Date   

Headstock shims...

Thomas Harrold
 

Hi, I noticed some odd behavior from my SBL 9" (circa 1957).  I could visibly see stock in the chuck moving when the lathe was running.
When I put an indicator on the chuck, and even on the end of the stock (a dowel pin, or drill rod), I would see virtually NO movement.

So I lifted UP on the stock, and...I could actually see movement of the entire chuck and spindle. 

I restored this lathe 3-4 years ago, and was just learning about SBL (and older lathes in general), so when I re-assembled the headstock, I put the original shims back in, tightened down the headstock, and forgot about them. 

I pulled the shims.  Found what appears to be a solid aluminum shim, and the brass "shim pack", which is layers of .002" shim stock somehow glued together.

I remove a layer, and re-assembled.  Better, but not perfect.  Before I continue down this path, I thought I'd ask about best practices when tweaking the headstock bearing spacing.

1) do you try to keep both the right and left shims at the same thickness?
2) How tight are the bolts supposed to be?
3) should the shims be the right thickness so you can torque down the bolts, and the spindle still spins freely?
4) any good tutorials on how to properly adjust the headshock shims, or is it basically trial and error?

Thanks in advance,

-Tom


Re: Mica Undercutting Accessory.

Nitro
 

It had to do with the material that the brushes were made out of.
Higher load starting motors had higher copper content as opposed to the higher carbon contact of a generator brush that got accelerated wear from the mica.

I have the factory motorized mica undercutter for my Atlas 618, but at this stage of my game, it is purely a relic ;)


Re: Mica Undercutting Accessory.

bob
 

The bulletin printed by SB mentioned that starters don't get undercut but not why. Thanks for the additional info.


Re: Mica Undercutting Accessory.

bob
 

Thank you for the Bulletin. Printed, read and saved. Very helpful.


Re: Mica Undercutting Accessory.

Nick Jonkman
 

Hi, If memory serves me right you only undercut generator armatures not starer armatures, only those with carbon brushes not with copper brushes as starters have. Over the last 60 years I probably have done hundreds of them, not too many in the last 20 years since retiring from full time mechanicing.

I only work on some classic cars now for others and of course my own Studebaker and my modern vehicles

Nick


On 20-01-16 8:29 PM, bob wrote:
Didn't know what this was at first. Found it in the '58 South Bend Catalog. Fitted it onto my 9,10K and heavy 10. Now I have to take apart an old motor to try it. It came with the brass jaw Jacobs chuck too.


Mica Undercutting Accessory.

Jim_B
 

Here is how SB said to use it.



Sent from my iPhone-8
Jim B,

--
Jim B


Mica Undercutting Accessory.

bob
 

Didn't know what this was at first. Found it in the '58 South Bend Catalog. Fitted it onto my 9,10K and heavy 10. Now I have to take apart an old motor to try it. It came with the brass jaw Jacobs chuck too.


Re: My latest project

Roy Wall
 

Nice work as always Jim!!!


Re: My latest project

Payson
 

 Would a round, thread-in sight gage, as in a Nardini, be useful? 

Payson


Re: 9A Bed Profile

mike allen
 

        thanks Jim

        animal

On 1/14/2020 7:58 AM, Jim_B wrote:


Just to give you some Ideas, here is a drawing of my DI Bed stop, for the 9” lathe.  It seems to date from 2008. 
Note that at the crest of the 90o VEE I have added a slot. As your, tool or your bed wears you may get a ridge. This will cause the clamping to be unreliable. Adding the slot takes care of this. 



Jim B





--
Jim B


Re: 9A Bed Profile

mike allen
 

    thanks Chips

    animal

On 1/14/2020 7:03 AM, Chips wrote:
Mike:
Here's a few cartoons I sketched up and pics for you to make your accessories.
While you're set up to do the 45 degree way grooves, you might as well whittle out a dial indicator mount.
As to the knobs for the indicator mount, no particular dims. Just carve them out to suit your needs. *The knurled knobs are a ton faster than fiddling with allen wrenches to move the mount around.
Have fun !


Re: My latest project

Jim_B
 

If this doesn’t work that might be next.



--
Jim B


Re: My latest project

Ralph
 

And I thought you might be telling us how you modified the engine for a modern seal🙂 Electrics by the prince of darkness!



On Jan 14, 2020, at 4:59 PM, Jim_B <jim@...> wrote:


As you aLL know, by now,  I have an older MG. 

There is a saying about British cars of this period, “If it does not leak, It's out of oil”.

I have a rear main-seal leak. They are common. The main-seal is a piece if rope. The shaft has a reverse spiral groove. The groove is supposed to move the oil back into the pan. Many times the groove itself will provide a leakage path. Particularly when the engine is OFF. 

MG actually put a drain hole in the bell housing, to allow the oil a path out, so the clutch would not slip. In the hole is a cotter pin to help wick the oil away. It works but the owner better have a drip pan under the car or his/her garage floor will be a mess. 

Many owners fabricate a ketch-pan that bolts to the bell housing and collects the oil from the cotterpin, to be drained when the build up is sufficient. It is nice if this ketch pan has a sight glass so the owner can see if it needs draining. 

So here is my project. A ketch pan with a sight glass. 

<93C24F6B-9B64-41E2-84FD-19EB02D5ED54.jpeg>

I started by making several cardboard prototypes and ultimately used one to layout a pattern on a flat piece of 1/16 Aluminum. I cut it out with a hand held jig saw and dressed the edges. 


<1C93E681-5D4C-43CA-8B81-7B1B4A8ADA94.jpeg>

I had my friend Donnie, bend and weld the brackets. 
The sight glass used two pieces that were fabricated on the lathe. On the lower one, one end had a #22 hole for the sight tube, off center. There was a stepped flat, milled on the lathe part way up, and the other end had a 1/16 NPT thread. 

<B8879844-648B-4EC3-BD39-79CAC3938C1C.jpeg>

Above shows the milling. I use a QCTP holder as a milling vise. So far it works Just fine



<44A6A1F6-8590-4C7A-A06D-7E6B37792254.jpeg>

The offset hole was also drilled using the Same setup. Since I knew where the flat was from the above procedure, It was only a matter of measuring the additional depth and finding the rod center.

The top piece was similar but there was no pipe thread. 
In addition, there was a side hole in both. On the bottom to allow the oil in and on the top to allow the air out. 
The sight glass is oil resistant plastic tubing. 

<F40E55DF-02A9-4408-8A4E-6F93B958D910.jpeg>

Welding the small bosses onto the pan gave Donnie some grief.  
Crawling under to put it on gave me some grief. 

Since I am waiting for some pats to stop a gearbox leak I cant report how successful my ketchpan is. 


Jim B.





--
Jim B


Re: stuck chuck

Stephen Bartlett
 

Thanks for all the suggestions.

I normally have the collet attachment on, using the chuck only occasionally.

I always clean the threads, because even a spec of whatever makes the chuck or the nose protector not want to go on.

I have some shim stock. Will find something thin and make a washer.

Steve Bartlett


Re: stuck chuck

richard jones
 

I have had multi lathes for 50 years and never had a stuck chuck.  One thing that I have done to all the lathes is cut a deep notch in the 1st full thread at the start at  90 degrees crossed the thread. This helps clean the threads as the chuck is screwed on.


Re: My latest project

Jim_B
 

Thank you Nelson. 

-8
Jim B,

On Jan 14, 2020, at 8:56 PM, Nelson Collar via Groups.Io <nel2lar@...> wrote:


Jim
Very nice, let us know how it works out.
Nelson


--
Jim B


Re: My latest project

Nelson Collar
 

Jim
Very nice, let us know how it works out.
Nelson

On Tuesday, January 14, 2020, 03:59:48 PM CST, Jim_B <jim@...> wrote:



As you aLL know, by now,  I have an older MG. 

There is a saying about British cars of this period, “If it does not leak, It's out of oil”.

I have a rear main-seal leak. They are common. The main-seal is a piece if rope. The shaft has a reverse spiral groove. The groove is supposed to move the oil back into the pan. Many times the groove itself will provide a leakage path. Particularly when the engine is OFF. 

MG actually put a drain hole in the bell housing, to allow the oil a path out, so the clutch would not slip. In the hole is a cotter pin to help wick the oil away. It works but the owner better have a drip pan under the car or his/her garage floor will be a mess. 

Many owners fabricate a ketch-pan that bolts to the bell housing and collects the oil from the cotterpin, to be drained when the build up is sufficient. It is nice if this ketch pan has a sight glass so the owner can see if it needs draining. 

So here is my project. A ketch pan with a sight glass. 


I started by making several cardboard prototypes and ultimately used one to layout a pattern on a flat piece of 1/16 Aluminum. I cut it out with a hand held jig saw and dressed the edges. 



I had my friend Donnie, bend and weld the brackets. 
The sight glass used two pieces that were fabricated on the lathe. On the lower one, one end had a #22 hole for the sight tube, off center. There was a stepped flat, milled on the lathe part way up, and the other end had a 1/16 NPT thread. 


Above shows the milling. I use a QCTP holder as a milling vise. So far it works Just fine




The offset hole was also drilled using the Same setup. Since I knew where the flat was from the above procedure, It was only a matter of measuring the additional depth and finding the rod center.

The top piece was similar but there was no pipe thread. 
In addition, there was a side hole in both. On the bottom to allow the oil in and on the top to allow the air out. 
The sight glass is oil resistant plastic tubing. 


Welding the small bosses onto the pan gave Donnie some grief.  
Crawling under to put it on gave me some grief. 

Since I am waiting for some pats to stop a gearbox leak I cant report how successful my ketchpan is. 


Jim B.





--
Jim B


My latest project

Jim_B
 


As you aLL know, by now,  I have an older MG. 

There is a saying about British cars of this period, “If it does not leak, It's out of oil”.

I have a rear main-seal leak. They are common. The main-seal is a piece if rope. The shaft has a reverse spiral groove. The groove is supposed to move the oil back into the pan. Many times the groove itself will provide a leakage path. Particularly when the engine is OFF. 

MG actually put a drain hole in the bell housing, to allow the oil a path out, so the clutch would not slip. In the hole is a cotter pin to help wick the oil away. It works but the owner better have a drip pan under the car or his/her garage floor will be a mess. 

Many owners fabricate a ketch-pan that bolts to the bell housing and collects the oil from the cotterpin, to be drained when the build up is sufficient. It is nice if this ketch pan has a sight glass so the owner can see if it needs draining. 

So here is my project. A ketch pan with a sight glass. 


I started by making several cardboard prototypes and ultimately used one to layout a pattern on a flat piece of 1/16 Aluminum. I cut it out with a hand held jig saw and dressed the edges. 



I had my friend Donnie, bend and weld the brackets. 
The sight glass used two pieces that were fabricated on the lathe. On the lower one, one end had a #22 hole for the sight tube, off center. There was a stepped flat, milled on the lathe part way up, and the other end had a 1/16 NPT thread. 


Above shows the milling. I use a QCTP holder as a milling vise. So far it works Just fine




The offset hole was also drilled using the Same setup. Since I knew where the flat was from the above procedure, It was only a matter of measuring the additional depth and finding the rod center.

The top piece was similar but there was no pipe thread. 
In addition, there was a side hole in both. On the bottom to allow the oil in and on the top to allow the air out. 
The sight glass is oil resistant plastic tubing. 


Welding the small bosses onto the pan gave Donnie some grief.  
Crawling under to put it on gave me some grief. 

Since I am waiting for some pats to stop a gearbox leak I cant report how successful my ketchpan is. 


Jim B.





--
Jim B


Re: stuck chuck

fwhite913
 

Yes - hard to do and the ID wasn't that pretty, but it really helped.

 

 

On 01/14/2020 09:40 AM, Steven H via Groups.Io wrote:

   Hi Fred,
Did you make your thin washer from brass shim stock? Thanks,
Steve


Sent from AOL Mobile Mail
Get the new AOL app: mail.mobile.aol.com

On Tuesday, January 14, 2020, fwhite913 via Groups.Io <913fred@...> wrote:

Reply to Steve- 

>>Maybe some sort of shim, maybe Teflon, a few thou thick, if it is rigid enough to not deflect.

I did that with a washer made from thin shim stock and never had a major problem removing a chuck on my 12" Clausing.

I don't think you want the washer too thick in case somehow it would affect the register of the chuck when installed.

Fred

 

 

 

On 01/14/2020 07:25 AM, ww_big_al wrote:

One suggestion I haven't seen is don't put the chuck on and leave it there.  Put on and off periodically. I end up swapping between the chuck and collets several times a year which I believe helps. A chuck left on for years give moisture a chance to attack it and oil time to varnish up. Also, don't crash it 😊

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of Stephen Bartlett via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, January 13, 2020 10:46 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] stuck chuck

 

Is there anything that can be done to prevent a chuck from sticking?

 

Other than not socking it tightly to begin with.

 

Maybe some sort of shim, maybe Teflon, a few thou thick, if it is rigid enough to not deflect.

 

Steve Bartlett

 

 

 

 


Re: 9A Bed Profile

Jim_B
 



Just to give you some Ideas, here is a drawing of my DI Bed stop, for the 9” lathe.  It seems to date from 2008. 
Note that at the crest of the 90o VEE I have added a slot. As your, tool or your bed wears you may get a ridge. This will cause the clamping to be unreliable. Adding the slot takes care of this. 



Jim B





--
Jim B