feed handles hitting ea. other.


rudd long
 

I've got a '42 vintage 13" machine. If the compound is set at 0
degrees, the compound and cross feed screw handles will interefere w/
ea other. I have the small dials FWIW - has anyone else run into this?
Quite annoying.


Steve Wells
 

Rudd,
Set you compound on angle at lets say 30 degrees right and always try and feed towards the head stock if the cut allows,
square you tool or tool post to the work or chuck. If your cutting to a shoulder try to add a little cutter side relief so you
can face out as you bring the tool home with you cross slide. 
 
Steve 


eng4turns
 

Yeah, my '40s 13" does the same thing as does my '30s 415. It's
inherent and is avoided by angling the compound off zero.

If you want to eliminate it, you must re-manufacture your cross-feed
screw and bushing to move the handle further out by quite a bit. Is
the annoyance factor worth it? OTOH, you could make this your
opportunity to make and install large dials :)

Ed in Florida

--- In southbendlathe@..., "rudd long" <rudd135@...> wrote:

I've got a '42 vintage 13" machine. If the compound is set at 0
degrees, the compound and cross feed screw handles will interefere
w/
ea other. I have the small dials FWIW - has anyone else run into
this?
Quite annoying.


walter peterson <walt4711@...>
 

I have found the same thing on my 9" machine, but
since a person normally uses the cross feed for
faceing, I normally keep my compound at 29 degrees as
if I'm threading.
Walt


--- rudd long <rudd135@...> wrote:

I've got a '42 vintage 13" machine. If the compound
is set at 0
degrees, the compound and cross feed screw handles
will interefere w/
ea other. I have the small dials FWIW - has anyone
else run into this?
Quite annoying.




test'; ">


Clive Foster
 

Rudd

Pretty much a normal feature on all small and many not so small lathes.
Simply not enough vertical room for decent size handle clearance.
Usual solution is to set the top slide at a suitable angle, like Walt
mine is set at around 28 or 29 degrees ready for threading.
Very few jobs need the top-slide at 0 and these are usually a bit
special with other problems to cope with.
Only cure is an offset geared top-slide feed al la DSG, Holbrook,
Smart & Brown etc.
The George Thomas design for a Myford could be adapted but its
lots of work.

Less of a pain to me than the stupidly short travel on the
topslide and tailstock poppet. At leas an inch too little.

Clive

"rudd long" <rudd135@...> wrote:


I've got a '42 vintage 13" machine. If the compound is set at 0
degrees, the compound and cross feed screw handles will interefere w/
ea other. I have the small dials FWIW - has anyone else run into this?
Quite annoying.