Topics

Large Drills in the headstock


Don Verdiani
 

I'm a Heavy 10 guy. I find myself with a bunch of greater than 3/4" #3 Morse taper shank drills and am wondering. I could easily make a sleeve to put #3 MT drills in the S/B spindle. I have a sleeve with a  #2 MT, no big deal to make another for #3.  It means learning to set work up on the cross slide, but I bet I can figure that out. Anyone tried this? Is it worth doing?

Don V.
West Chester, PA


Roger Bickers
 

Whats the bore size of your spindle? If its the large hole, then get a 13" spindle sleeve adapter, its sized for a #3 mt. Roger


On Mon, Jan 7, 2019 at 10:44 PM, Don Verdiani via Groups.Io
<DLVerdiani@...> wrote:
I'm a Heavy 10 guy. I find myself with a bunch of greater than 3/4" #3 Morse taper shank drills and am wondering. I could easily make a sleeve to put #3 MT drills in the S/B spindle. I have a sleeve with a  #2 MT, no big deal to make another for #3.  It means learning to set work up on the cross slide, but I bet I can figure that out. Anyone tried this? Is it worth doing?

Don V.
West Chester, PA


eddie.draper@btinternet.com
 

Assuming you can somehow fit the no3 MT drills in the headstock mandrel, then, whilst you can set jobs up on the cross slide, beware of the large forces involved.  An alternative option is to fit a flat pad into the tailstock and you can use it like a drill press for drilling long members, e.g. angle iron.  A rope from a roof member is probably safer than holding the end, and use the tool post to stop the workpiece pulling forward a long way on breakthrough.

Eddie

On Tuesday, 8 January 2019, 03:50:20 GMT, Roger Bickers via Groups.Io <mr.concrete1964@...> wrote:


Whats the bore size of your spindle? If its the large hole, then get a 13" spindle sleeve adapter, its sized for a #3 mt. Roger


On Mon, Jan 7, 2019 at 10:44 PM, Don Verdiani via Groups.Io
<DLVerdiani@...> wrote:
I'm a Heavy 10 guy. I find myself with a bunch of greater than 3/4" #3 Morse taper shank drills and am wondering. I could easily make a sleeve to put #3 MT drills in the S/B spindle. I have a sleeve with a  #2 MT, no big deal to make another for #3.  It means learning to set work up on the cross slide, but I bet I can figure that out. Anyone tried this? Is it worth doing?

Don V.
West Chester, PA


Morris Mallard <morrismallard@...>
 


From: "eddie.draper@... via Groups.Io" <eddie.draper@...>
To: "SouthBendLathe@groups.io" <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, January 8, 2019 3:07 AM
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Large Drills in the headstock

Assuming you can somehow fit the no3 MT drills in the headstock mandrel, then, whilst you can set jobs up on the cross slide, beware of the large forces involved.  An alternative option is to fit a flat pad into the tailstock and you can use it like a drill press for drilling long members, e.g. angle iron.  A rope from a roof member is probably safer than holding the end, and use the tool post to stop the workpiece pulling forward a long way on breakthrough.

Eddie

On Tuesday, 8 January 2019, 03:50:20 GMT, Roger Bickers via Groups.Io <mr.concrete1964@...> wrote:


Whats the bore size of your spindle? If its the large hole, then get a 13" spindle sleeve adapter, its sized for a #3 mt. Roger


On Mon, Jan 7, 2019 at 10:44 PM, Don Verdiani via Groups.Io
<DLVerdiani@...> wrote:
I'm a Heavy 10 guy. I find myself with a bunch of greater than 3/4" #3 Morse taper shank drills and am wondering. I could easily make a sleeve to put #3 MT drills in the S/B spindle. I have a sleeve with a  #2 MT, no big deal to make another for #3.  It means learning to set work up on the cross slide, but I bet I can figure that out. Anyone tried this? Is it worth doing?

Don V.
West Chester, PA



rlm_mcv
 

Adapter sleeves are easy to make by turning the compound to the desired angle and hand feeding.  Setup can be accomplished using a dial indicator traveling the length to get a zero reading for the angle.  I have not made an adapter sleeve for a heavy 10 but have made several for 24" and 16" South Bends.  I always make spares when I have the compound set for the cutting.  It seems like someone is always needing one.


On Monday, January 7, 2019, 9:44:56 PM CST, Don Verdiani via Groups.Io <DLVerdiani@...> wrote:


I'm a Heavy 10 guy. I find myself with a bunch of greater than 3/4" #3 Morse taper shank drills and am wondering. I could easily make a sleeve to put #3 MT drills in the S/B spindle. I have a sleeve with a  #2 MT, no big deal to make another for #3.  It means learning to set work up on the cross slide, but I bet I can figure that out. Anyone tried this? Is it worth doing?

Don V.
West Chester, PA


David Meyer
 
Edited

I know it’s common but I can’t remember the last time I needed a bit or cutter in the spindle end of a lathe(but I’m just a hobbyist). I have crotch centers but have always had other ways to drill a hole that I saw as safer or more controllable. Never had a milling attachment but those appear rather limited in range and the flexibility and might limit the use of such large tooling. Drilling larger than 3/4” holes in something attached to the compound, or I suppose directly to the cross slide, to me, sounds like a last ditch effort(more stable but troublesome setup). On many objects it would then need to be bored concentric anyway so get the boring head ready for the spindle as well.
Just some things that come to mind.  
Dave


Guenther Paul
 

If you use large diameter drill that is with a MT larger then your tail stock, i recommend you get a MT adapter to fit the drill and with a MT to fit your tail stock. You have to go easy with large drills so they don't spin in the tail stock. I saw some adapters on e-bay 

GP


On Thursday, January 24, 2019, 4:35:24 PM EST, David Meyer via Groups.Io <dmar836@...> wrote:


[Edited Message Follows]

I know it’s common but I can’t remember the last time I needed a bit or cutter in the spindle end of a lathe(but I’m just a hobbyist). I have crotch centers but have always had other ways to drill a hole that I saw as safer or more controllable. Never had a milling attachment but those appear rather limited in range and the flexibility and might limit the use of such large tooling. Drilling larger than 3/4” holes in something attached to the compound, or I suppose directly to the cross slide, to me, sounds like a last ditch effort(more stable but troublesome setup). On many objects it would then need to be bored concentric anyway so get the boring head ready for the spindle as well.
Just some things that come to mind.  
Dave


eddie.draper@btinternet.com
 

The secret to avoiding Morse Taper drills spinning is to keep the axial force to torque ratio high.  I.e. do not try to enlarge an existing hole by a small amount.  Impose a limitation of say at least a 50% increase in diameter.  (Theoretically, a pilot drill should only clear the centre core diameter of a larger drill where it doesn't cut.)  If you really must enlarge a hole by a small amount, locally grind the helix angle off the cutting edge of the drill or even reverse it slightly so it can't pull into the hole, and be very, very gentle & careful.

I have drilled long large holes through things clamped to the cross slide prior to boring with a boring bar between centres, but you need to push from behind with the tailstock to avoid too much force going in via the feed mechanism of the saddle and the clamps you're using to hold the job down.  I even put a 3/4" hole through a block of horrid stainless using a Myford ML7 this way.  Slowly!

Eddie

On Thursday, 24 January 2019, 21:45:10 GMT, Guenther Paul <paulguenter@...> wrote:


If you use large diameter drill that is with a MT larger then your tail stock, i recommend you get a MT adapter to fit the drill and with a MT to fit your tail stock. You have to go easy with large drills so they don't spin in the tail stock. I saw some adapters on e-bay 

GP


On Thursday, January 24, 2019, 4:35:24 PM EST, David Meyer via Groups.Io <dmar836@...> wrote:


[Edited Message Follows]

I know it’s common but I can’t remember the last time I needed a bit or cutter in the spindle end of a lathe(but I’m just a hobbyist). I have crotch centers but have always had other ways to drill a hole that I saw as safer or more controllable. Never had a milling attachment but those appear rather limited in range and the flexibility and might limit the use of such large tooling. Drilling larger than 3/4” holes in something attached to the compound, or I suppose directly to the cross slide, to me, sounds like a last ditch effort(more stable but troublesome setup). On many objects it would then need to be bored concentric anyway so get the boring head ready for the spindle as well.
Just some things that come to mind.  
Dave


glenn brooks <brooks.glenn@...>
 

Eddie,  good tip. Maybe this is the reason a drill will catch and grab as it pushes through the last little bit of the work, at the far end side of the work??

Glenn 


On Jan 25, 2019, at 12:59 AM, eddie.draper@... via Groups.Io <eddie.draper@...> wrote:

The secret to avoiding Morse Taper drills spinning is to keep the axial force to torque ratio high.  I.e. do not try to enlarge an existing hole by a small amount.  Impose a limitation of say at least a 50% increase in diameter.  (Theoretically, a pilot drill should only clear the centre core diameter of a larger drill where it doesn't cut.)  If you really must enlarge a hole by a small amount, locally grind the helix angle off the cutting edge of the drill or even reverse it slightly so it can't pull into the hole, and be very, very gentle & careful.

I have drilled long large holes through things clamped to the cross slide prior to boring with a boring bar between centres, but you need to push from behind with the tailstock to avoid too much force going in via the feed mechanism of the saddle and the clamps you're using to hold the job down.  I even put a 3/4" hole through a block of horrid stainless using a Myford ML7 this way.  Slowly!

Eddie

On Thursday, 24 January 2019, 21:45:10 GMT, Guenther Paul <paulguenter@...> wrote:


If you use large diameter drill that is with a MT larger then your tail stock, i recommend you get a MT adapter to fit the drill and with a MT to fit your tail stock. You have to go easy with large drills so they don't spin in the tail stock. I saw some adapters on e-bay 

GP


On Thursday, January 24, 2019, 4:35:24 PM EST, David Meyer via Groups.Io <dmar836@...> wrote:


[Edited Message Follows]

I know it’s common but I can’t remember the last time I needed a bit or cutter in the spindle end of a lathe(but I’m just a hobbyist). I have crotch centers but have always had other ways to drill a hole that I saw as safer or more controllable. Never had a milling attachment but those appear rather limited in range and the flexibility and might limit the use of such large tooling. Drilling larger than 3/4” holes in something attached to the compound, or I suppose directly to the cross slide, to me, sounds like a last ditch effort(more stable but troublesome setup). On many objects it would then need to be bored concentric anyway so get the boring head ready for the spindle as well.
Just some things that come to mind.  
Dave


eddie.draper@btinternet.com
 

Pretty well exactly right, Glenn.  One needs to detect when breakthrough is approaching and ease the pressure / feed to avoid breaking drills / wrists, depending on the size of the bit whe it is handheld.

On Friday, 25 January 2019, 19:51:01 GMT, glenn brooks <brooks.glenn@...> wrote:


Eddie,  good tip. Maybe this is the reason a drill will catch and grab as it pushes through the last little bit of the work, at the far end side of the work??

Glenn 


On Jan 25, 2019, at 12:59 AM, eddie.draper@... via Groups.Io <eddie.draper@...> wrote:

The secret to avoiding Morse Taper drills spinning is to keep the axial force to torque ratio high.  I.e. do not try to enlarge an existing hole by a small amount.  Impose a limitation of say at least a 50% increase in diameter.  (Theoretically, a pilot drill should only clear the centre core diameter of a larger drill where it doesn't cut.)  If you really must enlarge a hole by a small amount, locally grind the helix angle off the cutting edge of the drill or even reverse it slightly so it can't pull into the hole, and be very, very gentle & careful.

I have drilled long large holes through things clamped to the cross slide prior to boring with a boring bar between centres, but you need to push from behind with the tailstock to avoid too much force going in via the feed mechanism of the saddle and the clamps you're using to hold the job down.  I even put a 3/4" hole through a block of horrid stainless using a Myford ML7 this way.  Slowly!

Eddie

On Thursday, 24 January 2019, 21:45:10 GMT, Guenther Paul <paulguenter@...> wrote:


If you use large diameter drill that is with a MT larger then your tail stock, i recommend you get a MT adapter to fit the drill and with a MT to fit your tail stock. You have to go easy with large drills so they don't spin in the tail stock. I saw some adapters on e-bay 

GP


On Thursday, January 24, 2019, 4:35:24 PM EST, David Meyer via Groups.Io <dmar836@...> wrote:


[Edited Message Follows]

I know it’s common but I can’t remember the last time I needed a bit or cutter in the spindle end of a lathe(but I’m just a hobbyist). I have crotch centers but have always had other ways to drill a hole that I saw as safer or more controllable. Never had a milling attachment but those appear rather limited in range and the flexibility and might limit the use of such large tooling. Drilling larger than 3/4” holes in something attached to the compound, or I suppose directly to the cross slide, to me, sounds like a last ditch effort(more stable but troublesome setup). On many objects it would then need to be bored concentric anyway so get the boring head ready for the spindle as well.
Just some things that come to mind.  
Dave