Take II, spindle bearing wicks?


Henry Hopkins <rhhph@...>
 

Let me throw this one out to the list one more time. Seems like folks
were too worked up about the pacific rim etc. to answer technical
questions ;-)

Am I supposed to have a cotton wick in my spindle bearings?
(1922 11 inch SB)

If so does the wick just go in the oiler hole or is it also supposed
to run lengthwise along the bearing like it does on the counter shaft
bearings.

Henry



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kc1fp
 

Henry, The wicks are SAE grade F1 felt. You can get it from
McMaster-Carr industrial supply in rope, strip and sheet form. While I
do not have reference to the 11 inch lathe for reference the others
has the wick end rubbing against the spindle journal and the other end
in a well of spindle oil ISO 22 grade machine oil.

On the 10L the wick is 3/8" rope with 1/8" rope used in the apron to
distribute the same oil.

Grade F1 felt is the best to distribute oil and it is relatively hard,
the loose stuff is no good as an oil wick. It will take a razor blade
and a little patience. You can also buy the wicks pre-cut from Leblond
and probably from Parts Works as well. JP

--- In southbendlathe@..., Henry Hopkins <rhhph@r...> wrote:
Let me throw this one out to the list one more time. Seems like folks
were too worked up about the pacific rim etc. to answer technical
questions ;-)

Am I supposed to have a cotton wick in my spindle bearings?
(1922 11 inch SB)

If so does the wick just go in the oiler hole or is it also supposed
to run lengthwise along the bearing like it does on the counter shaft
bearings.

Henry



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eeengineer@...
 

I don't own a 1922 11 inch so what I am going to say could be a lot of junk.
 
My 1934 9C (Model 405) is different than the later units. It has (had) oil caps on the top and not on the side. There is a slot axially in the bearing which is supposed to have wicks. There were no wicks in the oil holes. On the front jurnal part of this wick was missing. The lack of lubrication on only part of the bearing caused the spindle to seize.
 
I am guessing your lathe is similar.
 
Jim B.
 

-------------- Original message --------------

>
> Let me throw this one out to the list one more time. Seems like folks
> were too worked up about the pacific rim etc. to answer technical
> questions ;-)
>
> Am I supposed to have a cotton wick in my spindle bearings?
> (1922 11 inch SB)
>
> If so does the wick just go in the oiler hole or is it also supposed
> to run lengthwise along the bearing like it does on the counter shaft
> bearings.
>
> Henry


Steve Wells
 

Henry,
I have the same problem with my 1922 9" model 25A.
It has phosphorus bronze "Babbit type" bearings, with overhead
oil holes. It does not have covers on the tulip shaped, press-in type,
brass oilers. I'm not sure if it ever had felt running on the
spindle, and may have just been drip oiled by hand. I am going to fit
a cup type oiler with the spring retained felt in the bearing cap.
It looks like I will end up trimming the felt to pass through the
bearing top hole to rest on the spindle. I can tap the bearing cap
hole to fit a larger cup or press some type of an insert in and tap
that. Does anyone have some expert advise here? I would like to do it
the "right way"

Steve


viajoaquin@...
 

Steve
Wicks are used to bring oil up from a well below the bearing on lathes with the oil cups on the front of the head stock. If your lathe has oil cups in the top of the bearing caps you don't need any wicks because the oil gravity feeds. The only thing you might want to do is keep some kind of cap over the cup to keep crud from getting into it.
Roy
 

In a message dated 2/3/2005 5:46:44 AM Pacific Standard Time, wswells@... writes:
Henry,
I have the same problem with my 1922 9" model 25A.
It has phosphorus bronze "Babbit type" bearings, with overhead
oil holes. It does not have covers on the tulip shaped, press-in type,
brass oilers. I'm not sure if it ever had felt running on the
spindle, and may have just been drip oiled by hand. I am going to fit
a cup type oiler with the spring retained felt in the bearing cap.
It looks like I will end up trimming the felt to pass through the
bearing top hole to rest on the spindle. I can tap the bearing cap
hole to fit a larger cup or press some type of an insert in and tap
that. Does anyone have some expert advise here? I would like to do it
the "right way"

Steve    


Steve Wells
 

Roy,
Thanks for the wick info, I was pretty sure there was never a wick or
cover in or on the oil cap from the amount of dirt and crud I found
in there. Another option I have is to drill and tap a drip type
oiler in the bearing cap. I thought this might be the best soultion
if I could find a small brass one with shut-off and sight glass. The
bearing oil cap holes are 5/16.

Steve


kc1fp
 

McMasters carries those as well. I have felt stuffed oilers on my
Shaper. They seem to control the flow of oil nicely.

--- In southbendlathe@..., "disco_elvis" <wswells@e...> wrote:

Roy,
Thanks for the wick info, I was pretty sure there was never a wick or
cover in or on the oil cap from the amount of dirt and crud I found
in there. Another option I have is to drill and tap a drip type
oiler in the bearing cap. I thought this might be the best soultion
if I could find a small brass one with shut-off and sight glass. The
bearing oil cap holes are 5/16.

Steve


Henry Hopkins <rhhph@...>
 

Hello Roy,

In my case it looks like I need at least one wick to keep the oil
from running right through the bearing. The fact that if runs right
though might have to do with damage to the spindle and bearing
surfaces.

Henry

--- viajoaquin@... wrote:

Steve
Wicks are used to bring oil up from a well below the bearing on
lathes with
the oil cups on the front of the head stock. If your lathe has oil
cups in the
top of the bearing caps you don't need any wicks because the oil
gravity
feeds. The only thing you might want to do is keep some kind of cap
over the cup to
keep crud from getting into it.
Roy

In a message dated 2/3/2005 5:46:44 AM Pacific Standard Time,
wswells@... writes:
Henry,
I have the same problem with my 1922 9" model 25A.
It has phosphorus bronze "Babbit type" bearings, with overhead
oil holes. It does not have covers on the tulip shaped, press-in
type,
brass oilers. I'm not sure if it ever had felt running on the
spindle, and may have just been drip oiled by hand. I am going to
fit
a cup type oiler with the spring retained felt in the bearing cap.
It looks like I will end up trimming the felt to pass through the
bearing top hole to rest on the spindle. I can tap the bearing cap
hole to fit a larger cup or press some type of an insert in and tap

that. Does anyone have some expert advise here? I would like to do
it
the "right way"

Steve


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eng4turns
 

Steve, I had the same problem with a 1936 9C. Here's what I'd
suggest: Go to http://www.gitsmfg.com/wick-feed-oil-cups-Style-
WD.asp and look at these oilers. The construction has an oil
reservoir with a standpipe in the center that extends down to a
threaded mount. The oil level is always below the top of the
standpipe. The wick loops up out of the oil, through an air space
and down into the standpipe, out the bottom and onto your spinning
spindle. When the lathe is running, the spindle removes oil from the
end of the wick, causing sufficient capillary action so that oil can
overcome the "lift" up out of the reservoir. This helps to prevent
oil from flowing when the lathe is not running.

Ed in Florida

--- In southbendlathe@..., "disco_elvis" <wswells@e...>
wrote:

Roy,
Thanks for the wick info, I was pretty sure there was never a wick
or
cover in or on the oil cap from the amount of dirt and crud I found
in there. Another option I have is to drill and tap a drip type
oiler in the bearing cap. I thought this might be the best soultion
if I could find a small brass one with shut-off and sight glass.
The
bearing oil cap holes are 5/16.

Steve


Steve Wells
 

All,
I ordered the standpipe type cups from Gits as per your post.
I believe they will do the trick, if they wick enough oil.
Henry, if the bearings are shimmed for spindle alignment and the
oil drops over head, it can leak from the top of the bearing.
the felt oiler should keep it in the bearing hole and on the spindle.
You must shim the caps for proper bearing clearance. I found this
last weekend that I had to shim the front bearing (not the cap)
down .002 to allow it to seat and properly tighten on the lower
bearing, I have the rear bearing clearance at .001 right now, I have
ordered spindle oil and will re-clean the spindle and bearings and
apply this oil to see if I can lower the clearance to about .0008-
.0009. If I can't, If I read the post's correctly that .001 is OK.
The slots in the bearings would seem to be to allow the oil to flow
down spindle before being wiped. They have ends that are open to the
inside top surface of the head to allow dripping (IMHO) My front
bearing clearance is about perfect right now, but if I tighten the
caps, let's say to about 30 fp it gets tight. I would think I don't
have the shims correct and will reshim untill this does not happen
and the clearance remains the same with the light oil. I am now down
to working with the .001 shims.
Thanks for everyone's help, without it I would be lost.

Steve







--- In southbendlathe@..., "eng4turns" <eng4turns@y...>
wrote:

Steve, I had the same problem with a 1936 9C. Here's what I'd
suggest: Go to http://www.gitsmfg.com/wick-feed-oil-cups-Style-
WD.asp and look at these oilers. The construction has an oil
reservoir with a standpipe in the center that extends down to a
threaded mount. The oil level is always below the top of the
standpipe. The wick loops up out of the oil, through an air space
and down into the standpipe, out the bottom and onto your spinning
spindle. When the lathe is running, the spindle removes oil from
the
end of the wick, causing sufficient capillary action so that oil
can
overcome the "lift" up out of the reservoir. This helps to prevent
oil from flowing when the lathe is not running.

Ed in Florida

--- In southbendlathe@..., "disco_elvis" <wswells@e...>
wrote:

Roy,
Thanks for the wick info, I was pretty sure there was never a
wick
or
cover in or on the oil cap from the amount of dirt and crud I
found
in there. Another option I have is to drill and tap a drip type
oiler in the bearing cap. I thought this might be the best
soultion
if I could find a small brass one with shut-off and sight glass.
The
bearing oil cap holes are 5/16.

Steve