing not for cutting with the spindles running in reverse, that requires positive locking.

OK

On Friday, October 25, 2019, 11:09:55 AM EDT, john kling via Groups.Io <jkling222@...> wrote:


I have an old (now unused) Goodell Pratt lathe that holds the threaded adjustment ring in position on the spindle with a set screw that does not go all the way through the end/adjustment ring. I note that this lathe like many of the South Bends has no babbit, brons, ball or taper spindle bearings just the cast iron in the head stock.

On Friday, October 25, 2019, 10:56:18 AM EDT, Scott Highton <scott@...> wrote:


Just curious on your perspectives here…  what’s the difference between this patent and the more simple installation of a set screw (or a double set screw) to hold the plate / chuck onto the spindle?


Scott


Davis Johnson
 

The main advantage I see is that you couldn't forget to tighten the lock.

On 10/25/19 10:56 AM, Scott Highton wrote:
Just curious on your perspectives here… what’s the difference between this patent and the more simple installation of a set screw (or a double set screw) to hold the plate / chuck onto the spindle?


Scott


davesmith1800
 

Like that post 
Simple way of stoping threading of face plate
It rare I see some new

Thank you
Dave