Date   

Re: Southbend 9" lathe table

david pennington
 

I've made a variation on the suggestion by Thomas Harold. My 9C is configured the same way as your lathe. The fellow I bought it from had it mounted on a single sheet of 3/4" plywood, bolted to the top of two 21x22 steel drawer units. That was nowhere near rigid enough!

I cut two pieces of 3/4" plywood 22x42, marked up the top sheet with my intended layout, and took a great deal of care glueing them together. I drilled pilot holes in one sheet, about 6" apart, and started the screws. I put enough glue on the other piece so that when I drove the screws home--starting at the center--glue was squeezed out on all sides. After that had time to fully cure and dry, I hung it up in a garage and coated it on sides and edges with several coats of spar varnish.

When I set things up, I first secure and level the two drawer units, which are also bolted together. Then I put 
packaging tape on the top surface of the outside edge and the partition between the units. Using the "original" silicone RTV, I draw a thick bead on all the taped surfaces. On top of that I lay out strips of plastic grocery bags. 

The next step takes two people: placing the prepared table top on the RTV. (I have four holes in top and drawer units to line it all up.) I leave that alone for several days to let the RTV fully cure.

The original 3/4" table top goes on top of that, because it's significantly larger and provides some useful space.

I've made leveling blocks to go under the lathe feet--I'm happy to share the details, but be forewarned: I am a bit geeky, and one look at my arrangement may send you running the other way.

I prepared this setup in 2013 and have moved three times since. I go through the whole set up process each time, with fresh RTV. It's worked out pretty well.

In the attached pic you can see that the drawer units are not on the floor. They are on 8" concrete blocks, which are themselves resting on RTV pads to stabilize them. The feet of the drawer units--carriage bolts with smoothed off heads and ends that fit a 1/4" socket extension--are stabilized by being in recesses in 1x4s, front and back.

The other pic shows one lathe foot on top of a leveling base of my design.

If I had had access to oak, I'd have probably figured out a way to use it. The South Bend manual, by the way, recommends a maple bench top 1-1/2" or 2" thick...I forget which.

Hope this is useful to you.

Dave

David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado
815-382-1994


On Friday, December 20, 2019, 7:33:58 PM MST, mike allen <animal@...> wrote:


        ya want to make sure that it has support from under the lathe feet to the floor . I made my bench with 4 x4 in the corners & 2x4 legs mid span & used a solid core door for the top . if I lean on the bench with my any of my Starrett levels

        on the lathe I can watch the deflection on the level

        YMMV

        animal

On 12/20/2019 3:20 PM, Thomas Harrold via Groups.Io wrote:

3/4" plywood doubled up (glued with some screws every 12") is super solid for a surface, and will be pretty straight.

a SB 9" only weighs about 200lbs if I recall (maybe 300 with the motor an all the accessories), so something pretty simple like a frame with 2x4 legs and some cross bracing for stability should be pretty good.

 

-Tom

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io [mailto:SouthBendLathe@groups.io] On Behalf Of ov10fac
Sent: Friday, December 20, 2019 5:11 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] Southbend 9" lathe table

 

I am pretty new to metal turning and a few years ago purchased a SB 9" lathe.  Its been sitting in my storage shed for about 4 or 5 years and I now have time to start putting it back together.  First question I have is how to build a table to support the lathe.  First off, I will not be using it to do really accurate machining initially.  Second, I have no metal working tools so my bench will of necessity have to be made from wood, I am thinking Oak as I have a pretty good supply.
Any suggestions, plans, or information on how to get this done would be greatly appreciated.  By the way, the motor mounts behind the lathe not underneath.


Re: Southbend 9" lathe table

Phillip Rankin
 

Under the files tab on the groups.io web page for this group there is a tab labeled SB Bench. Take a look ate lathe bench in those files. It might be something you would want to build. 
This link should take you straight to it. https://groups.io/g/SouthBendLathe/files/SB%20Bench


Re: Southbend 9" lathe table

mike allen
 

        ya want to make sure that it has support from under the lathe feet to the floor . I made my bench with 4 x4 in the corners & 2x4 legs mid span & used a solid core door for the top . if I lean on the bench with my any of my Starrett levels

        on the lathe I can watch the deflection on the level

        YMMV

        animal

On 12/20/2019 3:20 PM, Thomas Harrold via Groups.Io wrote:

3/4" plywood doubled up (glued with some screws every 12") is super solid for a surface, and will be pretty straight.

a SB 9" only weighs about 200lbs if I recall (maybe 300 with the motor an all the accessories), so something pretty simple like a frame with 2x4 legs and some cross bracing for stability should be pretty good.

 

-Tom

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io [mailto:SouthBendLathe@groups.io] On Behalf Of ov10fac
Sent: Friday, December 20, 2019 5:11 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] Southbend 9" lathe table

 

I am pretty new to metal turning and a few years ago purchased a SB 9" lathe.  Its been sitting in my storage shed for about 4 or 5 years and I now have time to start putting it back together.  First question I have is how to build a table to support the lathe.  First off, I will not be using it to do really accurate machining initially.  Second, I have no metal working tools so my bench will of necessity have to be made from wood, I am thinking Oak as I have a pretty good supply.
Any suggestions, plans, or information on how to get this done would be greatly appreciated.  By the way, the motor mounts behind the lathe not underneath.


Re: Southbend 9" lathe table

Thomas Harrold
 

3/4" plywood doubled up (glued with some screws every 12") is super solid for a surface, and will be pretty straight.

a SB 9" only weighs about 200lbs if I recall (maybe 300 with the motor an all the accessories), so something pretty simple like a frame with 2x4 legs and some cross bracing for stability should be pretty good.

 

-Tom

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io [mailto:SouthBendLathe@groups.io] On Behalf Of ov10fac
Sent: Friday, December 20, 2019 5:11 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] Southbend 9" lathe table

 

I am pretty new to metal turning and a few years ago purchased a SB 9" lathe.  Its been sitting in my storage shed for about 4 or 5 years and I now have time to start putting it back together.  First question I have is how to build a table to support the lathe.  First off, I will not be using it to do really accurate machining initially.  Second, I have no metal working tools so my bench will of necessity have to be made from wood, I am thinking Oak as I have a pretty good supply.
Any suggestions, plans, or information on how to get this done would be greatly appreciated.  By the way, the motor mounts behind the lathe not underneath.


Re: Southbend 9" lathe table

Steven H
 

If you Google Metal lathe bench plans you will find some You Tube videos and other links that may give you some ideas.

Here is what is written in the South Bend book “How To Run A Lathe”:
“Bench lathes should be mounted on a substantial bench, providing rigid support and leveled as outlined above. The bench top should be about 28” high and if made of wood should be of 2 inch lumber. The bench should be securely bolted to the floor so there will be no danger of the bench shifting and throwing the lathe out of level. Some bench lathes have leveling screws in the right leg which may be used for making the final leveling adjustments.”

Here is what the Atlas Press Company had to say about Lathe Bench Requirements:
1) A rigid bench or floor stand must be used for mounting the lathe. Bench top must have a clear semi-hard or hardwood top at least 1-5/8” thick, cleated or well doweled to form a rigid table. Do not use softwoods or boards not cleated together.
2) Bench legs should be of heavy construction, preferably 4” x 4” lumber, well braced and securely anchored to bench top. Provide legs with lugs for bolting bench securely to floor. Overall height of bench should be approximately 30 or 32 inches.
3) Level the floor stand or bench before mounting lathe, this will omit excessive shimming when leveling lathe bed. Use a precision machinists level, placing shins as required between bench legs and floor to accurately level bench top. Bolt bench to floor. 

My comments: as far as height of the bench, if you are a tall person you might want the bench higher or lower if you are a shorter person. Obviously, you will want so diagonal bracing on the legs to prevent racking. Probably a nice design for a good strong woodworkers bench would be perfect.

Good luck.

Steve Haskell
Troy, MI


On Dec 20, 2019, at 6:10 PM, ov10fac <ov10fac@...> wrote:

I am pretty new to metal turning and a few years ago purchased a SB 9" lathe.  Its been sitting in my storage shed for about 4 or 5 years and I now have time to start putting it back together.  First question I have is how to build a table to support the lathe.  First off, I will not be using it to do really accurate machining initially.  Second, I have no metal working tools so my bench will of necessity have to be made from wood, I am thinking Oak as I have a pretty good supply.
Any suggestions, plans, or information on how to get this done would be greatly appreciated.  By the way, the motor mounts behind the lathe not underneath.


Re: Southbend 9" lathe table

ww_big_al
 

This is what I did for my SB 9A. An old desk I got for 5 or 10 dollars. Put it on a platform and casters to get a better working height. Also added a Formica wood top I rimmed with some oak to act as a catch tray. A cookie sheet for catching swarf’s. Pardon the mess it is in, but it is a working lathe 😊

 

Al

 

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of ov10fac
Sent: Friday, December 20, 2019 6:11 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] Southbend 9" lathe table

 

I am pretty new to metal turning and a few years ago purchased a SB 9" lathe.  Its been sitting in my storage shed for about 4 or 5 years and I now have time to start putting it back together.  First question I have is how to build a table to support the lathe.  First off, I will not be using it to do really accurate machining initially.  Second, I have no metal working tools so my bench will of necessity have to be made from wood, I am thinking Oak as I have a pretty good supply.
Any suggestions, plans, or information on how to get this done would be greatly appreciated.  By the way, the motor mounts behind the lathe not underneath.


Southbend 9" lathe table

ov10fac
 

I am pretty new to metal turning and a few years ago purchased a SB 9" lathe.  Its been sitting in my storage shed for about 4 or 5 years and I now have time to start putting it back together.  First question I have is how to build a table to support the lathe.  First off, I will not be using it to do really accurate machining initially.  Second, I have no metal working tools so my bench will of necessity have to be made from wood, I am thinking Oak as I have a pretty good supply.
Any suggestions, plans, or information on how to get this done would be greatly appreciated.  By the way, the motor mounts behind the lathe not underneath.


Re: SB9 Lathe Cross Slide Handle Needed

Roger Bickers
 

Contact latheman for a handle. 


Re: SB9 Lathe Cross Slide Handle Needed

Guenther Paul
 

I have a broken hand wheel from a craftsman and also a complete handle from a 10" S.B.  Did you ask the member in South Bend, Ind  that used to work for S.B. lathe, he has a lot of parts. Also you mat try Mr Concrete here with this group. He had a small junk lathe  may have bean a S.B. Be careful with him he thinks his parts are gold plated

GP


On Wednesday, December 18, 2019, 5:47:00 PM EST, Steven H via Groups.Io <stevesmachining@...> wrote:


I don’t have any spare ball crank handles. Hopefully you will find one. Some suggested places to look would be eBay, and if you Google ‘ball crank handles’ you will also find possible sources such as Wholesale Tool Co (www.wttool.com) and J.W. Winco (www.jwwinco.com). A ball crank handle from an Atlas lathe might also be retrofitted (check eBay), but Atlas handles are chrome plated ZAMAK alloy instead of steel like on a South Bend. Good luck.

Steve Haskell

On Dec 18, 2019, at 3:39 PM, Rick Kruger <krugerr@...> wrote:

Greetings,

I am looking for a cross slide handle for a SB9" lathe, or something very similar that would fit and work.  Lathe is a 1923 era SB9 with quick change gear box, with the single lever, dog clutch box.  I do not have reference material to look up a part number.

The lathe belongs to a friend, but I helped him buy it and I assisted on an earlier repair of the carriage feed gearing.  I just completed repairing the cross slide screw, which broke.  In the doing, I converted it to large dial (100 grad.) using a large dial assembly I had taking up space on my shelves from long ago when I had a SB9A in much need of repair.  I installed two sets of thrust bearings and a deep groove ball bearing.  No backlash in this assembly. The handle that has gone missing is shown.
https://vimeo.com/378442413
https://vimeo.com/378719550 

So, my friend and I live 2000 miles apart.  He shipped his saddle and CS with all the parts to me, sans the CS nut.  I did the repairs and just shipped it all back to him, using his packing materials.  Priority Mail.  He received it today.  The box had come open during shipment and the handle is now missing.  He is going to try the compound handle to see if that is an interim fix.  Even so, that handle will have to be replaced.  

My guess is a handle from a different model of SB lathe, even larger or smaller, may work.  Through hole is 1/4" ID with a 1/8" keyway with a round key/pin.  I'll work out any key/pin issues. 

Thanks,  

Rick
<CS Handle 12-18-19.jpg>


Re: SB9 Lathe Cross Slide Handle Needed

Guenther Paul
 

If you shipped with USPS there is a $ 200.00 standard no cost insurance on the package, you may get some money back if still have the shipping receipt 

GP


On Wednesday, December 18, 2019, 5:47:00 PM EST, Steven H via Groups.Io <stevesmachining@...> wrote:


I don’t have any spare ball crank handles. Hopefully you will find one. Some suggested places to look would be eBay, and if you Google ‘ball crank handles’ you will also find possible sources such as Wholesale Tool Co (www.wttool.com) and J.W. Winco (www.jwwinco.com). A ball crank handle from an Atlas lathe might also be retrofitted (check eBay), but Atlas handles are chrome plated ZAMAK alloy instead of steel like on a South Bend. Good luck.

Steve Haskell

On Dec 18, 2019, at 3:39 PM, Rick Kruger <krugerr@...> wrote:

Greetings,

I am looking for a cross slide handle for a SB9" lathe, or something very similar that would fit and work.  Lathe is a 1923 era SB9 with quick change gear box, with the single lever, dog clutch box.  I do not have reference material to look up a part number.

The lathe belongs to a friend, but I helped him buy it and I assisted on an earlier repair of the carriage feed gearing.  I just completed repairing the cross slide screw, which broke.  In the doing, I converted it to large dial (100 grad.) using a large dial assembly I had taking up space on my shelves from long ago when I had a SB9A in much need of repair.  I installed two sets of thrust bearings and a deep groove ball bearing.  No backlash in this assembly. The handle that has gone missing is shown.
https://vimeo.com/378442413
https://vimeo.com/378719550 

So, my friend and I live 2000 miles apart.  He shipped his saddle and CS with all the parts to me, sans the CS nut.  I did the repairs and just shipped it all back to him, using his packing materials.  Priority Mail.  He received it today.  The box had come open during shipment and the handle is now missing.  He is going to try the compound handle to see if that is an interim fix.  Even so, that handle will have to be replaced.  

My guess is a handle from a different model of SB lathe, even larger or smaller, may work.  Through hole is 1/4" ID with a 1/8" keyway with a round key/pin.  I'll work out any key/pin issues. 

Thanks,  

Rick
<CS Handle 12-18-19.jpg>


Re: SB9 Lathe Cross Slide Handle Needed

Guenther Paul
 

I may have a broken hand wheel with the handle still in it. If not i suggest make one. I will go to my shop and look hang on i will be back  

GP


On Wednesday, December 18, 2019, 5:47:00 PM EST, Steven H via Groups.Io <stevesmachining@...> wrote:


I don’t have any spare ball crank handles. Hopefully you will find one. Some suggested places to look would be eBay, and if you Google ‘ball crank handles’ you will also find possible sources such as Wholesale Tool Co (www.wttool.com) and J.W. Winco (www.jwwinco.com). A ball crank handle from an Atlas lathe might also be retrofitted (check eBay), but Atlas handles are chrome plated ZAMAK alloy instead of steel like on a South Bend. Good luck.

Steve Haskell

On Dec 18, 2019, at 3:39 PM, Rick Kruger <krugerr@...> wrote:

Greetings,

I am looking for a cross slide handle for a SB9" lathe, or something very similar that would fit and work.  Lathe is a 1923 era SB9 with quick change gear box, with the single lever, dog clutch box.  I do not have reference material to look up a part number.

The lathe belongs to a friend, but I helped him buy it and I assisted on an earlier repair of the carriage feed gearing.  I just completed repairing the cross slide screw, which broke.  In the doing, I converted it to large dial (100 grad.) using a large dial assembly I had taking up space on my shelves from long ago when I had a SB9A in much need of repair.  I installed two sets of thrust bearings and a deep groove ball bearing.  No backlash in this assembly. The handle that has gone missing is shown.
https://vimeo.com/378442413
https://vimeo.com/378719550 

So, my friend and I live 2000 miles apart.  He shipped his saddle and CS with all the parts to me, sans the CS nut.  I did the repairs and just shipped it all back to him, using his packing materials.  Priority Mail.  He received it today.  The box had come open during shipment and the handle is now missing.  He is going to try the compound handle to see if that is an interim fix.  Even so, that handle will have to be replaced.  

My guess is a handle from a different model of SB lathe, even larger or smaller, may work.  Through hole is 1/4" ID with a 1/8" keyway with a round key/pin.  I'll work out any key/pin issues. 

Thanks,  

Rick
<CS Handle 12-18-19.jpg>


Re: SB9 Lathe Cross Slide Handle Needed

m. allan noah
 

Make one. Clamp the cross slide gib screws, infeed with the compound.

allan

On Wed, Dec 18, 2019 at 5:46 PM Steven H via Groups.Io
<stevesmachining=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

I don’t have any spare ball crank handles. Hopefully you will find one. Some suggested places to look would be eBay, and if you Google ‘ball crank handles’ you will also find possible sources such as Wholesale Tool Co (www.wttool.com) and J.W. Winco (www.jwwinco.com). A ball crank handle from an Atlas lathe might also be retrofitted (check eBay), but Atlas handles are chrome plated ZAMAK alloy instead of steel like on a South Bend. Good luck.

Steve Haskell

On Dec 18, 2019, at 3:39 PM, Rick Kruger <krugerr@...> wrote:

Greetings,

I am looking for a cross slide handle for a SB9" lathe, or something very similar that would fit and work. Lathe is a 1923 era SB9 with quick change gear box, with the single lever, dog clutch box. I do not have reference material to look up a part number.

The lathe belongs to a friend, but I helped him buy it and I assisted on an earlier repair of the carriage feed gearing. I just completed repairing the cross slide screw, which broke. In the doing, I converted it to large dial (100 grad.) using a large dial assembly I had taking up space on my shelves from long ago when I had a SB9A in much need of repair. I installed two sets of thrust bearings and a deep groove ball bearing. No backlash in this assembly. The handle that has gone missing is shown.
https://vimeo.com/378442413
https://vimeo.com/378719550

So, my friend and I live 2000 miles apart. He shipped his saddle and CS with all the parts to me, sans the CS nut. I did the repairs and just shipped it all back to him, using his packing materials. Priority Mail. He received it today. The box had come open during shipment and the handle is now missing. He is going to try the compound handle to see if that is an interim fix. Even so, that handle will have to be replaced.

My guess is a handle from a different model of SB lathe, even larger or smaller, may work. Through hole is 1/4" ID with a 1/8" keyway with a round key/pin. I'll work out any key/pin issues.

Thanks,

Rick
<CS Handle 12-18-19.jpg>



--
"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge
of my hand"


Re: SB9 Lathe Cross Slide Handle Needed

Steven H
 

I don’t have any spare ball crank handles. Hopefully you will find one. Some suggested places to look would be eBay, and if you Google ‘ball crank handles’ you will also find possible sources such as Wholesale Tool Co (www.wttool.com) and J.W. Winco (www.jwwinco.com). A ball crank handle from an Atlas lathe might also be retrofitted (check eBay), but Atlas handles are chrome plated ZAMAK alloy instead of steel like on a South Bend. Good luck.

Steve Haskell

On Dec 18, 2019, at 3:39 PM, Rick Kruger <krugerr@...> wrote:

Greetings,

I am looking for a cross slide handle for a SB9" lathe, or something very similar that would fit and work.  Lathe is a 1923 era SB9 with quick change gear box, with the single lever, dog clutch box.  I do not have reference material to look up a part number.

The lathe belongs to a friend, but I helped him buy it and I assisted on an earlier repair of the carriage feed gearing.  I just completed repairing the cross slide screw, which broke.  In the doing, I converted it to large dial (100 grad.) using a large dial assembly I had taking up space on my shelves from long ago when I had a SB9A in much need of repair.  I installed two sets of thrust bearings and a deep groove ball bearing.  No backlash in this assembly. The handle that has gone missing is shown.
https://vimeo.com/378442413
https://vimeo.com/378719550 

So, my friend and I live 2000 miles apart.  He shipped his saddle and CS with all the parts to me, sans the CS nut.  I did the repairs and just shipped it all back to him, using his packing materials.  Priority Mail.  He received it today.  The box had come open during shipment and the handle is now missing.  He is going to try the compound handle to see if that is an interim fix.  Even so, that handle will have to be replaced.  

My guess is a handle from a different model of SB lathe, even larger or smaller, may work.  Through hole is 1/4" ID with a 1/8" keyway with a round key/pin.  I'll work out any key/pin issues. 

Thanks,  

Rick
<CS Handle 12-18-19.jpg>


Re: SB9 Lathe Cross Slide Handle Needed

mike allen
 

                ya have any more extra large dial's sittin on yer shelf ?

        animal

On 12/18/2019 12:38 PM, Rick Kruger wrote:
Greetings,

I am looking for a cross slide handle for a SB9" lathe, or something very similar that would fit and work.  Lathe is a 1923 era SB9 with quick change gear box, with the single lever, dog clutch box.  I do not have reference material to look up a part number.

The lathe belongs to a friend, but I helped him buy it and I assisted on an earlier repair of the carriage feed gearing.  I just completed repairing the cross slide screw, which broke.  In the doing, I converted it to large dial (100 grad.) using a large dial assembly I had taking up space on my shelves from long ago when I had a SB9A in much need of repair.  I installed two sets of thrust bearings and a deep groove ball bearing.  No backlash in this assembly. The handle that has gone missing is shown.
https://vimeo.com/378442413
https://vimeo.com/378719550 

So, my friend and I live 2000 miles apart.  He shipped his saddle and CS with all the parts to me, sans the CS nut.  I did the repairs and just shipped it all back to him, using his packing materials.  Priority Mail.  He received it today.  The box had come open during shipment and the handle is now missing.  He is going to try the compound handle to see if that is an interim fix.  Even so, that handle will have to be replaced.  

My guess is a handle from a different model of SB lathe, even larger or smaller, may work.  Through hole is 1/4" ID with a 1/8" keyway with a round key/pin.  I'll work out any key/pin issues. 

Thanks,  

Rick


Re: SB9 Lathe Cross Slide Handle Needed

Rick Kruger
 

The lathe under repair has been posted about here previously.  It belongs to Steve.  Please include him in any responses, especially PMs, as I will just have to forward them otherwise:

steve@...

Thanks,

Rick


Milling attachment for 9"

Guenther Paul
 

On facebook market place is a miiling attachment for a 9" south bend , Its in bloomington,  ill


Re: SB9 Lathe Cross Slide Handle Needed

Steve Yasgur
 

Cheri says, “ Good JOB!”

S.




Stevan S. Yasgur
Suite 550
3300 Edinborough Way
Edina, MN. 55435
(952) 893-9393

NOTICE: This E-mail (including attachments) is covered by the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, 18 U.S.C. §§ 2510-2521, is confidential and may be legally privileged. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any retention, dissemination, distribution, or copying of this communication is strictly prohibited. Please reply to the sender that you have received the message in error, then delete it. This email is not, nor shall it be deemed to be, legal advice or counsel, unless the recipient already has an attorney-client relationship with the firm or me. This email does not create an attorney-client relationship. 
Thank you.

On Dec 18, 2019, at 2:38 PM, Rick Kruger <krugerr@...> wrote:

Greetings,

I am looking for a cross slide handle for a SB9" lathe, or something very similar that would fit and work.  Lathe is a 1923 era SB9 with quick change gear box, with the single lever, dog clutch box.  I do not have reference material to look up a part number.

The lathe belongs to a friend, but I helped him buy it and I assisted on an earlier repair of the carriage feed gearing.  I just completed repairing the cross slide screw, which broke.  In the doing, I converted it to large dial (100 grad.) using a large dial assembly I had taking up space on my shelves from long ago when I had a SB9A in much need of repair.  I installed two sets of thrust bearings and a deep groove ball bearing.  No backlash in this assembly. The handle that has gone missing is shown.
https://vimeo.com/378442413
https://vimeo.com/378719550 

So, my friend and I live 2000 miles apart.  He shipped his saddle and CS with all the parts to me, sans the CS nut.  I did the repairs and just shipped it all back to him, using his packing materials.  Priority Mail.  He received it today.  The box had come open during shipment and the handle is now missing.  He is going to try the compound handle to see if that is an interim fix.  Even so, that handle will have to be replaced.  

My guess is a handle from a different model of SB lathe, even larger or smaller, may work.  Through hole is 1/4" ID with a 1/8" keyway with a round key/pin.  I'll work out any key/pin issues. 

Thanks,  

Rick <CS Handle 12-18-19.jpg>


SB9 Lathe Cross Slide Handle Needed

Rick Kruger
 

Greetings,

I am looking for a cross slide handle for a SB9" lathe, or something very similar that would fit and work.  Lathe is a 1923 era SB9 with quick change gear box, with the single lever, dog clutch box.  I do not have reference material to look up a part number.

The lathe belongs to a friend, but I helped him buy it and I assisted on an earlier repair of the carriage feed gearing.  I just completed repairing the cross slide screw, which broke.  In the doing, I converted it to large dial (100 grad.) using a large dial assembly I had taking up space on my shelves from long ago when I had a SB9A in much need of repair.  I installed two sets of thrust bearings and a deep groove ball bearing.  No backlash in this assembly. The handle that has gone missing is shown.
https://vimeo.com/378442413
https://vimeo.com/378719550 

So, my friend and I live 2000 miles apart.  He shipped his saddle and CS with all the parts to me, sans the CS nut.  I did the repairs and just shipped it all back to him, using his packing materials.  Priority Mail.  He received it today.  The box had come open during shipment and the handle is now missing.  He is going to try the compound handle to see if that is an interim fix.  Even so, that handle will have to be replaced.  

My guess is a handle from a different model of SB lathe, even larger or smaller, may work.  Through hole is 1/4" ID with a 1/8" keyway with a round key/pin.  I'll work out any key/pin issues. 

Thanks,  

Rick


Re: Magnetic Chuck Question

Steven H
 

After watching a few of the You Tube videos, make sure you match mark things before you disassemble to save yourself some reassembly time.

Steve Haskell


On Dec 16, 2019, at 5:22 PM, Steven H via Groups.Io <stevesmachining@...> wrote:

Go to You Tube, search ‘magnetic Chuck disassembly’ (without apostrophe marks), you will find several videos. I haven’t viewed them, but there is a video by Suburban Tool, that one should be good as Suburban Tool makes great precision tools (angle plates, sine tables, etc. (www.subtool.com)

Steve Haskell

On Dec 16, 2019, at 4:34 PM, David Beierl <dbeierl@...> wrote:


So, if anyone has any information or experience they would like to relay, please let me know.

I can tell you that I completely wrecked a bicycle hub generator by disassembling it without (as instructed) simultaneously inserting a "keeper" of soft iron to preserve the magnetic path. 

Yrs,
d


Re: Magnetic Chuck Question

Steven H
 

Go to You Tube, search ‘magnetic Chuck disassembly’ (without apostrophe marks), you will find several videos. I haven’t viewed them, but there is a video by Suburban Tool, that one should be good as Suburban Tool makes great precision tools (angle plates, sine tables, etc. (www.subtool.com)

Steve Haskell

On Dec 16, 2019, at 4:34 PM, David Beierl <dbeierl@...> wrote:


So, if anyone has any information or experience they would like to relay, please let me know.

I can tell you that I completely wrecked a bicycle hub generator by disassembling it without (as instructed) simultaneously inserting a "keeper" of soft iron to preserve the magnetic path. 

Yrs,
d