plates


bripaul67 <brian.paulino@...>
 

I'm rebuilding my 13" SB lathe and I'm wondering if anyone would know
where I can find NOS data plates that are installed throughout the
lathe. Or a business that can reproduce such items. Thank you.


David J. Young
 

There's a guy (Randy?) that used to sell very nice reproduction data
plates. He still sells under the sellers name of DT38K on Ebay, but I
don't see any plates for sell. Go to http://tinyurl.com/2lnmme and
you'll see the stuff he's selling. You could then ask him whether he
has any in stock.

Dave Young


--- In southbendlathe@..., "bripaul67" <brian.paulino@...>
wrote:

I'm rebuilding my 13" SB lathe and I'm wondering if anyone would know
where I can find NOS data plates that are installed throughout the
lathe. Or a business that can reproduce such items. Thank you.


bripaul67
 

Hi Dave,
Wow my first posting in this group and within hours I got good help.
Thank you for the lead, I did contact the guy and he has the plates I
need. He was very prompt in his reply and sounds like a good person for
other parts. brian


--- In southbendlathe@..., "David J. Young" <daveyoung@...>
wrote:

There's a guy (Randy?) that used to sell very nice reproduction data
plates. He still sells under the sellers name of DT38K on Ebay, but I
don't see any plates for sell. Go to http://tinyurl.com/2lnmme and
you'll see the stuff he's selling. You could then ask him whether he
has any in stock.

Dave Young


--- In southbendlathe@..., "bripaul67" brian.paulino@
wrote:

I'm rebuilding my 13" SB lathe and I'm wondering if anyone would
know
where I can find NOS data plates that are installed throughout the
lathe. Or a business that can reproduce such items. Thank you.


David J. Young
 

Brian,

Randy (I believe that was his name) used to be somewhat of a regular
on this forum, and if memory serves me correctly, had a good
reputation. I've seen photo's of his reproduction plates and they
were beautifully done. I believe you'll be very happy with his
merchandise.

If you have any questions about your lathe, please post them here.
There are a lot of very talented and knowledgeable individuals here
that are extremely helpful. You should also look at the FAQ for this
forum at http://tinyurl.com/2r22mh . There's a LOT of good info there.

Welcome aboard!

Dave Young

--- In southbendlathe@..., "bripaul67" <bryp@...> wrote:

Hi Dave,
Wow my first posting in this group and within hours I got good help.
Thank you for the lead, I did contact the guy and he has the plates I
need. He was very prompt in his reply and sounds like a good person for
other parts. brian


bripaul67
 

It's a good thing I emailed Randy the exact picture of the data plate
for my 13" SB. He told me that he has the plates for the earlier
model 13" lathes and promptly refunded me. So I'm still in search for
this plate. Randy did refer me to check seller millermachinesales on
Ebay so hopefully he'll reply with good news. In the meantime, I'm
assuming these plates are made by screen printing it on the aluminum??
Does anyone know are are these plates are actually produced?


David J. Young
 

Brian,

I have a Word document that explains how a DIY can do a brass
nameplate that I got off the Internet a while back. If you want it,
send me an e-mail (so that I can get your e-mail address) I'll reply
to you with a copy. My e-mail address is daveyoung@....

Dave

--- In southbendlathe@..., "bripaul67" <bryp@...> wrote:

It's a good thing I emailed Randy the exact picture of the data plate
for my 13" SB. He told me that he has the plates for the earlier
model 13" lathes and promptly refunded me. So I'm still in search for
this plate. Randy did refer me to check seller millermachinesales on
Ebay so hopefully he'll reply with good news. In the meantime, I'm
assuming these plates are made by screen printing it on the aluminum??
Does anyone know are are these plates are actually produced?


bripaul67
 

I can see on the original plate the letters are raised a bit. Randy
told me the raised letters are produced with acid and then screen
printed. Is there anyone in this group that actually worked at South
Bend that would know where they were made originally? In house?


ChristopherS
 

The original SB brass plates were embossed. Even if the paint wore off, the data is still there. Either SB stamped the plates or rolled them though a die prior to coloring them.
 
Chris


bripaul67 wrote:

I can see on the original plate the letters are raised a bit. Randy
told me the raised letters are produced with acid and then screen
printed. Is there anyone in this group that actually worked at South
Bend that would know where they were made originally? In house?



Dennis Turk <dennis.turk2@...>
 

Hi Chris

With all the SB tags and legend plates I have played with over the
years and also the time I spent at Tektronix in Beaverton Oregon were
they had an extensive chem. mill facility. The older SB plates were
or appeared to be chemically milled to create the raised detail. I
say chem. mill rather than stamped because if they were stamped there
would be impressions on the back side of the plate and I have never
seen any on a SB plate.

Also at least the pre war data plates were not painted rather they
were enameled. This was a process much like powder coating. The dry
powder is applied to the recess areas of the plate and then they
went through a baking process. That is what made them so durable.
As this was done while the plate was dead flat after baking they went
through a burnishing process to brighten the raised detail of the
plate. I dont thing SB made any of there own tags and legend plats
as there would have been companies that specialized in this area of
manufacturing.

Dalton and Flather used the same company in Ma. to make there tags.
The only difference in the two company's tags is the company name and
address the tags are identical

Just like threading lead screws. SB never made any of there own
except for the 405 left hand screw. All others were sourced from a
sub contractor.

Some of the plates I see in the Amsted era are in fact just flat
brass plates that have been silk screened. These did not hold up
well.

Just some thoughts and observations.

Turk


Steve Wells
 

Here's a link to a forum for making plates by the
chemically milled process that Denny described,
you might contact Mike Burdick from this group.
the second link describes how to make a plate.

http://bbssystem.com/viewforum.php?f=15

http://www.gasenginemagazine.com/archive/0403/0403_feature1.html


Steve


ChristopherS
 

Thanks Denny. That's a big surprise! I didn't give a thought to the fact that they may have etched the background away. That's quite a bit of metal to etch away, but hey.... what ever works.
 
Chris


Dennis Turk wrote:

Hi Chris

With all the SB tags and legend plates I have played with over the
years and also the time I spent at Tektronix in Beaverton Oregon were
they had an extensive chem. mill facility. The older SB plates were
or appeared to be chemically milled to create the raised detail. I
say chem. mill rather than stamped because if they were stamped there
would be impressions on the back side of the plate and I have never
seen any on a SB plate.

Also at least the pre war data plates were not painted rather they
were enameled. This was a process much like powder coating. The dry
powder is applied to the recess areas of the plate and then they
went through a baking process. That is what made them so durable.
As this was done while the plate was dead flat after baking they went
through a burnishing process to brighten the raised detail of the
plate. I dont thing SB made any of there own tags and legend plats
as there would have been companies that specialized in this area of
manufacturing.

Dalton and Flather used the same company in Ma. to make there tags.
The only difference in the two company's tags is the company name and
address the tags are identical

Just like threading lead screws. SB never made any of there own
except for the 405 left hand screw. All others were sourced from a
sub contractor.

Some of the plates I see in the Amsted era are in fact just flat
brass plates that have been silk screened. These did not hold up
well.

Just some thoughts and observations.

Turk