Date   

Re: Fooling Around in the Shop

John Dammeyer
 

Thanks.  Stored in my Lathe Folder.

John

 

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io [mailto:SouthBendLathe@groups.io] On Behalf Of George Meinschein
Sent: December-11-19 8:14 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Fooling Around in the Shop

 

John,

I haven't knurled anything for years and haven't thought that much about the topic for about the same time.  The recent conversations triggered me to do a little online research into knurling techniques and I found the attached.  The pitch diameter & depth of knurl info might help you in getting to a finished product with a really nice appearance.

Thanks,
George H. Meinschein, P.E.
 
Meinschein Engineering Consultants, LLC
150 Brittany Drive
Freehold, NJ 07728-1500
Direct Dial: 732-409-0778
Cell: 732-580-1736
Fax: 732-358-0369
www.meinscheinengineering.com

On 12/10/2019 11:58 PM, John Dammeyer wrote:

How I wish I could do knurls that nice.

John

 

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io [mailto:SouthBendLathe@groups.io] On Behalf Of wlw19958
Sent: December-10-19 7:48 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] Fooling Around in the Shop

 

Hi There,

There hasn't been much posted for awhile so I thought
I would show what I've been doing. 

Over the weekend, I made the depth screw for my threading attachment.




When I got it, the screw was too big in diameter.  After a little research, I discovered
that the threading stop for the 9 inch and 10K.  I had an NOS one I bought back in the
1980's.



(you can see the "too big" screw at the top of the picture).
I measured the 9 inch/10K screw and made a copy.  I made
a few cosmetic changes to the head to make it look more like
the style of the bigger one.



One of the changes was to use a 45° diamond knurls instead of the 30° ones.
(They are a little more South Bend-like). 

The other thing I did was to make a replacement oil tube for the one that was
broken off in the reversing gear tumbler.  I measured the one in the reversing
tumbler I borrowed from another lathe and bought some heavy walled (.065")
260 brass tubing.  I already had a 5/16 x 32 tpi die. to thread it.  I drilled the
other end out to 1/4" so I could drive a Gits oiler into it. 






I also repaired the broken gear bearing journal.  I took some pics with my cell phone
but they didn't come out good but I do have one of the completed journal assembly.



Originally, the threaded end had broken off so I cut the nub off just at the undercut
behind the threads, drilled and tapped it, threaded in a new section (using 1144
steel).  Then I drilled and cross-pinned the insert so it won't come out.



(If you look careful, you can make out the outline of the pin). 

Now I have the original reversing tumbler assembly back in my lathe (and it runs
quieter than the other one)!

So, my lathe may not be the "prettiest" lathe, but it pleases me.  Thanks for letting
me share my small activities.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: Fooling Around in the Shop

George Meinschein
 

Now, I'm getting the urge to go knurl something!

Thanks,
George H. Meinschein, P.E.

Meinschein Engineering Consultants, LLC
150 Brittany Drive
Freehold, NJ 07728-1500
Direct Dial: 732-409-0778
Cell: 732-580-1736
Fax: 732-358-0369
www.meinscheinengineering.com
On 12/11/2019 12:01 PM, Roger Bickers via Groups.Io wrote:

I've always thought the diamond pattern was totally hip and very professional looking. Not to mention that it provides a better grip with my beat up hands and fingers these days as I'm getting older.  Good PDF George! 
Roger


On Wed, Dec 11, 2019 at 11:58 AM, ww_big_al

Nice document. Hadn’t seen that one.

Al

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of George Meinschein
Sent: Wednesday, December 11, 2019 11:14 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Fooling Around in the Shop

 

John,

I haven't knurled anything for years and haven't thought that much about the topic for about the same time.  The recent conversations triggered me to do a little online research into knurling techniques and I found the attached.  The pitch diameter & depth of knurl info might help you in getting to a finished product with a really nice appearance.

Thanks,
George H. Meinschein, P.E.
  
Meinschein Engineering Consultants, LLC
150 Brittany Drive
Freehold, NJ 07728-1500
Direct Dial: 732-409-0778
Cell: 732-580-1736
Fax: 732-358-0369
www.meinscheinengineering.com

On 12/10/2019 11:58 PM, John Dammeyer wrote:


Re: Fooling Around in the Shop

Roger Bickers
 

I've always thought the diamond pattern was totally hip and very professional looking. Not to mention that it provides a better grip with my beat up hands and fingers these days as I'm getting older.  Good PDF George! 
Roger


On Wed, Dec 11, 2019 at 11:58 AM, ww_big_al
<arknack@...> wrote:

Nice document. Hadn’t seen that one.

Al

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of George Meinschein
Sent: Wednesday, December 11, 2019 11:14 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Fooling Around in the Shop

 

John,

I haven't knurled anything for years and haven't thought that much about the topic for about the same time.  The recent conversations triggered me to do a little online research into knurling techniques and I found the attached.  The pitch diameter & depth of knurl info might help you in getting to a finished product with a really nice appearance.

Thanks,
George H. Meinschein, P.E.
  
Meinschein Engineering Consultants, LLC
150 Brittany Drive
Freehold, NJ 07728-1500
Direct Dial: 732-409-0778
Cell: 732-580-1736
Fax: 732-358-0369
www.meinscheinengineering.com

On 12/10/2019 11:58 PM, John Dammeyer wrote:


Re: Fooling Around in the Shop

ww_big_al
 

Nice document. Hadn’t seen that one.

Al

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of George Meinschein
Sent: Wednesday, December 11, 2019 11:14 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Fooling Around in the Shop

 

John,

I haven't knurled anything for years and haven't thought that much about the topic for about the same time.  The recent conversations triggered me to do a little online research into knurling techniques and I found the attached.  The pitch diameter & depth of knurl info might help you in getting to a finished product with a really nice appearance.

Thanks,
George H. Meinschein, P.E.
 
Meinschein Engineering Consultants, LLC
150 Brittany Drive
Freehold, NJ 07728-1500
Direct Dial: 732-409-0778
Cell: 732-580-1736
Fax: 732-358-0369
www.meinscheinengineering.com

On 12/10/2019 11:58 PM, John Dammeyer wrote:


Re: Fooling Around in the Shop

George Meinschein
 

John,

I haven't knurled anything for years and haven't thought that much about the topic for about the same time.  The recent conversations triggered me to do a little online research into knurling techniques and I found the attached.  The pitch diameter & depth of knurl info might help you in getting to a finished product with a really nice appearance.

Thanks,
George H. Meinschein, P.E.

Meinschein Engineering Consultants, LLC
150 Brittany Drive
Freehold, NJ 07728-1500
Direct Dial: 732-409-0778
Cell: 732-580-1736
Fax: 732-358-0369
www.meinscheinengineering.com
On 12/10/2019 11:58 PM, John Dammeyer wrote:

How I wish I could do knurls that nice.

John

 

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io [mailto:SouthBendLathe@groups.io] On Behalf Of wlw19958
Sent: December-10-19 7:48 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] Fooling Around in the Shop

 

Hi There,

There hasn't been much posted for awhile so I thought
I would show what I've been doing. 

Over the weekend, I made the depth screw for my threading attachment.




When I got it, the screw was too big in diameter.  After a little research, I discovered
that the threading stop for the 9 inch and 10K.  I had an NOS one I bought back in the
1980's.



(you can see the "too big" screw at the top of the picture).
I measured the 9 inch/10K screw and made a copy.  I made
a few cosmetic changes to the head to make it look more like
the style of the bigger one.



One of the changes was to use a 45° diamond knurls instead of the 30° ones.
(They are a little more South Bend-like). 

The other thing I did was to make a replacement oil tube for the one that was
broken off in the reversing gear tumbler.  I measured the one in the reversing
tumbler I borrowed from another lathe and bought some heavy walled (.065")
260 brass tubing.  I already had a 5/16 x 32 tpi die. to thread it.  I drilled the
other end out to 1/4" so I could drive a Gits oiler into it. 






I also repaired the broken gear bearing journal.  I took some pics with my cell phone
but they didn't come out good but I do have one of the completed journal assembly.



Originally, the threaded end had broken off so I cut the nub off just at the undercut
behind the threads, drilled and tapped it, threaded in a new section (using 1144
steel).  Then I drilled and cross-pinned the insert so it won't come out.



(If you look careful, you can make out the outline of the pin). 

Now I have the original reversing tumbler assembly back in my lathe (and it runs
quieter than the other one)!

So, my lathe may not be the "prettiest" lathe, but it pleases me.  Thanks for letting
me share my small activities.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: Fooling Around in the Shop

ww_big_al
 

Very nice work. Congrats

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of wlw19958
Sent: Wednesday, December 11, 2019 6:35 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Fooling Around in the Shop

 

Hi There,

Thanks for the compliments!  I use a scissors type knurling tool. 
The "secret" is to use plenty of oil.  I mean, Plenty!  I Have a pistol
type pump oil gun and I am squirting oil over the knurling wheels
all the time I'm knurling to flush away the chips that come off.  I also
reverse the spindle rotation now and then too.

The latest task was to make a copy of the knurled thumb screws for
a steady rest.



The lower one is the original and the upper one is my copy.  Mine was
made from 1144 Stressproof steel.  I started with 1/2" rod and the finished
product comes out .497" in diameter.  The original is slightly larger (measures
.520").  The pitch and angle of the knurls look right (mine being new, has 
sharper diamonds).

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: Fooling Around in the Shop

wlw19958
 

Hi There,

Thanks for the compliments!  I use a scissors type knurling tool. 
The "secret" is to use plenty of oil.  I mean, Plenty!  I Have a pistol
type pump oil gun and I am squirting oil over the knurling wheels
all the time I'm knurling to flush away the chips that come off.  I also
reverse the spindle rotation now and then too.

The latest task was to make a copy of the knurled thumb screws for
a steady rest.



The lower one is the original and the upper one is my copy.  Mine was
made from 1144 Stressproof steel.  I started with 1/2" rod and the finished
product comes out .497" in diameter.  The original is slightly larger (measures
.520").  The pitch and angle of the knurls look right (mine being new, has 
sharper diamonds).

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: Fooling Around in the Shop

John Dammeyer
 

How I wish I could do knurls that nice.

John

 

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io [mailto:SouthBendLathe@groups.io] On Behalf Of wlw19958
Sent: December-10-19 7:48 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] Fooling Around in the Shop

 

Hi There,

There hasn't been much posted for awhile so I thought
I would show what I've been doing. 

Over the weekend, I made the depth screw for my threading attachment.




When I got it, the screw was too big in diameter.  After a little research, I discovered
that the threading stop for the 9 inch and 10K.  I had an NOS one I bought back in the
1980's.



(you can see the "too big" screw at the top of the picture).
I measured the 9 inch/10K screw and made a copy.  I made
a few cosmetic changes to the head to make it look more like
the style of the bigger one.



One of the changes was to use a 45° diamond knurls instead of the 30° ones.
(They are a little more South Bend-like). 

The other thing I did was to make a replacement oil tube for the one that was
broken off in the reversing gear tumbler.  I measured the one in the reversing
tumbler I borrowed from another lathe and bought some heavy walled (.065")
260 brass tubing.  I already had a 5/16 x 32 tpi die. to thread it.  I drilled the
other end out to 1/4" so I could drive a Gits oiler into it. 






I also repaired the broken gear bearing journal.  I took some pics with my cell phone
but they didn't come out good but I do have one of the completed journal assembly.



Originally, the threaded end had broken off so I cut the nub off just at the undercut
behind the threads, drilled and tapped it, threaded in a new section (using 1144
steel).  Then I drilled and cross-pinned the insert so it won't come out.



(If you look careful, you can make out the outline of the pin). 

Now I have the original reversing tumbler assembly back in my lathe (and it runs
quieter than the other one)!

So, my lathe may not be the "prettiest" lathe, but it pleases me.  Thanks for letting
me share my small activities.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: Fooling Around in the Shop

Jim_B
 

Yes very nice work. 

-8
Jim B,

On Dec 10, 2019, at 10:55 PM, Phillip Rankin <phillip.rankin1964@...> wrote:


nice work.

--
Jim B


Re: Fooling Around in the Shop

Phillip Rankin
 

nice work.


Fooling Around in the Shop

wlw19958
 

Hi There,

There hasn't been much posted for awhile so I thought
I would show what I've been doing. 

Over the weekend, I made the depth screw for my threading attachment.




When I got it, the screw was too big in diameter.  After a little research, I discovered
that the threading stop for the 9 inch and 10K.  I had an NOS one I bought back in the
1980's.



(you can see the "too big" screw at the top of the picture).
I measured the 9 inch/10K screw and made a copy.  I made
a few cosmetic changes to the head to make it look more like
the style of the bigger one.



One of the changes was to use a 45° diamond knurls instead of the 30° ones.
(They are a little more South Bend-like). 

The other thing I did was to make a replacement oil tube for the one that was
broken off in the reversing gear tumbler.  I measured the one in the reversing
tumbler I borrowed from another lathe and bought some heavy walled (.065")
260 brass tubing.  I already had a 5/16 x 32 tpi die. to thread it.  I drilled the
other end out to 1/4" so I could drive a Gits oiler into it. 






I also repaired the broken gear bearing journal.  I took some pics with my cell phone
but they didn't come out good but I do have one of the completed journal assembly.



Originally, the threaded end had broken off so I cut the nub off just at the undercut
behind the threads, drilled and tapped it, threaded in a new section (using 1144
steel).  Then I drilled and cross-pinned the insert so it won't come out.



(If you look careful, you can make out the outline of the pin). 

Now I have the original reversing tumbler assembly back in my lathe (and it runs
quieter than the other one)!

So, my lathe may not be the "prettiest" lathe, but it pleases me.  Thanks for letting
me share my small activities.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: Making (Modifying) A Collet Closer (Draw Bar) for My L00 Heavy Ten

wlw19958
 

Hi There,

Nice work.  I am trying to figure out how to use 5C collets on my 9C (1949 vintage) when I get it going again.  There ought to be some way…

There is a way.  You can mount a 5C collet chuck on the spindle. 
You will still be restricted on the size of stock that have to pass
through the spindle though.  I was considering this route until
I decided to convert my lathe over to L00. 

There is a "kit" you can build from Metal Lathe Accessories for
a collet chuck:  Metal Lathe Accessories MLA-21

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: 9A Spring-loaded Spindle Oil Wicks

jonwoellhaf
 

Hi, Webb.
 
My 1948 9A is a horizontal drive.
 
I will measure the wick hole depths tomorrow.
 
Jan (Yan)
 

From: wlw19958
Sent: December 5, 2019 19:08
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 9A Spring-loaded Spindle Oil Wicks
 
Hi There,

Is your 9A a bench top model (back drive) or a cabinet model (underdrive)?
Either way, there shouldn't be a difference between the front and rear wicks.
I have been inside at least a dozen different ones and this is the first time I
have ever heard of this situation. 

A wick that has been "clipped off" at spring level is usually from someone
installing the spindle without compressing the wick and using the skewers
to hold them down.  I'm with carbure2003; It sounds like something is in the
well interfering with the springs ability to be compressed (maybe a piece of
old wick spring).

Use a piece of wire or something and measure the depth of the wells (front
and back) and see how much they differ.  If they are really different, you can
cut some of the coils out of the bottom of the spring so that it will compress
enough to allow the spindle to be installed.  As long as the springs raises the
wick high enough to make good contact with the bearing journal, you should
be fine. 

I once had a late model 10K (Korean made) cabinet (underdrive) model and
the rear bearing was always loosing its oil.  I found that when they drilled the
well, they went a smidgen too far and just nicked the hole for the reversing
tumbler pivot.  I cleaned it up with solvent and compressed air and using a
heat gun, I dripped a drop of JB Weld epoxy into the well to seal the hole.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: L00 Heavy 10 Toolroom for Sale

mike allen
 

       " locks only keep honest people honest" when yer through learnin yer through

        animal


On 12/6/2019 10:19 AM, david pennington via Groups.Io wrote:
Thank you, Mike...er, animal. To do otherwise is unconscionable.

I have a theory, using the term in its basic meaning as a logical construct that accounts for a set of known data. That theory is that when those in power are known to be dishonest and to skirt or to even defy the law, not to mention common ethical norms, then the common folk lose their incentive to be honest and ethical in their daily lives.

This theory sort of formed itself out of about a decade of observations of the city of Chicago and the state government in Springfield. My brother once remarked to me that after several years residence in the city, he had concluded that the only member of the city board of aldermen who might be honest was his own alderman, but then that man had been indicted on federal charges--the only kind that ever happen in Illinois--for corruption that very day.

There are many honest and ethical people in Illinois and even in Chicago, but the incidence of meeting people who are less inclined to be on the up-and-up seems to me to be higher in that geographic area than has been my experience in other parts of the country.

My 2 cents.

Dave

David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado
815-382-1994


On Friday, December 6, 2019, 10:46:08 AM MST, mike allen <animal@...> wrote:


        that is honorable , I  was raised & trained that same way

        animal

On 12/6/2019 7:04 AM, david pennington via Groups.Io wrote:
Exactly!

I was somewhat new to this part of my career and was shocked at the attitude, the open discussion, and the agreement. It prompted me to start a personal list of folks I would not work together with in the future. We were employed by the same agency.

David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado
815-382-1994


On Friday, December 6, 2019, 7:42:19 AM MST, Payson <egreene104@...> wrote:


you mean the "don't kill the job," not the "do a great job, under budget, and hope for a pat on the back, and more work!"

Payson.


Re: L00 Heavy 10 Toolroom for Sale

david pennington
 

Thank you, Mike...er, animal. To do otherwise is unconscionable.

I have a theory, using the term in its basic meaning as a logical construct that accounts for a set of known data. That theory is that when those in power are known to be dishonest and to skirt or to even defy the law, not to mention common ethical norms, then the common folk lose their incentive to be honest and ethical in their daily lives.

This theory sort of formed itself out of about a decade of observations of the city of Chicago and the state government in Springfield. My brother once remarked to me that after several years residence in the city, he had concluded that the only member of the city board of aldermen who might be honest was his own alderman, but then that man had been indicted on federal charges--the only kind that ever happen in Illinois--for corruption that very day.

There are many honest and ethical people in Illinois and even in Chicago, but the incidence of meeting people who are less inclined to be on the up-and-up seems to me to be higher in that geographic area than has been my experience in other parts of the country.

My 2 cents.

Dave

David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado
815-382-1994


On Friday, December 6, 2019, 10:46:08 AM MST, mike allen <animal@...> wrote:


        that is honorable , I  was raised & trained that same way

        animal

On 12/6/2019 7:04 AM, david pennington via Groups.Io wrote:
Exactly!

I was somewhat new to this part of my career and was shocked at the attitude, the open discussion, and the agreement. It prompted me to start a personal list of folks I would not work together with in the future. We were employed by the same agency.

David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado
815-382-1994


On Friday, December 6, 2019, 7:42:19 AM MST, Payson <egreene104@...> wrote:


you mean the "don't kill the job," not the "do a great job, under budget, and hope for a pat on the back, and more work!"

Payson.


Re: L00 Heavy 10 Toolroom for Sale

Bill in OKC too
 

I guess I've been lucky most of my life. I've only met a few people like that. I'm not in this business, I'm doing machining because I like it, and want to do it for fun, with maybe a little profit one of these days when I'm much better at it. I have, however, run into some of the kind of folks you guys are talking about. I was in three major career fields in the USAF before I retired, and I've been a student and teacher. I used them as examples of what I do NOT want to grow up to be.

https://despair.com/products/mistakes?variant=2457302467

Bill in OKC

A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders,
give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new
problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight
efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects.
LAZARUS LONG (Robert A. Heinlein)

On Friday, December 6, 2019, 11:46:09 AM CST, mike allen <animal@...> wrote:


        that is honorable , I  was raised & trained that same way

        animal

On 12/6/2019 7:04 AM, david pennington via Groups.Io wrote:
Exactly!

I was somewhat new to this part of my career and was shocked at the attitude, the open discussion, and the agreement. It prompted me to start a personal list of folks I would not work together with in the future. We were employed by the same agency.

David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado
815-382-1994


On Friday, December 6, 2019, 7:42:19 AM MST, Payson <egreene104@...> wrote:


you mean the "don't kill the job," not the "do a great job, under budget, and hope for a pat on the back, and more work!"

Payson.


Re: L00 Heavy 10 Toolroom for Sale

mike allen
 

        that is honorable , I  was raised & trained that same way

        animal

On 12/6/2019 7:04 AM, david pennington via Groups.Io wrote:
Exactly!

I was somewhat new to this part of my career and was shocked at the attitude, the open discussion, and the agreement. It prompted me to start a personal list of folks I would not work together with in the future. We were employed by the same agency.

David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado
815-382-1994


On Friday, December 6, 2019, 7:42:19 AM MST, Payson <egreene104@...> wrote:


you mean the "don't kill the job," not the "do a great job, under budget, and hope for a pat on the back, and more work!"

Payson.


Re: L00 Heavy 10 Toolroom for Sale

david pennington
 

Exactly!

I was somewhat new to this part of my career and was shocked at the attitude, the open discussion, and the agreement. It prompted me to start a personal list of folks I would not work together with in the future. We were employed by the same agency.

David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado
815-382-1994


On Friday, December 6, 2019, 7:42:19 AM MST, Payson <egreene104@...> wrote:


you mean the "don't kill the job," not the "do a great job, under budget, and hope for a pat on the back, and more work!"

Payson.


Re: L00 Heavy 10 Toolroom for Sale

Payson
 

you mean the "don't kill the job," not the "do a great job, under budget, and hope for a pat on the back, and more work!"

Payson.


Re: L00 Heavy 10 Toolroom for Sale

david pennington
 

Especially if you're in a union, I've heard...other than marriage, that is.

Although, I have had colleagues in my profession, as a contract engineer, who have a practice of milking contracts and did not like it when I would not join them. 

The traits are endemic with humans it would seem.

David W. Pennington
Denver, Colorado
815-382-1994


On Thursday, December 5, 2019, 9:11:03 PM MST, Payson <egreene104@...> wrote:


I agree David, but I find now that continually reaching can cause animosity from people who are complacent.
Best regards,

Payson.
Green 10K undermount.