Date   

Southbend 9" lathe table in CONCRETE?

Steven Schlegel
 

With all of the discussions about lathe tables, I have to ask:  What is your opinion about making one out of concrete?  I have heard they are very dead (no spring) so makes turning a lot easier.  As I approach putting my 1940 SB 9” A and C lathes into operation, I am planning ahead for the tables.

 

Steven


Re: Southbend 9" lathe table

david pennington
 

I have pictures and will make an explanatory sketch...stay tuned.

In the meantime, I will describe the idea. I wanted to be able to adjust the height and tilt of each lathe foot relative to the other. To accomplish that, each lathe foot rests on a pair of plates that can be adjusted for separation and tilt. There are bolts--fairly long--that run from the feet through the plates to secure the whole to the table. The adjustment is accomplished using bolts that run from beneath the table, up through threads in the lower plate, to press against the upper plate. This requires two adjustment bolts for each of the four mounting bolts, one on either side.

Pictures and sketch(es) to follow.

Dave

David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado
815-382-1994


On Saturday, December 21, 2019, 8:43:39 AM MST, ov10fac <ov10fac@...> wrote:


Thanks everyone for all your suggestions and great ideas.  I now have enough to start my design process.  I am actually thinking of machined 2X4 top in a butcher block type configuration.  That gives me about a 3" top.  I will use the suggestion in the designs of using a series of rods across the table to add strength and rigidity.  I will then add a 3/4 MDF or plywood surface for added strength and stability and finish it off with a 1/4 " hard board sacrificial top.  That should give me the rigidity I think I need and the smoothness to allow me to do a pretty good job of leveling.  As I said, I won't be doing real precision work (no bearings or any thing like that) at least until my skills improve so this should be adequate for my purposes so I'm not too worried about extremely precise leveling.
The base will be made from more machined 2X4s laminated together to give me about 3X3 legs.  Cross pieces will be joined with mortise and tenon reinforced with dowels through the tenon.  That's about as far into the thought process I have gotten.
Again, many thanks for the ideas and suggestions. 
As an aside, I would be interested in the leveling method David mentioned.  If you could describe that I would be appreciative.  I too am a little geeky!!


Re: Drill press spindle run out

Bill in OKC too
 

Did you actually check the quill, or just the drill shank? Twist drills are REAL easy to bend, even in the larger sizes, relative to a rod or cylinder of the same diameter. The solution might be as simple as getting a new drill bit. 

Too bad  you're not closer, I could have maybe gotten a great deal on a drill press! ;)  Or at least helped you check it out. 

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Thursday, December 26, 2019, 09:30:29 PM CST, Phillip Rankin <phillip.rankin1964@...> wrote:


Well Bill,
 I am not exactly close to Oklahoma City. Denham Springs, LA is about 650 miles from your abode. I won't spend any more time on the quill, but I will keep an eye out for a replacement. There will be a cheap 14" Chinese donner drill press show up sooner of later. I'm in no hurry. I do more drilling on my lathe than on the drill press, but it is nice to be able to drill a hole in a vertical plane instead of a horizontal plane from time to time.

On Thu, Dec 26, 2019, 1:59 PM Bill in OKC too via Groups.Io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
OK, so no sentimental attachment, but have you priced a decent drill press recently? Yikes!

Another poster has a suggestion that looks pretty good to bring that one back, at reasonable expense, but it's work you could do yourself, probably. Shaper or mill (or both) would be seriously helpful, but it can be done on the lathe alone, if necessary.

Or you could offer it for free on Craigslist or one or more of the Yahoo or GIO groups. Lots of people with more time than money would love to have it. If you're not too far from Oklahoma City, I'd be interested. ;)

That's how I got my big antique. It still cost me, I had to buy an engine hoist to get the pieces out of my truck, but I've used them both enough to make it worthwhile.

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)







Re: Drill press spindle run out

Bill in OKC too
 

that is a good question!

Bill in OKC

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Friday, December 27, 2019, 08:24:48 AM CST, m. allan noah <kitno455@...> wrote:


I'm sorry, but I missed this- have you actually checked the runout of
the quill, or are you still using the side of the drill shank? If the
latter, are you sure the drill is not bent?

allan

On Thu, Dec 26, 2019 at 10:30 PM Phillip Rankin
<phillip.rankin1964@...> wrote:
>
> Well Bill,
>  I am not exactly close to Oklahoma City. Denham Springs, LA is about 650 miles from your abode. I won't spend any more time on the quill, but I will keep an eye out for a replacement. There will be a cheap 14" Chinese donner drill press show up sooner of later. I'm in no hurry. I do more drilling on my lathe than on the drill press, but it is nice to be able to drill a hole in a vertical plane instead of a horizontal plane from time to time.
>
> On Thu, Dec 26, 2019, 1:59 PM Bill in OKC too via Groups.Io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
>>
>> OK, so no sentimental attachment, but have you priced a decent drill press recently? Yikes!
>>
>> Another poster has a suggestion that looks pretty good to bring that one back, at reasonable expense, but it's work you could do yourself, probably. Shaper or mill (or both) would be seriously helpful, but it can be done on the lathe alone, if necessary.
>>
>> Or you could offer it for free on Craigslist or one or more of the Yahoo or GIO groups. Lots of people with more time than money would love to have it. If you're not too far from Oklahoma City, I'd be interested. ;)
>>
>> That's how I got my big antique. It still cost me, I had to buy an engine hoist to get the pieces out of my truck, but I've used them both enough to make it worthwhile.
>>
>> William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)
>>
>>
>> A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
>> butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
>> accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
>> give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
>> problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
>> efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
>> LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>



--
"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge
of my hand"



Re: Drill press spindle run out

m. allan noah
 

I'm sorry, but I missed this- have you actually checked the runout of
the quill, or are you still using the side of the drill shank? If the
latter, are you sure the drill is not bent?

allan

On Thu, Dec 26, 2019 at 10:30 PM Phillip Rankin
<phillip.rankin1964@gmail.com> wrote:

Well Bill,
I am not exactly close to Oklahoma City. Denham Springs, LA is about 650 miles from your abode. I won't spend any more time on the quill, but I will keep an eye out for a replacement. There will be a cheap 14" Chinese donner drill press show up sooner of later. I'm in no hurry. I do more drilling on my lathe than on the drill press, but it is nice to be able to drill a hole in a vertical plane instead of a horizontal plane from time to time.

On Thu, Dec 26, 2019, 1:59 PM Bill in OKC too via Groups.Io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

OK, so no sentimental attachment, but have you priced a decent drill press recently? Yikes!

Another poster has a suggestion that looks pretty good to bring that one back, at reasonable expense, but it's work you could do yourself, probably. Shaper or mill (or both) would be seriously helpful, but it can be done on the lathe alone, if necessary.

Or you could offer it for free on Craigslist or one or more of the Yahoo or GIO groups. Lots of people with more time than money would love to have it. If you're not too far from Oklahoma City, I'd be interested. ;)

That's how I got my big antique. It still cost me, I had to buy an engine hoist to get the pieces out of my truck, but I've used them both enough to make it worthwhile.

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)







--
"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge
of my hand"


Re: Drill press spindle run out

Phillip Rankin
 

Well Bill,
 I am not exactly close to Oklahoma City. Denham Springs, LA is about 650 miles from your abode. I won't spend any more time on the quill, but I will keep an eye out for a replacement. There will be a cheap 14" Chinese donner drill press show up sooner of later. I'm in no hurry. I do more drilling on my lathe than on the drill press, but it is nice to be able to drill a hole in a vertical plane instead of a horizontal plane from time to time.


On Thu, Dec 26, 2019, 1:59 PM Bill in OKC too via Groups.Io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
OK, so no sentimental attachment, but have you priced a decent drill press recently? Yikes!

Another poster has a suggestion that looks pretty good to bring that one back, at reasonable expense, but it's work you could do yourself, probably. Shaper or mill (or both) would be seriously helpful, but it can be done on the lathe alone, if necessary.

Or you could offer it for free on Craigslist or one or more of the Yahoo or GIO groups. Lots of people with more time than money would love to have it. If you're not too far from Oklahoma City, I'd be interested. ;)

That's how I got my big antique. It still cost me, I had to buy an engine hoist to get the pieces out of my truck, but I've used them both enough to make it worthwhile.

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)







Re: 9A Bed Profile

mike allen
 

thanks Tom , I have that . what I'm lookin for is a drawing of the bed from the tail stock end that has the dimensions of the ways & flats if that makes any sense

        thanks

        animal

On 12/26/2019 11:58 AM, Thomas Harrold via Groups.Io wrote:
Maybe this will help?

https://groups.io/g/SouthBendLathe/files/Techinfo/sbarmylathe.pdf

-Tom

-----Original Message-----
From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io [mailto:SouthBendLathe@groups.io] On Behalf Of mike allen
Sent: Thursday, December 26, 2019 1:47 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] 9A Bed Profile

happy Holidays folks . I'm wonderin if there is a drawing of a 9A bed profile somewhere . if so can someone kindly point me towards it .
tks
animal









Re: Drill press spindle run out

Bill in OKC too
 

OK, so no sentimental attachment, but have you priced a decent drill press recently? Yikes!

Another poster has a suggestion that looks pretty good to bring that one back, at reasonable expense, but it's work you could do yourself, probably. Shaper or mill (or both) would be seriously helpful, but it can be done on the lathe alone, if necessary.

Or you could offer it for free on Craigslist or one or more of the Yahoo or GIO groups. Lots of people with more time than money would love to have it. If you're not too far from Oklahoma City, I'd be interested. ;)

That's how I got my big antique. It still cost me, I had to buy an engine hoist to get the pieces out of my truck, but I've used them both enough to make it worthwhile.

William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)


A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)





On Thursday, December 26, 2019, 11:32:03 AM CST, Phillip Rankin <phillip.rankin1964@...> wrote:


I acquired the drill press from the side of the road after it took a swim in a flood back in 2016. I had motor hanging out in my garage that was looking for a machine to hang on. So for the price of new bearings, and a switch I had a otherwise free 16 speed floor standing drill press. I have a HF 8" bench drill press as a backup. I am undecided what I'll do with the bigger 16 speed with the bent quill. I like it because I can mount all my MT2 tools in it, but after spending 3 hours trying to straighten the quill I'm thinking the scrap yard might be the best place for that thing.

On Thu, Dec 26, 2019, 3:28 AM Bill in OKC too via Groups.Io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
My yahoo mail has apparently been hiding your reply, so I just saw it. More than doubled, though not as bad as what my "little" brother did. You may be able to straighten it, you could do something like I did, replace the entire drill press,  or you could make a complete new quill. On my drill press, I'll need to replace the bearings, too. You may be able to get away with out that, but if you really like that drill press, you may want to go ahead and replace them too. I made do with quite a while with one of the 8" Harbor Freight drill presses, and for most of what I do, could have continued nearly forever that way, but I like my old Craftsman. Among other things, it's the one I learned how to use a drill press with, and I made quite a lot of neat stuff with it as a kid, mostly in wood. It would still work for me in my metalworking, and one of these days, it will, but I've also got a 900lbs monster antique that will handle anything the HF can't do, so it's not as high a priority. Besides, I need to finish fixing the shaper and at least one of the larger lathes to do a good job on the new quill. If you measured that a year ago, I suppose it's also possible the bearings were going bad, and replacing them might fix it, too. Keep us advised on what you decide, and I'll cheer you on, whatever it is. 

Bill in OKC

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)


On Sunday, December 22, 2019, 06:17:17 PM CST, Phillip Rankin <phillip.rankin1964@...> wrote:


About a year ago I measured the run out using the same drill bit measured just above the flutes as in this video. Back then run out measured 0.006. now it measures 0.014. I know drill presses aren't precision instruments, and I was okay with 0.006, but 0.014 is way more than I am willing to tolerate.


Re: 9A Bed Profile

Thomas Harrold
 

-----Original Message-----
From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io [mailto:SouthBendLathe@groups.io] On Behalf Of mike allen
Sent: Thursday, December 26, 2019 1:47 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] 9A Bed Profile

happy Holidays folks . I'm wonderin if there is a drawing of a 9A bed profile somewhere . if so can someone kindly point me towards it .
tks
animal


9A Bed Profile

mike allen
 

happy Holidays folks . I'm wonderin if there is a drawing of a 9A bed profile somewhere . if so can someone kindly point me towards it .
tks
animal


Re: Drill press spindle run out

mike allen
 

        here's a post from another group with a guy with drill press woes . I just pasted the whole message so there's some readin to do

        animal

    Found a source for Drill press spindle repair here in North Carolina. I purchased a really nice Buffalo Forge #15 Drill press awhile back off craigslist. It was made in the 1940 -1950's ( like most of us ) and was complete almost perfect condition with the exception of the spindle taper. When I turned it on to test it ran out like a drunken sailor. Since the Press was such excellent condition it ended up magically following me home. The spindles I saw on ebay didn't appear to be in as nice condition as what I had plus I didn't know if they had runout like mine. I was toying with the idea of getting the runout as good as I could then machining a larger #33 taper sleeve and going that route. I had never seen a spindle run out like that, about .014 thousand. 

I was thinking that ebay could be one source for a used spindle and for $ 85.00 couldn't pass it up. ( Buffalo is still in business, the new price for a #15 Drill press is at $2,400 GULP!! ) 
  While I was searching for repair I picked up a mint Rockwell 11-100 & Electro-Mechano high speed precision mini drill press. One can NEVER have too many Drill presses!!
  I searched the net for weeks and found noting out there that I could send it to for repair. I just happened to be searching around  again for Delta drill presses and found this site: hammerscale.com .I called the owner Gary ( 919.906.1000) and he said that repairing the taper & new bearings wouldn't be too difficult. He furthered that he has done many spindle straightening repairs and felt confident that he could bring it back to factory specs ( .0005 -.001 ) He usually charges around $135.00 and that includes a full service, (new quality ABEC bearings and the Taper repair). You can send in your spindle cartridge as a unit and he will deal with the rest and return it to you ready to reinstall usually in 2 weeks. He also has a few original Delta N.O.S. parts and makes new handles, depth stop collars ,etc.
  I stopped by his shop today and had a nice chat with him, he has many Delta presses that he has gone thru and would fit right in with us Valleymetal guys.
    He is expanding his services to include other Delta\Rockwell equipment so keep him in mind.

On 12/26/2019 1:27 AM, Bill in OKC too via Groups.Io wrote:
My yahoo mail has apparently been hiding your reply, so I just saw it. More than doubled, though not as bad as what my "little" brother did. You may be able to straighten it, you could do something like I did, replace the entire drill press,  or you could make a complete new quill. On my drill press, I'll need to replace the bearings, too. You may be able to get away with out that, but if you really like that drill press, you may want to go ahead and replace them too. I made do with quite a while with one of the 8" Harbor Freight drill presses, and for most of what I do, could have continued nearly forever that way, but I like my old Craftsman. Among other things, it's the one I learned how to use a drill press with, and I made quite a lot of neat stuff with it as a kid, mostly in wood. It would still work for me in my metalworking, and one of these days, it will, but I've also got a 900lbs monster antique that will handle anything the HF can't do, so it's not as high a priority. Besides, I need to finish fixing the shaper and at least one of the larger lathes to do a good job on the new quill. If you measured that a year ago, I suppose it's also possible the bearings were going bad, and replacing them might fix it, too. Keep us advised on what you decide, and I'll cheer you on, whatever it is. 

Bill in OKC

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)


On Sunday, December 22, 2019, 06:17:17 PM CST, Phillip Rankin <phillip.rankin1964@...> wrote:


About a year ago I measured the run out using the same drill bit measured just above the flutes as in this video. Back then run out measured 0.006. now it measures 0.014. I know drill presses aren't precision instruments, and I was okay with 0.006, but 0.014 is way more than I am willing to tolerate.


Re: Drill press spindle run out

Phillip Rankin
 

I acquired the drill press from the side of the road after it took a swim in a flood back in 2016. I had motor hanging out in my garage that was looking for a machine to hang on. So for the price of new bearings, and a switch I had a otherwise free 16 speed floor standing drill press. I have a HF 8" bench drill press as a backup. I am undecided what I'll do with the bigger 16 speed with the bent quill. I like it because I can mount all my MT2 tools in it, but after spending 3 hours trying to straighten the quill I'm thinking the scrap yard might be the best place for that thing.


On Thu, Dec 26, 2019, 3:28 AM Bill in OKC too via Groups.Io <wmrmeyers=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
My yahoo mail has apparently been hiding your reply, so I just saw it. More than doubled, though not as bad as what my "little" brother did. You may be able to straighten it, you could do something like I did, replace the entire drill press,  or you could make a complete new quill. On my drill press, I'll need to replace the bearings, too. You may be able to get away with out that, but if you really like that drill press, you may want to go ahead and replace them too. I made do with quite a while with one of the 8" Harbor Freight drill presses, and for most of what I do, could have continued nearly forever that way, but I like my old Craftsman. Among other things, it's the one I learned how to use a drill press with, and I made quite a lot of neat stuff with it as a kid, mostly in wood. It would still work for me in my metalworking, and one of these days, it will, but I've also got a 900lbs monster antique that will handle anything the HF can't do, so it's not as high a priority. Besides, I need to finish fixing the shaper and at least one of the larger lathes to do a good job on the new quill. If you measured that a year ago, I suppose it's also possible the bearings were going bad, and replacing them might fix it, too. Keep us advised on what you decide, and I'll cheer you on, whatever it is. 

Bill in OKC

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)


On Sunday, December 22, 2019, 06:17:17 PM CST, Phillip Rankin <phillip.rankin1964@...> wrote:


About a year ago I measured the run out using the same drill bit measured just above the flutes as in this video. Back then run out measured 0.006. now it measures 0.014. I know drill presses aren't precision instruments, and I was okay with 0.006, but 0.014 is way more than I am willing to tolerate.


Re: Drill press spindle run out

Bill in OKC too
 

My yahoo mail has apparently been hiding your reply, so I just saw it. More than doubled, though not as bad as what my "little" brother did. You may be able to straighten it, you could do something like I did, replace the entire drill press,  or you could make a complete new quill. On my drill press, I'll need to replace the bearings, too. You may be able to get away with out that, but if you really like that drill press, you may want to go ahead and replace them too. I made do with quite a while with one of the 8" Harbor Freight drill presses, and for most of what I do, could have continued nearly forever that way, but I like my old Craftsman. Among other things, it's the one I learned how to use a drill press with, and I made quite a lot of neat stuff with it as a kid, mostly in wood. It would still work for me in my metalworking, and one of these days, it will, but I've also got a 900lbs monster antique that will handle anything the HF can't do, so it's not as high a priority. Besides, I need to finish fixing the shaper and at least one of the larger lathes to do a good job on the new quill. If you measured that a year ago, I suppose it's also possible the bearings were going bad, and replacing them might fix it, too. Keep us advised on what you decide, and I'll cheer you on, whatever it is. 

Bill in OKC

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)


On Sunday, December 22, 2019, 06:17:17 PM CST, Phillip Rankin <phillip.rankin1964@...> wrote:


About a year ago I measured the run out using the same drill bit measured just above the flutes as in this video. Back then run out measured 0.006. now it measures 0.014. I know drill presses aren't precision instruments, and I was okay with 0.006, but 0.014 is way more than I am willing to tolerate.


Re: 9A Spindle Wicks

jonwoellhaf
 

Thanks, animal!

-----Original Message-----
From: mike allen
Sent: December 23, 2019 21:10
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 9A Spindle Wicks

ok , I've seen ya there .well good luck with your venture

animal


On 12/23/2019 7:13 PM, jonwoellhaf wrote:
PS: I should have added, I post in PM as Yan Wo. :)

-----Original Message----- From: mike allen
Sent: December 23, 2019 20:01
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] 9A Spindle Wicks

here's some info that other's have found

https://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/south-bend-lathes/capillary-oiler-felt-wicks-question-325499/

animal









Re: 9A Spindle Wicks

mike allen
 

ok , I've seen ya there .well good luck with your venture

        animal

On 12/23/2019 7:13 PM, jonwoellhaf wrote:
PS: I should have added, I post in PM as Yan Wo. :)

-----Original Message----- From: mike allen
Sent: December 23, 2019 20:01
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] 9A Spindle Wicks

       here's some info that other's have found

https://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/south-bend-lathes/capillary-oiler-felt-wicks-question-325499/

        animal








Re: Southbend 9" lathe table

carbure2003
 

This is a good procedure, but you have to determine if it applies to your lathe.
 
Before you do this, check wear on your bed ways.
 
I have seen a worn south bend that the procedure would not work. In between centre, on my 20” test bar, I was plus or minus 20 thou diameter, measuring with a good dial indicator, the worst being close to the headstock.   
 
If you have a ridge on your bed ways, stay away from it, you might bring the lathe in a worse alignment state.
 
Have a merry Christmas
 
Guy Cadrin
 
 


---------- Original Message ----------
From: "ART" <twocan90@...>
To: <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Southbend 9" lathe table
Date: Mon, 23 Dec 2019 16:27:40 +0000 (UTC)

 
Hey Steven H.:
 
That Blondihacks video is excellent.  Thank you for posting it.
 
Here is the link:
 
How To Align Your Lathe
 
 
Capt. Art
 
ps.  My lathe is on a boat.
 
 
 
On Saturday, December 21, 2019, 01:49:01 PM EST, Steven H via Groups.Io <stevesmachining@...> wrote:
 
 
Blondihacks on You Tube just put out a great video on lathe alignment.

Steve Haskell
 

On Dec 21, 2019, at 1:36 PM, david pennington via Groups.Io <davidwpennington@...> wrote:

I was thinking the same thing about twist.
 
 
 
Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
 
-------- Original message --------
From: mike allen <animal@...>
Date: 12/21/19 11:29 (GMT-07:00)
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Southbend 9" lathe table
 

            just remember leveling is not as important as making sure there is no twist in the bed . twist = taper

        animal

On 12/21/2019 7:43 AM, ov10fac wrote:
Thanks everyone for all your suggestions and great ideas.  I now have enough to start my design process.  I am actually thinking of machined 2X4 top in a butcher block type configuration.  That gives me about a 3" top.  I will use the suggestion in the designs of using a series of rods across the table to add strength and rigidity.  I will then add a 3/4 MDF or plywood surface for added strength and stability and finish it off with a 1/4 " hard board sacrificial top.  That should give me the rigidity I think I need and the smoothness to allow me to do a pretty good job of leveling.  As I said, I won't be doing real precision work (no bearings or any thing like that) at least until my skills improve so this should be adequate for my purposes so I'm not too worried about extremely precise leveling.
The base will be made from more machined 2X4s laminated together to give me about 3X3 legs.  Cross pieces will be joined with mortise and tenon reinforced with dowels through the tenon.  That's about as far into the thought process I have gotten.
Again, many thanks for the ideas and suggestions. 
As an aside, I would be interested in the leveling method David mentioned.  If you could describe that I would be appreciative.  I too am a little geeky!!
 


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Re: 9A Spindle Wicks

jonwoellhaf
 

PS: I should have added, I post in PM as Yan Wo. :)

-----Original Message-----
From: mike allen
Sent: December 23, 2019 20:01
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] 9A Spindle Wicks

here's some info that other's have found

https://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/south-bend-lathes/capillary-oiler-felt-wicks-question-325499/

animal


Re: 9A Spindle Wicks

jonwoellhaf
 

Yes. I am on PM and I found that thread -- and even posted to it. I was disappointed in the responses.

Thanks very much for your help, Mike.

Jan

-----Original Message-----
From: mike allen
Sent: December 23, 2019 20:01
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] 9A Spindle Wicks

here's some info that other's have found

https://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/south-bend-lathes/capillary-oiler-felt-wicks-question-325499/

animal


9A Spindle Wicks

mike allen
 


Re: 9A Spring-loaded Spindle Oil Wicks

mike allen
 

        Jon , ya may want to chek in here , there's a ton of South Bend pros there & ever a couple of guy's that worked there

        https://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/south-bend-lathes/

        animal

On 12/23/2019 5:18 PM, jonwoellhaf wrote:
I have a photo of the bottom of the hole, but am unable to get it to send to this group.
 
From: mike allen
Sent: December 23, 2019 17:35
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 9A Spring-loaded Spindle Oil Wicks
 

        wow , i guess I'll have to chek mine next time I pull the spindle

        animal

On 12/23/2019 3:39 PM, jonwoellhaf wrote:
Done. Nothing in the bottom of the hole.
 
From: mike allen
Sent: December 23, 2019 13:03
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 9A Spring-loaded Spindle Oil Wicks
 

        I would double check the right side to make sure there's nothing stuck in the bottom . ya may be able to run some compressed air in through the fill hole while plugging the pin hole just above the fill hole with yer

        finger

        animal

On 12/23/2019 11:33 AM, jonwoellhaf wrote:
Spindle wick hole depths on my 1948 9A with plain bearings: I measure left 0.950 and right 0.675, +/- 0.005. Both holes appear to have been cast.
 
From: jonwoellhaf
Sent: December 6, 2019 13:17
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 9A Spring-loaded Spindle Oil Wicks
 
Hi, Webb.
 
My 1948 9A is a horizontal drive.
 
I will measure the wick hole depths tomorrow.
 
Jan (Yan)
 
From: wlw19958
Sent: December 5, 2019 19:08
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 9A Spring-loaded Spindle Oil Wicks
 
Hi There,

Is your 9A a bench top model (back drive) or a cabinet model (underdrive)?
Either way, there shouldn't be a difference between the front and rear wicks.
I have been inside at least a dozen different ones and this is the first time I
have ever heard of this situation. 

A wick that has been "clipped off" at spring level is usually from someone
installing the spindle without compressing the wick and using the skewers
to hold them down.  I'm with carbure2003; It sounds like something is in the
well interfering with the springs ability to be compressed (maybe a piece of
old wick spring).

Use a piece of wire or something and measure the depth of the wells (front
and back) and see how much they differ.  If they are really different, you can
cut some of the coils out of the bottom of the spring so that it will compress
enough to allow the spindle to be installed.  As long as the springs raises the
wick high enough to make good contact with the bearing journal, you should
be fine. 

I once had a late model 10K (Korean made) cabinet (underdrive) model and
the rear bearing was always loosing its oil.  I found that when they drilled the
well, they went a smidgen too far and just nicked the hole for the reversing
tumbler pivot.  I cleaned it up with solvent and compressed air and using a
heat gun, I dripped a drop of JB Weld epoxy into the well to seal the hole.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb

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