Date   
Re: Magnetic Chuck Question

David Beierl
 

So, if anyone has any information or experience they would like to relay, please let me know.

I can tell you that I completely wrecked a bicycle hub generator by disassembling it without (as instructed) simultaneously inserting a "keeper" of soft iron to preserve the magnetic path. 

Yrs,
d

Magnetic Chuck Question

wlw19958
 

Hi There,

I know this is a little off topic but I am looking for information
about disassembling a permanent magnet type chuck.  I have
read that removing the magnets will severely weaken them.  
So, if anyone has any information or experience they would
like to relay, please let me know.

Thanks in advance!
-Blue Chips-
Webb

Playing around with metric conversion

carbure2003
 

A few weeks ago I made the decision to convert to metric my SB 9A.

As I do metric work on a regular basis, I kept the metric transposing gear on the machine. I also replaced the dial for a metric dial on the cross slide. It is a 254 graduation dial. Every graduation corresponds to 0.02 mm diameter. Dial was cut on my 10K. (attached photo)

It is not a big issue since I have a SB 10K sitting just besides.

Ten years ago I was offered a SB 10K metric that I declined at that time. Now I regret.

Next little project will be a rotary broach. It will require some metric threading as well as boring metric holes for bearings.

I just finished the rebuild of a SB 9A for a friend. Machine will probably leave my basement this week end.

Guy Cadrin
____________________________________________________________
How To Remove Eye Bags & Lip Lines Fast (Watch)
Fit Mom Daily
http://thirdpartyoffers.netzero.net/TGL3241/5df30562c770a562315cst01vuc

Re: Fooling Around in the Shop

wlw19958
 

Hi There,

On Thu, Dec 12, 2019 at 03:57 AM, Jim Croyle wrote:
That looks great. What did you use for the finish?
I used a plater's wire wheel.  These are extremely fine wire
wheels (like about .003-.004" diameter wire) and produce a
very fine (soft) finish.  It also cleans out the valleys of any
crud.

This kind of wire wheel is so soft, you cannot hurt yourself
when your hand contacts the bristles (even if you leave your
hand in there a long time).

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb

Re: Fooling Around in the Shop

Jim Croyle
 

That looks great. What did you use for the finish?


On Thu, Dec 12, 2019 at 5:51 AM John <reproturn@...> wrote:

Really excellent – I am envious!

Cheers

John B

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of wlw19958
Sent: Wednesday, December 11, 2019 10:35 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Fooling Around in the Shop

 

Hi There,

Thanks for the compliments!  I use a scissors type knurling tool. 
The "secret" is to use plenty of oil.  I mean, Plenty!  I Have a pistol
type pump oil gun and I am squirting oil over the knurling wheels
all the time I'm knurling to flush away the chips that come off.  I also
reverse the spindle rotation now and then too.

The latest task was to make a copy of the knurled thumb screws for
a steady rest.



The lower one is the original and the upper one is my copy.  Mine was
made from 1144 Stressproof steel.  I started with 1/2" rod and the finished
product comes out .497" in diameter.  The original is slightly larger (measures
.520").  The pitch and angle of the knurls look right (mine being new, has 
sharper diamonds).

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb

Re: Fooling Around in the Shop

John
 

Really excellent – I am envious!

Cheers

John B

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of wlw19958
Sent: Wednesday, December 11, 2019 10:35 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Fooling Around in the Shop

 

Hi There,

Thanks for the compliments!  I use a scissors type knurling tool. 
The "secret" is to use plenty of oil.  I mean, Plenty!  I Have a pistol
type pump oil gun and I am squirting oil over the knurling wheels
all the time I'm knurling to flush away the chips that come off.  I also
reverse the spindle rotation now and then too.

The latest task was to make a copy of the knurled thumb screws for
a steady rest.



The lower one is the original and the upper one is my copy.  Mine was
made from 1144 Stressproof steel.  I started with 1/2" rod and the finished
product comes out .497" in diameter.  The original is slightly larger (measures
.520").  The pitch and angle of the knurls look right (mine being new, has 
sharper diamonds).

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb

Re: Fooling Around in the Shop

Steven Schlegel
 

Thanks for the info.  I am looking forward to trying it.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of George Meinschein <bustedguns@...>
Sent: Wednesday, December 11, 2019 8:14:15 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Fooling Around in the Shop
 

John,

I haven't knurled anything for years and haven't thought that much about the topic for about the same time.  The recent conversations triggered me to do a little online research into knurling techniques and I found the attached.  The pitch diameter & depth of knurl info might help you in getting to a finished product with a really nice appearance.

Thanks,
George H. Meinschein, P.E.

Meinschein Engineering Consultants, LLC
150 Brittany Drive
Freehold, NJ 07728-1500
Direct Dial: 732-409-0778
Cell: 732-580-1736
Fax: 732-358-0369
www.meinscheinengineering.com
On 12/10/2019 11:58 PM, John Dammeyer wrote:

How I wish I could do knurls that nice.

John

 

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io [mailto:SouthBendLathe@groups.io] On Behalf Of wlw19958
Sent: December-10-19 7:48 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] Fooling Around in the Shop

 

Hi There,

There hasn't been much posted for awhile so I thought
I would show what I've been doing. 

Over the weekend, I made the depth screw for my threading attachment.




When I got it, the screw was too big in diameter.  After a little research, I discovered
that the threading stop for the 9 inch and 10K.  I had an NOS one I bought back in the
1980's.



(you can see the "too big" screw at the top of the picture).
I measured the 9 inch/10K screw and made a copy.  I made
a few cosmetic changes to the head to make it look more like
the style of the bigger one.



One of the changes was to use a 45° diamond knurls instead of the 30° ones.
(They are a little more South Bend-like). 

The other thing I did was to make a replacement oil tube for the one that was
broken off in the reversing gear tumbler.  I measured the one in the reversing
tumbler I borrowed from another lathe and bought some heavy walled (.065")
260 brass tubing.  I already had a 5/16 x 32 tpi die. to thread it.  I drilled the
other end out to 1/4" so I could drive a Gits oiler into it. 






I also repaired the broken gear bearing journal.  I took some pics with my cell phone
but they didn't come out good but I do have one of the completed journal assembly.



Originally, the threaded end had broken off so I cut the nub off just at the undercut
behind the threads, drilled and tapped it, threaded in a new section (using 1144
steel).  Then I drilled and cross-pinned the insert so it won't come out.



(If you look careful, you can make out the outline of the pin). 

Now I have the original reversing tumbler assembly back in my lathe (and it runs
quieter than the other one)!

So, my lathe may not be the "prettiest" lathe, but it pleases me.  Thanks for letting
me share my small activities.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb

Re: Fooling Around in the Shop

RJ White
 

Good job thanks for posting with all the glitter of Christmas it’s nice to see a littel iron . And I like Christmas!  Merry Christmas to all. 


On Dec 10, 2019, at 9:01 PM, John Dammeyer <johnd@...> wrote:



How I wish I could do knurls that nice.

John

 

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io [mailto:SouthBendLathe@groups.io] On Behalf Of wlw19958
Sent: December-10-19 7:48 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] Fooling Around in the Shop

 

Hi There,

There hasn't been much posted for awhile so I thought
I would show what I've been doing. 

Over the weekend, I made the depth screw for my threading attachment.

<image001.jpg>



When I got it, the screw was too big in diameter.  After a little research, I discovered
that the threading stop for the 9 inch and 10K.  I had an NOS one I bought back in the
1980's.

<image002.jpg>


(you can see the "too big" screw at the top of the picture).
I measured the 9 inch/10K screw and made a copy.  I made
a few cosmetic changes to the head to make it look more like
the style of the bigger one.

<image003.png>


One of the changes was to use a 45° diamond knurls instead of the 30° ones.
(They are a little more South Bend-like). 

The other thing I did was to make a replacement oil tube for the one that was
broken off in the reversing gear tumbler.  I measured the one in the reversing
tumbler I borrowed from another lathe and bought some heavy walled (.065")
260 brass tubing.  I already had a 5/16 x 32 tpi die. to thread it.  I drilled the
other end out to 1/4" so I could drive a Gits oiler into it. 

<image004.png>


<image005.png>



I also repaired the broken gear bearing journal.  I took some pics with my cell phone
but they didn't come out good but I do have one of the completed journal assembly.

<image006.png>


Originally, the threaded end had broken off so I cut the nub off just at the undercut
behind the threads, drilled and tapped it, threaded in a new section (using 1144
steel).  Then I drilled and cross-pinned the insert so it won't come out.

<image007.png>


(If you look careful, you can make out the outline of the pin). 

Now I have the original reversing tumbler assembly back in my lathe (and it runs
quieter than the other one)!

So, my lathe may not be the "prettiest" lathe, but it pleases me.  Thanks for letting
me share my small activities.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb

Re: Fooling Around in the Shop

John Dammeyer
 

Thanks.  Stored in my Lathe Folder.

John

 

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io [mailto:SouthBendLathe@groups.io] On Behalf Of George Meinschein
Sent: December-11-19 8:14 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Fooling Around in the Shop

 

John,

I haven't knurled anything for years and haven't thought that much about the topic for about the same time.  The recent conversations triggered me to do a little online research into knurling techniques and I found the attached.  The pitch diameter & depth of knurl info might help you in getting to a finished product with a really nice appearance.

Thanks,
George H. Meinschein, P.E.
 
Meinschein Engineering Consultants, LLC
150 Brittany Drive
Freehold, NJ 07728-1500
Direct Dial: 732-409-0778
Cell: 732-580-1736
Fax: 732-358-0369
www.meinscheinengineering.com

On 12/10/2019 11:58 PM, John Dammeyer wrote:

How I wish I could do knurls that nice.

John

 

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io [mailto:SouthBendLathe@groups.io] On Behalf Of wlw19958
Sent: December-10-19 7:48 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] Fooling Around in the Shop

 

Hi There,

There hasn't been much posted for awhile so I thought
I would show what I've been doing. 

Over the weekend, I made the depth screw for my threading attachment.




When I got it, the screw was too big in diameter.  After a little research, I discovered
that the threading stop for the 9 inch and 10K.  I had an NOS one I bought back in the
1980's.



(you can see the "too big" screw at the top of the picture).
I measured the 9 inch/10K screw and made a copy.  I made
a few cosmetic changes to the head to make it look more like
the style of the bigger one.



One of the changes was to use a 45° diamond knurls instead of the 30° ones.
(They are a little more South Bend-like). 

The other thing I did was to make a replacement oil tube for the one that was
broken off in the reversing gear tumbler.  I measured the one in the reversing
tumbler I borrowed from another lathe and bought some heavy walled (.065")
260 brass tubing.  I already had a 5/16 x 32 tpi die. to thread it.  I drilled the
other end out to 1/4" so I could drive a Gits oiler into it. 






I also repaired the broken gear bearing journal.  I took some pics with my cell phone
but they didn't come out good but I do have one of the completed journal assembly.



Originally, the threaded end had broken off so I cut the nub off just at the undercut
behind the threads, drilled and tapped it, threaded in a new section (using 1144
steel).  Then I drilled and cross-pinned the insert so it won't come out.



(If you look careful, you can make out the outline of the pin). 

Now I have the original reversing tumbler assembly back in my lathe (and it runs
quieter than the other one)!

So, my lathe may not be the "prettiest" lathe, but it pleases me.  Thanks for letting
me share my small activities.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb

Re: Fooling Around in the Shop

George Meinschein
 

Now, I'm getting the urge to go knurl something!

Thanks,
George H. Meinschein, P.E.

Meinschein Engineering Consultants, LLC
150 Brittany Drive
Freehold, NJ 07728-1500
Direct Dial: 732-409-0778
Cell: 732-580-1736
Fax: 732-358-0369
www.meinscheinengineering.com
On 12/11/2019 12:01 PM, Roger Bickers via Groups.Io wrote:

I've always thought the diamond pattern was totally hip and very professional looking. Not to mention that it provides a better grip with my beat up hands and fingers these days as I'm getting older.  Good PDF George! 
Roger


On Wed, Dec 11, 2019 at 11:58 AM, ww_big_al

Nice document. Hadn’t seen that one.

Al

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of George Meinschein
Sent: Wednesday, December 11, 2019 11:14 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Fooling Around in the Shop

 

John,

I haven't knurled anything for years and haven't thought that much about the topic for about the same time.  The recent conversations triggered me to do a little online research into knurling techniques and I found the attached.  The pitch diameter & depth of knurl info might help you in getting to a finished product with a really nice appearance.

Thanks,
George H. Meinschein, P.E.
  
Meinschein Engineering Consultants, LLC
150 Brittany Drive
Freehold, NJ 07728-1500
Direct Dial: 732-409-0778
Cell: 732-580-1736
Fax: 732-358-0369
www.meinscheinengineering.com

On 12/10/2019 11:58 PM, John Dammeyer wrote:

Re: Fooling Around in the Shop

Roger Bickers
 

I've always thought the diamond pattern was totally hip and very professional looking. Not to mention that it provides a better grip with my beat up hands and fingers these days as I'm getting older.  Good PDF George! 
Roger


On Wed, Dec 11, 2019 at 11:58 AM, ww_big_al
<arknack@...> wrote:

Nice document. Hadn’t seen that one.

Al

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of George Meinschein
Sent: Wednesday, December 11, 2019 11:14 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Fooling Around in the Shop

 

John,

I haven't knurled anything for years and haven't thought that much about the topic for about the same time.  The recent conversations triggered me to do a little online research into knurling techniques and I found the attached.  The pitch diameter & depth of knurl info might help you in getting to a finished product with a really nice appearance.

Thanks,
George H. Meinschein, P.E.
  
Meinschein Engineering Consultants, LLC
150 Brittany Drive
Freehold, NJ 07728-1500
Direct Dial: 732-409-0778
Cell: 732-580-1736
Fax: 732-358-0369
www.meinscheinengineering.com

On 12/10/2019 11:58 PM, John Dammeyer wrote:

Re: Fooling Around in the Shop

ww_big_al
 

Nice document. Hadn’t seen that one.

Al

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of George Meinschein
Sent: Wednesday, December 11, 2019 11:14 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Fooling Around in the Shop

 

John,

I haven't knurled anything for years and haven't thought that much about the topic for about the same time.  The recent conversations triggered me to do a little online research into knurling techniques and I found the attached.  The pitch diameter & depth of knurl info might help you in getting to a finished product with a really nice appearance.

Thanks,
George H. Meinschein, P.E.
 
Meinschein Engineering Consultants, LLC
150 Brittany Drive
Freehold, NJ 07728-1500
Direct Dial: 732-409-0778
Cell: 732-580-1736
Fax: 732-358-0369
www.meinscheinengineering.com

On 12/10/2019 11:58 PM, John Dammeyer wrote:

Re: Fooling Around in the Shop

George Meinschein
 

John,

I haven't knurled anything for years and haven't thought that much about the topic for about the same time.  The recent conversations triggered me to do a little online research into knurling techniques and I found the attached.  The pitch diameter & depth of knurl info might help you in getting to a finished product with a really nice appearance.

Thanks,
George H. Meinschein, P.E.

Meinschein Engineering Consultants, LLC
150 Brittany Drive
Freehold, NJ 07728-1500
Direct Dial: 732-409-0778
Cell: 732-580-1736
Fax: 732-358-0369
www.meinscheinengineering.com
On 12/10/2019 11:58 PM, John Dammeyer wrote:

How I wish I could do knurls that nice.

John

 

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io [mailto:SouthBendLathe@groups.io] On Behalf Of wlw19958
Sent: December-10-19 7:48 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] Fooling Around in the Shop

 

Hi There,

There hasn't been much posted for awhile so I thought
I would show what I've been doing. 

Over the weekend, I made the depth screw for my threading attachment.




When I got it, the screw was too big in diameter.  After a little research, I discovered
that the threading stop for the 9 inch and 10K.  I had an NOS one I bought back in the
1980's.



(you can see the "too big" screw at the top of the picture).
I measured the 9 inch/10K screw and made a copy.  I made
a few cosmetic changes to the head to make it look more like
the style of the bigger one.



One of the changes was to use a 45° diamond knurls instead of the 30° ones.
(They are a little more South Bend-like). 

The other thing I did was to make a replacement oil tube for the one that was
broken off in the reversing gear tumbler.  I measured the one in the reversing
tumbler I borrowed from another lathe and bought some heavy walled (.065")
260 brass tubing.  I already had a 5/16 x 32 tpi die. to thread it.  I drilled the
other end out to 1/4" so I could drive a Gits oiler into it. 






I also repaired the broken gear bearing journal.  I took some pics with my cell phone
but they didn't come out good but I do have one of the completed journal assembly.



Originally, the threaded end had broken off so I cut the nub off just at the undercut
behind the threads, drilled and tapped it, threaded in a new section (using 1144
steel).  Then I drilled and cross-pinned the insert so it won't come out.



(If you look careful, you can make out the outline of the pin). 

Now I have the original reversing tumbler assembly back in my lathe (and it runs
quieter than the other one)!

So, my lathe may not be the "prettiest" lathe, but it pleases me.  Thanks for letting
me share my small activities.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb

Re: Fooling Around in the Shop

ww_big_al
 

Very nice work. Congrats

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> On Behalf Of wlw19958
Sent: Wednesday, December 11, 2019 6:35 AM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] Fooling Around in the Shop

 

Hi There,

Thanks for the compliments!  I use a scissors type knurling tool. 
The "secret" is to use plenty of oil.  I mean, Plenty!  I Have a pistol
type pump oil gun and I am squirting oil over the knurling wheels
all the time I'm knurling to flush away the chips that come off.  I also
reverse the spindle rotation now and then too.

The latest task was to make a copy of the knurled thumb screws for
a steady rest.



The lower one is the original and the upper one is my copy.  Mine was
made from 1144 Stressproof steel.  I started with 1/2" rod and the finished
product comes out .497" in diameter.  The original is slightly larger (measures
.520").  The pitch and angle of the knurls look right (mine being new, has 
sharper diamonds).

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb

Re: Fooling Around in the Shop

wlw19958
 

Hi There,

Thanks for the compliments!  I use a scissors type knurling tool. 
The "secret" is to use plenty of oil.  I mean, Plenty!  I Have a pistol
type pump oil gun and I am squirting oil over the knurling wheels
all the time I'm knurling to flush away the chips that come off.  I also
reverse the spindle rotation now and then too.

The latest task was to make a copy of the knurled thumb screws for
a steady rest.



The lower one is the original and the upper one is my copy.  Mine was
made from 1144 Stressproof steel.  I started with 1/2" rod and the finished
product comes out .497" in diameter.  The original is slightly larger (measures
.520").  The pitch and angle of the knurls look right (mine being new, has 
sharper diamonds).

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb

Re: Fooling Around in the Shop

John Dammeyer
 

How I wish I could do knurls that nice.

John

 

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io [mailto:SouthBendLathe@groups.io] On Behalf Of wlw19958
Sent: December-10-19 7:48 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io
Subject: [SouthBendLathe] Fooling Around in the Shop

 

Hi There,

There hasn't been much posted for awhile so I thought
I would show what I've been doing. 

Over the weekend, I made the depth screw for my threading attachment.




When I got it, the screw was too big in diameter.  After a little research, I discovered
that the threading stop for the 9 inch and 10K.  I had an NOS one I bought back in the
1980's.



(you can see the "too big" screw at the top of the picture).
I measured the 9 inch/10K screw and made a copy.  I made
a few cosmetic changes to the head to make it look more like
the style of the bigger one.



One of the changes was to use a 45° diamond knurls instead of the 30° ones.
(They are a little more South Bend-like). 

The other thing I did was to make a replacement oil tube for the one that was
broken off in the reversing gear tumbler.  I measured the one in the reversing
tumbler I borrowed from another lathe and bought some heavy walled (.065")
260 brass tubing.  I already had a 5/16 x 32 tpi die. to thread it.  I drilled the
other end out to 1/4" so I could drive a Gits oiler into it. 






I also repaired the broken gear bearing journal.  I took some pics with my cell phone
but they didn't come out good but I do have one of the completed journal assembly.



Originally, the threaded end had broken off so I cut the nub off just at the undercut
behind the threads, drilled and tapped it, threaded in a new section (using 1144
steel).  Then I drilled and cross-pinned the insert so it won't come out.



(If you look careful, you can make out the outline of the pin). 

Now I have the original reversing tumbler assembly back in my lathe (and it runs
quieter than the other one)!

So, my lathe may not be the "prettiest" lathe, but it pleases me.  Thanks for letting
me share my small activities.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb

Re: Fooling Around in the Shop

Jim_B
 

Yes very nice work. 

-8
Jim B,

On Dec 10, 2019, at 10:55 PM, Phillip Rankin <phillip.rankin1964@...> wrote:


nice work.

--
Jim B

Re: Fooling Around in the Shop

Phillip Rankin
 

nice work.

Fooling Around in the Shop

wlw19958
 

Hi There,

There hasn't been much posted for awhile so I thought
I would show what I've been doing. 

Over the weekend, I made the depth screw for my threading attachment.




When I got it, the screw was too big in diameter.  After a little research, I discovered
that the threading stop for the 9 inch and 10K.  I had an NOS one I bought back in the
1980's.



(you can see the "too big" screw at the top of the picture).
I measured the 9 inch/10K screw and made a copy.  I made
a few cosmetic changes to the head to make it look more like
the style of the bigger one.



One of the changes was to use a 45° diamond knurls instead of the 30° ones.
(They are a little more South Bend-like). 

The other thing I did was to make a replacement oil tube for the one that was
broken off in the reversing gear tumbler.  I measured the one in the reversing
tumbler I borrowed from another lathe and bought some heavy walled (.065")
260 brass tubing.  I already had a 5/16 x 32 tpi die. to thread it.  I drilled the
other end out to 1/4" so I could drive a Gits oiler into it. 






I also repaired the broken gear bearing journal.  I took some pics with my cell phone
but they didn't come out good but I do have one of the completed journal assembly.



Originally, the threaded end had broken off so I cut the nub off just at the undercut
behind the threads, drilled and tapped it, threaded in a new section (using 1144
steel).  Then I drilled and cross-pinned the insert so it won't come out.



(If you look careful, you can make out the outline of the pin). 

Now I have the original reversing tumbler assembly back in my lathe (and it runs
quieter than the other one)!

So, my lathe may not be the "prettiest" lathe, but it pleases me.  Thanks for letting
me share my small activities.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb

Re: Making (Modifying) A Collet Closer (Draw Bar) for My L00 Heavy Ten

wlw19958
 

Hi There,

Nice work.  I am trying to figure out how to use 5C collets on my 9C (1949 vintage) when I get it going again.  There ought to be some way…

There is a way.  You can mount a 5C collet chuck on the spindle. 
You will still be restricted on the size of stock that have to pass
through the spindle though.  I was considering this route until
I decided to convert my lathe over to L00. 

There is a "kit" you can build from Metal Lathe Accessories for
a collet chuck:  Metal Lathe Accessories MLA-21

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb