Topics

10L motor replacement recommendations #10l

jahick4@...
 

Hi all,

The motor on my 1942 10L seems to have given up the ghost, and despite my best Google Fu, I’ve had a very difficult time coming up with the best replacement motors due to the fact that it is from before ANSI/NEMA size and type conventions were standardized - or so I believe.

The motor I have is a 3/4 hp Wagner Electric Corporation 3-phase, 220v motor of the type “RP” and a 75U frame. Does anyone have a recommendation for a replacement motor that will require minimal modifications to the mounting plate? 

I’ve also read some debate in other posts over the past few years regarding horsepower rating. If I’m going to be replacing the motor anyway, I’d just assume give the old girl a power upgrade, too. Would a 1.5 or 2hp motor be a worthwhile upgrade for my machine? At what hp rating does the belt drive start to become a limiting factor in power transmission?

I would really appreciate any advice anyone is willing and able to provide. I really want to get her making chips again very badly!

Thank you!

John Hicks
Weymouth, MA

Andrei
 

Many have done a Consew 1000 sewing motor installation.

Typos are courtesy of autocorrect.


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of jahick4@... <jahick4@...>
Sent: Sunday, March 15, 2020 2:06:22 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] 10L motor replacement recommendations #10l
 

Hi all,

The motor on my 1942 10L seems to have given up the ghost, and despite my best Google Fu, I’ve had a very difficult time coming up with the best replacement motors due to the fact that it is from before ANSI/NEMA size and type conventions were standardized - or so I believe.

The motor I have is a 3/4 hp Wagner Electric Corporation 3-phase, 220v motor of the type “RP” and a 75U frame. Does anyone have a recommendation for a replacement motor that will require minimal modifications to the mounting plate? 

I’ve also read some debate in other posts over the past few years regarding horsepower rating. If I’m going to be replacing the motor anyway, I’d just assume give the old girl a power upgrade, too. Would a 1.5 or 2hp motor be a worthwhile upgrade for my machine? At what hp rating does the belt drive start to become a limiting factor in power transmission?

I would really appreciate any advice anyone is willing and able to provide. I really want to get her making chips again very badly!

Thank you!

John Hicks
Weymouth, MA

glenn brooks
 

Going thru the same thing. In the past, the only real solution is just drill new holes in the mounting plate.

Personally I would not upgrade to higher HP, certainly not 1.5hp. Reason being the older machines were designed with a specific hp in mind. If you increase HP, you run the risk of overloading some castings and gears and breaking same in the event of a mishap.  The 10L have served a long and useful life with 3/4 hp, I would stick with what works...  Maybe the SB gurus can add more knowledgeable comment...

Glenn B.


On Mar 15, 2020, at 8:09 AM, Andrei <calciu1@...> wrote:

Many have done a Consew 1000 sewing motor installation.

Typos are courtesy of autocorrect.


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of jahick4@... <jahick4@...>
Sent: Sunday, March 15, 2020 2:06:22 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] 10L motor replacement recommendations #10l
 

Hi all,

The motor on my 1942 10L seems to have given up the ghost, and despite my best Google Fu, I’ve had a very difficult time coming up with the best replacement motors due to the fact that it is from before ANSI/NEMA size and type conventions were standardized - or so I believe.

The motor I have is a 3/4 hp Wagner Electric Corporation 3-phase, 220v motor of the type “RP” and a 75U frame. Does anyone have a recommendation for a replacement motor that will require minimal modifications to the mounting plate? 

I’ve also read some debate in other posts over the past few years regarding horsepower rating. If I’m going to be replacing the motor anyway, I’d just assume give the old girl a power upgrade, too. Would a 1.5 or 2hp motor be a worthwhile upgrade for my machine? At what hp rating does the belt drive start to become a limiting factor in power transmission?

I would really appreciate any advice anyone is willing and able to provide. I really want to get her making chips again very badly!

Thank you!

John Hicks
Weymouth, MA

Bill in OKC too
 

My vintage 1941 10L Catalog 8187-RN 4-1/2' bed, shipped from the factory with a 3/4HP 1 phase 1725 rpm 115VAC motor, make is X'e out. That should be powerful enough as long as you don't buy one of the Chinese motors. Their horses seem to be a little smaller than ours. The motor that came with it is a 220VAC 3 phase motor. From the size, I'd guesstimate 1.5HP or so, but there's no data plate. I'm going on verbal info from the previous owner, who is going on the same from the guy he got it from. As best we all remember. So no promises there! ;)

Anyway, I hope the info that came off the build card helps.

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)




On Sunday, March 15, 2020, 01:06:28 PM CDT, <jahick4@...> wrote:


Hi all,

The motor on my 1942 10L seems to have given up the ghost, and despite my best Google Fu, I’ve had a very difficult time coming up with the best replacement motors due to the fact that it is from before ANSI/NEMA size and type conventions were standardized - or so I believe.

The motor I have is a 3/4 hp Wagner Electric Corporation 3-phase, 220v motor of the type “RP” and a 75U frame. Does anyone have a recommendation for a replacement motor that will require minimal modifications to the mounting plate? 

I’ve also read some debate in other posts over the past few years regarding horsepower rating. If I’m going to be replacing the motor anyway, I’d just assume give the old girl a power upgrade, too. Would a 1.5 or 2hp motor be a worthwhile upgrade for my machine? At what hp rating does the belt drive start to become a limiting factor in power transmission?

I would really appreciate any advice anyone is willing and able to provide. I really want to get her making chips again very badly!

Thank you!

John Hicks
Weymouth, MA

mike allen
 

        Consew makes motors larger than the 1000 , a quik google will show ya several different watt ratings. I just did a treadmill conversion just to see how I liked the variable speed & so far I love it . but I think  for the long run

        I'll end up with dither a Consew or a 110VAC to 230 3 phase with a vfd from dealers electric . I just need to under stand the whole VFD control

        YMMV

        animal

       

On 3/15/2020 11:09 AM, Andrei wrote:
Many have done a Consew 1000 sewing motor installation.

Typos are courtesy of autocorrect.


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of jahick4@... <jahick4@...>
Sent: Sunday, March 15, 2020 2:06:22 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] 10L motor replacement recommendations #10l
 

Hi all,

The motor on my 1942 10L seems to have given up the ghost, and despite my best Google Fu, I’ve had a very difficult time coming up with the best replacement motors due to the fact that it is from before ANSI/NEMA size and type conventions were standardized - or so I believe.

The motor I have is a 3/4 hp Wagner Electric Corporation 3-phase, 220v motor of the type “RP” and a 75U frame. Does anyone have a recommendation for a replacement motor that will require minimal modifications to the mounting plate? 

I’ve also read some debate in other posts over the past few years regarding horsepower rating. If I’m going to be replacing the motor anyway, I’d just assume give the old girl a power upgrade, too. Would a 1.5 or 2hp motor be a worthwhile upgrade for my machine? At what hp rating does the belt drive start to become a limiting factor in power transmission?

I would really appreciate any advice anyone is willing and able to provide. I really want to get her making chips again very badly!

Thank you!

John Hicks
Weymouth, MA

amriensr
 

I just got finished re-powering my 1942 Heavy Ten. I went to a Leeson 1hp 90v DC motor and a KB speed controller.  I really like the the variable speed and torque compensation feature.

On Sunday, March 15, 2020, 2:25:58 PM EDT, mike allen <animal@...> wrote:


        Consew makes motors larger than the 1000 , a quik google will show ya several different watt ratings. I just did a treadmill conversion just to see how I liked the variable speed & so far I love it . but I think  for the long run

        I'll end up with dither a Consew or a 110VAC to 230 3 phase with a vfd from dealers electric . I just need to under stand the whole VFD control

        YMMV

        animal

       

On 3/15/2020 11:09 AM, Andrei wrote:
Many have done a Consew 1000 sewing motor installation.

Typos are courtesy of autocorrect.


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of jahick4@... <jahick4@...>
Sent: Sunday, March 15, 2020 2:06:22 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] 10L motor replacement recommendations #10l
 

Hi all,

The motor on my 1942 10L seems to have given up the ghost, and despite my best Google Fu, I’ve had a very difficult time coming up with the best replacement motors due to the fact that it is from before ANSI/NEMA size and type conventions were standardized - or so I believe.

The motor I have is a 3/4 hp Wagner Electric Corporation 3-phase, 220v motor of the type “RP” and a 75U frame. Does anyone have a recommendation for a replacement motor that will require minimal modifications to the mounting plate? 

I’ve also read some debate in other posts over the past few years regarding horsepower rating. If I’m going to be replacing the motor anyway, I’d just assume give the old girl a power upgrade, too. Would a 1.5 or 2hp motor be a worthwhile upgrade for my machine? At what hp rating does the belt drive start to become a limiting factor in power transmission?

I would really appreciate any advice anyone is willing and able to provide. I really want to get her making chips again very badly!

Thank you!

John Hicks
Weymouth, MA

jahick4@...
 

Thank you so much for the advice, gentlemen. I really appreciate it greatly!

I’ll definitely look into the Consew motors. It certainly sounds promising. 


I did a treadmill motor conversion to an old Milwaukee drill press by piggy-backing off of the original treadmill controls with an Arduino. I hadn’t really considered that to be an option for the lathe - more because of the size of that massive 3-phase motor than the power output of the treadmill motor. The VFD I’ve been using provides variable speed control, so that was never a benefit that I needed to look for. 


Bill, I was Air Force too. Served nine-years. Figured if I hit ten, I’d have to stay for 20. Now I really wish I had. I’d be retiring next year if I had stuck it out!

Respectfully,

John

oscar kern
 


Go with DC treadmill motor

On Sun, Mar 15, 2020 at 1:06 PM, jahick4@...
<jahick4@...> wrote:

Hi all,

The motor on my 1942 10L seems to have given up the ghost, and despite my best Google Fu, I’ve had a very difficult time coming up with the best replacement motors due to the fact that it is from before ANSI/NEMA size and type conventions were standardized - or so I believe.

The motor I have is a 3/4 hp Wagner Electric Corporation 3-phase, 220v motor of the type “RP” and a 75U frame. Does anyone have a recommendation for a replacement motor that will require minimal modifications to the mounting plate? 

I’ve also read some debate in other posts over the past few years regarding horsepower rating. If I’m going to be replacing the motor anyway, I’d just assume give the old girl a power upgrade, too. Would a 1.5 or 2hp motor be a worthwhile upgrade for my machine? At what hp rating does the belt drive start to become a limiting factor in power transmission?

I would really appreciate any advice anyone is willing and able to provide. I really want to get her making chips again very badly!

Thank you!

John Hicks
Weymouth, MA

Andrei
 

Remember to salvage the controller from the treadmill, otherwise it will be expensive to source one to match the motor

Typos are courtesy of autocorrect.


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of oscar kern via Groups.Io <kernbigo@...>
Sent: Sunday, March 15, 2020 3:55:47 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 10L motor replacement recommendations #10l
 

Go with DC treadmill motor

On Sun, Mar 15, 2020 at 1:06 PM, jahick4@...
<jahick4@...> wrote:

Hi all,

The motor on my 1942 10L seems to have given up the ghost, and despite my best Google Fu, I’ve had a very difficult time coming up with the best replacement motors due to the fact that it is from before ANSI/NEMA size and type conventions were standardized - or so I believe.

The motor I have is a 3/4 hp Wagner Electric Corporation 3-phase, 220v motor of the type “RP” and a 75U frame. Does anyone have a recommendation for a replacement motor that will require minimal modifications to the mounting plate? 

I’ve also read some debate in other posts over the past few years regarding horsepower rating. If I’m going to be replacing the motor anyway, I’d just assume give the old girl a power upgrade, too. Would a 1.5 or 2hp motor be a worthwhile upgrade for my machine? At what hp rating does the belt drive start to become a limiting factor in power transmission?

I would really appreciate any advice anyone is willing and able to provide. I really want to get her making chips again very badly!

Thank you!

John Hicks
Weymouth, MA

m. allan noah
 

I have a 2hp 3phase motor with VFD on my 10L. The biggest problem
you'll have is reusing the motor pulley. If your old motor uses a
different shaft size than currently available motors, you'll have more
work to do. In my case (moving from a 66 to 143T), I made a new pulley
for a J-series poly-v (serpentine) belt. The mounting plate was pretty
easy, just take some measurements and drill/tap 4 holes.

allan

On Sun, Mar 15, 2020 at 3:04 PM <jahick4@...> wrote:

Thank you so much for the advice, gentlemen. I really appreciate it greatly!

I’ll definitely look into the Consew motors. It certainly sounds promising.


I did a treadmill motor conversion to an old Milwaukee drill press by piggy-backing off of the original treadmill controls with an Arduino. I hadn’t really considered that to be an option for the lathe - more because of the size of that massive 3-phase motor than the power output of the treadmill motor. The VFD I’ve been using provides variable speed control, so that was never a benefit that I needed to look for.


Bill, I was Air Force too. Served nine-years. Figured if I hit ten, I’d have to stay for 20. Now I really wish I had. I’d be retiring next year if I had stuck it out!

Respectfully,

John

--
"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge
of my hand"

David R8
 

On Sun, Mar 15, 2020 at 12:00 PM, amriensr wrote:
 
I just got finished re-powering my 1942 Heavy Ten. I went to a Leeson 1hp 90v DC motor and a KB speed controller.  I really like the the variable speed and torque compensation feature.

I’ve been following this discussion with interest as I’m considering repowering my 10K. 
Do you have some details on the motor and speed controller you used?
Link to sources would be greatly appreciated.  

mike allen
 

        like to hear more about yer Arduino speed controller

        animal

On 3/15/2020 12:04 PM, jahick4@... wrote:

Thank you so much for the advice, gentlemen. I really appreciate it greatly!

I’ll definitely look into the Consew motors. It certainly sounds promising. 


I did a treadmill motor conversion to an old Milwaukee drill press by piggy-backing off of the original treadmill controls with an Arduino. I hadn’t really considered that to be an option for the lathe - more because of the size of that massive 3-phase motor than the power output of the treadmill motor. The VFD I’ve been using provides variable speed control, so that was never a benefit that I needed to look for. 


Bill, I was Air Force too. Served nine-years. Figured if I hit ten, I’d have to stay for 20. Now I really wish I had. I’d be retiring next year if I had stuck it out!

Respectfully,

John

jahick4@...
 

 mike allen
5:00pm   

        like to hear more about yer Arduino speed controller

        animal

It’s been quite a while, so my memory isn’t all that fresh, but when I get back to work (where my boss is kind enough to let me keep my equipment) tomorrow and can verify the motor and motor controller specs, I’ll gladly post some pictures information on it. I’m not terrible with coding, but had it not been for a guy who had done a similar project with the same motor and controller, I’d have been way over my head. The guy was kind enough to not only post the code but also provided a great write up on the circuit. Due to work, the project hasn’t quite been completed to my satisfaction - my goal was to eliminate the treadmill control panel entirely and use a reed switch to measure and display the spindle RPM on a 7 segment display, but that has yet to happen. I am able to control the speed through the entire range of the motor using a potentiometer, and that’s the most important part to me. She’s ugly as hell, but she can drill a mean hole without having to mess with step pulleys.

In the meantime, here’s a link to a terrible video taken on a malfunctioning phone. I have to apologize for the quality, but it’s the best that I have:

https://share.icloud.com/photos/0FIdT9Ye0ik0fZFtgzHw4QFCQ#South_Weymouth

Respectfully,

John


jahick4@...
 

 m. allan noah
4:01pm   

I have a 2hp 3phase motor with VFD on my 10L. The biggest problem
you'll have is reusing the motor pulley. If your old motor uses a
different shaft size than currently available motors, you'll have more
work to do. In my case (moving from a 66 to 143T), I made a new pulley
for a J-series poly-v (serpentine) belt. The mounting plate was pretty
easy, just take some measurements and drill/tap 4 holes.

allan
Have you found 2hp to play well with your 10l? Did you notice a lot of difference in performance? I’ve heard so many different opinions on how much power these old lathes can actually make use of and how much they can safely handle. I thought I had read that they came equipped with up to 1.5hp out of the factory, but I may have been mistaken.

respectfully,

John

mike allen
 

        from what I understand HP for HP the 3 phase motor will have more torque than the single phase will . I've been eyeing a 1/2 hp 3 phase motor with a TECO VFD which has 110 VAC imput & 3 Phase output from

        Dealerselectric for @ $165.00 with out shipping . I just want to understand VFD's  more before I pop for one . I'm sittin on 6 or 7 treadmill motor rite now , with homes for all of them I just need to come up with

        a affordable controller for them . I have one I just recently put on my 9A with a MC-2100 controller & a small board I got from a guy in one of the forums for the speed control , seems to be working pretty good

        but I havn't done any work with anything but aluminum since I put it on . what I would like to come up with is a Arduino controller with a 4x4 keypad that I can input speed or if I get real smart ( which not sure

        that will happen ) input material from a pull down menu & then diameter from tables in the handbook & have that in turn fire up the motor at the speed I need . I'm way way far from that but I'm tryin to teach

        myself Arduino .

        animal

On 3/15/2020 2:35 PM, jahick4@... wrote:
 m. allan noah
4:01pm   

I have a 2hp 3phase motor with VFD on my 10L. The biggest problem you'll have is reusing the motor pulley. If your old motor uses a different shaft size than currently available motors, you'll have more work to do. In my case (moving from a 66 to 143T), I made a new pulley for a J-series poly-v (serpentine) belt. The mounting plate was pretty easy, just take some measurements and drill/tap 4 holes. allan
Have you found 2hp to play well with your 10l? Did you notice a lot of difference in performance? I’ve heard so many different opinions on how much power these old lathes can actually make use of and how much they can safely handle. I thought I had read that they came equipped with up to 1.5hp out of the factory, but I may have been mistaken.

respectfully,

John

m. allan noah
 

On Sun, Mar 15, 2020 at 5:35 PM <jahick4@...> wrote:

m. allan noah
4:01pm

I have a 2hp 3phase motor with VFD on my 10L. The biggest problem
you'll have is reusing the motor pulley. If your old motor uses a
different shaft size than currently available motors, you'll have more
work to do. In my case (moving from a 66 to 143T), I made a new pulley
for a J-series poly-v (serpentine) belt. The mounting plate was pretty
easy, just take some measurements and drill/tap 4 holes.

allan

Have you found 2hp to play well with your 10l? Did you notice a lot of difference in performance? I’ve heard so many different opinions on how much power these old lathes can actually make use of and how much they can safely handle. I thought I had read that they came equipped with up to 1.5hp out of the factory, but I may have been mistaken.
On any cone-head lathe, the limiting factor is the belts. I'll never
actually be able to put 2HP through the upper belt, it will either
slip or walk off the step. The place the extra power makes a
difference is when you slow the motor down using the VFD. Generally,
frequency and power are directly related (ignoring fancy feedback
mechanisms). IOW, at half speed, the motor makes half power. So when I
am running at lower speed, I've still got 'reasonable' power available
to remove metal. I routinely run the VFD at 30 Hz, and can still take
cuts that will just barely throw the upper belt.

If we were talking about a gearhead lathe, I'd be more concerned.

allan
--
"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge
of my hand"

John Dammeyer
 

I have a Baldor 1HP, 1725 RPM 220VAC 3 phase motor I bought to replace the 1HP single phase that came with the lathe. I use an inexpensive GS-1 VFD
https://www.automationdirect.com/adc/shopping/catalog/drives_-a-_soft_starters/ac_variable_frequency_drives_(vfd)/micro/gs1-21p0

It's not a high quality one but runs from low to high and even with back gear and parting I've had the 7 rib serpentine belt slip. Motor doesn't even care.

I put a small pulley on the motor and used the large flat belt cast iron pulley with that. I still move the flat belt for different speed ranges. But within the middle pulley the range is more than adequate.

John Dammeyer

-----Original Message-----
From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io [mailto:SouthBendLathe@groups.io] On
Behalf Of m. allan noah
Sent: March-15-20 3:45 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 10L motor replacement recommendations
#10l

On Sun, Mar 15, 2020 at 5:35 PM <jahick4@...> wrote:

m. allan noah
4:01pm

I have a 2hp 3phase motor with VFD on my 10L. The biggest problem
you'll have is reusing the motor pulley. If your old motor uses a
different shaft size than currently available motors, you'll have more
work to do. In my case (moving from a 66 to 143T), I made a new pulley
for a J-series poly-v (serpentine) belt. The mounting plate was pretty
easy, just take some measurements and drill/tap 4 holes.

allan

Have you found 2hp to play well with your 10l? Did you notice a lot of
difference in performance? I�ve heard so many different opinions on how
much power these old lathes can actually make use of and how much they
can safely handle. I thought I had read that they came equipped with up to
1.5hp out of the factory, but I may have been mistaken.
On any cone-head lathe, the limiting factor is the belts. I'll never
actually be able to put 2HP through the upper belt, it will either
slip or walk off the step. The place the extra power makes a
difference is when you slow the motor down using the VFD. Generally,
frequency and power are directly related (ignoring fancy feedback
mechanisms). IOW, at half speed, the motor makes half power. So when I
am running at lower speed, I've still got 'reasonable' power available
to remove metal. I routinely run the VFD at 30 Hz, and can still take
cuts that will just barely throw the upper belt.

If we were talking about a gearhead lathe, I'd be more concerned.

allan
--
"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge
of my hand"

Nelson Collar
 

John 
I am in total agreement with what you did going three phase. My first experience with 3 phase was nothing short of amazing. I enjoy the torque the motors have and probably the greatest thing is no capacitors to burn out and to reverse the motor direction just switch two of the leads. Like you said the range of speed is excellent. More people that need a new replacement motor need to check out the 3 phase and the VFD, what a winning pair. 
Nelson

On Sunday, March 15, 2020, 06:02:42 PM CDT, John Dammeyer <johnd@...> wrote:


I have a Baldor 1HP, 1725 RPM 220VAC 3 phase motor I bought to replace the 1HP single phase that came with the lathe.  I use an inexpensive GS-1 VFD
https://www.automationdirect.com/adc/shopping/catalog/drives_-a-_soft_starters/ac_variable_frequency_drives_(vfd)/micro/gs1-21p0

It's not a high quality one but runs from low to high and even with back gear and parting I've had the 7 rib serpentine belt slip.  Motor doesn't even care.

I put a small pulley on the motor and used the large flat belt cast iron pulley with that.  I still move the flat belt for different speed ranges. But within the middle pulley the range is more than adequate.

John Dammeyer


> -----Original Message-----
> From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io [mailto:SouthBendLathe@groups.io] On
> Behalf Of m. allan noah
> Sent: March-15-20 3:45 PM
> To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
> Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 10L motor replacement recommendations
> #10l
>
> On Sun, Mar 15, 2020 at 5:35 PM <jahick4@...> wrote:
> >
> >  m. allan noah
> > 4:01pm
> >
> > I have a 2hp 3phase motor with VFD on my 10L. The biggest problem
> > you'll have is reusing the motor pulley. If your old motor uses a
> > different shaft size than currently available motors, you'll have more
> > work to do. In my case (moving from a 66 to 143T), I made a new pulley
> > for a J-series poly-v (serpentine) belt. The mounting plate was pretty
> > easy, just take some measurements and drill/tap 4 holes.
> >
> > allan
> >
> > Have you found 2hp to play well with your 10l? Did you notice a lot of
> difference in performance? I�ve heard so many different opinions on how
> much power these old lathes can actually make use of and how much they
> can safely handle. I thought I had read that they came equipped with up to
> 1.5hp out of the factory, but I may have been mistaken.
> >
>
> On any cone-head lathe, the limiting factor is the belts. I'll never
> actually be able to put 2HP through the upper belt, it will either
> slip or walk off the step. The place the extra power makes a
> difference is when you slow the motor down using the VFD. Generally,
> frequency and power are directly related (ignoring fancy feedback
> mechanisms). IOW, at half speed, the motor makes half power. So when I
> am running at lower speed, I've still got 'reasonable' power available
> to remove metal. I routinely run the VFD at 30 Hz, and can still take
> cuts that will just barely throw the upper belt.
>
> If we were talking about a gearhead lathe, I'd be more concerned.
>
> allan
> --
> "well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge
> of my hand"
>
>


Nelson Collar
 

I would not buy a motor smaller than 1 hp and the VFD to be 220v  single phase. Dollar for dollar you will have better set up.
Nelson



On Sunday, March 15, 2020, 05:16:49 PM CDT, mike allen <animal@...> wrote:


        from what I understand HP for HP the 3 phase motor will have more torque than the single phase will . I've been eyeing a 1/2 hp 3 phase motor with a TECO VFD which has 110 VAC imput & 3 Phase output from

        Dealerselectric for @ $165.00 with out shipping . I just want to understand VFD's  more before I pop for one . I'm sittin on 6 or 7 treadmill motor rite now , with homes for all of them I just need to come up with

        a affordable controller for them . I have one I just recently put on my 9A with a MC-2100 controller & a small board I got from a guy in one of the forums for the speed control , seems to be working pretty good

        but I havn't done any work with anything but aluminum since I put it on . what I would like to come up with is a Arduino controller with a 4x4 keypad that I can input speed or if I get real smart ( which not sure

        that will happen ) input material from a pull down menu & then diameter from tables in the handbook & have that in turn fire up the motor at the speed I need . I'm way way far from that but I'm tryin to teach

        myself Arduino .

        animal

On 3/15/2020 2:35 PM, jahick4@... wrote:
 m. allan noah
4:01pm   

I have a 2hp 3phase motor with VFD on my 10L. The biggest problem you'll have is reusing the motor pulley. If your old motor uses a different shaft size than currently available motors, you'll have more work to do. In my case (moving from a 66 to 143T), I made a new pulley for a J-series poly-v (serpentine) belt. The mounting plate was pretty easy, just take some measurements and drill/tap 4 holes. allan
Have you found 2hp to play well with your 10l? Did you notice a lot of difference in performance? I’ve heard so many different opinions on how much power these old lathes can actually make use of and how much they can safely handle. I thought I had read that they came equipped with up to 1.5hp out of the factory, but I may have been mistaken.

respectfully,

John

John Dammeyer
 

Hi Nelson,

Thanks.  For my mill I'm going in a different direction.  I priced out a 3 Phase 2HP that would fit as there really wasn't anything available locally.  That and a nicer VFD started looking pretty expensive.

 

So I went with a Chinese Bergerda 1800W AC Servo c/w encoder.  It's not mounted yet but soon. With 0V to 10V input I get about 200 RPM up to 3000RPM.  With step/dir I can run 0 to 3000 RPM and the MESA 7i92H has no trouble doing that.

 

So eventually I'll have complete tapping capabilities at any speed.  And it's way smaller than a 3 phase.  Time will tell.

 

John

 

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io [mailto:SouthBendLathe@groups.io] On Behalf Of Nelson Collar via Groups.Io
Sent: March-15-20 5:06 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 10L motor replacement recommendations #10l

 

John 

I am in total agreement with what you did going three phase. My first experience with 3 phase was nothing short of amazing. I enjoy the torque the motors have and probably the greatest thing is no capacitors to burn out and to reverse the motor direction just switch two of the leads. Like you said the range of speed is excellent. More people that need a new replacement motor need to check out the 3 phase and the VFD, what a winning pair. 

Nelson

 

On Sunday, March 15, 2020, 06:02:42 PM CDT, John Dammeyer <johnd@...> wrote:

 

 

I have a Baldor 1HP, 1725 RPM 220VAC 3 phase motor I bought to replace the 1HP single phase that came with the lathe.  I use an inexpensive GS-1 VFD
https://www.automationdirect.com/adc/shopping/catalog/drives_-a-_soft_starters/ac_variable_frequency_drives_(vfd)/micro/gs1-21p0

It's not a high quality one but runs from low to high and even with back gear and parting I've had the 7 rib serpentine belt slip.  Motor doesn't even care.

I put a small pulley on the motor and used the large flat belt cast iron pulley with that.  I still move the flat belt for different speed ranges. But within the middle pulley the range is more than adequate.

John Dammeyer


> -----Original Message-----
> From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io [mailto:SouthBendLathe@groups.io] On
> Behalf Of m. allan noah
> Sent: March-15-20 3:45 PM
> To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
> Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 10L motor replacement recommendations
> #10l
>
> On Sun, Mar 15, 2020 at 5:35 PM <jahick4@...> wrote:
> >
> >  m. allan noah
> > 4:01pm
> >
> > I have a 2hp 3phase motor with VFD on my 10L. The biggest problem
> > you'll have is reusing the motor pulley. If your old motor uses a
> > different shaft size than currently available motors, you'll have more
> > work to do. In my case (moving from a 66 to 143T), I made a new pulley
> > for a J-series poly-v (serpentine) belt. The mounting plate was pretty
> > easy, just take some measurements and drill/tap 4 holes.
> >
> > allan
> >
> > Have you found 2hp to play well with your 10l? Did you notice a lot of
> difference in performance? I
ve heard so many different opinions on how
> much power these old lathes can actually make use of and how much they
> can safely handle. I thought I had read that they came equipped with up to
> 1.5hp out of the factory, but I may have been mistaken.
> >
>
> On any cone-head lathe, the limiting factor is the belts. I'll never
> actually be able to put 2HP through the upper belt, it will either
> slip or walk off the step. The place the extra power makes a
> difference is when you slow the motor down using the VFD. Generally,
> frequency and power are directly related (ignoring fancy feedback
> mechanisms). IOW, at half speed, the motor makes half power. So when I
> am running at lower speed, I've still got 'reasonable' power available
> to remove metal. I routinely run the VFD at 30 Hz, and can still take
> cuts that will just barely throw the upper belt.
>
> If we were talking about a gearhead lathe, I'd be more concerned.
>
> allan
> --
> "well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge
> of my hand"
>
>