Date   

Re: Lost Emails

Dennis Conway <dconway00@...>
 

Brian

Sorry to hear about the computer crash.

Has you son fully healed?

Dennis

millermachinefabrication wrote:

I know this is not the normal place to do this. But my computer crashed
and I lost allot of emails. If you have emailed us and we have not
replied please emails us again. We are sorry about the problems this
has caused. Thanks
Brian Miller



Re: Hercus compound slide rigidity

BOB WRIGHT
 

Let me chime in, i think you are talking about the two screws in the
cross slide that lock the compound to the desired angle. I think its a
better idea to have the screws pushing the compound to the casting
rather than the casting pushing against the screws under a load. I
have noticed the different screw positions on some aftermarket cross
slides....Bob


Re: Posting problems

Okey Caynor <captokey@...>
 

This is probably old news to most but I'll mention it because I find it so useful. There is a time unlimited free program that you can find with a search called "PDF Factory" (and at least one other ) that you can download and install , that when installed, allows you to select all or parts of a web page, hit print, and then choose PDF factory as the printer. The program comes up, and instead of printing, converts what you have selected as a PDF file. You can then name the file as you see fit , and save the entire thing for later. Granted, the free version will have something printed at the bottom that it was created with the Free version, but it beats a couple hundred bucks or so for the Acrobat software.
Okey Caynor
 

-----Original Message-----
From: southbendlathe@... [mailto:southbendlathe@...]On Behalf Of Chris Strazzeri
Sent: Wednesday, June 21, 2006 9:41 PM
To: southbendlathe@...
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] Posting problems

Den, I tried for over an hour and a half to save the complete web page in the 10K files section. I was able to do that minus all the graphics?! I gave up and just put the link in the "LINKS" section. I've never been able to save a complete web page. The graphics always end up as separate files which I can't piece back together.
 
Chris


Dennis Turk wrote:
OK I sent a post about a link in England with good information but I
misspelled a word in the header so I sent the one correcting it. Now
it seems that the original post never made it to the site. Maybe it
will show up later but anyway here is the link again.

This is good information that you can pint out of someone smarter than
me can put it in the file sections for future reference.

http://www.lathes.co.uk/latheparts/page7.html

Turk



Hercus compound slide rigidity

rodentie <r.entwistle@...>
 

Hi All,

I'm in Western Australia and have a query for any Hercus owners out
there. I own a Hercus 9" AR (manufactured 1971) which I find a nice
machine. Got it for a good tender price about 5 years ago and know
its history. The bed is worn but doesn't pose any real problem.

Over time I have noticed that the compound slide mount lacks
rigidity. The compound slide can effectively pivot about the front
of the slide base. (I have checked the flatness of the top slide
base and matching cross slide surface and all is fine.) I have
confirmed the fault by clamping a 300mm bar in the tool post,
oriented towards the operator, and leaning on it vertically. A
vertical dial gauge mounted on the cross slide but measuring the rear
edge of the top slide base (hence relatice movement) shows
significant upward deflection - 0.003" without too much load. The
effect at the tool would be several times this. This manifests
itself during intermittent (heavy) cuts where the tools deflection
can be seen visually.

Now, looking at the South Bend photos as well as other clones like
the Boxford, in all cases I notice that the top slide clamping screws
are at the 10 and 2 o'clock positions (operator looking down) while
the Hercus alone has them at 4 and 8 o'clock - that is, at the
front. I think that the 10 and 2 oclock arrangement will better
clamp the top slide down on the side that the cutting force is
applied, thus reducing the tendancy to rock about the front contact
surfaces. The Hercus 4 and 8 oclock arrangement leaves the top slide
to pivot about its front edge.

My question is, has anyone else noticed this or aware of other Hercus
owners who have noticed this? If so, is there any information about
on the matter? I'm thinking a solution may be to add two clamp
screws at the rear (10 and 2) by drilling and tapping the cross slide
casting.

[In case you think I'm just a butcher who overloads his machine, I
first saw this problem when using a slightly eccentric slitting saw
to slot a job held in the tool post. The applied load can be felt on
the cross slide feed and kept reasonable.]

I'd be interested in your thoughts/experiences.

Thankyou,
Rod.


Re: Fitting a chuck and making a baking plate

Dennis Turk <dennis.turk2@...>
 

Hi Jim

When I fit a chuck to a back plate I always turn the first part of
the register shoulder a little undersize so I can just start the
chuck onto the back plate. What I use to transfer the hole pattern
is a set of die makers transfer screws. These are like inverted set
screws with a hex so a wrench will screw them in and they also have
a point for transferring the center of the hole. In the case of
metric threads in the chuck I have made up transfer screws from
bolts. I turn a point on the short piece of bolt and then with a
collet block or just aluminum jaws in the mill I put to two apposing
flats on the pointed end of the screw so I can get them in and out
of the hole. This has always worked for me and I have always gotten
the hole pattern dead on.

I just tried to post this and it came back as message not found.
Hmmm


Turk
--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "physist" <physist@...> wrote:

I believe this will get through with Yahoos new format.

I have attached a Duplex article on fitting a chuck. It is only
63Kb large.
If wanted I will post it.

Of particular interest are the tips on transferring the mounting
holes. This
is always where I have trouble.
One thing I do, is to put a taper on the registration collar. Not
much, one
or two degrees. This helps to insert the plate onto the chuck and
then I get
a slight press fit as the mounting bolts draw the plate onto the
back of the
chuck.
I

Jim B.
Verona, NJ
"Etiquette requires us to admire the human race"

Mark Twain
----- Original Message -----
From: "Dennis Turk" <dennis.turk2@...>
To: <southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Wednesday, June 21, 2006 11:14 AM
Subject: [southbendlathe] Fitting a chuck and making a baking plate


Hi All

I found this on Tony's site in England. I think this is something
that you can print out and file for feature reference. I think
someone a lot smarter than me could put this up in the file section
for feature reference. Lot of good info here in plain terms we can
all understand.

http://www.lathes.co.uk/latheparts/page7.html

Turk


Lost Emails

millermachinefabrication <millermachinefabrication@...>
 

I know this is not the normal place to do this. But my computer crashed
and I lost allot of emails. If you have emailed us and we have not
replied please emails us again. We are sorry about the problems this
has caused. Thanks
Brian Miller


Re: Posting problems

ChristopherS
 

Den, I tried for over an hour and a half to save the complete web page in the 10K files section. I was able to do that minus all the graphics?! I gave up and just put the link in the "LINKS" section. I've never been able to save a complete web page. The graphics always end up as separate files which I can't piece back together.
 
Chris


Dennis Turk wrote:

OK I sent a post about a link in England with good information but I
misspelled a word in the header so I sent the one correcting it. Now
it seems that the original post never made it to the site. Maybe it
will show up later but anyway here is the link again.

This is good information that you can pint out of someone smarter than
me can put it in the file sections for future reference.

http://www.lathes.co.uk/latheparts/page7.html

Turk



Re: Fitting a chuck and making a baking plate

physist <physist@...>
 

I believe this will get through with Yahoos new format.

I have attached a Duplex article on fitting a chuck. It is only 63Kb large.
If wanted I will post it.

Of particular interest are the tips on transferring the mounting holes. This
is always where I have trouble.
One thing I do, is to put a taper on the registration collar. Not much, one
or two degrees. This helps to insert the plate onto the chuck and then I get
a slight press fit as the mounting bolts draw the plate onto the back of the
chuck.
I

Jim B.
Verona, NJ
"Etiquette requires us to admire the human race"

Mark Twain

----- Original Message -----
From: "Dennis Turk" <dennis.turk2@verizon.net>
To: <southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Wednesday, June 21, 2006 11:14 AM
Subject: [southbendlathe] Fitting a chuck and making a baking plate


Hi All

I found this on Tony's site in England. I think this is something
that you can print out and file for feature reference. I think
someone a lot smarter than me could put this up in the file section
for feature reference. Lot of good info here in plain terms we can
all understand.

http://www.lathes.co.uk/latheparts/page7.html

Turk


Fw: [southbend10k] Spare 6K collet to trade or ?

physist <physist@...>
 

I am nearing the end of my quest for a complete set of 6 K collets by
64ths.
Just recently, on eBay, I purchased a 23/64 and a 19/32 brand new Buck
collets in ther origonal package.
I didn't read the add correctly (read twice and buy once!) and there were
two 19/32 collets in the box. These appear to be brand new and still has
traces of a cosmoline like preservative.
I would like to trade for either a 17/32 or a 35/64 or a 39/64 if anybody
has a spare one and needs the 19/32 . I also have a spare 1/16. This is also
a Buck but used in good condition.

Jim B.
Verona, NJ
"Etiquette requires us to admire the human race"

Mark Twain


Help with 4 jaw Burnerd Chuck....

Paul <pc79@...>
 

Guys,
Got a real simple issue here. I've no experience doing this, but I
am about to attempt to mount a plain back 4 jaw Burnerd chuck to my
13" SB lathe.
I know I need a D1-4 backplate, and I was wondering if I should
just buy a Bison backplate in D1-4 configuration, and then mount the
Burnerd chuck to it, or should I go another route?
I've got very little lathe experience, and would like to know the
best way to get this plain back 4 jaw Burnerd mounted to my D1-4
spindle?????
Machining my own backplate (from scratch) is out of the question
right now, and I just need to get this 4 jaw chuck mounted, so I can
stop using this 3 jaw POS.
Can I buy a Bison backplate, or is that a bad idea? What is the
BEST option here?? Do I just need to buy a "semi machined"
backplate, such as the Bison, or what???
Thanks for ANY help guys.. I'm still trying to get started using
my lathe...
I'm dying to learn to use it. One day I'll be older and
experienced like you kind fellas, but for now, I'm a young wannabe
machinist, trying to learn machining....
Thanks for any help...


Posting problems

Dennis Turk <dennis.turk2@...>
 

OK I sent a post about a link in England with good information but I
misspelled a word in the header so I sent the one correcting it. Now
it seems that the original post never made it to the site. Maybe it
will show up later but anyway here is the link again.

This is good information that you can pint out of someone smarter than
me can put it in the file sections for future reference.

http://www.lathes.co.uk/latheparts/page7.html

Turk


Fitting a chuck

Dennis Turk <dennis.turk2@...>
 

Sorry I don't thing you wont to make a baking plate but rather a
backing plate."-)))

See told you we need someone smarter."-(((((

Turk


Fitting a chuck and making a baking plate

Dennis Turk <dennis.turk2@...>
 

Hi All

I found this on Tony's site in England. I think this is something
that you can print out and file for feature reference. I think
someone a lot smarter than me could put this up in the file section
for feature reference. Lot of good info here in plain terms we can
all understand.

http://www.lathes.co.uk/latheparts/page7.html

Turk


Re: Recommendations for moving a 10K

Mike
 

Mike:

I moved a 10k recently and had the luxury of having it loaded on my
pick-up truck with a fork lift but had to find a way to get it off and
carry it to the basement when I got home. I just disassembled it and
was able to move it with one friend. It really was pretty easy to do
and gives you a chance to clean everything up good.

I first removed the entire lathe from it's stand. Then I removed
headstock from the bed, tailstock from the bed and apron/carriage as
one piece from the bed. Last I removed the motor assembly from the
underdrive stand.

After taking it apart the hardest part to move was the stand which we
moved with a hand truck. The bed took two people to lift and the rest
I could carry myself.

Mike.





-- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Wirth" <mwirth@...> wrote:

Just bought a 1958-vintage 10K and have to move it home (18 miles).
It's horizontal drive, mounted on a steel table made from 2"x2" box
beams and an aluminum sheet top, 30" deep x 48" wide x 36" high, with
the motor overhanging the back by about 4". In a residential garage,
destination same.

I'm making two dollies with heavy 4" wheels to bolt onto the two ends.
The Army manual lists the packed(!) weight for this lathe as about
500#, which seems a bit heavy for the current configuration.

I can get a UHaul truck with a loading ramp for about $70 (rent plus
mileage), or I have a friend who'll help me with his largish pickup.
Seems like my options are:

1. Attach dollies, roll on UHaul, strap load properly, transport,
unload.

2. Attach dollies, use a couple 2x8's as a ramp and a 4x rope and
pulley to winch onto pickup, strap, transport, unload.

3. Attach dollies, roll next to tailgate of pickup, unfasten
motor/drivetrain and lathe, use 2x4's, etc., to slide onto truck bed,
strap, transport, reverse process.

Version 1 is the easiest, but costs a bit. 1 and 2 have tipping risks
because the table is very top-heavy (especially with option 1, since
the UHaul ramps are not very wide and I'll have to mount the wheels
accordingly). 3 is more work, has some risks to the lathe, etc.

Recommendations? (e.g., Do I need an engine hoist?)

Mike
Palo Alto, CA


Re: Recommendations for moving a 10K

bdmail <bdmail@...>
 

I agree with Roy, asI just moved my 10L a few weeks ago.

I did rent an Engine Hoist for $30 from a local tool rental and it made the night go really easy, as I have an awkward entrance.

Plus it made loading it on my pickup a breeze.

You can also disassemble it in two seconds and reassemble it indoors to lift the lathe back onto the bench.

But the 10L is some amount heavier, so that may even be overkill for a 10K (I don’t know)



Bernie




 
 

Mike,
Forget about the U-Haul and dollies, a full size pickup and a helper is all you really need. Unbolt the motor drive unit and carry it out by yourself. Next, unbolt the lathe and carry it out with a helper. (Remove the tailstock and anything that will siide or fall off!) Finally, struggle with the bench.
Roy
 




--------



Seems like my options are:

1. Attach dollies, roll on UHaul, strap load properly, transport, unload.

2. Attach dollies, use a couple 2x8's as a ramp and a 4x rope and
pulley to winch onto pickup, strap, transport, unload.

3. Attach dollies, roll next to tailgate of pickup, unfasten
motor/drivetrain and lathe, use 2x4's, etc., to slide onto truck bed,
strap, transport, reverse process.

Version 1 is the easiest, but costs a bit. 1 and 2 have tipping risks
because the table is very top-heavy (especially with option 1, since
the UHaul ramps are not very wide and I'll have to mount the wheels
accordingly). 3 is more work, has some risks to the lathe, etc.

Recommendations? (e.g., Do I need an engine hoist?)

Mike
Palo Alto, CA
 


Re: Electric Motor.  Which way to go?

Tim Gunn <timgunn@...>
 

Looks as if you've got it pretty well worked out.
 
I'd be inclined to use plugs and sockets on the power and control circuits to switch between machines, rather than the drum switch. You should have no trouble finding suitable connectors. 3-phase and ground for the power and at least 6 poles for the control. This is on low voltage so can be pretty small; even the mini-DIN used for PS2 mice and keyboard connections would probably do, though the full-size DIN are easier to wire and other, more "industrial" designs are available. You should just need a common, forward and reverse connections and 3 connections for the speed pot. You can then keep the controls where they can easily be reached. You can probably even use the original machine switches and just add the speed pots.
 
From the specs, the GP10 looks like a pretty tasty drive. The sensorless vector should give a lower minimum speed than a plain V/Hz drive, but I honestly doubt you'll ever need to go that slow. Your start and stop times look good to me, but bear in mind that starting in reverse at maximum speed has the same effect on a screw-mount chuck as stopping from forward maximum speed. Test carefully and be ready to slow the start ramp if necessary.
 
Have fun with it.
 
Regards
 
Tim Gunn
 
 
>System will be wired with a drum switch to send power to either motor
>as needed. Because motors are going to be identical, same
>configuration of the VFD should work for them. Actual on/off of the
>motors will be handled by the VFD to avoid spiking. (Considering
>installation of emergency 'kill' switch) VFD will be configured to
>wind motors up 3 seconds, and spin down 5 seconds. I don't see myself
>jumping quickly from one machine to the other, but either way I will
>make it practice not to throw the drum switch until the VFD has
>completely wound down. Might intall a lock-out on the switch to
>prevent that from happening. Probably mount the VFD and switch on a
>post between the two machines so that its readout will be visible from
>the operators position of both machines.


Re: My 1946 9A

fl.lusen
 

Turk,

Thanks for your wise council. I suspected the ring was threaded and it was
in fact a burr holding it. Should be no problem now.

As for the cleaning method. I have used this for some time now and have not
had a problem with the works being gummed up. I went away from caustic
cleaners when I realized that one would have to leave what is left to their
descendents. They can not be disposed of legally, at least not here in the
Dallas area. I went through a whole lot of aggravation with our local
environmental office a couple of years ago when I wanted to get rid of all
the environmentally un-correct material I had.

As for the protection, steel wool, oil, etc., I already have the steel wool
and oil and will follow your suggestions.

Thanks again.

Fred

-----Original Message-----
From: Dennis Turk
Subject: Re: My 1946 9A

Fred I am wondering if your method of cleaning the apron before
disassembly is not some of your problems in getting things apart.
You should really take it all apart before cleaning. Then use Mr.
Muscle oven cleaner on all the parts. Let soak overnight and rinse
them in hot water using a little hand scrub brush helps. They will
be clean as a whistle. No grease grime or paint. Just soft wire
wheel buff them and they are ready for paint and then assembly.
After rinsing them be sure to blow dry or the castings will rust
right away. If you're in a humid climate and the parts are going sit
for a wile you mite like to oil them down. Please don't use any WD-
40 or you will never get the paint to stick.

If you have any rust on the castings glass bead blast them. I
usually protect exposed machined surfaces because the bead blast
will dull them and make them look odd. You can use a gray or very
fine scotch bright wheel to lightly buff the machines surfaces to
get a nice luster back on them. Do not use on sliding surfaces
though. Only a little 0000 steel wool and oil on them. You just
wont to clean them not remove any material. If there is some
staining of the way surfaces usually this will not hurt and the
steel wool will for the most part not take it off. Just cleans very
well. On the bed ways I have had good luck with Brasso brass polish
and 0000 steel wool to clean up and brighten the ways.

Turk


Re: Bad Day

ChristopherS
 

Guys that don't, which are the majority, don't believe those of us that do?
 
Chris


Rob Purdy wrote:



" As far as this being a sickness....You just figured that out? The bad
news is, it will only get worse, and a shrink won't help. The only thing
that will help you is a wife that understands and lets you pursue your
obsession! Men with this affliction must be married to women that say.."
That's nice honey". "If it makes you happy, buy it"!"

I got one of those! Damn she's awsome....

Rob



Re: My 1946 9A

Dennis Turk <dennis.turk2@...>
 

Fred I am wondering if your method of cleaning the apron before
disassembly is not some of your problems in getting things apart.
You should really take it all apart before cleaning. Then use Mr.
Muscle oven cleaner on all the parts. Let soak overnight and rinse
them in hot water using a little hand scrub brush helps. They will
be clean as a whistle. No grease grime or paint. Just soft wire
wheel buff them and they are ready for paint and then assembly.
After rinsing them be sure to blow dry or the castings will rust
right away. If you're in a humid climate and the parts are going sit
for a wile you mite like to oil them down. Please don't use any WD-
40 or you will never get the paint to stick.

If you have any rust on the castings glass bead blast them. I
usually protect exposed machined surfaces because the bead blast
will dull them and make them look odd. You can use a gray or very
fine scotch bright wheel to lightly buff the machines surfaces to
get a nice luster back on them. Do not use on sliding surfaces
though. Only a little 0000 steel wool and oil on them. You just
wont to clean them not remove any material. If there is some
staining of the way surfaces usually this will not hurt and the
steel wool will for the most part not take it off. Just cleans very
well. On the bed ways I have had good luck with Brasso brass polish
and 0000 steel wool to clean up and brighten the ways.

Turk

--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "fl.lusen" <fl.lusen@...>
wrote:

Thanks everyone. It is out. I tapped it easy like with a manual
impact tool. It came right out. I am now up against another snag.
I have the pin and key out of the worm but I cannot pull the ring
off. If I hold the worm steady I can wiggle the ring somewhat along
the radius of the end of the worm but it will not move to come off.
Is it possible the ring is threaded?


Re: My 1946 9A

Dennis Turk <dennis.turk2@...>
 

Hi Fred

Yes the ring is threaded onto the end of the worm. Uaually a pin
puch in the hole for a lever is all you need to get it free. You
have a few burrs around the hold in the ring and the threaded worm
when it was drilled on assembly and never taken apart again. Now
you have to brake the burrs lose. Should not be hard I have taken
dozens of them apart this way.

Turk

--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "fl.lusen" <fl.lusen@...>
wrote:

Thanks everyone. It is out. I tapped it easy like with a manual
impact
tool. It came right out. I am now up against another snag. I
have the pin
and key out of the worm but I cannot pull the ring off. If I hold
the worm
steady I can wiggle the ring somewhat along the radius of the end
of the
worm but it will not move to come off. Is it possible the ring is
threaded?

Hogleg, I guess I was a bit off about central Texas. It was half
way
between IH-45 and College Station.

Fred

-----Original Message-----
From: southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Hogleg Willy
Sent: Tuesday, June 20, 2006 2:04 PM
To: southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] My 1946 9A

Where about in Central Texas? That is where I live (Austin)...

fl.lusen wrote:

John,

I have soaked it in brake free. I cannot believe that kroil is
any
different. I had originally cleaned the entire apron using
electrolysis.
That usually removes enough crud to loosen most everything. This
lathe had
been sitting in a barn in central Texas for 30 plus years
literally
unused.
You can imagine the crud that it was covered with. I will
persist.

Fred

-----Original Message-----
On Behalf Of Hogleg Willy
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] My 1946 9A

Any way to heat the outside without melting anything? Cool the
screw? I
have used freeze spray to loosen screws that way. Another thing
that
worked very well for me was to use kroil.

John

fl.lusen wrote:

OK gang, I know the screw holding the clutch knob is a left
hand thread.
Mine will not loosen. I do not want to exert any unnecessary
force. What
now?

Fred



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