Topics

threaded er chuck


John Gallo
 

Does any one know where I can find an ER collet chuck that threads onto a 11/2x8 spindle? I remember seeing one a while ago, but I can't remember who was selling them. It was nice because it would hold up to a 3/4 inch collet. Thanks, John.


Phillip Rankin
 

On Apr 19, 2017 5:58 PM, "johnnyblock1@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:
 

Does any one know where I can find an ER collet chuck that threads onto a 11/2x8 spindle? I remember seeing one a while ago, but I can't remember who was selling them. It was nice because it would hold up to a 3/4 inch collet. Thanks, John.


m. allan noah
 

You could make it yourself. http://tallgrasstools.com/products?page=2 has both kits and finished ones.

allan

On Wed, Apr 19, 2017 at 6:58 PM, johnnyblock1@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:
 

Does any one know where I can find an ER collet chuck that threads onto a 11/2x8 spindle? I remember seeing one a while ago, but I can't remember who was selling them. It was nice because it would hold up to a 3/4 inch collet. Thanks, John.




--
"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge of my hand"


soupy1951ca
 

I've bought things from joelr7052 on eBay and he has one listed right now. Just go to eBay and search for him by his ID.

Mike from Canada

On Wed, Apr 19, 2017 at 6:58 PM, johnnyblock1@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:
 

Does any one know where I can find an ER collet chuck that threads onto a 11/2x8 spindle? I remember seeing one a while ago, but I can't remember who was selling them. It was nice because it would hold up to a 3/4 inch collet. Thanks, John.



Guenther Paul
 

I would make my own chuck body for ER40 collets. You can buy the nut and wrench cheep . If your interested i have a drawing 
 
GP



From: "Soupy51 soupy51@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]"
To: "SOUTHBENDLATHE@..."
Sent: Wednesday, April 19, 2017 7:19 PM
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] threaded er chuck

 
I've bought things from joelr7052 on eBay and he has one listed right now. Just go to eBay and search for him by his ID.

Mike from Canada

On Wed, Apr 19, 2017 at 6:58 PM, johnnyblock1@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:
 
Does any one know where I can find an ER collet chuck that threads onto a 11/2x8 spindle? I remember seeing one a while ago, but I can't remember who was selling them. It was nice because it would hold up to a 3/4 inch collet. Thanks, John.




Guenther Paul
 

I would make my own before i pay $ 160.00 . Use steel you can shop harden
 
GP



From: "Phillip Rankin phillip.rankin1964@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]"
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Sent: Wednesday, April 19, 2017 7:30 PM
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] threaded er chuck

 

On Apr 19, 2017 5:58 PM, "johnnyblock1@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:
 
Does any one know where I can find an ER collet chuck that threads onto a 11/2x8 spindle? I remember seeing one a while ago, but I can't remember who was selling them. It was nice because it would hold up to a 3/4 inch collet. Thanks, John.



Neil Butterfield <neilbfield@...>
 

I built the ER40 Collet Chuck for my 9” South Bend Lathe with 1-1/2” – 8 spindle thread. Go to my article on my web site:  http://www.nbutterfield.com/Pages/ER40ColletChuck.aspx I built from the feature article in the 2016 Feb/Mar issue of Machinist’s Workshop magazine. I give all my costs including purchasing a complete set of ER40 imported collets. I highly recommend one built their own using the lathe it is to be used on. I now have a fantastic Collet Chuck with full set of collets from 1/8” to 1” with no gaps that holds parts removed and reinserted to within 0.001” repeatability.

 

One of the best tools I ever made for myself. I have all internet info for purchasing collets, the metric nut, and wrenches plus added info on the English ER40 square and hex collet blocks that use the same collets. Most purchase info in my article available on a one sheet info email for those interested. Glad to pass on to you fellows that should also built your own

 

I think it very important to make the Collet Chuck on the lathe on which it will be used to obtain the accuracies I’m bragging about above.

 

Neil Butterfield

Also, www.Neilsniche.com

 

 

 

 

From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... [mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@...]
Sent: Wednesday, April 19, 2017 4:14 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] threaded er chuck

 

 

You could make it yourself. http://tallgrasstools.com/products?page=2 has both kits and finished ones.

allan

 

On Wed, Apr 19, 2017 at 6:58 PM, johnnyblock1@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:

 

Does any one know where I can find an ER collet chuck that threads onto a 11/2x8 spindle? I remember seeing one a while ago, but I can't remember who was selling them. It was nice because it would hold up to a 3/4 inch collet. Thanks, John.




--

"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge of my hand"


kernbigo@...
 


John Gallo
 

Hi Neil,
Where can I get a copy of the magazine article you used? Also, can an acceptable metric thread be cut with the standard quick change gear box? Thanks, John.


Jack Dinan <jdinan@...>
 

I was inspired by Neil’s article and followed his directions to make one using my SB 9.

I invested in the two gears needed to turn metric threads and this part of the project went surprisingly well.

I chose to buy the metric versions of the collets because they were less expensive than the English versions. 

 It was the most complex – and most rewarding – project this novice had ever attempted.

Make the chuck. You’ll find that you will use it for the vast majority of your work.



On Apr 19, 2017, at 8:28 PM, kernbigo@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:



Neil Butterfield <neilbfield@...>
 

John,

I think you can purchase a copy of the Feb/Mar 2015 (I think said 2016 in my prev. email) Machinist Workshop magazine or if not the complete magazine they will send you a copy of the specific article.

 

There are numerous articles and You Tube Videos on cutting metric threads on an Imperial (English) lathe. The MW article by Dave Garrett describes a 98%+ accurate article which requires the purchase of one or two inexpensive additional change gears I believe. What I’m saying is there is all kinds of info out there to aid you in cutting Metric threads on a conventional English lathe. Remember these threads are for a simple nut that is holding a collet tightly in the chuck. Nothing fancy is required…it’s just a nut holder. I believe this is all accomplished with a conventional quick change gear box. If not, somewhere there will be info to cut metric with a conventional quick change gear box.

 

Good luck. You will be very proud when you complete making the ER collet chuck. I certainly was.

 

Neil

 

From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... [mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@...]
Sent: Wednesday, April 19, 2017 5:52 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: RE: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] threaded er chuck

 

 

Hi Neil,

Where can I get a copy of the magazine article you used? Also, can an acceptable metric thread be cut with the standard quick change gear box? Thanks, John.


Neil Butterfield <neilbfield@...>
 

Glad to hear you had such success Jack. I told you that you would be pleased with yourself didn’t I? So it was two gears you had to purchase. Did this then work with a quick change gear box?

Neil

 

From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... [mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@...]
Sent: Wednesday, April 19, 2017 5:57 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] threaded er chuck

 

 

I was inspired by Neil’s article and followed his directions to make one using my SB 9.

 

I invested in the two gears needed to turn metric threads and this part of the project went surprisingly well.

 

I chose to buy the metric versions of the collets because they were less expensive than the English versions. 

 

 It was the most complex – and most rewarding – project this novice had ever attempted.

 

Make the chuck. You’ll find that you will use it for the vast majority of your work.

 

 

 

On Apr 19, 2017, at 8:28 PM, kernbigo@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:

 

 


Guenther Paul
 

I always made my chuck backplate and other items and fitted them to the thread of the lathe the item is used on, i think it is a very important 
 
GP



From: "'Neil Butterfield' neilbfield@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]"
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Sent: Wednesday, April 19, 2017 8:25 PM
Subject: RE: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] threaded er chuck

 
I built the ER40 Collet Chuck for my 9” South Bend Lathe with 1-1/2” – 8 spindle thread. Go to my article on my web site:  http://www.nbutterfield.com/Pages/ER40ColletChuck.aspx I built from the feature article in the 2016 Feb/Mar issue of Machinist’s Workshop magazine. I give all my costs including purchasing a complete set of ER40 imported collets. I highly recommend one built their own using the lathe it is to be used on. I now have a fantastic Collet Chuck with full set of collets from 1/8” to 1” with no gaps that holds parts removed and reinserted to within 0.001” repeatability.
 
One of the best tools I ever made for myself. I have all internet info for purchasing collets, the metric nut, and wrenches plus added info on the English ER40 square and hex collet blocks that use the same collets. Most purchase info in my article available on a one sheet info email for those interested. Glad to pass on to you fellows that should also built your own
 
I think it very important to make the Collet Chuck on the lathe on which it will be used to obtain the accuracies I’m bragging about above.
 
Neil Butterfield
 
 
 
 
From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... [mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@...]
Sent: Wednesday, April 19, 2017 4:14 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] threaded er chuck
 
 
You could make it yourself. http://tallgrasstools.com/products?page=2 has both kits and finished ones.
allan
 
On Wed, Apr 19, 2017 at 6:58 PM, johnnyblock1@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:
 
Does any one know where I can find an ER collet chuck that threads onto a 11/2x8 spindle? I remember seeing one a while ago, but I can't remember who was selling them. It was nice because it would hold up to a 3/4 inch collet. Thanks, John.



--
"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge of my hand"



Jack Dinan <jdinan@...>
 

It did. My gear is a 9A.  

Imagine my delight when the chuck threaded onto this huge metric  thread. 

Now that I have the transposing gears, I look for excuses to make my second metric thread. In an earlier life, I was deeply into all things vintage VW (when I could still craw under one of them). The ability to single point metric threads would have been so helpful then.


On Apr 19, 2017, at 9:22 PM, 'Neil Butterfield' neilbfield@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:


Glad to hear you had such success Jack. I told you that you would be pleased with yourself didn’t I? So it was two gears you had to purchase. Did this then work with a quick change gear box?

Neil 

 

From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... [mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@...] 
Sent: Wednesday, April 19, 2017 5:57 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] threaded er chuck

 

  

I was inspired by Neil’s article and followed his directions to make one using my SB 9.

 

I invested in the two gears needed to turn metric threads and this part of the project went surprisingly well.

 

I chose to buy the metric versions of the collets because they were less expensive than the English versions. 

 

 It was the most complex – and most rewarding – project this novice had ever attempted.

 

Make the chuck. You’ll find that you will use it for the vast majority of your work.

 

 

 

On Apr 19, 2017, at 8:28 PM, kernbigo@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:

 

 




Neil Butterfield <neilbfield@...>
 

With the making of one tool for your own use you just doubled your machining capability…now you can cut metric threads. I’m frequently amazed at the number of home shop machinists that can’t or haven’t tried, to cut single point threads. Cutting threads is one of the primary (and phenomenal) features of the engine lathe. Also, as you’ve proven, cutting metric threads is very important in this day and age, and not that difficult.

 

It pleases me jack that you’ve done so well.

 

Neil

 

From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... [mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@...]
Sent: Wednesday, April 19, 2017 6:38 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] threaded er chuck

 

 

It did. My gear is a 9A.  

 

Imagine my delight when the chuck threaded onto this huge metric  thread. 

 

Now that I have the transposing gears, I look for excuses to make my second metric thread. In an earlier life, I was deeply into all things vintage VW (when I could still craw under one of them). The ability to single point metric threads would have been so helpful then.

 

 

On Apr 19, 2017, at 9:22 PM, 'Neil Butterfield' neilbfield@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:

 

 

Glad to hear you had such success Jack. I told you that you would be pleased with yourself didn’t I? So it was two gears you had to purchase. Did this then work with a quick change gear box?

Neil 

 

From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... [mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@...] 
Sent: Wednesday, April 19, 2017 5:57 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] threaded er chuck

 

  

I was inspired by Neil’s article and followed his directions to make one using my SB 9.

 

I invested in the two gears needed to turn metric threads and this part of the project went surprisingly well.

 

I chose to buy the metric versions of the collets because they were less expensive than the English versions. 

 

 It was the most complex – and most rewarding – project this novice had ever attempted.

 

Make the chuck. You’ll find that you will use it for the vast majority of your work.

 

 

 

On Apr 19, 2017, at 8:28 PM, kernbigo@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:

 

 

 

 


Jack Dinan <jdinan@...>
 

Neil: It was your article, so thorough and so well written, that opened the flood gates for me. 
Even with all the info on YouTube, I wouldn’t have attempted this otherwise.

On Apr 19, 2017, at 10:01 PM, 'Neil Butterfield' neilbfield@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:


With the making of one tool for your own use you just doubled your machining capability…now you can cut metric threads. I’m frequently amazed at the number of home shop machinists that can’t or haven’t tried, to cut single point threads. Cutting threads is one of the primary (and phenomenal) features of the engine lathe. Also, as you’ve proven, cutting metric threads is very important in this day and age, and not that difficult. 

 

It pleases me jack that you’ve done so well.

 

Neil

 

From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... [mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@...] 
Sent: Wednesday, April 19, 2017 6:38 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] threaded er chuck

 

  

It did. My gear is a 9A.  

 

Imagine my delight when the chuck threaded onto this huge metric  thread. 

 

Now that I have the transposing gears, I look for excuses to make my second metric thread. In an earlier life, I was deeply into all things vintage VW (when I could still craw under one of them). The ability to single point metric threads would have been so helpful then.

 

 

On Apr 19, 2017, at 9:22 PM, 'Neil Butterfield' neilbfield@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:

 

 

Glad to hear you had such success Jack. I told you that you would be pleased with yourself didn’t I? So it was two gears you had to purchase. Did this then work with a quick change gear box?

Neil 

 

From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... [mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@...] 
Sent: Wednesday, April 19, 2017 5:57 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] threaded er chuck

 

  

I was inspired by Neil’s article and followed his directions to make one using my SB 9.

 

I invested in the two gears needed to turn metric threads and this part of the project went surprisingly well.

 

I chose to buy the metric versions of the collets because they were less expensive than the English versions. 

 

 It was the most complex – and most rewarding – project this novice had ever attempted.

 

Make the chuck. You’ll find that you will use it for the vast majority of your work.

 

 

 

On Apr 19, 2017, at 8:28 PM, kernbigo@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:

 

 

 

 




John Gallo
 

Hi Jack, 
I think I am going the same route as you and Neil and make my own. It would be a big help if you could tell me where you got the transposing gears and how you found out where they go and how to use them. Thanks, John.


Guenther Paul
 

Jack
I bean in the machining trade for over 50 years, don't go by what you see on You Tube most people you see there are wanna be movie stars. There are some dependable and people that actually know what there talking about most are a joke.
 
GP



From: "Jack Dinan jdinan@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]"
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Sent: Wednesday, April 19, 2017 10:38 PM
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] threaded er chuck

 
Neil: It was your article, so thorough and so well written, that opened the flood gates for me. 
Even with all the info on YouTube, I wouldn’t have attempted this otherwise.

On Apr 19, 2017, at 10:01 PM, 'Neil Butterfield' neilbfield@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:


With the making of one tool for your own use you just doubled your machining capability…now you can cut metric threads. I’m frequently amazed at the number of home shop machinists that can’t or haven’t tried, to cut single point threads. Cutting threads is one of the primary (and phenomenal) features of the engine lathe. Also, as you’ve proven, cutting metric threads is very important in this day and age, and not that difficult. 
 
It pleases me jack that you’ve done so well.
 
Neil
 
From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... [mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@...] 
Sent: Wednesday, April 19, 2017 6:38 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] threaded er chuck
 
  
It did. My gear is a 9A.  
 
Imagine my delight when the chuck threaded onto this huge metric  thread. 
 
Now that I have the transposing gears, I look for excuses to make my second metric thread. In an earlier life, I was deeply into all things vintage VW (when I could still craw under one of them). The ability to single point metric threads would have been so helpful then.
 
 
On Apr 19, 2017, at 9:22 PM, 'Neil Butterfield' neilbfield@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:
 
 
Glad to hear you had such success Jack. I told you that you would be pleased with yourself didn’t I? So it was two gears you had to purchase. Did this then work with a quick change gear box?
Neil 
 
From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... [mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@...] 
Sent: Wednesday, April 19, 2017 5:57 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] threaded er chuck
 
  
I was inspired by Neil’s article and followed his directions to make one using my SB 9.
 
I invested in the two gears needed to turn metric threads and this part of the project went surprisingly well.
 
I chose to buy the metric versions of the collets because they were less expensive than the English versions. 
 
 It was the most complex – and most rewarding – project this novice had ever attempted.
 
Make the chuck. You’ll find that you will use it for the vast majority of your work.
 
 
 
On Apr 19, 2017, at 8:28 PM, kernbigo@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:
 
 
 
 





m. allan noah
 

The ER32 nuts have a 1.5mm pitch thread. The easiest way to cut very close metric threads on the 9A or 10K is from this 5 year old post I made at HSM: http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/threads/54967-Cutting-a-2-mm-pitch-on-an-imperial-lathe?p=780780#post780780

A slightly reformatted version of that post, plus more:

You can buy a 54 and an 80 tooth gear from the normal 9B/9C set. If you remove the current 20 and 56 tooth gears from the end of the lathe, and replace with 54 and 80 respectively, you will turn the gearbox at 1.89 times its normal speed. This will make your 8tpi leadscrew act like it is 4.233 tpi. This happens to be 6.00075 mm, which is 6mm with 0.0125% error.

Now, your gearbox can be used to cut 11 metric pitches.

gearbox   mmpt %err
     192     0.25 0.012
     160     0.30 0.012
      96     0.50 0.012
      80     0.60 0.012
      64     0.75 0.013
      48     1.00 0.012
      32     1.50 0.013
      24     2.00 0.012
      16     3.00 0.013
      12     4.00 0.012
       8     6.00 0.013

Now, if you are a real cheapskate, and you don't mind more error, you can make a perfectly serviceable thread using the gears you already have. Put the 20 on the stud and the 40 on the gearbox. That turns the gearbox 1.4 times normal speed, which makes the leadscrew act like 4.4450 mm pitch, or 4.5 with 1.2% error. Now your gearbox will cut 13 metric pitches (with that same error or slightly less)

gearbox   mmpt %err
     144     0.25 1.222
      88     0.40 1.023
      80     0.44 1.222
      72     0.49 1.222
      48     0.74 1.222
      44     0.81 1.023
      40     0.89 1.222
      36     0.99 1.222
      24     1.48 1.222
      18     1.98 1.222
      12     2.96 1.222
       9     3.95 1.222
       8     4.44 1.222

Hope this helps.

allan


John Gallo
 

Thanks for the info Allan. I'm confident that I can do this now. It's some thing I have never thought about before. John