Date   

Re: 9A Spring-loaded Spindle Oil Wicks

mike allen
 

        Jon , ya may want to chek in here , there's a ton of South Bend pros there & ever a couple of guy's that worked there

        https://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/south-bend-lathes/

        animal

On 12/23/2019 5:18 PM, jonwoellhaf wrote:
I have a photo of the bottom of the hole, but am unable to get it to send to this group.
 
From: mike allen
Sent: December 23, 2019 17:35
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 9A Spring-loaded Spindle Oil Wicks
 

        wow , i guess I'll have to chek mine next time I pull the spindle

        animal

On 12/23/2019 3:39 PM, jonwoellhaf wrote:
Done. Nothing in the bottom of the hole.
 
From: mike allen
Sent: December 23, 2019 13:03
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 9A Spring-loaded Spindle Oil Wicks
 

        I would double check the right side to make sure there's nothing stuck in the bottom . ya may be able to run some compressed air in through the fill hole while plugging the pin hole just above the fill hole with yer

        finger

        animal

On 12/23/2019 11:33 AM, jonwoellhaf wrote:
Spindle wick hole depths on my 1948 9A with plain bearings: I measure left 0.950 and right 0.675, +/- 0.005. Both holes appear to have been cast.
 
From: jonwoellhaf
Sent: December 6, 2019 13:17
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 9A Spring-loaded Spindle Oil Wicks
 
Hi, Webb.
 
My 1948 9A is a horizontal drive.
 
I will measure the wick hole depths tomorrow.
 
Jan (Yan)
 
From: wlw19958
Sent: December 5, 2019 19:08
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 9A Spring-loaded Spindle Oil Wicks
 
Hi There,

Is your 9A a bench top model (back drive) or a cabinet model (underdrive)?
Either way, there shouldn't be a difference between the front and rear wicks.
I have been inside at least a dozen different ones and this is the first time I
have ever heard of this situation. 

A wick that has been "clipped off" at spring level is usually from someone
installing the spindle without compressing the wick and using the skewers
to hold them down.  I'm with carbure2003; It sounds like something is in the
well interfering with the springs ability to be compressed (maybe a piece of
old wick spring).

Use a piece of wire or something and measure the depth of the wells (front
and back) and see how much they differ.  If they are really different, you can
cut some of the coils out of the bottom of the spring so that it will compress
enough to allow the spindle to be installed.  As long as the springs raises the
wick high enough to make good contact with the bearing journal, you should
be fine. 

I once had a late model 10K (Korean made) cabinet (underdrive) model and
the rear bearing was always loosing its oil.  I found that when they drilled the
well, they went a smidgen too far and just nicked the hole for the reversing
tumbler pivot.  I cleaned it up with solvent and compressed air and using a
heat gun, I dripped a drop of JB Weld epoxy into the well to seal the hole.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: 9A Spring-loaded Spindle Oil Wicks

jonwoellhaf
 

I have a photo of the bottom of the hole, but am unable to get it to send to this group.
 

From: mike allen
Sent: December 23, 2019 17:35
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 9A Spring-loaded Spindle Oil Wicks
 

        wow , i guess I'll have to chek mine next time I pull the spindle

        animal

On 12/23/2019 3:39 PM, jonwoellhaf wrote:
Done. Nothing in the bottom of the hole.
 
From: mike allen
Sent: December 23, 2019 13:03
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 9A Spring-loaded Spindle Oil Wicks
 

        I would double check the right side to make sure there's nothing stuck in the bottom . ya may be able to run some compressed air in through the fill hole while plugging the pin hole just above the fill hole with yer

        finger

        animal

On 12/23/2019 11:33 AM, jonwoellhaf wrote:
Spindle wick hole depths on my 1948 9A with plain bearings: I measure left 0.950 and right 0.675, +/- 0.005. Both holes appear to have been cast.
 
From: jonwoellhaf
Sent: December 6, 2019 13:17
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 9A Spring-loaded Spindle Oil Wicks
 
Hi, Webb.
 
My 1948 9A is a horizontal drive.
 
I will measure the wick hole depths tomorrow.
 
Jan (Yan)
 
From: wlw19958
Sent: December 5, 2019 19:08
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 9A Spring-loaded Spindle Oil Wicks
 
Hi There,

Is your 9A a bench top model (back drive) or a cabinet model (underdrive)?
Either way, there shouldn't be a difference between the front and rear wicks.
I have been inside at least a dozen different ones and this is the first time I
have ever heard of this situation. 

A wick that has been "clipped off" at spring level is usually from someone
installing the spindle without compressing the wick and using the skewers
to hold them down.  I'm with carbure2003; It sounds like something is in the
well interfering with the springs ability to be compressed (maybe a piece of
old wick spring).

Use a piece of wire or something and measure the depth of the wells (front
and back) and see how much they differ.  If they are really different, you can
cut some of the coils out of the bottom of the spring so that it will compress
enough to allow the spindle to be installed.  As long as the springs raises the
wick high enough to make good contact with the bearing journal, you should
be fine. 

I once had a late model 10K (Korean made) cabinet (underdrive) model and
the rear bearing was always loosing its oil.  I found that when they drilled the
well, they went a smidgen too far and just nicked the hole for the reversing
tumbler pivot.  I cleaned it up with solvent and compressed air and using a
heat gun, I dripped a drop of JB Weld epoxy into the well to seal the hole.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: 9A Spring-loaded Spindle Oil Wicks

mike allen
 

        wow , i guess I'll have to chek mine next time I pull the spindle

        animal

On 12/23/2019 3:39 PM, jonwoellhaf wrote:
Done. Nothing in the bottom of the hole.
 
From: mike allen
Sent: December 23, 2019 13:03
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 9A Spring-loaded Spindle Oil Wicks
 

        I would double check the right side to make sure there's nothing stuck in the bottom . ya may be able to run some compressed air in through the fill hole while plugging the pin hole just above the fill hole with yer

        finger

        animal

On 12/23/2019 11:33 AM, jonwoellhaf wrote:
Spindle wick hole depths on my 1948 9A with plain bearings: I measure left 0.950 and right 0.675, +/- 0.005. Both holes appear to have been cast.
 
From: jonwoellhaf
Sent: December 6, 2019 13:17
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 9A Spring-loaded Spindle Oil Wicks
 
Hi, Webb.
 
My 1948 9A is a horizontal drive.
 
I will measure the wick hole depths tomorrow.
 
Jan (Yan)
 
From: wlw19958
Sent: December 5, 2019 19:08
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 9A Spring-loaded Spindle Oil Wicks
 
Hi There,

Is your 9A a bench top model (back drive) or a cabinet model (underdrive)?
Either way, there shouldn't be a difference between the front and rear wicks.
I have been inside at least a dozen different ones and this is the first time I
have ever heard of this situation. 

A wick that has been "clipped off" at spring level is usually from someone
installing the spindle without compressing the wick and using the skewers
to hold them down.  I'm with carbure2003; It sounds like something is in the
well interfering with the springs ability to be compressed (maybe a piece of
old wick spring).

Use a piece of wire or something and measure the depth of the wells (front
and back) and see how much they differ.  If they are really different, you can
cut some of the coils out of the bottom of the spring so that it will compress
enough to allow the spindle to be installed.  As long as the springs raises the
wick high enough to make good contact with the bearing journal, you should
be fine. 

I once had a late model 10K (Korean made) cabinet (underdrive) model and
the rear bearing was always loosing its oil.  I found that when they drilled the
well, they went a smidgen too far and just nicked the hole for the reversing
tumbler pivot.  I cleaned it up with solvent and compressed air and using a
heat gun, I dripped a drop of JB Weld epoxy into the well to seal the hole.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: 9A Spring-loaded Spindle Oil Wicks

jonwoellhaf
 

Done. Nothing in the bottom of the hole.
 

From: mike allen
Sent: December 23, 2019 13:03
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 9A Spring-loaded Spindle Oil Wicks
 

        I would double check the right side to make sure there's nothing stuck in the bottom . ya may be able to run some compressed air in through the fill hole while plugging the pin hole just above the fill hole with yer

        finger

        animal

On 12/23/2019 11:33 AM, jonwoellhaf wrote:
Spindle wick hole depths on my 1948 9A with plain bearings: I measure left 0.950 and right 0.675, +/- 0.005. Both holes appear to have been cast.
 
From: jonwoellhaf
Sent: December 6, 2019 13:17
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 9A Spring-loaded Spindle Oil Wicks
 
Hi, Webb.
 
My 1948 9A is a horizontal drive.
 
I will measure the wick hole depths tomorrow.
 
Jan (Yan)
 
From: wlw19958
Sent: December 5, 2019 19:08
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 9A Spring-loaded Spindle Oil Wicks
 
Hi There,

Is your 9A a bench top model (back drive) or a cabinet model (underdrive)?
Either way, there shouldn't be a difference between the front and rear wicks.
I have been inside at least a dozen different ones and this is the first time I
have ever heard of this situation. 

A wick that has been "clipped off" at spring level is usually from someone
installing the spindle without compressing the wick and using the skewers
to hold them down.  I'm with carbure2003; It sounds like something is in the
well interfering with the springs ability to be compressed (maybe a piece of
old wick spring).

Use a piece of wire or something and measure the depth of the wells (front
and back) and see how much they differ.  If they are really different, you can
cut some of the coils out of the bottom of the spring so that it will compress
enough to allow the spindle to be installed.  As long as the springs raises the
wick high enough to make good contact with the bearing journal, you should
be fine. 

I once had a late model 10K (Korean made) cabinet (underdrive) model and
the rear bearing was always loosing its oil.  I found that when they drilled the
well, they went a smidgen too far and just nicked the hole for the reversing
tumbler pivot.  I cleaned it up with solvent and compressed air and using a
heat gun, I dripped a drop of JB Weld epoxy into the well to seal the hole.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: 9A Spring-loaded Spindle Oil Wicks

mike allen
 

        I would double check the right side to make sure there's nothing stuck in the bottom . ya may be able to run some compressed air in through the fill hole while plugging the pin hole just above the fill hole with yer

        finger

        animal

On 12/23/2019 11:33 AM, jonwoellhaf wrote:
Spindle wick hole depths on my 1948 9A with plain bearings: I measure left 0.950 and right 0.675, +/- 0.005. Both holes appear to have been cast.
 
From: jonwoellhaf
Sent: December 6, 2019 13:17
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 9A Spring-loaded Spindle Oil Wicks
 
Hi, Webb.
 
My 1948 9A is a horizontal drive.
 
I will measure the wick hole depths tomorrow.
 
Jan (Yan)
 
From: wlw19958
Sent: December 5, 2019 19:08
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 9A Spring-loaded Spindle Oil Wicks
 
Hi There,

Is your 9A a bench top model (back drive) or a cabinet model (underdrive)?
Either way, there shouldn't be a difference between the front and rear wicks.
I have been inside at least a dozen different ones and this is the first time I
have ever heard of this situation. 

A wick that has been "clipped off" at spring level is usually from someone
installing the spindle without compressing the wick and using the skewers
to hold them down.  I'm with carbure2003; It sounds like something is in the
well interfering with the springs ability to be compressed (maybe a piece of
old wick spring).

Use a piece of wire or something and measure the depth of the wells (front
and back) and see how much they differ.  If they are really different, you can
cut some of the coils out of the bottom of the spring so that it will compress
enough to allow the spindle to be installed.  As long as the springs raises the
wick high enough to make good contact with the bearing journal, you should
be fine. 

I once had a late model 10K (Korean made) cabinet (underdrive) model and
the rear bearing was always loosing its oil.  I found that when they drilled the
well, they went a smidgen too far and just nicked the hole for the reversing
tumbler pivot.  I cleaned it up with solvent and compressed air and using a
heat gun, I dripped a drop of JB Weld epoxy into the well to seal the hole.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: 9A Spring-loaded Spindle Oil Wicks

jonwoellhaf
 

Spindle wick hole depths on my 1948 9A with plain bearings: I measure left 0.950 and right 0.675, +/- 0.005. Both holes appear to have been cast.
 

From: jonwoellhaf
Sent: December 6, 2019 13:17
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 9A Spring-loaded Spindle Oil Wicks
 
Hi, Webb.
 
My 1948 9A is a horizontal drive.
 
I will measure the wick hole depths tomorrow.
 
Jan (Yan)
 
From: wlw19958
Sent: December 5, 2019 19:08
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 9A Spring-loaded Spindle Oil Wicks
 
Hi There,

Is your 9A a bench top model (back drive) or a cabinet model (underdrive)?
Either way, there shouldn't be a difference between the front and rear wicks.
I have been inside at least a dozen different ones and this is the first time I
have ever heard of this situation. 

A wick that has been "clipped off" at spring level is usually from someone
installing the spindle without compressing the wick and using the skewers
to hold them down.  I'm with carbure2003; It sounds like something is in the
well interfering with the springs ability to be compressed (maybe a piece of
old wick spring).

Use a piece of wire or something and measure the depth of the wells (front
and back) and see how much they differ.  If they are really different, you can
cut some of the coils out of the bottom of the spring so that it will compress
enough to allow the spindle to be installed.  As long as the springs raises the
wick high enough to make good contact with the bearing journal, you should
be fine. 

I once had a late model 10K (Korean made) cabinet (underdrive) model and
the rear bearing was always loosing its oil.  I found that when they drilled the
well, they went a smidgen too far and just nicked the hole for the reversing
tumbler pivot.  I cleaned it up with solvent and compressed air and using a
heat gun, I dripped a drop of JB Weld epoxy into the well to seal the hole.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: Making (Modifying) A Collet Closer (Draw Bar) for My L00 Heavy Ten

Steven Schlegel
 

Thanks for the info. I will try it.


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of wlw19958 <wlw-19958@...>
Sent: Friday, December 6, 2019 1:56:37 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Making (Modifying) A Collet Closer (Draw Bar) for My L00 Heavy Ten
 
Hi There,

Nice work.  I am trying to figure out how to use 5C collets on my 9C (1949 vintage) when I get it going again.  There ought to be some way…

There is a way.  You can mount a 5C collet chuck on the spindle. 
You will still be restricted on the size of stock that have to pass
through the spindle though.  I was considering this route until
I decided to convert my lathe over to L00. 

There is a "kit" you can build from Metal Lathe Accessories for
a collet chuck:  Metal Lathe Accessories MLA-21

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: Southbend 9" lathe table

ART
 

Hey Steven H.:

That Blondihacks video is excellent.  Thank you for posting it.

Here is the link:


On Saturday, December 21, 2019, 01:49:01 PM EST, Steven H via Groups.Io <stevesmachining@...> wrote:


Blondihacks on You Tube just put out a great video on lathe alignment.

Steve Haskell


On Dec 21, 2019, at 1:36 PM, david pennington via Groups.Io <davidwpennington@...> wrote:


I was thinking the same thing about twist.



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: mike allen <animal@...>
Date: 12/21/19 11:29 (GMT-07:00)
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Southbend 9" lathe table

            just remember leveling is not as important as making sure there is no twist in the bed . twist = taper

        animal

On 12/21/2019 7:43 AM, ov10fac wrote:
Thanks everyone for all your suggestions and great ideas.  I now have enough to start my design process.  I am actually thinking of machined 2X4 top in a butcher block type configuration.  That gives me about a 3" top.  I will use the suggestion in the designs of using a series of rods across the table to add strength and rigidity.  I will then add a 3/4 MDF or plywood surface for added strength and stability and finish it off with a 1/4 " hard board sacrificial top.  That should give me the rigidity I think I need and the smoothness to allow me to do a pretty good job of leveling.  As I said, I won't be doing real precision work (no bearings or any thing like that) at least until my skills improve so this should be adequate for my purposes so I'm not too worried about extremely precise leveling.
The base will be made from more machined 2X4s laminated together to give me about 3X3 legs.  Cross pieces will be joined with mortise and tenon reinforced with dowels through the tenon.  That's about as far into the thought process I have gotten.
Again, many thanks for the ideas and suggestions. 
As an aside, I would be interested in the leveling method David mentioned.  If you could describe that I would be appreciative.  I too am a little geeky!!


Re: Drill press spindle run out

Phillip Rankin
 

When I find my snap ring pliers I'll investigate this further, but for now I'll turn my attention to family, and Christmas.

Merry Christmas folks
Phillip R.


Re: Drill press spindle run out

Phillip Rankin
 

About a year ago I measured the run out using the same drill bit measured just above the flutes as in this video. Back then run out measured 0.006. now it measures 0.014. I know drill presses aren't precision instruments, and I was okay with 0.006, but 0.014 is way more than I am willing to tolerate.


Re: Drill press spindle run out

Phillip Rankin
 

Fwhite913, If you watch the video you should notice that there is no chuck involved The drill bit I am using to drive the quill fits the MT2 taper of the quill. 
Phillip R.


Re: Drill press spindle run out

Steven H
 

Try your indicator on the taper shank of the drill just below the end of the spindle nose and see if you get the same reading. Then take the drill out of the spindle and set up an indicator to read on the inside of the spindle taper and see what you get. Good luck.

Steve Haskell


On Dec 22, 2019, at 3:15 PM, Mark R. Jonkman <mark.jonkman@...> wrote:

If you can get it a part then you could try heat straightening it. If you look on YouTube Keith Fenner does a lot of shaft straightening using that technique. Basically you place the shaft on vblocks or roller blocks and with indicator locate the point of bend. Then apply heat at that point then you hit it with cold water to cool it rapidly. I believe you heat the high point then cool it rapidly - the rapid cooling causes the metal to shrink slightly at that point thus shrinking the point of bend thus shortening that area pulling the bend out.

The alternative would be to set it up similarly in a press - shaft on two v-blocks and pressing down at high point.

It would largely depend on where bend is. If it’s at the end where it mounts chuck then probably only option would be to heat straightening.

Or put your machine shop skills to work and make new one - easier said then done depending on your skills and availability of equipment

Mark 


On Dec 22, 2019, at 12:54 PM, Phillip Rankin <phillip.rankin1964@...> wrote:

So this happened the other day when a drill bound  a up, and snatched a piece of metal from under my clamp on my drill press. I now have about .013 inches of run out at the end of the spindle. I haven't removed the spindle from the sleeve yet. Anyone been down this road before? Can it be straightened, or would it be easier to find another drill press?
<VID_20191222_114020442.mp4>


Re: Drill press spindle run out

Mark R. Jonkman
 

If you can get it a part then you could try heat straightening it. If you look on YouTube Keith Fenner does a lot of shaft straightening using that technique. Basically you place the shaft on vblocks or roller blocks and with indicator locate the point of bend. Then apply heat at that point then you hit it with cold water to cool it rapidly. I believe you heat the high point then cool it rapidly - the rapid cooling causes the metal to shrink slightly at that point thus shrinking the point of bend thus shortening that area pulling the bend out.

The alternative would be to set it up similarly in a press - shaft on two v-blocks and pressing down at high point.

It would largely depend on where bend is. If it’s at the end where it mounts chuck then probably only option would be to heat straightening.

Or put your machine shop skills to work and make new one - easier said then done depending on your skills and availability of equipment

Mark 


On Dec 22, 2019, at 12:54 PM, Phillip Rankin <phillip.rankin1964@...> wrote:

So this happened the other day when a drill bound  a up, and snatched a piece of metal from under my clamp on my drill press. I now have about .013 inches of run out at the end of the spindle. I haven't removed the spindle from the sleeve yet. Anyone been down this road before? Can it be straightened, or would it be easier to find another drill press?
<VID_20191222_114020442.mp4>


Re: Drill press spindle run out

fwhite913
 

How is the drill press chuck attached to the spindle- a 33JT , a 2MT or what?.

Try removing the chuck from the spindle and remounting it.

 

 

On 12/22/2019 01:35 PM, Rogan Creswick wrote:

I had a drill press that was in that condition, and I sold it for parts, but the buyer was convinced he could straighten it with a press / vice.  I'm sure it's *possible* but I think it would be rather difficult to do.
 
You may be able to find the spindle / spindle assembly on ebay, though, which would be an easier fix.
 
--Rogan

On Sun, Dec 22, 2019 at 9:57 AM Phillip Rankin <phillip.rankin1964@...> wrote:
So this happened the other day when a drill bound  a up, and snatched a piece of metal from under my clamp on my drill press. I now have about .013 inches of run out at the end of the spindle. I haven't removed the spindle from the sleeve yet. Anyone been down this road before? Can it be straightened, or would it be easier to find another drill press?

 

 


Re: Drill press spindle run out

Bill in OKC too
 

Try that again with the the indicator running on the inside of the taper, unless you know you had zero run-out on the outside before your incident. 

I have a Craftsman drill press that was my dad's when I was a kid. My next-youngest brother, who is a 6'8" 300lbs gorilla, bent the quilt on it about 25 years ago. I turned down the end to remove the bent section, and cut & threaded it and a replacement piece to be loctited on and turned to match the taper on the drill chuck. Threaded on and not loctited, run- out was about .003". This was done on my HF 7x10 mini-lathe. I've not completed it yet, as I've got a better lathe, an Atlas TH42, and an SB Heavy 10L restoration project, and a Lewis shaper. I want to use one or the other of those lathes and the shaper to completely remake a quill with an MT2 taper to replace the original. It's still on hold because I also have a much heavier antique drill press already equiped with an MT2 quill. 

Drill presses aren't really precision machine tools, so you may be able to live with it as is. Mine had about .250 of run-out. That just wasn't going to work. If I get too pressed for time and need another drill press fast, I could live with the .003 now, I just want the MT2 socket instead of a JT33 male taper, so I can skip the chuck entirely.

HTH!

Bill in OKC



William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)

Guard your women and children well,
Send These Bastards Back to Hell
We'll teach them the ways of war,
They Won't Come Here Any More
Use your shield and use your head,
Fight till Every One is Dead
Raise the flag up to the sky,
How Many of Them Can We Make Die!

Heather Alexander, March of Cambredth


On Sunday, December 22, 2019, 11:59:15 AM CST, Phillip Rankin <phillip.rankin1964@...> wrote:


So this happened the other day when a drill bound  a up, and snatched a piece of metal from under my clamp on my drill press. I now have about .013 inches of run out at the end of the spindle. I haven't removed the spindle from the sleeve yet. Anyone been down this road before? Can it be straightened, or would it be easier to find another drill press?


Re: Southbend 9" lathe table

Carl Bukowsky
 

That table top is 27” deep by 44” long. 

Sent by my iPhone

On Dec 22, 2019, at 10:14 AM, ov10fac <ov10fac@...> wrote:

Carl,
Can you tell me how wide your table is?  I have parts in my shop and some in my storage facility, but didn't take any measurements when I picked it up, so the width of the table is pretty much a guess right now since I don't know how much room I need to mount the motor and pulley arrangement.


Re: Drill press spindle run out

Rogan Creswick
 

I had a drill press that was in that condition, and I sold it for parts, but the buyer was convinced he could straighten it with a press / vice.  I'm sure it's *possible* but I think it would be rather difficult to do.

You may be able to find the spindle / spindle assembly on ebay, though, which would be an easier fix.

--Rogan

On Sun, Dec 22, 2019 at 9:57 AM Phillip Rankin <phillip.rankin1964@...> wrote:
So this happened the other day when a drill bound  a up, and snatched a piece of metal from under my clamp on my drill press. I now have about .013 inches of run out at the end of the spindle. I haven't removed the spindle from the sleeve yet. Anyone been down this road before? Can it be straightened, or would it be easier to find another drill press?


Re: Southbend 9" lathe table

mike allen
 

        yea , thats the one

        animal

On 12/22/2019 10:47 AM, Bob Kellermann via Groups.Io wrote:

On Dec 22, 2019, at 1:44 PM, Bob Kellermann via Groups.Io <rtjkeller@...> wrote:




On Dec 22, 2019, at 1:31 PM, mike allen <animal@...> wrote:



        in the files section there is a manual for the lathe & there is a page with the recommended placement for the motor mount in relation to the lathe . they also recommend a height off the table for the lathe which I think is a

        bit low , it doesn't give much room underneath for cleaning . the motor placement is kinda needed so ya have as much belt surface on the pulleys a can have

        animal

On 12/22/2019 8:14 AM, ov10fac wrote:
Carl,
Can you tell me how wide your table is?  I have parts in my shop and some in my storage facility, but didn't take any measurements when I picked it up, so the width of the table is pretty much a guess right now since I don't know how much room I need to mount the motor and pulley arrangement.


Re: Southbend 9" lathe table

Bob Kellermann
 


On Dec 22, 2019, at 1:44 PM, Bob Kellermann via Groups.Io <rtjkeller@...> wrote:




On Dec 22, 2019, at 1:31 PM, mike allen <animal@...> wrote:



        in the files section there is a manual for the lathe & there is a page with the recommended placement for the motor mount in relation to the lathe . they also recommend a height off the table for the lathe which I think is a

        bit low , it doesn't give much room underneath for cleaning . the motor placement is kinda needed so ya have as much belt surface on the pulleys a can have

        animal

On 12/22/2019 8:14 AM, ov10fac wrote:
Carl,
Can you tell me how wide your table is?  I have parts in my shop and some in my storage facility, but didn't take any measurements when I picked it up, so the width of the table is pretty much a guess right now since I don't know how much room I need to mount the motor and pulley arrangement.


Re: Southbend 9" lathe table

Bob Kellermann
 



On Dec 22, 2019, at 1:31 PM, mike allen <animal@...> wrote:



        in the files section there is a manual for the lathe & there is a page with the recommended placement for the motor mount in relation to the lathe . they also recommend a height off the table for the lathe which I think is a

        bit low , it doesn't give much room underneath for cleaning . the motor placement is kinda needed so ya have as much belt surface on the pulleys a can have

        animal

On 12/22/2019 8:14 AM, ov10fac wrote:
Carl,
Can you tell me how wide your table is?  I have parts in my shop and some in my storage facility, but didn't take any measurements when I picked it up, so the width of the table is pretty much a guess right now since I don't know how much room I need to mount the motor and pulley arrangement.

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