Date   

Re: Thread dial for circa 1938 13”

v.gearheardt@...
 

Any thread dial gauge for a 9-13 will work. Not the later, '50s 9s nor 10Ks. What do you mean you have no mounting holes? Maybe they are just painted over but they are there for sure. 


Increasing the speed on Southbend 10-16” Models. Late 1930s-late 1940s.

v.gearheardt@...
 

These lathes were designed to run on plain bearings for 8-16 hours a day, with daily oilings. My 10R from 1939 has two countershaft speeds of 300 and 579 from a 2 groove pulley on its 1725 RPM motor. Speed changes via  V belt from the  2” and  3.375”  pulley with a slightly smaller corresponding  groove in large countershaft pulley. This was an option I believe. Bit of a pain as you have to reduce belt tension adjuster to move v belt. 


For the standard 2” pulley the Countershaft runs at 300 RPM and the 3 spindle speeds are 700, 434 and 277 PRM. (Back gear drive neglected ). Shifting V belt  to the larger drive pulley,  the spindle goes to 1357, 837 and 535 RPM. Southbend HTRAL has warnings about bearing adjustments and lubrication at this speed, so this is clearly a maximum.


It is  easy to increase the size of the motor drive pulley in order to create a countershaft speed that will yield a top spindle RPM of 1000, but at less than the 579 countershaft speed that is the maximum for this series of lathes. WARNING. I have no operational measurements for bearing temperatures at anything above 700 which will tell you if you are pushing your lathe too far, and if you do this, I would recommend taking your bearing temperatures before and after. Bearings heat up over time, 20-30 minutes before my lathe flattened  out at a 30 deg rise at a spindle of 700 rpm.They will get hotter at 1000 RPM! . How hot is “too hot” is not clear. The decision for you is how many hours you will run at this speed and how good are your bearings and oil passages.


Doing some  math, you can get your countershaft pulley to 429 RPM, and then your 3 spindle speeds will be 999,  643, 395 RPM by increasing the motor pulley from 2” to 2.75”. I would be careful using backgears with this countershaft speed and not for long periods if you do. Use your ears and make sure backgears are well lubricated, with teflon grease on the shaft and heavy gear oil on the bull gear.  Use only cast iron pulleys, not die cast, and can order any size  from McMaster Carr. You will likely need a gear puller and the set screw may be tough to remove. You may want to make sure you can remove your pulley before ordering new. You will likely have enough belt adjustment range to use the same belt but you can order a size longer from McMaster. Without the 2 groove pulley, this is a semi-permanent change and its use depends upon what speeds you normally run. All the VFD users will come out now and point out how it’s easier and better to go that route but my simple phase converter only goes from 60Hz down and my motor is pre-1992 which makes its use with a VFD problematic. This only costs $30.  

 


Re: 10L motor replacement recommendations #10l

Lou
 

In case nobody else addressed this ... my "training" in the 1960's was to rely upon about 1 HP of power transmission per inch of belt width, assuming:  leather belt, properly "dressed" with "belt dressing", nice clean trued pulleys, and "normal wear and tear".  Beyond 1 HP per inch of belt width, there would be damage to the belt.  Personally I think that 3/4 HP per inch is a safer standard, especially on natural leather belting;  synthetic takes a lot more heating and can outlast the leather by a factor of 3 or 4.)

... at that time I was working in an environment of 6" belt, overhead drive, feeding a half dozen machines from a single prime-mover 2-1/2 HP 220V-single-phase motor that weighed a bit over 400 lbs and delivered a starting torque powerful enough to suck a VW Beetle through a soda straw if given the opportunity.  (Running out of soda straws and inquisitive tourists meant we had to go back to work.) The much higher-quality transmission belts available today have probably made that old standard irrelevant, but I'm still busy remembering the '60's as a time when anything was possible.

v/r
Lou



I went down and checked my 10L. 

 

It has the dual large pulley but I've only got one smaller one on the 1HP 3Phase motor I bought to replace the 1HP single phase.  So it runs from the small pulley up to the larger one.

 

At 60Hz I get 387 RPM on the smallest flat belt pulley and 987 RPM on the largest.  I can knock the speed down to about 90 RPM without back gear at 15hz and up to about 1850 RPM at 120Hz across the pulleys.  The RPM is measured with the single pulse per revolution required by my ELS.

 

And obviously with back gear and slowest belt setting it would crawl at 15Hz.

 

I'm using a GS-1 VFD which isn't the best you can get but has worked well for me.

https://www.automationdirect.com/adc/shopping/catalog/drives_-a-_soft_starters/ac_variable_frequency_drives_(vfd)/micro/gs1-21p0

 

I now have a small PWM to 0V -- 10V module that I will run from my ELS which has been modified to deliver PWM instead of Charge-Pump.  That will allow me to adjust spindle RPM while facing and keeping a steady SFM.  (Within reason).

 

John

 

 

 

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io [mailto:SouthBendLathe@groups.io] On Behalf Of Ruth Busch
Sent: July-08-20 4:36 PM
To: SouthBendLathe
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 10L motor replacement recommendations #10l

 

Look for the same frame size in the voltage that you want.  Or, as i did on my 10L, buy a off the shelf motor and build an adapter.  If you look around the net you will find frame size dimensions and how to adapt one to another.  I replaced a 1HP 220 3phase with a 3/4 HP 120/240 single phase.  The new motor was from a local farm supply store.  The adapter was easy to build with some odd pieces of angle iron; no welding needed.

 


From: "David Brown" <davidivesbrown@...>
To: "SouthBendLathe" <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, July 8, 2020 5:07:39 PM
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 10L motor replacement recommendations #10l

 

My 1950 10L came with a 3-phase motor that I had to replace to use with my local 220V source.

I found that a Baldor L3566M motor had a form factor that was 1 to 1 with my old 3-phase. 

I couldn't believe it.  It's 1 HP, 1725 RPM, 60 Hz.

 

Good luck with your motor swap.

 

D.

 

On Sun, Mar 15, 2020 at 11:06 AM <jahick4@...> wrote:

Hi all,

The motor on my 1942 10L seems to have given up the ghost, and despite my best Google Fu, I’ve had a very difficult time coming up with the best replacement motors due to the fact that it is from before ANSI/NEMA size and type conventions were standardized - or so I believe.

The motor I have is a 3/4 hp Wagner Electric Corporation 3-phase, 220v motor of the type “RP” and a 75U frame. Does anyone have a recommendation for a replacement motor that will require minimal modifications to the mounting plate? 

I’ve also read some debate in other posts over the past few years regarding horsepower rating. If I’m going to be replacing the motor anyway, I’d just assume give the old girl a power upgrade, too. Would a 1.5 or 2hp motor be a worthwhile upgrade for my machine? At what hp rating does the belt drive start to become a limiting factor in power transmission?

I would really appreciate any advice anyone is willing and able to provide. I really want to get her making chips again very badly!

Thank you!

John Hicks
Weymouth, MA

 



Re: 10L motor replacement recommendations #10l

John Dammeyer
 

I went down and checked my 10L. 

 

It has the dual large pulley but I've only got one smaller one on the 1HP 3Phase motor I bought to replace the 1HP single phase.  So it runs from the small pulley up to the larger one.

 

At 60Hz I get 387 RPM on the smallest flat belt pulley and 987 RPM on the largest.  I can knock the speed down to about 90 RPM without back gear at 15hz and up to about 1850 RPM at 120Hz across the pulleys.  The RPM is measured with the single pulse per revolution required by my ELS.

 

And obviously with back gear and slowest belt setting it would crawl at 15Hz.

 

I'm using a GS-1 VFD which isn't the best you can get but has worked well for me.

https://www.automationdirect.com/adc/shopping/catalog/drives_-a-_soft_starters/ac_variable_frequency_drives_(vfd)/micro/gs1-21p0

 

I now have a small PWM to 0V -- 10V module that I will run from my ELS which has been modified to deliver PWM instead of Charge-Pump.  That will allow me to adjust spindle RPM while facing and keeping a steady SFM.  (Within reason).

 

John

 

 

 

 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io [mailto:SouthBendLathe@groups.io] On Behalf Of Ruth Busch
Sent: July-08-20 4:36 PM
To: SouthBendLathe
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 10L motor replacement recommendations #10l

 

Look for the same frame size in the voltage that you want.  Or, as i did on my 10L, buy a off the shelf motor and build an adapter.  If you look around the net you will find frame size dimensions and how to adapt one to another.  I replaced a 1HP 220 3phase with a 3/4 HP 120/240 single phase.  The new motor was from a local farm supply store.  The adapter was easy to build with some odd pieces of angle iron; no welding needed.

 


From: "David Brown" <davidivesbrown@...>
To: "SouthBendLathe" <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, July 8, 2020 5:07:39 PM
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 10L motor replacement recommendations #10l

 

My 1950 10L came with a 3-phase motor that I had to replace to use with my local 220V source.

I found that a Baldor L3566M motor had a form factor that was 1 to 1 with my old 3-phase. 

I couldn't believe it.  It's 1 HP, 1725 RPM, 60 Hz.

 

Good luck with your motor swap.

 

D.

 

On Sun, Mar 15, 2020 at 11:06 AM <jahick4@...> wrote:

Hi all,

The motor on my 1942 10L seems to have given up the ghost, and despite my best Google Fu, I’ve had a very difficult time coming up with the best replacement motors due to the fact that it is from before ANSI/NEMA size and type conventions were standardized - or so I believe.

The motor I have is a 3/4 hp Wagner Electric Corporation 3-phase, 220v motor of the type “RP” and a 75U frame. Does anyone have a recommendation for a replacement motor that will require minimal modifications to the mounting plate? 

I’ve also read some debate in other posts over the past few years regarding horsepower rating. If I’m going to be replacing the motor anyway, I’d just assume give the old girl a power upgrade, too. Would a 1.5 or 2hp motor be a worthwhile upgrade for my machine? At what hp rating does the belt drive start to become a limiting factor in power transmission?

I would really appreciate any advice anyone is willing and able to provide. I really want to get her making chips again very badly!

Thank you!

John Hicks
Weymouth, MA

 


Re: 10L motor replacement recommendations #10l

Ruth Busch
 

Look for the same frame size in the voltage that you want.  Or, as i did on my 10L, buy a off the shelf motor and build an adapter.  If you look around the net you will find frame size dimensions and how to adapt one to another.  I replaced a 1HP 220 3phase with a 3/4 HP 120/240 single phase.  The new motor was from a local farm supply store.  The adapter was easy to build with some odd pieces of angle iron; no welding needed.


From: "David Brown" <davidivesbrown@...>
To: "SouthBendLathe" <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, July 8, 2020 5:07:39 PM
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 10L motor replacement recommendations #10l

My 1950 10L came with a 3-phase motor that I had to replace to use with my local 220V source.
I found that a Baldor L3566M motor had a form factor that was 1 to 1 with my old 3-phase. 
I couldn't believe it.  It's 1 HP, 1725 RPM, 60 Hz.

Good luck with your motor swap.

D.

On Sun, Mar 15, 2020 at 11:06 AM <jahick4@...> wrote:

Hi all,

The motor on my 1942 10L seems to have given up the ghost, and despite my best Google Fu, I’ve had a very difficult time coming up with the best replacement motors due to the fact that it is from before ANSI/NEMA size and type conventions were standardized - or so I believe.

The motor I have is a 3/4 hp Wagner Electric Corporation 3-phase, 220v motor of the type “RP” and a 75U frame. Does anyone have a recommendation for a replacement motor that will require minimal modifications to the mounting plate? 

I’ve also read some debate in other posts over the past few years regarding horsepower rating. If I’m going to be replacing the motor anyway, I’d just assume give the old girl a power upgrade, too. Would a 1.5 or 2hp motor be a worthwhile upgrade for my machine? At what hp rating does the belt drive start to become a limiting factor in power transmission?

I would really appreciate any advice anyone is willing and able to provide. I really want to get her making chips again very badly!

Thank you!

John Hicks
Weymouth, MA



Re: 10L motor replacement recommendations #10l

David Brown
 

My 1950 10L came with a 3-phase motor that I had to replace to use with my local 220V source.
I found that a Baldor L3566M motor had a form factor that was 1 to 1 with my old 3-phase. 
I couldn't believe it.  It's 1 HP, 1725 RPM, 60 Hz.

Good luck with your motor swap.

D.

On Sun, Mar 15, 2020 at 11:06 AM <jahick4@...> wrote:

Hi all,

The motor on my 1942 10L seems to have given up the ghost, and despite my best Google Fu, I’ve had a very difficult time coming up with the best replacement motors due to the fact that it is from before ANSI/NEMA size and type conventions were standardized - or so I believe.

The motor I have is a 3/4 hp Wagner Electric Corporation 3-phase, 220v motor of the type “RP” and a 75U frame. Does anyone have a recommendation for a replacement motor that will require minimal modifications to the mounting plate? 

I’ve also read some debate in other posts over the past few years regarding horsepower rating. If I’m going to be replacing the motor anyway, I’d just assume give the old girl a power upgrade, too. Would a 1.5 or 2hp motor be a worthwhile upgrade for my machine? At what hp rating does the belt drive start to become a limiting factor in power transmission?

I would really appreciate any advice anyone is willing and able to provide. I really want to get her making chips again very badly!

Thank you!

John Hicks
Weymouth, MA


Re: 10L motor replacement recommendations #10l

v.gearheardt@...
 

WARNING! Your 10L has simple bronze bearings. It was NEVER designed to be run at more than 1500 rpm, and in the HTRAL book, you can achieve this spindle speed on a 10L only if you have dual size V belt, BUT they warn to not use back gears at this spindle speed. These are slow speed lathes, respect their limitations. Changing speeds via the belt takes but a minute.  Pay attention to your pulley sizes.


Re: 9A lever collet closer - spindle pin

Ondrej Krejci
 

Hello,

There is no reason for the sleeve to seat on the shoulder.  HSK tapers, which seat on shoulders, were not yet even pondered when your lathe was made.  All other tapers seat taper on taper.
Using a quick open-close turning collet set-up to hold milling tools is a horrible idea because the tools will move.

Good Luck,


OK

On Wednesday, July 1, 2020, 08:58:40 PM EDT, comstock_friend <jfriend314@...> wrote:


[Edited Message Follows]

Had a quality Royal lever closer on my Enco 12" (5C collets and very similar spindle as my SB 13"). Found that for onesy twosy hobby work it was a pain in the ass to get the correct tension. Built a manual closer for the 13" SB and the Enco (the two share the same draw tube). Much quicker now.

The SB 9"ers at the cabin both have manual closers. Your collet sleeve is sticking out the appropriate distance. Either the thread protector can knock it out or a knock out bar (I use both). The SB 10K has collet nose ground into the spindle with a key to use special 6k collets, while the 9"ers are the modified MT3 spindle with the adapter.

The SB 9" collet system, 1A and 3C collets are interchangeable, is very handy for round work under 9/16". Use them all the time. Haven't tried to hold end mills for milling as I have a BP and some horizontal Diamonds for that.

John


Re: 9A lever collet closer - spindle pin

comstock_friend
 
Edited

Had a quality Royal lever closer on my Enco 12" (5C collets and very similar spindle as my SB 13"). Found that for onesy twosy hobby work it was a pain in the ass to get the correct tension. Built a manual closer for the 13" SB and the Enco (the two share the same draw tube). Much quicker now.

The SB 9"ers at the cabin both have manual closers. Your collet sleeve is sticking out the appropriate distance. Either the thread protector can knock it out or a knock out bar (I use both). The SB 10K has collet nose ground into the spindle with a key to use special 6k collets, while the 9"ers are the modified MT3 spindle with the adapter.

The SB 9" collet system, 1A and 3C collets are interchangeable, is very handy for round work under 9/16". Use them all the time. Haven't tried to hold end mills for milling as I have a BP and some horizontal Diamonds for that.

John


Re: 9A lever collet closer - spindle pin

Stephen Bartlett
 

That is a safe way to remove the collet closer? I have always worried about damaging or at east unduly wearing the spindle threads.

I have a spanner wrench that fits the nose piece.

If the closer is not too tight I sometimes bump it out from the left end with a piece of aluminum rod. I am not sure if that is a good idea either.

Steve Bartlett


From: Nick Jonkman
Date: Wed, 01 Jul 2020 14:09:52 EDT

Larry

That is far enough. The thread protector is used to eject the sleeve.

Nick


Re: 9A lever collet closer - spindle pin

Bob Kellermann
 

Hope this helps 


On Jul 1, 2020, at 5:13 PM, Bob Kellermann via groups.io <rtjkeller@...> wrote:


<cid:80B6BBD3-64B7-43D5-BEC6-0554407C54FB.jpg>

On Jul 1, 2020, at 4:58 PM, Andrei <calciu1@...> wrote:


The pictures are of a 3c collet closer setup on a SB 9a. This one is operated with a handwheel at the back. but the front portion of the setup (shown in pic) is identical as for the lever closer. 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Robert H. Blodinger <w4npx@...>
Sent: Wednesday, July 1, 2020 4:53 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 9A lever collet closer - spindle pin
 
I don’t know what collets that sleeve in the photo is for, but I have what looks like the same sleeve and nose protector and it is for 3C collets which I use all the time.  The nose piece and the collet which is threaded are drawn into the sleeve by a threaded draw bar placed into the spindle from the left side of the headstock and then tightened up.  You better use that nose protector at all times because sometimes I tighten up the drawbar tight enough that without the nose protector and a spanner wrench around the nosepiece it would be hard to get that sleeve off to remove it.

By the way, best thing I ever did was to make an ER 40 collet chuck, pretty easy job and it gets used more than any other chucks.  

Running a 1935 wide bed 9.

Bob

On Jul 1, 2020, at 2:03 PM, Larry Shaw <larry@...> wrote:

Reposting but with the pics and correct spelling this time and a couple clarifications.
The collet sleeve (I was calling it “nosepiece” but this is SBL’s term) is shown below both with and without the thread protector ring installed. The collets fit the same with or without the thread protector ring installed. The
collet sleeve is a taper friction fit inside the spindle, no threads or pins in spindle to engage. No markings on the collet sleeve. I can’t get the collet sleeve in further even with a bit of persuasion from a dead blow hammer. Thanks for your comments!
<76BC0238-4CAC-4E28-8DCF-3AA088D213D1.jpeg><F84E992F-3AC0-4490-BAE0-BC56A0630F84.jpeg><C66B2527-DECA-4A69-A8A8-E3A2B19EFC05.jpeg><36F4FBBB-14B9-4BCA-86C0-C43F2DDFEBFF.jpeg>


Re: 9A lever collet closer - spindle pin

Bob Kellermann
 


On Jul 1, 2020, at 4:58 PM, Andrei <calciu1@...> wrote:


The pictures are of a 3c collet closer setup on a SB 9a. This one is operated with a handwheel at the back. but the front portion of the setup (shown in pic) is identical as for the lever closer. 

From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Robert H. Blodinger <w4npx@...>
Sent: Wednesday, July 1, 2020 4:53 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 9A lever collet closer - spindle pin
 
I don’t know what collets that sleeve in the photo is for, but I have what looks like the same sleeve and nose protector and it is for 3C collets which I use all the time.  The nose piece and the collet which is threaded are drawn into the sleeve by a threaded draw bar placed into the spindle from the left side of the headstock and then tightened up.  You better use that nose protector at all times because sometimes I tighten up the drawbar tight enough that without the nose protector and a spanner wrench around the nosepiece it would be hard to get that sleeve off to remove it.

By the way, best thing I ever did was to make an ER 40 collet chuck, pretty easy job and it gets used more than any other chucks.  

Running a 1935 wide bed 9.

Bob

On Jul 1, 2020, at 2:03 PM, Larry Shaw <larry@...> wrote:

Reposting but with the pics and correct spelling this time and a couple clarifications.
The collet sleeve (I was calling it “nosepiece” but this is SBL’s term) is shown below both with and without the thread protector ring installed. The collets fit the same with or without the thread protector ring installed. The
collet sleeve is a taper friction fit inside the spindle, no threads or pins in spindle to engage. No markings on the collet sleeve. I can’t get the collet sleeve in further even with a bit of persuasion from a dead blow hammer. Thanks for your comments!
<76BC0238-4CAC-4E28-8DCF-3AA088D213D1.jpeg><F84E992F-3AC0-4490-BAE0-BC56A0630F84.jpeg><C66B2527-DECA-4A69-A8A8-E3A2B19EFC05.jpeg><36F4FBBB-14B9-4BCA-86C0-C43F2DDFEBFF.jpeg>


Re: 9A lever collet closer - spindle pin

Andrei
 

The pictures are of a 3c collet closer setup on a SB 9a. This one is operated with a handwheel at the back. but the front portion of the setup (shown in pic) is identical as for the lever closer. 


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of Robert H. Blodinger <w4npx@...>
Sent: Wednesday, July 1, 2020 4:53 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 9A lever collet closer - spindle pin
 
I don’t know what collets that sleeve in the photo is for, but I have what looks like the same sleeve and nose protector and it is for 3C collets which I use all the time.  The nose piece and the collet which is threaded are drawn into the sleeve by a threaded draw bar placed into the spindle from the left side of the headstock and then tightened up.  You better use that nose protector at all times because sometimes I tighten up the drawbar tight enough that without the nose protector and a spanner wrench around the nosepiece it would be hard to get that sleeve off to remove it.

By the way, best thing I ever did was to make an ER 40 collet chuck, pretty easy job and it gets used more than any other chucks.  

Running a 1935 wide bed 9.

Bob

On Jul 1, 2020, at 2:03 PM, Larry Shaw <larry@...> wrote:

Reposting but with the pics and correct spelling this time and a couple clarifications.
The collet sleeve (I was calling it “nosepiece” but this is SBL’s term) is shown below both with and without the thread protector ring installed. The collets fit the same with or without the thread protector ring installed. The
collet sleeve is a taper friction fit inside the spindle, no threads or pins in spindle to engage. No markings on the collet sleeve. I can’t get the collet sleeve in further even with a bit of persuasion from a dead blow hammer. Thanks for your comments!
<76BC0238-4CAC-4E28-8DCF-3AA088D213D1.jpeg><F84E992F-3AC0-4490-BAE0-BC56A0630F84.jpeg><C66B2527-DECA-4A69-A8A8-E3A2B19EFC05.jpeg><36F4FBBB-14B9-4BCA-86C0-C43F2DDFEBFF.jpeg>


Re: 9A lever collet closer - spindle pin

Robert H. Blodinger
 

I don’t know what collets that sleeve in the photo is for, but I have what looks like the same sleeve and nose protector and it is for 3C collets which I use all the time.  The nose piece and the collet which is threaded are drawn into the sleeve by a threaded draw bar placed into the spindle from the left side of the headstock and then tightened up.  You better use that nose protector at all times because sometimes I tighten up the drawbar tight enough that without the nose protector and a spanner wrench around the nosepiece it would be hard to get that sleeve off to remove it.

By the way, best thing I ever did was to make an ER 40 collet chuck, pretty easy job and it gets used more than any other chucks.  

Running a 1935 wide bed 9.

Bob

On Jul 1, 2020, at 2:03 PM, Larry Shaw <larry@...> wrote:

Reposting but with the pics and correct spelling this time and a couple clarifications.
The collet sleeve (I was calling it “nosepiece” but this is SBL’s term) is shown below both with and without the thread protector ring installed. The collets fit the same with or without the thread protector ring installed. The
collet sleeve is a taper friction fit inside the spindle, no threads or pins in spindle to engage. No markings on the collet sleeve. I can’t get the collet sleeve in further even with a bit of persuasion from a dead blow hammer. Thanks for your comments!
<76BC0238-4CAC-4E28-8DCF-3AA088D213D1.jpeg><F84E992F-3AC0-4490-BAE0-BC56A0630F84.jpeg><C66B2527-DECA-4A69-A8A8-E3A2B19EFC05.jpeg><36F4FBBB-14B9-4BCA-86C0-C43F2DDFEBFF.jpeg>


Re: 9A lever collet closer - spindle pin

Andrei
 

Here is what my handwheel model looks when not tightened at allImage

Image



Typos are courtesy of autocorrect.


From: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io> on behalf of mike allen <animal@...>
Sent: Wednesday, July 1, 2020 4:30:30 PM
To: SouthBendLathe@groups.io <SouthBendLathe@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SouthBendLathe] 9A lever collet closer - spindle pin
 

        ok , I was just kinda guessin at things ,. I dont have a collet setup , I havn't had a collet system pop up in my neck of the woods as of yet

        animal

On 7/1/2020 1:18 PM, Bob Kellermann via groups.io wrote:
The Collett holder/ nose piece does not go in all the way that is the way it is supposed to be I use 3c collects on my 10k with the same nose piece but use hand wheel 
The thread protector is used to eject the holder/nose piece 

On Jul 1, 2020, at 3:51 PM, mike allen <animal@...> wrote:



        does a center fit in the spindle all the way ? have ya looked inside of the spindle bore for any kind of irregularity that could stop it from going in all the way ? how's the outside of the "collet sleeve " ? all smooth ?

        ya may need to get a Morse taper reamer & give the spindle a tad of touch up

        animal

On 7/1/2020 11:03 AM, Larry Shaw wrote:
Reposting but with the pics and correct spelling this time and a couple clarifications.
The collet sleeve (I was calling it “nosepiece” but this is SBL’s term) is shown below both with and without the thread protector ring installed. The collets fit the same with or without the thread protector ring installed. The
collet sleeve is a taper friction fit inside the spindle, no threads or pins in spindle to engage. No markings on the collet sleeve. I can’t get the collet sleeve in further even with a bit of persuasion from a dead blow hammer. Thanks for your comments!
<76BC0238-4CAC-4E28-8DCF-3AA088D213D1.jpeg>
<F84E992F-3AC0-4490-BAE0-BC56A0630F84.jpeg>
<C66B2527-DECA-4A69-A8A8-E3A2B19EFC05.jpeg>
<36F4FBBB-14B9-4BCA-86C0-C43F2DDFEBFF.jpeg>


Re: 9A lever collet closer - spindle pin

mike allen
 

        ok , I was just kinda guessin at things ,. I dont have a collet setup , I havn't had a collet system pop up in my neck of the woods as of yet

        animal

On 7/1/2020 1:18 PM, Bob Kellermann via groups.io wrote:
The Collett holder/ nose piece does not go in all the way that is the way it is supposed to be I use 3c collects on my 10k with the same nose piece but use hand wheel 
The thread protector is used to eject the holder/nose piece 

On Jul 1, 2020, at 3:51 PM, mike allen <animal@...> wrote:



        does a center fit in the spindle all the way ? have ya looked inside of the spindle bore for any kind of irregularity that could stop it from going in all the way ? how's the outside of the "collet sleeve " ? all smooth ?

        ya may need to get a Morse taper reamer & give the spindle a tad of touch up

        animal

On 7/1/2020 11:03 AM, Larry Shaw wrote:
Reposting but with the pics and correct spelling this time and a couple clarifications.
The collet sleeve (I was calling it “nosepiece” but this is SBL’s term) is shown below both with and without the thread protector ring installed. The collets fit the same with or without the thread protector ring installed. The
collet sleeve is a taper friction fit inside the spindle, no threads or pins in spindle to engage. No markings on the collet sleeve. I can’t get the collet sleeve in further even with a bit of persuasion from a dead blow hammer. Thanks for your comments!
<76BC0238-4CAC-4E28-8DCF-3AA088D213D1.jpeg>
<F84E992F-3AC0-4490-BAE0-BC56A0630F84.jpeg>
<C66B2527-DECA-4A69-A8A8-E3A2B19EFC05.jpeg>
<36F4FBBB-14B9-4BCA-86C0-C43F2DDFEBFF.jpeg>


Re: 9A lever collet closer - spindle pin

Bob Kellermann
 

The Collett holder/ nose piece does not go in all the way that is the way it is supposed to be I use 3c collects on my 10k with the same nose piece but use hand wheel 
The thread protector is used to eject the holder/nose piece 

On Jul 1, 2020, at 3:51 PM, mike allen <animal@...> wrote:



        does a center fit in the spindle all the way ? have ya looked inside of the spindle bore for any kind of irregularity that could stop it from going in all the way ? how's the outside of the "collet sleeve " ? all smooth ?

        ya may need to get a Morse taper reamer & give the spindle a tad of touch up

        animal

On 7/1/2020 11:03 AM, Larry Shaw wrote:
Reposting but with the pics and correct spelling this time and a couple clarifications.
The collet sleeve (I was calling it “nosepiece” but this is SBL’s term) is shown below both with and without the thread protector ring installed. The collets fit the same with or without the thread protector ring installed. The
collet sleeve is a taper friction fit inside the spindle, no threads or pins in spindle to engage. No markings on the collet sleeve. I can’t get the collet sleeve in further even with a bit of persuasion from a dead blow hammer. Thanks for your comments!
<76BC0238-4CAC-4E28-8DCF-3AA088D213D1.jpeg>
<F84E992F-3AC0-4490-BAE0-BC56A0630F84.jpeg>
<C66B2527-DECA-4A69-A8A8-E3A2B19EFC05.jpeg>
<36F4FBBB-14B9-4BCA-86C0-C43F2DDFEBFF.jpeg>


Re: 9A lever collet closer - spindle pin

mike allen
 

        does a center fit in the spindle all the way ? have ya looked inside of the spindle bore for any kind of irregularity that could stop it from going in all the way ? how's the outside of the "collet sleeve " ? all smooth ?

        ya may need to get a Morse taper reamer & give the spindle a tad of touch up

        animal

On 7/1/2020 11:03 AM, Larry Shaw wrote:
Reposting but with the pics and correct spelling this time and a couple clarifications.
The collet sleeve (I was calling it “nosepiece” but this is SBL’s term) is shown below both with and without the thread protector ring installed. The collets fit the same with or without the thread protector ring installed. The
collet sleeve is a taper friction fit inside the spindle, no threads or pins in spindle to engage. No markings on the collet sleeve. I can’t get the collet sleeve in further even with a bit of persuasion from a dead blow hammer. Thanks for your comments!


Re: 9A lever collet closer - spindle pin

eddie.draper@btinternet.com
 

At last someone has asked the fundamental question below.  Why would you need to use a collet for holding a milling cutter?  I don't mill on the railway's 14.5" S/B because there is a proper milling machine there, but I do on my Myford ML7 at home, and that is perfectly happy with milling cutters in the 3 jaw chuck.  Happy enough to allow me to damage quite large cutters through carelessness without them shifting in the chuck.

Incidentally, the protrusion of the collet holder shown in the photos looks very similar to that on our lathe. 

A proper milling collet system is quite a lot different from a lathe collet system, and so far as I know, invariably has screw thread tightening with a spanner of some sort in order to tighten the collet onto the cutter.

Eddie

On Wednesday, 1 July 2020, 20:10:53 BST, Louis via groups.io <l_schoolkate@...> wrote:


I have a similar closer for my Heavy 10 and where you have the pin, I have a key and keyway to allow the closer to slide off. My closer uses 5C collets with a front adapter.

Although I would be comfortable using my setup for milling, I would be very careful and take very light cuts. I agree with Steven. Milling generates a lot of pressure and vibration. 


Re: 9A lever collet closer - spindle pin

Louis
 

I have a similar closer for my Heavy 10 and where you have the pin, I have a key and keyway to allow the closer to slide off. My closer uses 5C collets with a front adapter.

Although I would be comfortable using my setup for milling, I would be very careful and take very light cuts. I agree with Steven. Milling generates a lot of pressure and vibration.