9a Reverse Gear Shaft Stuck


Mosa Kaleel
 

Hi.  First, thank you for this excellent group.   I’ve recently started fixing up my 1951 9a.  I’m new to this whole thing and am following the excellent Wells book and reading every post on this site I can.  I started with the tailstock just to get going and I’m hooked.   But now I’m stuck.  On my old-style reverse gear assembly, I am having no luck pushing out the Reverse Shaft.   The Reverse Gear (I think that’s what it is) is keyed on and I’m not sure how to get at it.  I’ve uploaded two photos.  I’ve tried pushing on the threaded end with my 1-ton arbor press as the book suggests, but no luck, and I’m afraid to ruin the threads. The shaft does have a little bit of wiggle in and out, which is confusing.   The Wells books shows the newer plunger style Reverse Bracket, which appears to leave out the spacer gear, but otherwise, it seems the same.  So my question is, am I just not getting enough leverage with my little arbor press (my suspicion), or am I missing something that is locking the assembly in place?  Thank you so much in advance. 



John Gallo
 

I am having the exact same problem. I decided it wasn't worth taking a chance on ruining anything by applying too much force and just cleaned it up real well and soaked it with type C oil. It spins very smoothly and I don't see what the advantage would be by taking it apart. Just my uneducated opinion. John.


Marti
 

You don't need to take EVERYTHING apart to perform a good cleaning and inspection. The gear tree in the QCGB and apron worm are best left intact, just flush/brush out with a solvent and re oil. The lower shaft in the QCGB should be removed to access the internal oil ports,  The felts in the QCGB can be removed and replaced from the side with care. 


Jim B. <btdtrf@...>
 

martik777@...

Is correct. There is no need to remove this shaft.

You can Just clean things up.

I have attached a photo of what the shaft, when removed, looks like. It’s the shaft on the left.

I have made a new shaft for my lathe (on the right) so I can use different (20 DP) gears.

I would never have removed the original if I did not need to.

It is a very hard press fit.

 

 

Jim B.


From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... [mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@...]
Sent: Thursday, May 22, 2014 12:56 AM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] 9a Reverse Gear Shaft Stuck

 

 

Hi.  First, thank you for this excellent group.   I’ve recently started fixing up my 1951 9a.  I’m new to this whole thing and am following the excellent Wells book and reading every post on this site I can.  I started with the tailstock just to get going and I’m hooked.   But now I’m stuck.  On my old-style reverse gear assembly, I am having no luck pushing out the Reverse Shaft.   The Reverse Gear (I think that’s what it is) is keyed on and I’m not sure how to get at it.  I’ve uploaded two photos.  I’ve tried pushing on the threaded end with my 1-ton arbor press as the book suggests, but no luck, and I’m afraid to ruin the threads. The shaft does have a little bit of wiggle in and out, which is confusing.   The Wells books shows the newer plunger style Reverse Bracket, which appears to leave out the spacer gear, but otherwise, it seems the same.  So my question is, am I just not getting enough leverage with my little arbor press (my suspicion), or am I missing something that is locking the assembly in place?  Thank you so much in advance. 

 


Mosa Kaleel
 

I really appreciate the advice and Jim B thanks for the photo. So, just to make sure, contrary to the (fantastic) Wells book which uses a newer plunger style as the example, it appears that there are no internal wicks or channels in this old style Reverse Bracket? Thus, there is no need to remove the shaft because there is nothing that needs to be accessed?  Is this all correct?

 

There is a hole above the handle, which appears to be the place to oil the shaft, or is there supposed to be a wick here?  Finally, is the only place for wicks and on the entire thing just the shafts of the twin gears, with an oiling hole on their back?   Thank you so much.


Davis Johnson
 

There are felts in my old-style bolt-type reverse lever assembly.

The two tumbler gear shafts (the gears that take turns engaging the teeth on the end of the spindle) have an off-center hole in the outside end. This hole actually angles in to the center of the shaft, where it intersects a cross-wise hole that should have a felt in it (3/16 diameter round, I seem to recall). Oil goes from your can into the angled hole, which saturates the cross-wise felt that caries the oil to the inside of the gear.

I'm not sure that I would understand that explanation if I hadn't written it myself.

My felts were so solid with varnish from 60 years of oil that I had to drill them out with a drill bit spun between my thumb and fore finger.

Like you, I was unable to press out the stud-gear shaft. I soaked the whole assembly in carburetor  cleaner. This cleaned it up (including all the paint). I'm pretty sure that I can see the end of a length-wise rectangular felt on the stud gear shaft. I'm not 100% sure without getting the shaft out, which my arbor press won't do either. I'm not sure how oil gets to it.

The other hidden  or non-obvious feature is a pair of screws at either end of the bolt-slot so that forward and reverse gear mesh can be adjusted.

On 5/22/2014 9:27 PM, mosak@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] wrote:
 

I really appreciate the advice and Jim B thanks for the photo. So, just to make sure, contrary to the (fantastic) Wells book which uses a newer plunger style as the example, it appears that there are no internal wicks or channels in this old style Reverse Bracket? Thus, there is no need to remove the shaft because there is nothing that needs to be accessed?  Is this all correct?

 

There is a hole above the handle, which appears to be the place to oil the shaft, or is there supposed to be a wick here?  Finally, is the only place for wicks and on the entire thing just the shafts of the twin gears, with an oiling hole on their back?   Thank you so much.


Steve Wells
 


I'm in this thread late, but let me clarify a few things for the posters. first I did not write the rebuild books, nor do I sell
them on e-bay, that is Steve Brooks, although our eBay user names are similar and my website must be used for
references, there is no connection between us. As for the question, if his book does not list the wicks in the reverse tumbler
studs or reverse shaft for the 9A Workshop, it is an error, they indeed have felts. the older Workshops used part number
256 x 7 which is a 3/16 round in the studs, the newer used a 256 x 1 which is 1/16 x 1/8, the reverse shaft uses a 256 x 3,
which is a 3/32 x 3/16. I stock both the 1 and the 3, they are $3.00 each, being 24 inches long, so there is enough to do the apron
also. On the older ones you can substitute the 3 for the 7. attached pictures of the reverse shaft and oil hole.
Yes, the shaft is hard to remove after time, DO NOT push or beat on the threads. Make a bushing that slips over the threads
and use this to press with, support the bracket close to the shaft on the reverse side with another bushing, don't spread out the force
on the cast iron.
 
Steve Wells  
 
 
 
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, May 22, 2014 10:53 PM
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Re: 9a Reverse Gear Shaft Stuck

 

There are felts in my old-style bolt-type reverse lever assembly.

The two tumbler gear shafts (the gears that take turns engaging the teeth on the end of the spindle) have an off-center hole in the outside end. This hole actually angles in to the center of the shaft, where it intersects a cross-wise hole that should have a felt in it (3/16 diameter round, I seem to recall). Oil goes from your can into the angled hole, which saturates the cross-wise felt that caries the oil to the inside of the gear.

I'm not sure that I would understand that explanation if I hadn't written it myself.

My felts were so solid with varnish from 60 years of oil that I had to drill them out with a drill bit spun between my thumb and fore finger.

Like you, I was unable to press out the stud-gear shaft. I soaked the whole assembly in carburetor  cleaner. This cleaned it up (including all the paint). I'm pretty sure that I can see the end of a length-wise rectangular felt on the stud gear shaft. I'm not 100% sure without getting the shaft out, which my arbor press won't do either. I'm not sure how oil gets to it.

The other hidden  or non-obvious feature is a pair of screws at either end of the bolt-slot so that forward and reverse gear mesh can be adjusted.

On 5/22/2014 9:27 PM, mosak@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] wrote:
 

I really appreciate the advice and Jim B thanks for the photo. So, just to make sure, contrary to the (fantastic) Wells book which uses a newer plunger style as the example, it appears that there are no internal wicks or channels in this old style Reverse Bracket? Thus, there is no need to remove the shaft because there is nothing that needs to be accessed?  Is this all correct?

 

There is a hole above the handle, which appears to be the place to oil the shaft, or is there supposed to be a wick here?  Finally, is the only place for wicks and on the entire thing just the shafts of the twin gears, with an oiling hole on their back?   Thank you so much.