I made a bolt! (and a threading dial ;)


DJ Delorie
 

I needed a 3/6-16 by 3/4 bolt, the hardware store was closed, I didn't
have one handy, and DARNIT I HAVE A LATHE! So I made one from some
1/2" hex stock...

http://www.delorie.com/photos/southbend-lathe/img_3136.html
(shown with matching commercial nut and some all-thread)

All those hours of watching youtube videos have paid off! I have
saved 5 cents by doing it myself! And it only took an hour or two!

This was the last bit I needed for the new threading dial (aka thread
chasing dial, chasing indicator, thread indicator, or whatever you
want to call it ;). It holds the indicator to the apron.

Yes, I managed to find a spot on the apron that had enough meat for a
3/8x1 tapped hole, but I had to put it between two other bolts and the
halfnut cam, which is where it looked like it should be from the few
photos I could find of a 34 with a threading dial.

The dial itself is 3D-printed ABS plastic, with an aluminum shaft,
including a printed helix gear. I have some photos of the process
starting here (keep hitting "next" until you get to the invoice pic):

http://www.delorie.com/photos/southbend-lathe/img_3125.html

Note that the shroud being printed is the first version, that expected
the 3/8 round that newer lathes had. I had to print a second one with
an L-bracket to fit the 34, which you can see in the "installed"
pictures, such as #3133 and #3135. The helix gear is shown in #3132.

The bracket has some flex in it, but I think that's OK as the drive
screw has some runout anyway. The indicator bobs along as the screw
turns, but the gear stays nicely meshed with essentially zero
backlash.

Just for reference, the shroud took about 17 hours to print, and the
gear and dial about 2 hours each. I wasn't in a hurry and chose
precision over speed. Putting all the pieces together took about five
hours, which included making that bolt and trimming down two set
screws.

Thus ends step one of my master plan... (step 2, reversible motor, and
step 3, metric gearing :)


soupy1951ca
 

I am SOOO impressed!!! I love the 3D printing phenomenon that is taking place!! It has to be the coolest thing to happen in a long time. If they can only get the price of reasonable sized machines down so more folks can own them. Very neat thread dial you have created and your bolt is nice too.

Mike from Canada

On Sun, May 31, 2015 at 7:20 PM, DJ Delorie dj@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:
 


I needed a 3/6-16 by 3/4 bolt, the hardware store was closed, I didn't
have one handy, and DARNIT I HAVE A LATHE! So I made one from some
1/2" hex stock...

http://www.delorie.com/photos/southbend-lathe/img_3136.html
(shown with matching commercial nut and some all-thread)

All those hours of watching youtube videos have paid off! I have
saved 5 cents by doing it myself! And it only took an hour or two!

This was the last bit I needed for the new threading dial (aka thread
chasing dial, chasing indicator, thread indicator, or whatever you
want to call it ;). It holds the indicator to the apron.

Yes, I managed to find a spot on the apron that had enough meat for a
3/8x1 tapped hole, but I had to put it between two other bolts and the
halfnut cam, which is where it looked like it should be from the few
photos I could find of a 34 with a threading dial.

The dial itself is 3D-printed ABS plastic, with an aluminum shaft,
including a printed helix gear. I have some photos of the process
starting here (keep hitting "next" until you get to the invoice pic):

http://www.delorie.com/photos/southbend-lathe/img_3125.html

Note that the shroud being printed is the first version, that expected
the 3/8 round that newer lathes had. I had to print a second one with
an L-bracket to fit the 34, which you can see in the "installed"
pictures, such as #3133 and #3135. The helix gear is shown in #3132.

The bracket has some flex in it, but I think that's OK as the drive
screw has some runout anyway. The indicator bobs along as the screw
turns, but the gear stays nicely meshed with essentially zero
backlash.

Just for reference, the shroud took about 17 hours to print, and the
gear and dial about 2 hours each. I wasn't in a hurry and chose
precision over speed. Putting all the pieces together took about five
hours, which included making that bolt and trimming down two set
screws.

Thus ends step one of my master plan... (step 2, reversible motor, and
step 3, metric gearing :)




--

“People that know they are important think about others, people that think they are important, think about themselves.” – Hans F. Hansen

 

Learn from the mistakes of others, you might not live long enough to make them all yourself!!!


DJ Delorie
 

I am SOOO impressed!!! I love the 3D printing phenomenon that is
taking place!! It has to be the coolest thing to happen in a long
time. If they can only get the price of reasonable sized machines
down so more folks can own them. Very neat thread dial you have
created and your bolt is nice too.
I'm still working out the kinks in mine, which I got from a friend:

http://seemecnc.com/products/rostock-max-complete-kit

The price for this is pretty good for what you get (it can print 11"
dia by 14" tall), but not as cheap as you can get. Some are as low as
$400 for a small printer (http://printrbot.com/). The filament is
pretty cheap, I think that indicator cost me about 50 cents in
plastic.

The tricky part with all 3D printers is getting all the (many)
settings right, so that you have good quality yet reasonable print
times. For example, while removing the "scaffolding" for the
threading shroud, the bracket cracked between two layers and I had to
glue it back together, because the scaffolding was stronger than the
part it was supporting!

I do plan on 3D printing some gears for the 34, though, to give it
metric threading capabilities. We'll see if ABS plastic is strong
enough for the task! I'm only making the transposition gear, so I
don't have to worry about driving a shaft or stripping a keyway. I
should be able to make do with two sets, one for small threads (0-1mm)
and one for large threads (1+mm). Unlike metal gears, I can print
both gears as one unit, so there's no problem about how to connect
them together.

Also, I designed the threading dial so it could be turned out of
metal, assuming you can weld on the angle bracket. Just in case, you
know ;-)


Jim B. <btdtrf@...>
 

Just an enhancement.

The next time you cut a thread dial gear, the teeth should run at a slight angle.

About 6.5 degrees, to match the lead of the lead screw.

Straight is OK since there is little load on the gear.

 

But overall very nice work.

Jim B. 


From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... [mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@...]
Sent: Sunday, May 31, 2015 7:57 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] I made a bolt! (and a threading dial ;)

 

 


> I am SOOO impressed!!! I love the 3D printing phenomenon that is
> taking place!! It has to be the coolest thing to happen in a long
> time. If they can only get the price of reasonable sized machines
> down so more folks can own them. Very neat thread dial you have
> created and your bolt is nice too.

I'm still working out the kinks in mine, which I got from a friend:

http://seemecnc.com/products/rostock-max-complete-kit

The price for this is pretty good for what you get (it can print 11"
dia by 14" tall), but not as cheap as you can get. Some are as low as
$400 for a small printer (http://printrbot.com/). The filament is
pretty cheap, I think that indicator cost me about 50 cents in
plastic.

The tricky part with all 3D printers is getting all the (many)
settings right, so that you have good quality yet reasonable print
times. For example, while removing the "scaffolding" for the
threading shroud, the bracket cracked between two layers and I had to
glue it back together, because the scaffolding was stronger than the
part it was supporting!

I do plan on 3D printing some gears for the 34, though, to give it
metric threading capabilities. We'll see if ABS plastic is strong
enough for the task! I'm only making the transposition gear, so I
don't have to worry about driving a shaft or stripping a keyway. I
should be able to make do with two sets, one for small threads (0-1mm)
and one for large threads (1+mm). Unlike metal gears, I can print
both gears as one unit, so there's no problem about how to connect
them together.

Also, I designed the threading dial so it could be turned out of
metal, assuming you can weld on the angle bracket. Just in case, you
know ;-)


armne@sbcglobal.net <armne@...>
 

 
         Why did it take 5 hrs to assemble?
Thanks


On Sunday, May 31, 2015 4:57 PM, "DJ Delorie dj@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" wrote:


 

> I am SOOO impressed!!! I love the 3D printing phenomenon that is
> taking place!! It has to be the coolest thing to happen in a long
> time. If they can only get the price of reasonable sized machines
> down so more folks can own them. Very neat thread dial you have
> created and your bolt is nice too.

I'm still working out the kinks in mine, which I got from a friend:

http://seemecnc.com/products/rostock-max-complete-kit

The price for this is pretty good for what you get (it can print 11"
dia by 14" tall), but not as cheap as you can get. Some are as low as
$400 for a small printer (http://printrbot.com/). The filament is
pretty cheap, I think that indicator cost me about 50 cents in
plastic.

The tricky part with all 3D printers is getting all the (many)
settings right, so that you have good quality yet reasonable print
times. For example, while removing the "scaffolding" for the
threading shroud, the bracket cracked between two layers and I had to
glue it back together, because the scaffolding was stronger than the
part it was supporting!

I do plan on 3D printing some gears for the 34, though, to give it
metric threading capabilities. We'll see if ABS plastic is strong
enough for the task! I'm only making the transposition gear, so I
don't have to worry about driving a shaft or stripping a keyway. I
should be able to make do with two sets, one for small threads (0-1mm)
and one for large threads (1+mm). Unlike metal gears, I can print
both gears as one unit, so there's no problem about how to connect
them together.

Also, I designed the threading dial so it could be turned out of
metal, assuming you can weld on the angle bracket. Just in case, you
know ;-)



DJ Delorie
 

Why did it take 5 hrs to assemble?
Not sure where the day went, but...

The print had "scaffolding" around it to hold up the overhangs. It
all had to be removed. Carefully. Turns out there's a bug in my
slicer that makes the scaffolding stick to the part more than it
should.

I had to figure out how to clamp a triangular section while the ABS
glue set. Turns out the lathe chuck was almost ideal for this,
though.

The slicer put scaffolding INSIDE the axle hole to hold up the edge of
a relief I added. If I had known how hard that would be to remove, I
would have designed it differently.

3D printing is not exact. All the holes had to be reamed, and where
appropriate, threaded. It's like working with a casting.

I only had long setscrews so had to shorten them. I tried a few ways
to hold them in the 34 before remembering I had a small chinese lathe,
which could hold them directly.

I had to make a bolt. This took longer than you'd expect because I'm
not a machinist. At least, I don't think of myself as one yet :-)

I had to remember where I left all my hand tools...


Gregg Eshelman
 

On 5/31/2015 5:56 PM, DJ Delorie dj@delorie.com [SOUTHBENDLATHE] wrote:

I do plan on 3D printing some gears for the 34, though, to give it
metric threading capabilities. We'll see if ABS plastic is strong
enough for the task! I'm only making the transposition gear, so I
don't have to worry about driving a shaft or stripping a keyway. I
should be able to make do with two sets, one for small threads (0-1mm)
and one for large threads (1+mm). Unlike metal gears, I can print
both gears as one unit, so there's no problem about how to connect
them together.
For anything that needs to take mechanical stress you should set it to 100% in-fill.

Since your printer can print ABS, you should be able to adjust the temperature to print nylon, which tends to have better layer adhesion. Whats extra nice is nylon filament can be bought really cheap as string trimmer line.

Google 3D printed gears and you'll find some folks who have printed nylon gears for Atlas and 9x20 and some other lathes. On Thingiverse there's at least one full set of Atlas change gear models to download.


DJ Delorie
 

For anything that needs to take mechanical stress you should set it
to 100% in-fill.
I have trouble at 100% because any inaccuracy in the filament diameter
or print path causes an accumulation of bloat. 90% gives the print
some "breathing room". Other folks print in the 75-90% range for
strength parts.

But... this isn't a regular gear, this is a transposition gear. The
teeth are always 100% filled anyway, and most of the power is
transferred between the two rings of teeth, the shaft is "just" there
to keep it centered (unlike a metal gear, where the shaft/key
transfers all the power). So I need most of the strenth in the outer
portion of the gear, which is where there's the most plastic anyway.

The "failure mode" would be the two halves of the gear separating at a
print layer. If that happens, I'll design in some holes for pins or
something. My plan, though, is to print those key layers at 100%
infill.

Since your printer can print ABS, you should be able to adjust the
temperature to print nylon, which tends to have better layer adhesion.
I have some nylon but haven't tried it yet. ABS and nylon are at the
upper limit of the temperatures I can use so I don't know if it'll be
hot enough for a good print. I'll try it (and PLA, and maybe TGlase)
if the ABS gear breaks, but given that this is just to run the lead
screw, unless I make large pitch metric screws I don't think it will
be a problem. We'll see. For normal turning (power feed and imperial
threads) I can use the metal gears.

Google 3D printed gears and you'll find some folks who have printed
nylon gears for Atlas and 9x20 and some other lathes. On Thingiverse
there's at least one full set of Atlas change gear models to download.
On Thingiverse there's pretty much everything...


Mark Hofer
 

Impressive use of a 3-d printer!  Well done!
M


http://www.delorie.com/photos/southbend-lathe/img_3136.html


The dial itself is 3D-printed ABS plastic, with an aluminum shaft,
including a printed helix gear. I have some photos of the process
starting here (keep hitting "next" until you get to the invoice pic):

http://www.delorie.com/photos/southbend-lathe/img_3125.html

Note that the shroud being printed is the first version, that expected
the 3/8 round that newer lathes had. I had to print a second one with
an L-bracket to fit the 34, which you can see in the "installed"
pictures, such as #3133 and #3135. The helix gear is shown in #3132.

The bracket has some flex in it, but I think that's OK as the drive
screw has some runout anyway. The indicator bobs along as the screw
turns, but the gear stays nicely meshed with essentially zero
backlash.

Just for reference, the shroud took about 17 hours to print, and the
gear and dial about 2 hours each. I wasn't in a hurry and chose
precision over speed. Putting all the pieces together took about five
hours, which included making that bolt and trimming down 

Reply via web post Reply to sender Reply to group Start a New Topic .


James Instone
 

3D Printing gears:
I am going to use a 3D printed gear on a spindle as an indexer to cut an aluminum or cast iron gear on my mill. I hope to make a 34 tooth gear to insert on my 9" Southbend to be able to cut some metric threads. I have a rotary table but do not have the plates to cut odd number of teeth. SketchUp has an app to draw gears. The 3-D printed gear does not have to be as strong as I plan to have a lock on the spindle shaft while cutting the final gear.

joutrock




On Monday, June 1, 2015 3:09 AM, "DJ Delorie dj@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:


 

> For anything that needs to take mechanical stress you should set it
> to 100% in-fill.

I have trouble at 100% because any inaccuracy in the filament diameter
or print path causes an accumulation of bloat. 90% gives the print
some "breathing room". Other folks print in the 75-90% range for
strength parts.

But... this isn't a regular gear, this is a transposition gear. The
teeth are always 100% filled anyway, and most of the power is
transferred between the two rings of teeth, the shaft is "just" there
to keep it centered (unlike a metal gear, where the shaft/key
transfers all the power). So I need most of the strenth in the outer
portion of the gear, which is where there's the most plastic anyway.

The "failure mode" would be the two halves of the gear separating at a
print layer. If that happens, I'll design in some holes for pins or
something. My plan, though, is to print those key layers at 100%
infill.

> Since your printer can print ABS, you should be able to adjust the
> temperature to print nylon, which tends to have better layer adhesion.

I have some nylon but haven't tried it yet. ABS and nylon are at the
upper limit of the temperatures I can use so I don't know if it'll be
hot enough for a good print. I'll try it (and PLA, and maybe TGlase)
if the ABS gear breaks, but given that this is just to run the lead
screw, unless I make large pitch metric screws I don't think it will
be a problem. We'll see. For normal turning (power feed and imperial
threads) I can use the metal gears.

> Google 3D printed gears and you'll find some folks who have printed
> nylon gears for Atlas and 9x20 and some other lathes. On Thingiverse
> there's at least one full set of Atlas change gear models to download.

On Thingiverse there's pretty much everything...



DJ Delorie
 

3D Printing gears:I am going to use a 3D printed gear on a spindle
as an indexer to cut an aluminum or cast iron gear on my mill. I
hope to make a 34 tooth gear to insert on my 9" Southbend to be able
to cut some metric threads. I have a rotary table but do not have
the plates to cut odd number of teeth. SketchUp has an app to draw
gears. The 3-D printed gear does not have to be as strong as I plan
to have a lock on the spindle shaft while cutting the final gear.
Do you need a gear, or just an index plate?

If you have a DRO on your lathe, it's pretty easy to generate a list
of drill spots for a bolt circle of 34 bolts... just search the web
for "bolt circle calculator".


armne@...
 

   How do you use a DRO to make a bolt circle on a lathe ?


DJ Delorie
 

If you have a DRO on your lathe,
Of course I meant *mill*. Sigh, mornings...


James Instone
 

I do not have a DRO on my mill. I have made gears using the rotary table by interpolating the degrees with real good success. However, 34 teeth comes out to 10.588 degrees.This is just a new way that I think will be easy and quick. I have access to a 3-D printer at our local Fab Lab. I will be building the spindle and gear blank holding mechanism in the near future. I have the correct gear cutter for making an 18 pitch gear for my Southbend lathe. On the other hand, I have seen videos of a person using an Arduino to drive a stepper motor to turn the rotary table. He has succeeded in moving his rotary table very accurately. I am an 81 year-old hobbyist and like finding new ways to do things.

joutrock


armne@...
 

    Cool Keep up the Great Work
Allec


DJ Delorie
 

I am an 81 year-old hobbyist and like finding new ways to do things.
You're still younger than my lathe :-)


This is the gear library I'm using: http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3575

The only trick is converting imperial DP (diametric pitch) to the
buggy metric CP he uses. Here's the openscad math for my gears:

PA = 14.5; // pressure_angle
DP = 16; // "imperial" diametric pitch
CP = 180 * 25.4 / DP; // circular_pitch


David Rysdam <david@...>
 

"DJ Delorie dj@delorie.com [SOUTHBENDLATHE]"
<SOUTHBENDLATHE@yahoogroups.com> writes:
The only trick is converting imperial DP (diametric pitch) to the
buggy metric CP he uses. Here's the openscad math for my gears:

PA = 14.5; // pressure_angle
DP = 16; // "imperial" diametric pitch
CP = 180 * 25.4 / DP; // circular_pitch
I can include my entire gear OpenSCAD thing I designed from scratch,
although mine just does spur, not bevel gears. I only did it so I could
make sure I understand the concept and so I could print some test gears
to compare against those I machined:

http://david.rysdam.org/machining/gears.html


Eddie kee
 

I made a set of metric transposing gears for a  9A on a 3d printer.  Printed them out of ABS and they have been making threads for six months now.

It took about ten minutes to draw them and two hours each to print them.  The first gears I made where not solid, I upped the fill to 80% and then they were strong enough to use.  I was planning on making an index plate and cutting metal ones but for minimal effort it takes to print a set I will print them into the future. 

 

 

From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... [mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@...]
Sent: Monday, June 1, 2015 9:32 AM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] I made a bolt! (and a threading dial ;)

 

 

3D Printing gears:

I am going to use a 3D printed gear on a spindle as an indexer to cut an aluminum or cast iron gear on my mill. I hope to make a 34 tooth gear to insert on my 9" Southbend to be able to cut some metric threads. I have a rotary table but do not have the plates to cut odd number of teeth. SketchUp has an app to draw gears. The 3-D printed gear does not have to be as strong as I plan to have a lock on the spindle shaft while cutting the final gear.

 

joutrock

 

 

 

On Monday, June 1, 2015 3:09 AM, "DJ Delorie dj@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:

 

 


> For anything that needs to take mechanical stress you should set it
> to 100% in-fill.

I have trouble at 100% because any inaccuracy in the filament diameter
or print path causes an accumulation of bloat. 90% gives the print
some "breathing room". Other folks print in the 75-90% range for
strength parts.

But... this isn't a regular gear, this is a transposition gear. The
teeth are always 100% filled anyway, and most of the power is
transferred between the two rings of teeth, the shaft is "just" there
to keep it centered (unlike a metal gear, where the shaft/key
transfers all the power). So I need most of the strenth in the outer
portion of the gear, which is where there's the most plastic anyway.

The "failure mode" would be the two halves of the gear separating at a
print layer. If that happens, I'll design in some holes for pins or
something. My plan, though, is to print those key layers at 100%
infill.

> Since your printer can print ABS, you should be able to adjust the
> temperature to print nylon, which tends to have better layer adhesion.

I have some nylon but haven't tried it yet. ABS and nylon are at the
upper limit of the temperatures I can use so I don't know if it'll be
hot enough for a good print. I'll try it (and PLA, and maybe TGlase)
if the ABS gear breaks, but given that this is just to run the lead
screw, unless I make large pitch metric screws I don't think it will
be a problem. We'll see. For normal turning (power feed and imperial
threads) I can use the metal gears.

> Google 3D printed gears and you'll find some folks who have printed
> nylon gears for Atlas and 9x20 and some other lathes. On Thingiverse
> there's at least one full set of Atlas change gear models to download.

On Thingiverse there's pretty much everything...

 


James Instone
 

Eddie Kee said:
"I made a set of metric transposing gears for a  9A on a 3d printer.  Printed them out of ABS and they have been making threads for six months now."

Thanks for the idea. I had been contemplating doing that, but wanted to make a metal gear. I heard of a fellow that used a 3-D orinted gear on his lathe and he said that it made his gear train run quieter. So, I think I will try the 3-D printed gear  idea because I don't make that many metric threads.

joutrock





On Wednesday, June 3, 2015 9:14 AM, "'Eddie Kee' eddie@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" wrote:


 
I made a set of metric transposing gears for a  9A on a 3d printer.  Printed them out of ABS and they have been making threads for six months now.
It took about ten minutes to draw them and two hours each to print them.  The first gears I made where not solid, I upped the fill to 80% and then they were strong enough to use.  I was planning on making an index plate and cutting metal ones but for minimal effort it takes to print a set I will print them into the future. 
 
 
From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... [mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@...]
Sent: Monday, June 1, 2015 9:32 AM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] I made a bolt! (and a threading dial ;)
 
 
3D Printing gears:
I am going to use a 3D printed gear on a spindle as an indexer to cut an aluminum or cast iron gear on my mill. I hope to make a 34 tooth gear to insert on my 9" Southbend to be able to cut some metric threads. I have a rotary table but do not have the plates to cut odd number of teeth. SketchUp has an app to draw gears. The 3-D printed gear does not have to be as strong as I plan to have a lock on the spindle shaft while cutting the final gear.
 
joutrock
 
 
 
On Monday, June 1, 2015 3:09 AM, "DJ Delorie dj@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:
 
 

> For anything that needs to take mechanical stress you should set it
> to 100% in-fill.

I have trouble at 100% because any inaccuracy in the filament diameter
or print path causes an accumulation of bloat. 90% gives the print
some "breathing room". Other folks print in the 75-90% range for
strength parts.

But... this isn't a regular gear, this is a transposition gear. The
teeth are always 100% filled anyway, and most of the power is
transferred between the two rings of teeth, the shaft is "just" there
to keep it centered (unlike a metal gear, where the shaft/key
transfers all the power). So I need most of the strenth in the outer
portion of the gear, which is where there's the most plastic anyway.

The "failure mode" would be the two halves of the gear separating at a
print layer. If that happens, I'll design in some holes for pins or
something. My plan, though, is to print those key layers at 100%
infill.

> Since your printer can print ABS, you should be able to adjust the
> temperature to print nylon, which tends to have better layer adhesion.

I have some nylon but haven't tried it yet. ABS and nylon are at the
upper limit of the temperatures I can use so I don't know if it'll be
hot enough for a good print. I'll try it (and PLA, and maybe TGlase)
if the ABS gear breaks, but given that this is just to run the lead
screw, unless I make large pitch metric screws I don't think it will
be a problem. We'll see. For normal turning (power feed and imperial
threads) I can use the metal gears.

> Google 3D printed gears and you'll find some folks who have printed
> nylon gears for Atlas and 9x20 and some other lathes. On Thingiverse
> there's at least one full set of Atlas change gear models to download.

On Thingiverse there's pretty much everything...
 



Nelson Collar
 

Ha guys with the 3-D printers, go in business and make some money. After setting up the program it is just push the button and load the spool of plastic. I'm interested in buying a transposing.
Nelson Collar



From: "James Instone joutrock@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]"
To: "SOUTHBENDLATHE@..."
Sent: Thursday, June 4, 2015 9:08 AM
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] I made a bolt! (and a threading dial ;)

 
Eddie Kee said:
"I made a set of metric transposing gears for a  9A on a 3d printer.  Printed them out of ABS and they have been making threads for six months now."

Thanks for the idea. I had been contemplating doing that, but wanted to make a metal gear. I heard of a fellow that used a 3-D orinted gear on his lathe and he said that it made his gear train run quieter. So, I think I will try the 3-D printed gear  idea because I don't make that many metric threads.

joutrock





On Wednesday, June 3, 2015 9:14 AM, "'Eddie Kee' eddie@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" wrote:


 
I made a set of metric transposing gears for a  9A on a 3d printer.  Printed them out of ABS and they have been making threads for six months now.
It took about ten minutes to draw them and two hours each to print them.  The first gears I made where not solid, I upped the fill to 80% and then they were strong enough to use.  I was planning on making an index plate and cutting metal ones but for minimal effort it takes to print a set I will print them into the future. 
 
 


From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... [mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@...]
Sent: Monday, June 1, 2015 9:32 AM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] I made a bolt! (and a threading dial ;)
 
 
3D Printing gears:
I am going to use a 3D printed gear on a spindle as an indexer to cut an aluminum or cast iron gear on my mill. I hope to make a 34 tooth gear to insert on my 9" Southbend to be able to cut some metric threads. I have a rotary table but do not have the plates to cut odd number of teeth. SketchUp has an app to draw gears. The 3-D printed gear does not have to be as strong as I plan to have a lock on the spindle shaft while cutting the final gear.
 
joutrock
 
 
 
On Monday, June 1, 2015 3:09 AM, "DJ Delorie dj@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:
 
 

> For anything that needs to take mechanical stress you should set it
> to 100% in-fill.

I have trouble at 100% because any inaccuracy in the filament diameter
or print path causes an accumulation of bloat. 90% gives the print
some "breathing room". Other folks print in the 75-90% range for
strength parts.

But... this isn't a regular gear, this is a transposition gear. The
teeth are always 100% filled anyway, and most of the power is
transferred between the two rings of teeth, the shaft is "just" there
to keep it centered (unlike a metal gear, where the shaft/key
transfers all the power). So I need most of the strenth in the outer
portion of the gear, which is where there's the most plastic anyway.

The "failure mode" would be the two halves of the gear separating at a
print layer. If that happens, I'll design in some holes for pins or
something. My plan, though, is to print those key layers at 100%
infill.

> Since your printer can print ABS, you should be able to adjust the
> temperature to print nylon, which tends to have better layer adhesion.

I have some nylon but haven't tried it yet. ABS and nylon are at the
upper limit of the temperatures I can use so I don't know if it'll be
hot enough for a good print. I'll try it (and PLA, and maybe TGlase)
if the ABS gear breaks, but given that this is just to run the lead
screw, unless I make large pitch metric screws I don't think it will
be a problem. We'll see. For normal turning (power feed and imperial
threads) I can use the metal gears.

> Google 3D printed gears and you'll find some folks who have printed
> nylon gears for Atlas and 9x20 and some other lathes. On Thingiverse
> there's at least one full set of Atlas change gear models to download.

On Thingiverse there's pretty much everything...