How one thing leads to another (Supposed to be funny)


Jim B. <btdtrf@...>
 

Last Saturday the forecast was for rain, rain and more rain.

It was a good time to patch the dead spots in the grass.

The plan was, remove the dead sod, break up the caked soil, spread quick grow seed, mix the seed in, wait for rain.

Looking around for implements of destruction the one that worked the best was a kids toy, a short iron rake.

I had repaired this before, when the handle broke. I had grafted on a fiberglass handle.  Trouble was the graft used the original plastic insert and would not hold.

 

Sunday the rain came. I decided a quick rainy day project would be to fix the rake.

 

I had almost 3 feet of 6061 by 7/8 aluminum. I cut off 9”. This required moving the MG-TD over a foot to clear the bar in the horizontal saw.

Then I turned 6” to 0.720 on the Heavy 10. It was set up for collets, (most common in my shop). That’s ok I have both 7/8 and 23/32 collets.

Now I needed to make an axial slot. 3/16 high by about 9/16 wide by about 2-1/2” deep.

I looked in my endmill drawer for a long 3/16 endmill. All I could find was a short ball end endmill.

Ok, I thought, I will chuck the piece up in the 3 jaw. Offset it 3/16 with a shim in one jaw, drill a hole in the offset position, rotate it 180 drill another hole, put it back on-center drill a hole. They should break just through. The do some chopping with a chisel and it should fit.

I remove the collet holders and mount the 3-jaw.

Three broken 3/16 drills later. I quit for the day.  I had a 1-3/4 deep slot with a bridge in the middle and (unknown to me) a piece of broken drill bit still in the middle.

 

So this AM we walk around the park as usual. Mother’s day is Sunday. We go to the Girls store to look. (No it’s not that easy. Nothing there will do!).  It’s now about 2:30 PM. I put together and order for McMasters. It includes 3 3/16 drill bits.

 

I go down to the workshop and look through the endmill drawer again.  OOPS over that is a 3/16 by 3” long 4 flute center cutting endmill.

The Burke Millis set up with the vertical head. I need to change it over to a horizontal. It has an index head on the table. I need a vise.

 

Ok now it set up, but I need to rotate the vise 90 degrees.

I tried milling a slot. I get about 1-1/2 “ deep. Do I dare go 2-1/2”. Perhaps I should plunge the rest of the distance, move 0.050, plunge, etc.

Ok for the first two plunges, then I hear a tell tail, tick, tick, tick.

I take the part out of the mill with a large magnifying lens and a bright light I can just see the broken drill bit.  But by now my 4 flute endmill is a 3 flute end mill. (Add one of those to the McMasters order.)

I start banging with a plastic hammer and trying to grab the broken drill with a ling skinny pair of needle nose pliers.

It looks like its budging, yes it is. It’s out.

Back to the mil. Align by eye. Finish the slot.

 

Ok the tong of the rake head has two holes. 1/8 diameter spaced 1-9/16. The plan is to drill and tap the aluminum bar 8-32, and  modify a screw to fit into the holes.

Drilling the bar goes uneventful. I hold the rod in the 3 jaw and use my cross drilling fixture to drill and tap the holes. The way mounted indicator sets up the distance between holes.

I look at my 8-32 screw supply and the only ones I have are 1-1/4” long.

Well they need to be reduced 9/16 in length and about. 3/8 of the remaining turned down to 0.120 or so.

 

I have a bunch of “Screw holders”, ½” hex stock, threaded through and slotted, so when you clamp them in a 3 Jaw they squeeze the screw. BUT I don’t see 8-32. ( Why didn’t I pick 10_32, I have several of those.)

So I quickly make an 8-32 screw holder. I cut the screws to length and turn a stub.  

Finally its down.

It only cost $10 for drills, 18 for the endmill and two days of my time.

 

 

 

Jim B.

 


Virus-free. www.avast.com


ww_big_al
 

Jim, I bet a roll of duct tape would have work a lot faster. LOL

Been there. Different story but same tune.

Al

 

From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... [mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@...]
Sent: Monday, May 02, 2016 8:22 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] How one thing leads to another (Supposed to be funny)

 

 

Last Saturday the forecast was for rain, rain and more rain.

It was a good time to patch the dead spots in the grass.

The plan was, remove the dead sod, break up the caked soil, spread quick grow seed, mix the seed in, wait for rain.

Looking around for implements of destruction the one that worked the best was a kids toy, a short iron rake.

I had repaired this before, when the handle broke. I had grafted on a fiberglass handle.  Trouble was the graft used the original plastic insert and would not hold.

 

Sunday the rain came. I decided a quick rainy day project would be to fix the rake.

 

I had almost 3 feet of 6061 by 7/8 aluminum. I cut off 9”. This required moving the MG-TD over a foot to clear the bar in the horizontal saw.

Then I turned 6” to 0.720 on the Heavy 10. It was set up for collets, (most common in my shop). That’s ok I have both 7/8 and 23/32 collets.

Now I needed to make an axial slot. 3/16 high by about 9/16 wide by about 2-1/2” deep.

I looked in my endmill drawer for a long 3/16 endmill. All I could find was a short ball end endmill.

Ok, I thought, I will chuck the piece up in the 3 jaw. Offset it 3/16 with a shim in one jaw, drill a hole in the offset position, rotate it 180 drill another hole, put it back on-center drill a hole. They should break just through. The do some chopping with a chisel and it should fit.

I remove the collet holders and mount the 3-jaw.

Three broken 3/16 drills later. I quit for the day.  I had a 1-3/4 deep slot with a bridge in the middle and (unknown to me) a piece of broken drill bit still in the middle.

 

So this AM we walk around the park as usual. Mother’s day is Sunday. We go to the Girls store to look. (No it’s not that easy. Nothing there will do!).  It’s now about 2:30 PM. I put together and order for McMasters. It includes 3 3/16 drill bits.

 

I go down to the workshop and look through the endmill drawer again.  OOPS over that is a 3/16 by 3” long 4 flute center cutting endmill.

The Burke Millis set up with the vertical head. I need to change it over to a horizontal. It has an index head on the table. I need a vise.

 

Ok now it set up, but I need to rotate the vise 90 degrees.

I tried milling a slot. I get about 1-1/2 “ deep. Do I dare go 2-1/2”. Perhaps I should plunge the rest of the distance, move 0.050, plunge, etc.

Ok for the first two plunges, then I hear a tell tail, tick, tick, tick.

I take the part out of the mill with a large magnifying lens and a bright light I can just see the broken drill bit.  But by now my 4 flute endmill is a 3 flute end mill. (Add one of those to the McMasters order.)

I start banging with a plastic hammer and trying to grab the broken drill with a ling skinny pair of needle nose pliers.

It looks like its budging, yes it is. It’s out.

Back to the mil. Align by eye. Finish the slot.

 

Ok the tong of the rake head has two holes. 1/8 diameter spaced 1-9/16. The plan is to drill and tap the aluminum bar 8-32, and  modify a screw to fit into the holes.

Drilling the bar goes uneventful. I hold the rod in the 3 jaw and use my cross drilling fixture to drill and tap the holes. The way mounted indicator sets up the distance between holes.

I look at my 8-32 screw supply and the only ones I have are 1-1/4” long.

Well they need to be reduced 9/16 in length and about. 3/8 of the remaining turned down to 0.120 or so.

 

I have a bunch of “Screw holders”, ½” hex stock, threaded through and slotted, so when you clamp them in a 3 Jaw they squeeze the screw. BUT I don’t see 8-32. ( Why didn’t I pick 10_32, I have several of those.)

So I quickly make an 8-32 screw holder. I cut the screws to length and turn a stub.  

Finally its down.

It only cost $10 for drills, 18 for the endmill and two days of my time.

 

 

 

Jim B.

 

 

Virus-free. www.avast.com


Phillip Rankin
 

I feel better knowing that I am not the only one that has the ability to turn mole hills into mountains. :-)

On May 2, 2016 7:21 PM, "'Jim B.' btdtrf@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:
 

Last Saturday the forecast was for rain, rain and more rain.

It was a good time to patch the dead spots in the grass.

The plan was, remove the dead sod, break up the caked soil, spread quick grow seed, mix the seed in, wait for rain.

Looking around for implements of destruction the one that worked the best was a kids toy, a short iron rake.

I had repaired this before, when the handle broke. I had grafted on a fiberglass handle.  Trouble was the graft used the original plastic insert and would not hold.

 

Sunday the rain came. I decided a quick rainy day project would be to fix the rake.

 

I had almost 3 feet of 6061 by 7/8 aluminum. I cut off 9”. This required moving the MG-TD over a foot to clear the bar in the horizontal saw.

Then I turned 6” to 0.720 on the Heavy 10. It was set up for collets, (most common in my shop). That’s ok I have both 7/8 and 23/32 collets.

Now I needed to make an axial slot. 3/16 high by about 9/16 wide by about 2-1/2” deep.

I looked in my endmill drawer for a long 3/16 endmill. All I could find was a short ball end endmill.

Ok, I thought, I will chuck the piece up in the 3 jaw. Offset it 3/16 with a shim in one jaw, drill a hole in the offset position, rotate it 180 drill another hole, put it back on-center drill a hole. They should break just through. The do some chopping with a chisel and it should fit.

I remove the collet holders and mount the 3-jaw.

Three broken 3/16 drills later. I quit for the day.  I had a 1-3/4 deep slot with a bridge in the middle and (unknown to me) a piece of broken drill bit still in the middle.

 

So this AM we walk around the park as usual. Mother’s day is Sunday. We go to the Girls store to look. (No it’s not that easy. Nothing there will do!).  It’s now about 2:30 PM. I put together and order for McMasters. It includes 3 3/16 drill bits.

 

I go down to the workshop and look through the endmill drawer again.  OOPS over that is a 3/16 by 3” long 4 flute center cutting endmill.

The Burke Millis set up with the vertical head. I need to change it over to a horizontal. It has an index head on the table. I need a vise.

 

Ok now it set up, but I need to rotate the vise 90 degrees.

I tried milling a slot. I get about 1-1/2 “ deep. Do I dare go 2-1/2”. Perhaps I should plunge the rest of the distance, move 0.050, plunge, etc.

Ok for the first two plunges, then I hear a tell tail, tick, tick, tick.

I take the part out of the mill with a large magnifying lens and a bright light I can just see the broken drill bit.  But by now my 4 flute endmill is a 3 flute end mill. (Add one of those to the McMasters order.)

I start banging with a plastic hammer and trying to grab the broken drill with a ling skinny pair of needle nose pliers.

It looks like its budging, yes it is. It’s out.

Back to the mil. Align by eye. Finish the slot.

 

Ok the tong of the rake head has two holes. 1/8 diameter spaced 1-9/16. The plan is to drill and tap the aluminum bar 8-32, and  modify a screw to fit into the holes.

Drilling the bar goes uneventful. I hold the rod in the 3 jaw and use my cross drilling fixture to drill and tap the holes. The way mounted indicator sets up the distance between holes.

I look at my 8-32 screw supply and the only ones I have are 1-1/4” long.

Well they need to be reduced 9/16 in length and about. 3/8 of the remaining turned down to 0.120 or so.

 

I have a bunch of “Screw holders”, ½” hex stock, threaded through and slotted, so when you clamp them in a 3 Jaw they squeeze the screw. BUT I don’t see 8-32. ( Why didn’t I pick 10_32, I have several of those.)

So I quickly make an 8-32 screw holder. I cut the screws to length and turn a stub.  

Finally its down.

It only cost $10 for drills, 18 for the endmill and two days of my time.

 

 

 

Jim B.

 


Virus-free. www.avast.com


RJ White
 

That was funny , thanks for the laugh.


RJ  White
E mail soilrelocator@yahoo.com
619-405-1699

--------------------------------------------

On Mon, 5/2/16, Phillip Rankin phillip.rankin1964@gmail.com [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] How one thing leads to another (Supposed to be funny)
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@yahoogroups.com
Date: Monday, May 2, 2016, 7:36 PM


 









I feel better knowing that I am
not the only one that has the ability to turn mole hills
into mountains. :-)
On May 2, 2016 7:21
PM, "'Jim B.' btdtrf@verizon.net
[SOUTHBENDLATHE]" <SOUTHBENDLATHE@yahoogroups.com>
wrote:















 









Last Saturday the forecast was for
rain, rain and more rain. It was a good time to patch the
dead spots in the grass.The plan was, remove the dead sod,
break up the caked soil, spread quick grow seed, mix the
seed in, wait for rain. Looking around for implements of
destruction the one that worked the best was a kids toy, a
short iron rake. I had repaired this before, when
the handle broke. I had grafted on a fiberglass handle. 
Trouble was the graft used the original plastic insert and
would not hold.  Sunday the rain came. I decided a
quick rainy day project would be to fix the rake.
 I had almost 3 feet of 6061 by 7/8
aluminum. I cut off 9”. This required moving the MG-TD
over a foot to clear the bar in the horizontal saw.
Then I turned 6” to 0.720 on the
Heavy 10. It was set up for collets, (most common in my
shop). That’s ok I have both 7/8 and 23/32 collets.
Now I needed to make an axial
slot. 3/16 high by about 9/16 wide by about 2-1/2” deep.
I looked in my endmill drawer for
a long 3/16 endmill. All I could find was a short ball end
endmill. Ok, I thought, I will chuck the
piece up in the 3 jaw. Offset it 3/16 with a shim in one
jaw, drill a hole in the offset position, rotate it 180
drill another hole, put it back on-center drill a hole. They
should break just through. The do some chopping with a
chisel and it should fit. I remove the collet holders and
mount the 3-jaw. Three broken 3/16 drills later. I
quit for the day.  I had a 1-3/4 deep slot with a bridge in
the middle and (unknown to me) a piece of broken drill bit
still in the middle.  So this AM we walk around the park
as usual. Mother’s day is Sunday. We go to the Girls store
to look. (No it’s not that easy. Nothing there will
do!).  It’s now about 2:30 PM. I put together and order
for McMasters. It includes 3 3/16 drill bits.
 I go down to the workshop and look
through the endmill drawer again.  OOPS over that is a 3/16
by 3” long 4 flute center cutting endmill.
The Burke Millis set up with the
vertical head. I need to change it over to a horizontal. It
has an index head on the table. I need a vise.
 Ok now it set up, but I need to
rotate the vise 90 degrees. I tried milling a slot. I get
about 1-1/2 “ deep. Do I dare go 2-1/2”. Perhaps I
should plunge the rest of the distance, move 0.050, plunge,
etc. Ok for the first two plunges, then
I hear a tell tail, tick, tick, tick.
I take the part out of the mill
with a large magnifying lens and a bright light I can just
see the broken drill bit.  But by now my 4 flute endmill is
a 3 flute end mill. (Add one of those to the McMasters
order.)I start banging with a plastic
hammer and trying to grab the broken drill with a ling
skinny pair of needle nose pliers.
It looks like its budging, yes it
is. It’s out. Back to the mil. Align by eye.
Finish the slot.  Ok the tong of the rake head has
two holes. 1/8 diameter spaced 1-9/16. The plan is to drill
and tap the aluminum bar 8-32, and  modify a screw to fit
into the holes. Drilling the bar goes uneventful.
I hold the rod in the 3 jaw and use my cross drilling
fixture to drill and tap the holes. The way mounted
indicator sets up the distance between holes.
I look at my 8-32 screw supply and
the only ones I have are 1-1/4” long.
Well they need to be reduced 9/16
in length and about. 3/8 of the remaining turned down to
0.120 or so.  I have a bunch of “Screw
holders”, ½” hex stock, threaded through and slotted,
so when you clamp them in a 3 Jaw they squeeze the screw.
BUT I don’t see 8-32. ( Why didn’t I pick 10_32, I have
several of those.) So I quickly make an 8-32 screw
holder. I cut the screws to length and turn a stub.
 Finally its down.
It only cost $10 for drills, 18
for the endmill and two days of my time.
   Jim B.  

Virus-free. www.avast.com































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Ray De Jong
 

I know this experience first hand, happy to see that others do as well.
Good job Jim ;-))



From: "'Jim B.' btdtrf@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]"
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Sent: Monday, May 2, 2016 5:21 PM
Subject: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] How one thing leads to another (Supposed to be funny)

 
Last Saturday the forecast was for rain, rain and more rain.
It was a good time to patch the dead spots in the grass.
The plan was, remove the dead sod, break up the caked soil, spread quick grow seed, mix the seed in, wait for rain.
Looking around for implements of destruction the one that worked the best was a kids toy, a short iron rake.
I had repaired this before, when the handle broke. I had grafted on a fiberglass handle.  Trouble was the graft used the original plastic insert and would not hold.
 
Sunday the rain came. I decided a quick rainy day project would be to fix the rake.
 
I had almost 3 feet of 6061 by 7/8 aluminum. I cut off 9”. This required moving the MG-TD over a foot to clear the bar in the horizontal saw.
Then I turned 6” to 0.720 on the Heavy 10. It was set up for collets, (most common in my shop). That’s ok I have both 7/8 and 23/32 collets.
Now I needed to make an axial slot. 3/16 high by about 9/16 wide by about 2-1/2” deep.
I looked in my endmill drawer for a long 3/16 endmill. All I could find was a short ball end endmill.
Ok, I thought, I will chuck the piece up in the 3 jaw. Offset it 3/16 with a shim in one jaw, drill a hole in the offset position, rotate it 180 drill another hole, put it back on-center drill a hole. They should break just through. The do some chopping with a chisel and it should fit.
I remove the collet holders and mount the 3-jaw.
Three broken 3/16 drills later. I quit for the day.  I had a 1-3/4 deep slot with a bridge in the middle and (unknown to me) a piece of broken drill bit still in the middle.
 
So this AM we walk around the park as usual. Mother’s day is Sunday. We go to the Girls store to look. (No it’s not that easy. Nothing there will do!).  It’s now about 2:30 PM. I put together and order for McMasters. It includes 3 3/16 drill bits.
 
I go down to the workshop and look through the endmill drawer again.  OOPS over that is a 3/16 by 3” long 4 flute center cutting endmill.
The Burke Millis set up with the vertical head. I need to change it over to a horizontal. It has an index head on the table. I need a vise.
 
Ok now it set up, but I need to rotate the vise 90 degrees.
I tried milling a slot. I get about 1-1/2 “ deep. Do I dare go 2-1/2”. Perhaps I should plunge the rest of the distance, move 0.050, plunge, etc.
Ok for the first two plunges, then I hear a tell tail, tick, tick, tick.
I take the part out of the mill with a large magnifying lens and a bright light I can just see the broken drill bit.  But by now my 4 flute endmill is a 3 flute end mill. (Add one of those to the McMasters order.)
I start banging with a plastic hammer and trying to grab the broken drill with a ling skinny pair of needle nose pliers.
It looks like its budging, yes it is. It’s out.
Back to the mil. Align by eye. Finish the slot.
 
Ok the tong of the rake head has two holes. 1/8 diameter spaced 1-9/16. The plan is to drill and tap the aluminum bar 8-32, and  modify a screw to fit into the holes.
Drilling the bar goes uneventful. I hold the rod in the 3 jaw and use my cross drilling fixture to drill and tap the holes. The way mounted indicator sets up the distance between holes.
I look at my 8-32 screw supply and the only ones I have are 1-1/4” long.
Well they need to be reduced 9/16 in length and about. 3/8 of the remaining turned down to 0.120 or so.
 
I have a bunch of “Screw holders”, ½” hex stock, threaded through and slotted, so when you clamp them in a 3 Jaw they squeeze the screw. BUT I don’t see 8-32. ( Why didn’t I pick 10_32, I have several of those.)
So I quickly make an 8-32 screw holder. I cut the screws to length and turn a stub.  
Finally its down.
It only cost $10 for drills, 18 for the endmill and two days of my time.
 
 
 
Jim B.
 

Virus-free. www.avast.com



roefa.excite
 

Exactly why I have quit worrying about dead spots in the grass !
Fun story, Jim... Thanks.
:)
Roger Memphis
 

-----Original Message-----
From: "'Jim B.' btdtrf@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" [SOUTHBENDLATHE@...]
Date: 05/02/2016 07:21 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] How one thing leads to another (Supposed to be funny)

 

 

Last Saturday the forecast was for rain, rain and more rain.

It was a good time to patch the dead spots in the grass.

The plan was, remove the dead sod, break up the caked soil, spread quick grow seed, mix the seed in, wait for rain.

Looking around for implements of destruction the one that worked the best was a kids toy, a short iron rake.

I had repaired this before, when the handle broke. I had grafted on a fiberglass handle.  Trouble was the graft used the original plastic insert and would not hold.

 

Sunday the rain came. I decided a quick rainy day project would be to fix the rake.

 

I had almost 3 feet of 6061 by 7/8 aluminum. I cut off 9”. This required moving the MG-TD over a foot to clear the bar in the horizontal saw.

Then I turned 6” to 0.720 on the Heavy 10. It was set up for collets, (most common in my shop). That’s ok I have both 7/8 and 23/32 collets.

Now I needed to make an axial slot. 3/16 high by about 9/16 wide by about 2-1/2” deep.

I looked in my endmill drawer for a long 3/16 endmill. All I could find was a short ball end endmill.

Ok, I thought, I will chuck the piece up in the 3 jaw. Offset it 3/16 with a shim in one jaw, drill a hole in the offset position, rotate it 180 drill another hole, put it back on-center drill a hole. They should break just through. The do some chopping with a chisel and it should fit.

I remove the collet holders and mount the 3-jaw.

Three broken 3/16 drills later. I quit for the day.  I had a 1-3/4 deep slot with a bridge in the middle and (unknown to me) a piece of broken drill bit still in the middle.

 

So this AM we walk around the park as usual. Mother’s day is Sunday. We go to the Girls store to look. (No it’s not that easy. Nothing there will do!).  It’s now about 2:30 PM. I put together and order for McMasters. It includes 3 3/16 drill bits.

 

I go down to the workshop and look through the endmill drawer again.  OOPS over that is a 3/16 by 3” long 4 flute center cutting endmill.

The Burke Millis set up with the vertical head. I need to change it over to a horizontal. It has an index head on the table. I need a vise.

 

Ok now it set up, but I need to rotate the vise 90 degrees.

I tried milling a slot. I get about 1-1/2 “ deep. Do I dare go 2-1/2”. Perhaps I should plunge the rest of the distance, move 0.050, plunge, etc.

Ok for the first two plunges, then I hear a tell tail, tick, tick, tick.

I take the part out of the mill with a large magnifying lens and a bright light I can just see the broken drill bit.  But by now my 4 flute endmill is a 3 flute end mill. (Add one of those to the McMasters order.)

I start banging with a plastic hammer and trying to grab the broken drill with a ling skinny pair of needle nose pliers.

It looks like its budging, yes it is. It’s out.

Back to the mil. Align by eye. Finish the slot.

 

Ok the tong of the rake head has two holes. 1/8 diameter spaced 1-9/16. The plan is to drill and tap the aluminum bar 8-32, and  modify a screw to fit into the holes.

Drilling the bar goes uneventful. I hold the rod in the 3 jaw and use my cross drilling fixture to drill and tap the holes. The way mounted indicator sets up the distance between holes.

I look at my 8-32 screw supply and the only ones I have are 1-1/4” long.

Well they need to be reduced 9/16 in length and about. 3/8 of the remaining turned down to 0.120 or so.

 

I have a bunch of “Screw holders”, ½” hex stock, threaded through and slotted, so when you clamp them in a 3 Jaw they squeeze the screw. BUT I don’t see 8-32. ( Why didn’t I pick 10_32, I have several of those.)

So I quickly make an 8-32 screw holder. I cut the screws to length and turn a stub.  

Finally its down.

It only cost $10 for drills, 18 for the endmill and two days of my time.

 

 

 

Jim B.

 


Virus-free. www.avast.com

 

 


eddie.draper@btinternet.com
 

I fixed a rake for the wife with a broom handle, a wood chisel and a woodscrew.  Broom handle from a local cheapo shop.  Project time 10 mins at most.  Many domestic currency units gained.  (No, I didn't use the chisel for tightening the screw.  Alright, add a screwdriver to the above list.)

She uses the rake for pulling eggs from the nether reaches of the hen house so she can pick them up.

It's called appropriate technology.  I shudder to think how long it would take Jim to re-shaft an axe!

Eddie



From: "'R' roefa@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]"
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Sent: Tuesday, 3 May 2016, 6:11
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] How one thing leads to another (Supposed to be funny)

 
Exactly why I have quit worrying about dead spots in the grass !
Fun story, Jim... Thanks.
:)
Roger Memphis
 
-----Original Message-----
From: "'Jim B.' btdtrf@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" [SOUTHBENDLATHE@...]
Date: 05/02/2016 07:21 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] How one thing leads to another (Supposed to be funny)

 
 
Last Saturday the forecast was for rain, rain and more rain.
It was a good time to patch the dead spots in the grass.
The plan was, remove the dead sod, break up the caked soil, spread quick grow seed, mix the seed in, wait for rain.
Looking around for implements of destruction the one that worked the best was a kids toy, a short iron rake.
I had repaired this before, when the handle broke. I had grafted on a fiberglass handle.  Trouble was the graft used the original plastic insert and would not hold.
 
Sunday the rain came. I decided a quick rainy day project would be to fix the rake.
 
I had almost 3 feet of 6061 by 7/8 aluminum. I cut off 9”. This required moving the MG-TD over a foot to clear the bar in the horizontal saw.
Then I turned 6” to 0.720 on the Heavy 10. It was set up for collets, (most common in my shop). That’s ok I have both 7/8 and 23/32 collets.
Now I needed to make an axial slot. 3/16 high by about 9/16 wide by about 2-1/2” deep.
I looked in my endmill drawer for a long 3/16 endmill. All I could find was a short ball end endmill.
Ok, I thought, I will chuck the piece up in the 3 jaw. Offset it 3/16 with a shim in one jaw, drill a hole in the offset position, rotate it 180 drill another hole, put it back on-center drill a hole. They should break just through. The do some chopping with a chisel and it should fit.
I remove the collet holders and mount the 3-jaw.
Three broken 3/16 drills later. I quit for the day.  I had a 1-3/4 deep slot with a bridge in the middle and (unknown to me) a piece of broken drill bit still in the middle.
 
So this AM we walk around the park as usual. Mother’s day is Sunday. We go to the Girls store to look. (No it’s not that easy. Nothing there will do!).  It’s now about 2:30 PM. I put together and order for McMasters. It includes 3 3/16 drill bits.
 
I go down to the workshop and look through the endmill drawer again.  OOPS over that is a 3/16 by 3” long 4 flute center cutting endmill.
The Burke Millis set up with the vertical head. I need to change it over to a horizontal. It has an index head on the table. I need a vise.
 
Ok now it set up, but I need to rotate the vise 90 degrees.
I tried milling a slot. I get about 1-1/2 “ deep. Do I dare go 2-1/2”. Perhaps I should plunge the rest of the distance, move 0.050, plunge, etc.
Ok for the first two plunges, then I hear a tell tail, tick, tick, tick.
I take the part out of the mill with a large magnifying lens and a bright light I can just see the broken drill bit.  But by now my 4 flute endmill is a 3 flute end mill. (Add one of those to the McMasters order.)
I start banging with a plastic hammer and trying to grab the broken drill with a ling skinny pair of needle nose pliers.
It looks like its budging, yes it is. It’s out.
Back to the mil. Align by eye. Finish the slot.
 
Ok the tong of the rake head has two holes. 1/8 diameter spaced 1-9/16. The plan is to drill and tap the aluminum bar 8-32, and  modify a screw to fit into the holes.
Drilling the bar goes uneventful. I hold the rod in the 3 jaw and use my cross drilling fixture to drill and tap the holes. The way mounted indicator sets up the distance between holes.
I look at my 8-32 screw supply and the only ones I have are 1-1/4” long.
Well they need to be reduced 9/16 in length and about. 3/8 of the remaining turned down to 0.120 or so.
 
I have a bunch of “Screw holders”, ½” hex stock, threaded through and slotted, so when you clamp them in a 3 Jaw they squeeze the screw. BUT I don’t see 8-32. ( Why didn’t I pick 10_32, I have several of those.)
So I quickly make an 8-32 screw holder. I cut the screws to length and turn a stub.  
Finally its down.
It only cost $10 for drills, 18 for the endmill and two days of my time.
 
 
 
Jim B.
 

Virus-free. www.avast.com
 
 



Dorn Peterson
 

My lawn care philosophy is "Survival (or not) of the fittest and forget the fertilizer."  This, after many years, has led to a lot of clover and dandelions mixed in with the grass.  The clover is a nice addition.  As for the dandelions, when some busybody complains about them I say that I try to encourage them because they help out the bees by providing an early spring food source.  That generally changes their view of me from lazy bum (correct) to ecological do gooder (not even close.)


Mark Hofer
 

Eddie,
You must understand though, this is why we have these expensive machines with even more expensive tooling so that we can feel justified in fixing a $15 rake!  I applaud Jim's efforts (and enjoyed the story as well for the 'company' it provided).   For myself I found justification for purchase and possession of my SB 9A by sharpening my wife's crayons for her school class - high precision crayons being a fundamental necessity of course...... :)  Got lots of slack to cover over my many other transgressions for that one!
M





On May 3, 2016, at 4:04 AM, Edward Draper eddie.draper@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:


I fixed a rake for the wife with a broom handle, a wood chisel and a woodscrew.  Broom handle from a local cheapo shop.  Project time 10 mins at most.  Many domestic currency units gained.  (No, I didn't use the chisel for tightening the screw.  Alright, add a screwdriver to the above list.)

She uses the rake for pulling eggs from the nether reaches of the hen house so she can pick them up.

It's called appropriate technology.  I shudder to think how long it would take Jim to re-shaft an axe!

Eddie


-----Original Message-----
From: "'Jim B.' btdtrf@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" [SOUTHBENDLATHE@...]
Date: 05/02/2016 07:21 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] How one thing leads to another (Supposed to be funny)

 
 
Last Saturday the forecast was for rain, rain and more rain. 
It was a good time to patch the dead spots in the grass.
The plan was, remove the dead sod, break up the caked soil, spread quick grow seed, mix the seed in, wait for rain. 
Looking around for implements of destruction the one that worked the best was a kids toy, a short iron rake. 
I had repaired this before, when the handle broke. I had grafted on a fiberglass handle.  Trouble was the graft used the original plastic insert and would not hold. 
 
Sunday the rain came. I decided a quick rainy day project would be to fix the rake. 
 
I had almost 3 feet of 6061 by 7/8 aluminum. I cut off 9”. This required moving the MG-TD over a foot to clear the bar in the horizontal saw. 
Then I turned 6” to 0.720 on the Heavy 10. It was set up for collets, (most common in my shop). That’s ok I have both 7/8 and 23/32 collets. 
Now I needed to make an axial slot. 3/16 high by about 9/16 wide by about 2-1/2” deep. 
I looked in my endmill drawer for a long 3/16 endmill. All I could find was a short ball end endmill. 
Ok, I thought, I will chuck the piece up in the 3 jaw. Offset it 3/16 with a shim in one jaw, drill a hole in the offset position, rotate it 180 drill another hole, put it back on-center drill a hole. They should break just through. The do some chopping with a chisel and it should fit. 
I remove the collet holders and mount the 3-jaw. 
Three broken 3/16 drills later. I quit for the day.  I had a 1-3/4 deep slot with a bridge in the middle and (unknown to me) a piece of broken drill bit still in the middle. 
 
So this AM we walk around the park as usual. Mother’s day is Sunday. We go to the Girls store to look. (No it’s not that easy. Nothing there will do!).  It’s now about 2:30 PM. I put together and order for McMasters. It includes 3 3/16 drill bits. 
 
I go down to the workshop and look through the endmill drawer again.  OOPS over that is a 3/16 by 3” long 4 flute center cutting endmill. 
The Burke Millis set up with the vertical head. I need to change it over to a horizontal. It has an index head on the table. I need a vise. 
 
Ok now it set up, but I need to rotate the vise 90 degrees. 
I tried milling a slot. I get about 1-1/2 “ deep. Do I dare go 2-1/2”. Perhaps I should plunge the rest of the distance, move 0.050, plunge, etc. 
Ok for the first two plunges, then I hear a tell tail, tick, tick, tick. 
I take the part out of the mill with a large magnifying lens and a bright light I can just see the broken drill bit.  But by now my 4 flute endmill is a 3 flute end mill. (Add one of those to the McMasters order.)
I start banging with a plastic hammer and trying to grab the broken drill with a ling skinny pair of needle nose pliers. 
It looks like its budging, yes it is. It’s out. 
Back to the mil. Align by eye. Finish the slot. 
 
Ok the tong of the rake head has two holes. 1/8 diameter spaced 1-9/16. The plan is to drill and tap the aluminum bar 8-32, and  modify a screw to fit into the holes. 
Drilling the bar goes uneventful. I hold the rod in the 3 jaw and use my cross drilling fixture to drill and tap the holes. The way mounted indicator sets up the distance between holes. 
I look at my 8-32 screw supply and the only ones I have are 1-1/4” long. 
Well they need to be reduced 9/16 in length and about. 3/8 of the remaining turned down to 0.120 or so. 
 
I have a bunch of “Screw holders”, ½” hex stock, threaded through and slotted, so when you clamp them in a 3 Jaw they squeeze the screw. BUT I don’t see 8-32. ( Why didn’t I pick 10_32, I have several of those.) 
So I quickly make an 8-32 screw holder. I cut the screws to length and turn a stub.  
Finally its down. 
It only cost $10 for drills, 18 for the endmill and two days of my time. 
 
 
 


Nick Jonkman
 

I do the same with my lawn. I used to keep a few hives and looked forward to the dandelions so I wouldn't have to feed the bees. Actually that is the first food they will have for their larva and very important for a good brood.
Nick

On 16-05-03 5:26 AM, petersdw@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] wrote:
 

My lawn care philosophy is "Survival (or not) of the fittest and forget the fertilizer."  This, after many years, has led to a lot of clover and dandelions mixed in with the grass.  The clover is a nice addition.  As for the dandelions, when some busybody complains about them I say that I try to encourage them because they help out the bees by providing an early spring food source.  That generally changes their view of me from lazy bum (correct) to ecological do gooder (not even close.)



Flash Gordon
 

M,

At what angle do you cut the crayons?

Anon

At 08:15 AM 5/3/2016, you wrote:


Eddie,
You must understand though, this is why we have these expensive machines with even more expensive tooling so that we can feel justified in fixing a $15 rake! I applaud Jim's efforts (and enjoyed the story as well for the 'company' it provided). For myself I found justification for purchase and possession of my SB 9A by sharpening my wife's crayons for her school class - high precision crayons being a fundamental necessity of course...... :) Got lots of slack to cover over my many other transgressions for that one!
M


Mark Hofer
 

Dear Anon,
Depends on the color - one needs to adjust to get the chip formation just right.......    :)
M


On May 3, 2016, at 9:05 AM, Ed S eschwerkolt@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:

M,

At what angle do you cut the crayons?

Anon

At 08:15 AM 5/3/2016, you wrote:

>Eddie,
>You must understand though, this is why we have these expensive 
>machines with even more expensive tooling so that we can feel 
>justified in fixing a $15 rake! I applaud Jim's efforts (and 
>enjoyed the story as well for the 'company' it provided). For 
>myself I found justification for purchase and possession of my SB 9A 
>by sharpening my wife's crayons for her school class - high 
>precision crayons being a fundamental necessity of course...... 
>:) Got lots of slack to cover over my many other transgressions for that one!
>M


Posted by: Ed S <eschwerkolt@...> 
Reply via web postReply to sender Reply to group Start a New TopicMessages in this topic (11)

Check out the automatic photo album with  1 photo(s) from this topic. 
Crayon sharpening.jpg




eddie.draper@btinternet.com
 

Optimum angle probably depends on the colour! 

From the photo, you do not appear to have engaged in adequate swarf segregation.  It will have to be incinerated rather than recycled.  Slapped wrist.

Eddie



From: "Ed S eschwerkolt@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]"
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Sent: Tuesday, 3 May 2016, 14:05
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] How one thing leads to another (Supposed to be funny)

 
M,

At what angle do you cut the crayons?

Anon

At 08:15 AM 5/3/2016, you wrote:

>Eddie,
>You must understand though, this is why we have these expensive
>machines with even more expensive tooling so that we can feel
>justified in fixing a $15 rake! I applaud Jim's efforts (and
>enjoyed the story as well for the 'company' it provided). For
>myself I found justification for purchase and possession of my SB 9A
>by sharpening my wife's crayons for her school class - high
>precision crayons being a fundamental necessity of course......
>:) Got lots of slack to cover over my many other transgressions for that one!
>M




Nelson Collar
 

Jim
Very nice and more than needed on a small tool like that, but anything over designed should never fail. Looks real nice. The kids will love it and yourself when needing a small tool.
Nice job
Nelson Collar



From: "'Jim B.' btdtrf@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]"
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Sent: Monday, May 2, 2016 8:21 PM
Subject: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] How one thing leads to another (Supposed to be funny)

 
Last Saturday the forecast was for rain, rain and more rain.
It was a good time to patch the dead spots in the grass.
The plan was, remove the dead sod, break up the caked soil, spread quick grow seed, mix the seed in, wait for rain.
Looking around for implements of destruction the one that worked the best was a kids toy, a short iron rake.
I had repaired this before, when the handle broke. I had grafted on a fiberglass handle.  Trouble was the graft used the original plastic insert and would not hold.
 
Sunday the rain came. I decided a quick rainy day project would be to fix the rake.
 
I had almost 3 feet of 6061 by 7/8 aluminum. I cut off 9”. This required moving the MG-TD over a foot to clear the bar in the horizontal saw.
Then I turned 6” to 0.720 on the Heavy 10. It was set up for collets, (most common in my shop). That’s ok I have both 7/8 and 23/32 collets.
Now I needed to make an axial slot. 3/16 high by about 9/16 wide by about 2-1/2” deep.
I looked in my endmill drawer for a long 3/16 endmill. All I could find was a short ball end endmill.
Ok, I thought, I will chuck the piece up in the 3 jaw. Offset it 3/16 with a shim in one jaw, drill a hole in the offset position, rotate it 180 drill another hole, put it back on-center drill a hole. They should break just through. The do some chopping with a chisel and it should fit.
I remove the collet holders and mount the 3-jaw.
Three broken 3/16 drills later. I quit for the day.  I had a 1-3/4 deep slot with a bridge in the middle and (unknown to me) a piece of broken drill bit still in the middle.
 
So this AM we walk around the park as usual. Mother’s day is Sunday. We go to the Girls store to look. (No it’s not that easy. Nothing there will do!).  It’s now about 2:30 PM. I put together and order for McMasters. It includes 3 3/16 drill bits.
 
I go down to the workshop and look through the endmill drawer again.  OOPS over that is a 3/16 by 3” long 4 flute center cutting endmill.
The Burke Millis set up with the vertical head. I need to change it over to a horizontal. It has an index head on the table. I need a vise.
 
Ok now it set up, but I need to rotate the vise 90 degrees.
I tried milling a slot. I get about 1-1/2 “ deep. Do I dare go 2-1/2”. Perhaps I should plunge the rest of the distance, move 0.050, plunge, etc.
Ok for the first two plunges, then I hear a tell tail, tick, tick, tick.
I take the part out of the mill with a large magnifying lens and a bright light I can just see the broken drill bit.  But by now my 4 flute endmill is a 3 flute end mill. (Add one of those to the McMasters order.)
I start banging with a plastic hammer and trying to grab the broken drill with a ling skinny pair of needle nose pliers.
It looks like its budging, yes it is. It’s out.
Back to the mil. Align by eye. Finish the slot.
 
Ok the tong of the rake head has two holes. 1/8 diameter spaced 1-9/16. The plan is to drill and tap the aluminum bar 8-32, and  modify a screw to fit into the holes.
Drilling the bar goes uneventful. I hold the rod in the 3 jaw and use my cross drilling fixture to drill and tap the holes. The way mounted indicator sets up the distance between holes.
I look at my 8-32 screw supply and the only ones I have are 1-1/4” long.
Well they need to be reduced 9/16 in length and about. 3/8 of the remaining turned down to 0.120 or so.
 
I have a bunch of “Screw holders”, ½” hex stock, threaded through and slotted, so when you clamp them in a 3 Jaw they squeeze the screw. BUT I don’t see 8-32. ( Why didn’t I pick 10_32, I have several of those.)
So I quickly make an 8-32 screw holder. I cut the screws to length and turn a stub.  
Finally its down.
It only cost $10 for drills, 18 for the endmill and two days of my time.
 
 
 
Jim B.
 

Virus-free. www.avast.com



Nelson Collar
 

whatever it is on a new crayon!
Nelson Collar



From: "Ed S eschwerkolt@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]"
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Sent: Tuesday, May 3, 2016 9:05 AM
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] How one thing leads to another (Supposed to be funny)

 
M,

At what angle do you cut the crayons?

Anon

At 08:15 AM 5/3/2016, you wrote:

>Eddie,
>You must understand though, this is why we have these expensive
>machines with even more expensive tooling so that we can feel
>justified in fixing a $15 rake! I applaud Jim's efforts (and
>enjoyed the story as well for the 'company' it provided). For
>myself I found justification for purchase and possession of my SB 9A
>by sharpening my wife's crayons for her school class - high
>precision crayons being a fundamental necessity of course......
>:) Got lots of slack to cover over my many other transgressions for that one!
>M




Mark Hofer
 

True enough, but once recycled, one needs only a single crayon to have all colors needed.......much more convenient that way
M


On May 3, 2016, at 10:03 AM, Edward Draper eddie.draper@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:


Optimum angle probably depends on the colour!  

From the photo, you do not appear to have engaged in adequate swarf segregation.  It will have to be incinerated rather than recycled.  Slapped wrist.

Eddie



john kling
 

You can also put spay paint cans in a set off center independent jaw chucks  and run a slow speed to shake them up.


On Tuesday, May 3, 2016 2:09 PM, "Mark Hofer markahofer@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" wrote:


 
True enough, but once recycled, one needs only a single crayon to have all colors needed.......much more convenient that way
M


On May 3, 2016, at 10:03 AM, Edward Draper eddie.draper@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:


Optimum angle probably depends on the colour!  

From the photo, you do not appear to have engaged in adequate swarf segregation.  It will have to be incinerated rather than recycled.  Slapped wrist.

Eddie





john kling
 

Some of the home/garage targeted early lathes contained a power source that could be directed at a variety of tasks. For example Goodell Pratt lathes, had arbors for grinding and buffing and scroll saw attachments. Most lathes were capable of line boring and most had milling attachments available.


On Tuesday, May 3, 2016 3:35 PM, "john kling jkling222@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" wrote:


 
You can also put spay paint cans in a set off center independent jaw chucks  and run a slow speed to shake them up.


On Tuesday, May 3, 2016 2:09 PM, "Mark Hofer markahofer@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" wrote:


 
True enough, but once recycled, one needs only a single crayon to have all colors needed.......much more convenient that way
M


On May 3, 2016, at 10:03 AM, Edward Draper eddie.draper@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:


Optimum angle probably depends on the colour!  

From the photo, you do not appear to have engaged in adequate swarf segregation.  It will have to be incinerated rather than recycled.  Slapped wrist.

Eddie







eddie.draper@btinternet.com
 

And weedkiller.  Hope the attached isn't too big.  This is a cartridge of expensive concentrated glyphosphate for a hand held spinner atomiser.  The stuff comes out like specks of white emulsion paint so you can see where you've treated.  It had stood over 2 winters and another cartridge from the same batch caused endless trouble with nozzle blockages due to settling. An hour of this treatment settled its hash!

Eddie



From: "john kling jkling222@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]"
To: "SOUTHBENDLATHE@..."
Sent: Tuesday, 3 May 2016, 20:35
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] How one thing leads to another (Supposed to be funny)

 
You can also put spay paint cans in a set off center independent jaw chucks  and run a slow speed to shake them up.


On Tuesday, May 3, 2016 2:09 PM, "Mark Hofer markahofer@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" wrote:


 
True enough, but once recycled, one needs only a single crayon to have all colors needed.......much more convenient that way
M


On May 3, 2016, at 10:03 AM, Edward Draper eddie.draper@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:

< div class="yiv6632831786class" id="yiv6632831786ygrp-mlmsg" style="font-size:13px;font-family:Arial, helvetica, clean, sans-serif;font-style:normal;font-weight:normal;letter-spacing:normal;text-indent:0px;text-transform:none;white-space:normal;word-spacing:0px;">

Optimum angle probably depends on the colour!  

From the photo, you do not appear to have engaged in adequate swarf segregation.  It will have to be incinerated rather than recycled.  Slapped wrist.

Eddie

< /div>