New Photos


Steve Wells
 

Chris,
I've uploaded my last cross slide bushing photos at:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/stevewells/

After inspection, Denny says I have passed my pre-school test.
I am now ready for the gear cutting badge.:))

Anyone out there have a 3/4 or less straight shank arbor for a 1"
cutter to sell?

swells


ChristopherS
 

Steve,
 
With the kind of work you're producing you're more than capable of making your own. Go to the home page of the 10K group to see the ones that Bob Wright made. If you have a taper attachment you're good to go. If not, you can offset the TS.
 
Chris


Steve Wells wrote:

Chris,
I've uploaded my last cross slide bushing photos at:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/stevewells/

After inspection, Denny says I have passed my pre-school test.
I am now ready for the gear cutting badge.:))

Anyone out there have a 3/4 or less straight shank arbor for a 1"
cutter to sell?

swells



Joe R
 

Chris.
 
What a fantastic way Bob has for setting the taper attachment for MT's! I've been putting off turning some mt2 spindles for 1/2" chucks. This will make it a snap.
 
Joe Romas
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, March 11, 2007 10:59 PM
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] New Photos

Steve,
 
With the kind of work you're producing you're more than capable of making your own. Go to the home page of the 10K group to see the ones that Bob Wright made. If you have a taper attachment you're good to go. If not, you can offset the TS.
 
Chris


Steve Wells <wswells@earthlink.net> wrote:
Chris,
I've uploaded my last cross slide bushing photos at:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/stev


Steve Wells
 

Chris,
I'm looking for a straight shank, with the shank =/< 3/4 to fit my
ER32 collets with a 1" cutter arbor with single keyway. I've only been
able to find the correct gear cutter in 1". I'm building an indexing
cross slide holder for cutting the gear on the power feed models.
I could turn down a 1" if anyone has one.

Steve


BOB WRIGHT
 

Thanks guys for the comments. I haven't had much comp time as i have
been working 15 hr days since Feb 2nd with no days off. So heck with
work and back to the machining projects...Bob
--- In southbendlathe@..., "Joe R" <jromas@...> wrote:

Chris.

What a fantastic way Bob has for setting the taper attachment for
MT's! I've been putting off turning some mt2 spindles for 1/2" chucks.
This will make it a snap.

Joe Romas


ChristopherS
 

Yeah Joe, Bob has a way of un-complicating the complicated. He's a....uh...Minimalist!
 
Chris


Joe R wrote:

Chris.
 
What a fantastic way Bob has for setting the taper attachment for MT's! I've been putting off turning some mt2 spindles for 1/2" chucks. This will make it a snap.
 
Joe Romas
 
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, March 11, 2007 10:59 PM
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] New Photos

Steve,
 
With the kind of work you're producing you're more than capable of making your own. Go to the home page of the 10K group to see the ones that Bob Wright made. If you have a taper attachment you're good to go. If not, you can offset the TS.
 
Chris


Steve Wells <wswells@earthlink.net> wrote:
Chris,
I've uploaded my last cross slide bushing photos at:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/stev


ChristopherS
 

Steve,
 
Sorry about that. I thought you have a milling cutter with a 3/4" straight shank with a set screw flat.
 
Chris


Steve Wells wrote:

Chris,
I'm looking for a straight shank, with the shank =/< 3/4 to fit my
ER32 collets with a 1" cutter arbor with single keyway. I've only been
able to find the correct gear cutter in 1". I'm building an indexing
cross slide holder for cutting the gear on the power feed models.
I could turn down a 1" if anyone has one.

Steve



Rick Kruger <krugerr@...>
 

So, exactly where is this great method described? I went to the link which only takes one to the home page and I don't see anything there in the way of the details, nor a link or reference to where it is? Does one have to be a member of that group to see it in the files or photos sections?

Rick

At 03:58 AM 3/12/2007, you wrote:
Chris.

What a fantastic way Bob has for setting the taper attachment for MT's! I've been putting off turning some mt2 spindles for 1/2" chucks. This will make it a snap.

Joe Romas

----- Original Message -----
From: <mailto:cjstrazz@...>Chris Strazzeri
To: <mailto:southbendlathe@...>southbendlathe@...
Sent: Sunday, March 11, 2007 10:59 PM
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] New Photos

Steve,

With the kind of work you're producing you're more than capable of making your own. Go to the home page of the 10K group to see the ones that Bob Wright made. If you have a taper attachment you're good to go. If not, you can offset the TS.
<<http://groups.yahoo.com/group/southbend10k/?yguid=197128120>http://groups.yahoo.com/group/southbend10k/?yguid=197128120>

Chris


Steve Wells <<mailto:wswells@...>wswells@...> wrote:
Chris,
I've uploaded my last cross slide bushing photos at:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/stev



Joe R
 

Rick.
 
A picture is worth a thousand words! He mounted a center in his lathe, put a dial indicator in the cross slide and I assumed adjusted the taper attachment so as he moved the carriage the dial indicator stayed at one reading. That would mean he had it set at the right angle and was ready to make chips!
 
Joe

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, March 12, 2007 2:49 PM
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] New Photos

So, exactly where is this great method described? I went to the link
which only takes one to the home page and I don't see anything there
in the way of the details, nor a link or reference to where it
is? Does one have to be a member of that group to see it in the
files or photos sections?

Rick

At 03:58 AM 3/12/2007, you wrote:
>Chris.
>
>What a fantastic way Bob has for setting the taper attachment for
>MT's! I've been putting off turning some mt2 spindles for 1/2"
>chucks. This will make it a snap.
>
>Joe Romas
>
>----- Original Message -----
>From: cjstrazz@yahoo.com>Chris Strazzeri
>To: southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com>southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com
>Sent: Sunday, March 11, 2007 10:59 PM
>Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] New Photos
>
>Steve,
>
>With the kind of work you're producing you're more than capable of
>making your own. Go to the home page of the 10K group to see the
>ones that Bob Wright made. If you have a taper attachment you're
>good to go. If not, you can offset the TS.
><<http://groups.yahoo.com/group/southbend10k/?yguid=197128120>http://groups.yahoo.com/group/southbend10k/?yguid=197128120>
>
>Chris
>
>
>Steve Wells <wswells@earthlink.net>wswells@earthlink.net> wrote:
>Chris,
>I've uploaded my last cross slide bushing photos at:
>
>http://www.flickr.com/photos/stev
>
>
>


ChristopherS
 

Join the group and go to the Photo section.
 
Chris


Rick Kruger wrote:

So, exactly where is this great method described? I went to the link
which only takes one to the home page and I don't see anything there
in the way of the details, nor a link or reference to where it
is? Does one have to be a member of that group to see it in the
files or photos sections?

Rick

At 03:58 AM 3/12/2007, you wrote:
>Chris.
>
>What a fantastic way Bob has for setting the taper attachment for
>MT's! I've been putting off turning some mt2 spindles for 1/2"
>chucks. This will make it a snap.
>
>Joe Romas
>
>----- Original Message -----
>From: cjstrazz@yahoo.com>Chris Strazzeri
>To: southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com>southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com
>Sent: Sunday, March 11, 2007 10:59 PM
>Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] New Photos
>
>Steve,
>
>With the kind of work you're producing you're more than capable of
>making your own. Go to the home page of the 10K group to see the
>ones that Bob Wright made. If you have a taper attachment you're
>good to go. If not, you can offset the TS.
><<http://groups.yahoo.com/group/southbend10k/?yguid=197128120>http://groups.yahoo.com/group/southbend10k/?yguid=197128120>
>
>Chris
>
>
>Steve Wells <wswells@earthlink.net>wswells@earthlink.net> wrote:
>Chris,
>I've uploaded my last cross slide bushing photos at:
>
>http://www.flickr.com/photos/stev
>
>
>



Rick Kruger <krugerr@...>
 

Is it true that its just the dial indicator on an existing taper? That's as much as I need to know.

Rick

At 02:26 PM 3/12/2007, you wrote:
Join the group and go to the Photo section.

Chris


Rick Kruger <krugerr@...> wrote:
So, exactly where is this great method described? I went to the link
which only takes one to the home page and I don't see anything there
in the way of the details, nor a link or reference to where it
is? Does one have to be a member of that group to see it in the
files or photos sections?

Rick

At 03:58 AM 3/12/2007, you wrote:
Chris.

What a fantastic way Bob has for setting the taper attachment for
MT's! I've been putting off turning some mt2 spindles for 1/2"
chucks. This will make it a snap.

Joe Romas

----- Original Message -----
From: <mailto:cjstrazz@...>Chris Strazzeri
To:
<mailto:southbendlathe@...><mailto:southbendlathe%40yahoogroups.com>southbendlathe@...
Sent: Sunday, March 11, 2007 10:59 PM
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] New Photos

Steve,

With the kind of work you're producing you're more than capable of
making your own. Go to the home page of the 10K group to see the
ones that Bob Wright made. If you have a taper attachment you're
good to go. If not, you can offset the TS.
<<<http://groups.yahoo.com/group/southbend10k/?yguid=197128120>http
://groups.yahoo.com/group/southbend10k/?yguid=197128120>http://groups.yahoo.com/group/southbend10k/?yguid=197128120>

Chris


Steve Wells
<<mailto:wswells@...><mailto:wswells%40earthlink.net>wswells@...> wrote:
Chris,
I've uploaded my last cross slide bushing photos at:

<http://www.flickr.com/photos/stev>http://www.flickr.com/photos/stev




Clive Foster
 

Rick

Dail indicator on an existing, known good taper is an easy standard
method.

If you don't have a taper to hand you can use the same technique on
a parallel test bar by moving the saddle an accurately known
amount and setting the attachment to give a reading corresponding
to the specified taper per foot. 3 or 4 inches is a good movement.
Easy way to get it accurate is to drop the half-nuts and turn the
leadscrew by hand, this is a good time to have a calibrated handle,
to measure the distance needed and clamp bed stops at both
ends to restrict the carriage travel to that distance. Then you can
use the handwheel as per normal during setting up.

Second method needs a good quality indicator 'cos its being used
as a measuring instrument.
First method only needs a null poin indicator so pretty much anything
can be pressed into service. Even a long finger on a pivot or cigarette
papers and a round ended probe can get a result if used with sufficient
care.

Dont forget to check that things are concentric before setting up.
I know a man who just assumed and had to do it all over when the
reference turned out to be 10 thou out!

Clive

Is it true that its just the dial indicator on an existing
taper? That's as much as I need to know.

Rick


Rick Kruger <krugerr@...>
 

Yeah, being out of concentric would throw it off a bit. I'm not planning on making any, any time soon, so it was more of general interest. So, couldn't one use the taper in the spindle if they didn't have an taper to put between centers? The spindle taper is short, and would require a bit of a reach with the indicator, but if the indicator was rigid enough and had the travel. Isn't it the same thing as far as setting it up?

Rick

At 03:41 PM 3/12/2007, you wrote:
Rick

Dail indicator on an existing, known good taper is an easy standard
method.

If you don't have a taper to hand you can use the same technique on
a parallel test bar by moving the saddle an accurately known
amount and setting the attachment to give a reading corresponding
to the specified taper per foot. 3 or 4 inches is a good movement.
Easy way to get it accurate is to drop the half-nuts and turn the
leadscrew by hand, this is a good time to have a calibrated handle,
to measure the distance needed and clamp bed stops at both
ends to restrict the carriage travel to that distance. Then you can
use the handwheel as per normal during setting up.

Second method needs a good quality indicator 'cos its being used
as a measuring instrument.
First method only needs a null poin indicator so pretty much anything
can be pressed into service. Even a long finger on a pivot or cigarette
papers and a round ended probe can get a result if used with sufficient
care.

Dont forget to check that things are concentric before setting up.
I know a man who just assumed and had to do it all over when the
reference turned out to be 10 thou out!

Clive

Is it true that its just the dial indicator on an existing
taper? That's as much as I need to know.

Rick




--
Web: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/southbendlathe/
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Yahoo! Groups Links



Joe R
 

Yes but the way he has the mt centered allows a quick easy and accurate way to setup the taper attachment!
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, March 12, 2007 6:03 PM
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] New Photos

Is it true that its just the dial indicator on an existing
taper? That's as much as I need to know.

Rick

At 02:26 PM 3/12/2007, you wrote:
>Join the group and go to the Photo section.
>
>Chris
>
>
>Rick Kruger <krugerr@easystreet.com> wrote:
>So, exactly where is this great method described? I went to the link
>which only takes one to the home page and I don't see anything there
>in the way of the details, nor a link or reference to where it
>is? Does one have to be a member of that group to see it in the
>files or photos sections?
>
>Rick
>
>At 03:58 AM 3/12/2007, you wrote:
> >Chris.
> >
> >What a fantastic way Bob has for setting the taper attachment for
> >MT's! I've been putting off turning some mt2 spindles for 1/2"
> >chucks. This will make it a snap.
> >
> >Joe Romas
> >
> >----- Original Message -----
> >From: cjstrazz@yahoo.com>Chris Strazzeri
> >To:
> southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com>athe%40yahoogroups.com>southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com
> >Sent: Sunday, March 11, 2007 10:59 PM
> >Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] New Photos
> >
> >Steve,
> >
> >With the kind of work you're producing you're more than capable of
> >making your own. Go to the home page of the 10K group to see the
> >ones that Bob Wright made. If you have a taper attachment you're
> >good to go. If not, you can offset the TS.
> ><<<http://groups.yahoo.com/group/southbend10k/?yguid=197128120>http
> ://groups.yahoo.com/group/southbend10k/?yguid=197128120>http://groups.yahoo.com/group/southbend10k/?yguid=197128120>
> >
> >Chris
> >
> >
> >Steve Wells
> <wswells@earthlink.net><mailto:wswells%40earthlink.net>wswells@earthlink.net>
> wrote:
> >Chris,
> >I've uploaded my last cross slide bushing photos at:
> >
> ><http://www.flickr.com/photos/stev>http://www.flickr.com/photos/stev
> >
> >
> >
>
>
>


ChristopherS
 

Talk about turning what was a simple technique into a far more difficult task?x!?
 
Chris


Rick Kruger wrote:

 So, couldn't one use the taper in the spindle if they
didn't have an taper to put between centers? The spindle taper is
short, and would require a bit of a reach with the indicator, but if
the indicator was rigid enough and had the travel. Isn't it the same
thing as far as setting it up?

Rick

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Rick Kruger <krugerr@...>
 

I agree, but, in context, I was responding to what seemed like an even more difficult process...

Rick

At 03:41 PM 3/12/2007, Clive wrote:
...snip...
If you don't have a taper to hand you can use the same technique on
a parallel test bar by moving the saddle an accurately known
amount and setting the attachment to give a reading corresponding
to the specified taper per foot. 3 or 4 inches is a good movement.
Easy way to get it accurate is to drop the half-nuts and turn the
leadscrew by hand, this is a good time to have a calibrated handle,
to measure the distance needed and clamp bed stops at both
ends to restrict the carriage travel to that distance. Then you can
use the handwheel as per normal during setting up.
...snip...
Clive
At 08:03 PM 3/12/2007, you wrote:
Talk about turning what was a simple technique into a far more difficult task?x!?

Chris

Rick Kruger <krugerr@...> wrote:
So, couldn't one use the taper in the spindle if they
didn't have an taper to put between centers? The spindle taper is
short, and would require a bit of a reach with the indicator, but if
the indicator was rigid enough and had the travel. Isn't it the same
thing as far as setting it up?

Rick


BOB WRIGHT
 

The biggest reason i didn't use a dial indicator is i am trying to do
the job like most people with basic skills and no special measuring
instruments or a limited supply of them. I have all the tools and
skills to use them but 75% of the people on the groups prob don't
have them. So basically i am coming down to the average persons level
to get the same job done...Bob
--- In southbendlathe@..., Rick Kruger <krugerr@...>
wrote:

I agree, but, in context, I was responding to what seemed like an
even more difficult process...

Rick

At 03:41 PM 3/12/2007, Clive wrote:
...snip...
If you don't have a taper to hand you can use the same technique on
a parallel test bar by moving the saddle an accurately known
amount and setting the attachment to give a reading corresponding
to the specified taper per foot. 3 or 4 inches is a good
movement.
Easy way to get it accurate is to drop the half-nuts and turn the
leadscrew by hand, this is a good time to have a calibrated handle,
to measure the distance needed and clamp bed stops at both
ends to restrict the carriage travel to that distance. Then you can
use the handwheel as per normal during setting up.
...snip...
Clive
At 08:03 PM 3/12/2007, you wrote:
Talk about turning what was a simple technique into a far more
difficult task?x!?

Chris

Rick Kruger <krugerr@...> wrote:
So, couldn't one use the taper in the spindle if they
didn't have an taper to put between centers? The spindle taper is
short, and would require a bit of a reach with the indicator, but
if
the indicator was rigid enough and had the travel. Isn't it the
same
thing as far as setting it up?

Rick


Clive Foster
 

Chris

Using an internal taper in the spindle is hardly making things more difficult and pretty much ensures no concentricity troubles.

Its the way I did the job last time.

Easiest with a slender lever type indicator, like my old style Verdict 10 ths gauge, run down the back side of the taper so you can see WTHIGO and make the new taper big end to chuck or collet in best practice fashion.

If you've not got a slender indicator its easy enough to make up an L shape lever and mount to use a too big lever one or a plunger. Sort of thing its worth making a proper job of as it can come in handy for all sorts of other things. The UK magazine Model Engineers Workshop had a series a while back on making a set of such add-ons for a dial gauge along with illustrations of when they would be useful. As is so often the case once things are explained by example an, at first glance, "yeah nice but I'd hardly use it" thing turns out to have much wider employment.

Once again its a null, no movement, job so a long stiff wire on a pivot pointing percy at a centre in the tail stock works well enough if you take care. Time to dig out the eyeglass though to be sure it really is "null movement".

Big advantage of the parallel & dial gauge method is that you can set- up any taper from scratch providing you have the specs.

Clive


ChristopherS
 

Hi Clive,
 
I said what I said because it just seems logical that setting this up (as Bob did) is about the most simplistic and straight forward approach I could ever imagine. It also is right up in front of you, instead of being buried in a small dark hole. Old eyes, don't ya know!
 
Chris


Clive Foster wrote:

Chris

Using an internal taper in the spindle is hardly making things more
difficult and pretty much ensures no concentricity troubles.

Its the way I did the job last time.

Easiest with a slender lever type indicator, like my old style
Verdict 10 ths gauge, run down the back side of the taper so you can
see WTHIGO and make the new taper big end to chuck or collet in best
practice fashion.

If you've not got a slender indicator its easy enough to make up an L
shape lever and mount to use a too big lever one or a plunger. Sort
of thing its worth making a proper job of as it can come in handy for
all sorts of other things. The UK magazine Model Engineers Workshop
had a series a while back on making a set of such add-ons for a dial
gauge along with illustrations of when they would be useful. As is
so often the case once things are explained by example an, at first
glance, "yeah nice but I'd hardly use it" thing turns out to have
much wider employment.

Once again its a null, no movement, job so a long stiff wire on a
pivot pointing percy at a centre in the tail stock works well enough
if you take care. Time to dig out the eyeglass though to be sure it
really is "null movement".

Big advantage of the parallel & dial gauge method is that you can set-
up any taper from scratch providing you have the specs.

Clive