Date   

Parts list / manual

Alan Simpson <alan@...>
 

Re: SBL 9 inch Model A (circa 1950)

Hello everyone!

My pal is looking for the Parts list and manuals for the above lathe.
Is there anywhere on the internet these may be downlaoded from?

Thanks!!

Alan
Spences Bridge b.C.
Canada


furnas R4

henry rancourt <donnarancourt@...>
 

Hi all,
I am new to the site and really like it. I have a dayton 1hp 1 phase
cap. start motor that i want to control with a furnas R4. The motor
leads are p1, p2,t8,t3, t2,t5,t4 and ground. Based on the diagram in
the furnas cover and the motor wiring plate, I beleive furnas
connections should be: t8 to upper left, t2&t4 to middle left, p2&t3
to upper right and t5 to middle right. What gets connected to lower
left and lower right.
Thanks for your help
Henry


motor mount for 22A with legs

howellhandmade <howellhandmade@...>
 

Hello, All,

Please pardon my unfamiliarity with the forum. I just bought a 22A
with cast iron legs that is realy in very nice shape for its age,
despite being in pieces on a pallet at an auction. It's cleaning up
nicely, but the motor mount is a mess. It looks as though originally
the motor and countershaft hung on a wall behind the lathe, I assume
hinged in some way to provide belt tension although the archeological
evidence is far from conclusive. I've been trying to imagine different
solutions to mounting a new motor, and would love to see what others
have come up with for mounting motors for the leg model. I've almost
decided to build a cabinet and try to find a countershaft assembly, but
the lathe looks kinda cool and spindly, almost Victorian, on the legs.

Thank you,

Jack


Re: Horizontal mill, ok for a beginner?

Thomas G Brandl
 


Gary,
        A vertical mill would be a bit more versital. Still, there are some operations that a horizontal mill handles better. Horizontal mills are great for roughing off stock. I have seen some mills converted (at least pictures) with Bridgeport heads. That would add to your cost. I would think you might be in the price range of a good vertical mill. I am not sure of what type of work you will be doing. You might check into the Chinese mills or keep an eye out on other brands of vertical mills. Some of them fetch less money than Bridgeports.
                                                                                        Tom


Gary
Sent by: southbendlathe@...

02/18/2007 03:34 PM

Please respond to
southbendlathe@...

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southbendlathe@...
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Subject
[southbendlathe] Re: Horizontal mill, ok for a beginner?





Bill,
Thanks for the quick reply. They want 1100.00 for the 8540
Clausing Mill. It has a 3 phase converter and around 40 cutters for
it. The fact that its local also affects my decision, saving me any
shipping fee's. Ive been told I can add a type m bridgeport head to
it and have a combo vert/hor machine. I'm trying to be patient, but
Ive got the bug to purchase.

Thanks, Gary

--- In southbendlathe@..., "Bill Wattson"
wrote:
>
>
> I think you'll find a vertical knee mill like a Bridgeport much
more
> useful. I looked at the chinese Rong Fu style import vertical mini-
> mills as well but found that if a shopped it long enough, I could
get a
> Bridgeport for about the same money. Without getting into how much
is
> in your price range, the Rong Fu style mill drill is currently
priced
> at $1000 from Harbor Freight. The Bridgeport I have is a 9 x 36
Series
> I J-head with chromed ways for $1350 on eBay.
>
> Just my opinion but I'd hold out for a vertical with a knee. You
might
> have to put up with a little slop from wear but you might end up
with
> that problem even in a well worn horizontal.
>
> Bill Wattson
>
> --- In southbendlathe@..., "Gary"
> wrote:
> >
> > Hello,
> > I am interested in purchasing a mill to go along with my
old SB
> > lathe. I am under the impression that a vertical mill would be
more
> > versatile, but most used american made units seem out of my price
> > range. Ive found an older Clausing horizontal mill thats in my
price
> > range. I was wondering what your opinion is on this for someone
with
> > very little experience.
> >
> > Thanks, Gary
> >
>


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Re: Face plate for Heavy 10L.

ChristopherS
 

Hi John,
 
Like I said, this topic always kicks up a lot of flack. Here's a little side bar. Wood lathe spindles come in 3/4x16, 3/4x12, 1x8, 1-1/4x8 and 1-1/2x8. These are the most common spindle configurations on this side of the pond. There may be some wood lathes that employ a register but I haven't seen them. All the wood lathe spindles I've seen employ a thread stop groove where the register would be. On the other hand wood lathes don't deal with the tolerances that a metal lathe does. Check the run-out of a chuck, remove & remount and your readings will change.
 
Chris
 


John Dammeyer wrote:

Hi,
 
I measured the diameter of the threads of the spindle and came up with 2.245".  Recall that my SB  chucks register area was in the neighbourhood of 2.280"  while the spindle register was 2.261". 
 
A casual observer might comment that the 0.175 register area on the spindle is just a comfortable place to stop threading when producing as many spindles as possible during the war.  The slightly larger unthreaded area at the back of the chuck is simply a place to rest the chuck so that it's easier to thread onto the spindle.
 
Other manufacturers may well have used both to register the chucks for interchangebility between lathes.
 
Sherline lathes use 3/4-16 TPI so perhaps the question is best answered by a current North American Manufacturer of lathes.  What do they do?  And why?
 
John Dammeyer
 

Take a look at your spindle. You will see a small area close to the HS where the threads end just prior to running into the shoulder. That unthreaded area is called the Register. The Register along with the Shoulder constitute the two surfaces that accurately index anything screwed to the spindle. It's for this reason that whatever is being screwed on the spindle be accurately machined to mate with these two surfaces.
 
Be it known that the statements I just made are argued by some who believe that the Shoulder, in concert with the Threads are what's important for repeatable alignment. I do not subscribe to this line of thought.
 
You can search the message board and find many discussions on this topic. Enough to make your head explode. Wrap your head with duct tape prior to proceeding with the topic search. It will keep your cranium from scattering all over the place!
 
Chris


Re: Face plate for Heavy 10L.

John Dammeyer
 

Hi,
 
I measured the diameter of the threads of the spindle and came up with 2.245".  Recall that my SB  chucks register area was in the neighbourhood of 2.280"  while the spindle register was 2.261". 
 
A casual observer might comment that the 0.175 register area on the spindle is just a comfortable place to stop threading when producing as many spindles as possible during the war.  The slightly larger unthreaded area at the back of the chuck is simply a place to rest the chuck so that it's easier to thread onto the spindle.
 
Other manufacturers may well have used both to register the chucks for interchangebility between lathes.
 
Sherline lathes use 3/4-16 TPI so perhaps the question is best answered by a current North American Manufacturer of lathes.  What do they do?  And why?
 
John Dammeyer
 

Take a look at your spindle. You will see a small area close to the HS where the threads end just prior to running into the shoulder. That unthreaded area is called the Register. The Register along with the Shoulder constitute the two surfaces that accurately index anything screwed to the spindle. It's for this reason that whatever is being screwed on the spindle be accurately machined to mate with these two surfaces.
 
Be it known that the statements I just made are argued by some who believe that the Shoulder, in concert with the Threads are what's important for repeatable alignment. I do not subscribe to this line of thought.
 
You can search the message board and find many discussions on this topic. Enough to make your head explode. Wrap your head with duct tape prior to proceeding with the topic search. It will keep your cranium from scattering all over the place!
 
Chris


Re: Face plate for Heavy 10L.

ChristopherS
 

Take a look at your spindle. You will see a small area close to the HS where the threads end just prior to running into the shoulder. That unthreaded area is called the Register. The Register along with the Shoulder constitute the two surfaces that accurately index anything screwed to the spindle. It's for this reason that whatever is being screwed on the spindle be accurately machined to mate with these two surfaces.
 
Be it known that the statements I just made are argued by some who believe that the Shoulder, in concert with the Threads are what's important for repeatable alignment. I do not subscribe to this line of thought.
 
You can search the message board and find many discussions on this topic. Enough to make your head explode. Wrap your head with duct tape prior to proceeding with the topic search. It will keep your cranium from scattering all over the place!
 
Chris


imarelicz28 wrote:

Chris

Could you please explain what spindle thread/back plate thread
register is, and why is it important?

Thanks

Bob

--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, Chris Strazzeri
.> wrote:
>
> Actually, I would be surprised if I purchased a factory new
faceplate or backplate and found that it fit and ran dead on. Bison
expects the user to do all of what was described in this thread.
That said, I know that there are members that have more than one
lathe with the same threaded spindle nose and they will say that
they can interchange backplates & faceplates with no problem.
Question is... Is that the norm or the exception? It only seems
logical that if a user has three lathes and the register varies by a
thou between them, then the plate register would have to be at least
as large (+ clearance) as the lathe with the largest dia spindle
register. That would make the other two lathes a less than perfect
fit.
>
> Dennis would know better than me but I would guess that SB kept
a record of the register dia of every lathe SN that went out the
door. That way, you could order plates from them and insure a
precision fit.
>
> Just my .02 & some guessing,
> Chris
>
>
> Jeff Beck ...> wrote:
> Hi John,
> Thanks for the information. This is how i planned to machine the
one
> for my lathe as well. On my machine/plate the plate was aprox 2.26
> and the spindle it 2.27.
>
> The plate is based off of measurements i took from an original. I
> layed out all the holes/slots based on that. The plate OD,
thickness
> and the hub thickness are also measured from an original. What i
> didnt tell the mfg was any details on the ID area. I basically
told
> them to make me 10 with 1-1/2"-8 center and 10 with 2-1/4"-8
centers.
> The 1-1/2"-8 ones fit well, the 2-1/4"-8 ones ended up 1-2
> thousandths tight. I will also look into the amount of the hole
that
> is threaded vs the amount cleared for the register. Again, I didnt
> spec this either. I figured it was some sort of standard that the
> chuck mfg would know. I was mistaken.
>
> Its sort of a multi tiered problem as many will tell you that you
> should have as tight of a fit as possible to the register. I am
> finding that the registers vary alot on various makes/models
> machines. They even vary alot on the same make model machine.
Logan
> lathes for instance seem to have the largest register areas of any
i
> have run across.
>
> So many will argue that the ideal way to mfg these is to make them
> undersize and have people machine them. Unfourtantly, it seems
people
> are not too willing/interested in doing this. I think that my
> statement in my auctions that this will/may have to be enlarged a
few
> thousandths has really hurt the sales of them. The 1-1/2"-8 ones
sell
> for much more money as they dont have to be clearenced. Seems the
9"
> really doesnt have much of a registration surface to begin with
> (relative to the heavy 10 anyway).
>
> So long story short,for my next batch I am going to spec the
length
> and width of the registration area. The initial batch of 10 was
just
> to test the waters and see if there was interest in them.
>
> Regards
> Jeff
>



Re: Horizontal mill, ok for a beginner?

Gary
 

Bill,
Thanks for the quick reply. They want 1100.00 for the 8540
Clausing Mill. It has a 3 phase converter and around 40 cutters for
it. The fact that its local also affects my decision, saving me any
shipping fee's. Ive been told I can add a type m bridgeport head to
it and have a combo vert/hor machine. I'm trying to be patient, but
Ive got the bug to purchase.

Thanks, Gary



--- In southbendlathe@..., "Bill Wattson" <wwattso@...>
wrote:


I think you'll find a vertical knee mill like a Bridgeport much
more
useful. I looked at the chinese Rong Fu style import vertical mini-
mills as well but found that if a shopped it long enough, I could
get a
Bridgeport for about the same money. Without getting into how much
is
in your price range, the Rong Fu style mill drill is currently
priced
at $1000 from Harbor Freight. The Bridgeport I have is a 9 x 36
Series
I J-head with chromed ways for $1350 on eBay.

Just my opinion but I'd hold out for a vertical with a knee. You
might
have to put up with a little slop from wear but you might end up
with
that problem even in a well worn horizontal.

Bill Wattson

--- In southbendlathe@..., "Gary" <killercobretti@>
wrote:

Hello,
I am interested in purchasing a mill to go along with my
old SB
lathe. I am under the impression that a vertical mill would be
more
versatile, but most used american made units seem out of my price
range. Ive found an older Clausing horizontal mill thats in my
price
range. I was wondering what your opinion is on this for someone
with
very little experience.

Thanks, Gary


Re: Face plate for Heavy 10L.

John Dammeyer
 

Hi Jeff,

Using a micrometer I measure the SB 10L (1943 vintage) register diameter
at 2.261" at a temperature of 15C.

I verified my vernier dial calliper against this and it too showed
2.261" I then measured the inside ID of the back plate at 2.263" using
the vernier. I doubt I could have made it any closer since the way it
was mounted with the spacer it was out of round or offset a tiny bit.
Therefore I kept turning little bits off until it made a continuous cut
at which point I stopped.

Too keep this in perspective, my SB 3-Jaw measures 2.276, the SB 4-Jaw
measures 2.280" and the drive plate (also SB I suspect) measures 2.280"

On each of the SB units, the register section is 0.375" deep to the
start of the thread as is now my new faceplate. The spindle has the
thread ending at 0.175" from the flange.

The size of the register has been discussed at length on this forum in
the past. Some say it shouldn't touch. Other says it's just to
provide clearance for junk. BTW, I also turned a 30 degree chamfer on
the inside register part of the back plate a tiny bit smaller than what
was on the SB parts.

Oh, and at this point in time I have only cast aluminium, ZA12 and
Aluminium bronze. I have yet to try cast iron although it's in the
plans. The people I know who have cast using old brake rotors and drums
as raw material say that it's severely lacking in carbon which is why
it's tough to machine. Apparently old iron water pumps make better home
casting raw material. I'm told they add charcoal but as I said, I
haven't tried that yet. I found the face plate difficult to surface
which leads me to think it's closer to steel than to cast iron.

John Dammeyer


Hi John,
Thanks for the information. This is how i planned to machine the one
for my lathe as well. On my machine/plate the plate was aprox 2.26
and the spindle it 2.27.

The plate is based off of measurements i took from an original. I
layed out all the holes/slots based on that. The plate OD, thickness
and the hub thickness are also measured from an original. What i
didnt tell the mfg was any details on the ID area. I basically told
them to make me 10 with 1-1/2"-8 center and 10 with 2-1/4"-8 centers.
The 1-1/2"-8 ones fit well, the 2-1/4"-8 ones ended up 1-2
thousandths tight. I will also look into the amount of the hole that
is threaded vs the amount cleared for the register. Again, I didnt
spec this either. I figured it was some sort of standard that the
chuck mfg would know. I was mistaken.

Its sort of a multi tiered problem as many will tell you that you
should have as tight of a fit as possible to the register. I am
finding that the registers vary alot on various makes/models
machines. They even vary alot on the same make model machine. Logan
lathes for instance seem to have the largest register areas of any i
have run across.

So many will argue that the ideal way to mfg these is to make them
undersize and have people machine them. Unfourtantly, it seems people
are not too willing/interested in doing this. I think that my
statement in my auctions that this will/may have to be enlarged a few
thousandths has really hurt the sales of them. The 1-1/2"-8 ones sell
for much more money as they dont have to be clearenced. Seems the 9"
really doesnt have much of a registration surface to begin with
(relative to the heavy 10 anyway).

So long story short,for my next batch I am going to spec the length
and width of the registration area. The initial batch of 10 was just
to test the waters and see if there was interest in them.

Regards
Jeff




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Re: Horizontal mill, ok for a beginner?

Bill Wattson <wwattso@...>
 

I think you'll find a vertical knee mill like a Bridgeport much more
useful. I looked at the chinese Rong Fu style import vertical mini-
mills as well but found that if a shopped it long enough, I could get a
Bridgeport for about the same money. Without getting into how much is
in your price range, the Rong Fu style mill drill is currently priced
at $1000 from Harbor Freight. The Bridgeport I have is a 9 x 36 Series
I J-head with chromed ways for $1350 on eBay.

Just my opinion but I'd hold out for a vertical with a knee. You might
have to put up with a little slop from wear but you might end up with
that problem even in a well worn horizontal.

Bill Wattson

--- In southbendlathe@..., "Gary" <killercobretti@...>
wrote:

Hello,
I am interested in purchasing a mill to go along with my old SB
lathe. I am under the impression that a vertical mill would be more
versatile, but most used american made units seem out of my price
range. Ive found an older Clausing horizontal mill thats in my price
range. I was wondering what your opinion is on this for someone with
very little experience.

Thanks, Gary


Horizontal mill, ok for a beginner?

Gary
 

Hello,
I am interested in purchasing a mill to go along with my old SB
lathe. I am under the impression that a vertical mill would be more
versatile, but most used american made units seem out of my price
range. Ive found an older Clausing horizontal mill thats in my price
range. I was wondering what your opinion is on this for someone with
very little experience.

Thanks, Gary


Re: Face plate for Heavy 10L.

imarelicz28 <imarelicz28@...>
 

Chris

Could you please explain what spindle thread/back plate thread
register is, and why is it important?

Thanks

Bob

--- In southbendlathe@..., Chris Strazzeri
<cjstrazz@...> wrote:

Actually, I would be surprised if I purchased a factory new
faceplate or backplate and found that it fit and ran dead on. Bison
expects the user to do all of what was described in this thread.
That said, I know that there are members that have more than one
lathe with the same threaded spindle nose and they will say that
they can interchange backplates & faceplates with no problem.
Question is... Is that the norm or the exception? It only seems
logical that if a user has three lathes and the register varies by a
thou between them, then the plate register would have to be at least
as large (+ clearance) as the lathe with the largest dia spindle
register. That would make the other two lathes a less than perfect
fit.

Dennis would know better than me but I would guess that SB kept
a record of the register dia of every lathe SN that went out the
door. That way, you could order plates from them and insure a
precision fit.

Just my .02 & some guessing,
Chris


Jeff Beck <tools4cheap@...> wrote:
Hi John,
Thanks for the information. This is how i planned to machine the
one
for my lathe as well. On my machine/plate the plate was aprox 2.26
and the spindle it 2.27.

The plate is based off of measurements i took from an original. I
layed out all the holes/slots based on that. The plate OD,
thickness
and the hub thickness are also measured from an original. What i
didnt tell the mfg was any details on the ID area. I basically
told
them to make me 10 with 1-1/2"-8 center and 10 with 2-1/4"-8
centers.
The 1-1/2"-8 ones fit well, the 2-1/4"-8 ones ended up 1-2
thousandths tight. I will also look into the amount of the hole
that
is threaded vs the amount cleared for the register. Again, I didnt
spec this either. I figured it was some sort of standard that the
chuck mfg would know. I was mistaken.

Its sort of a multi tiered problem as many will tell you that you
should have as tight of a fit as possible to the register. I am
finding that the registers vary alot on various makes/models
machines. They even vary alot on the same make model machine.
Logan
lathes for instance seem to have the largest register areas of any
i
have run across.

So many will argue that the ideal way to mfg these is to make them
undersize and have people machine them. Unfourtantly, it seems
people
are not too willing/interested in doing this. I think that my
statement in my auctions that this will/may have to be enlarged a
few
thousandths has really hurt the sales of them. The 1-1/2"-8 ones
sell
for much more money as they dont have to be clearenced. Seems the
9"
really doesnt have much of a registration surface to begin with
(relative to the heavy 10 anyway).

So long story short,for my next batch I am going to spec the
length
and width of the registration area. The initial batch of 10 was
just
to test the waters and see if there was interest in them.

Regards
Jeff


Re: Face plate for Heavy 10L.

ChristopherS
 

Actually, I would be surprised if I purchased a factory new faceplate or backplate and found that it fit and ran dead on. Bison expects the user to do all of what was described in this thread.  That said, I know that there are members that have more than one lathe with the same threaded spindle nose and they will say that they can interchange backplates & faceplates with no problem. Question is... Is that the norm or the exception? It only seems logical that if a user has three lathes and the register varies by a thou between them, then the plate register would have to be at least as large (+ clearance) as the lathe with the largest dia spindle register. That would make the other two lathes a less than perfect fit.
 
Dennis would know better than me but I would guess that SB kept a record of the register dia of every lathe SN that went out the door. That way, you could order plates from them and insure a precision fit.
 
Just my .02 & some guessing,
Chris


Jeff Beck wrote:

Hi John,
Thanks for the information. This is how i planned to machine the one
for my lathe as well. On my machine/plate the plate was aprox 2.26
and the spindle it 2.27.

The plate is based off of measurements i took from an original. I
layed out all the holes/slots based on that. The plate OD, thickness
and the hub thickness are also measured from an original. What i
didnt tell the mfg was any details on the ID area. I basically told
them to make me 10 with 1-1/2"-8 center and 10 with 2-1/4"-8 centers.
The 1-1/2"-8 ones fit well, the 2-1/4"-8 ones ended up 1-2
thousandths tight. I will also look into the amount of the hole that
is threaded vs the amount cleared for the register. Again, I didnt
spec this either. I figured it was some sort of standard that the
chuck mfg would know. I was mistaken.

Its sort of a multi tiered problem as many will tell you that you
should have as tight of a fit as possible to the register. I am
finding that the registers vary alot on various makes/models
machines. They even vary alot on the same make model machine. Logan
lathes for instance seem to have the largest register areas of any i
have run across.

So many will argue that the ideal way to mfg these is to make them
undersize and have people machine them. Unfourtantly, it seems people
are not too willing/interested in doing this. I think that my
statement in my auctions that this will/may have to be enlarged a few
thousandths has really hurt the sales of them. The 1-1/2"-8 ones sell
for much more money as they dont have to be clearenced. Seems the 9"
really doesnt have much of a registration surface to begin with
(relative to the heavy 10 anyway).

So long story short,for my next batch I am going to spec the length
and width of the registration area. The initial batch of 10 was just
to test the waters and see if there was interest in them.

Regards
Jeff



Re: Heavy 10

Jeff Beck
 

--- In southbendlathe@..., "joebass1977" <joebass1977@...>
wrote:

Anybody know where there is a Heavy 10 in Western NY? I am just west
of
Rochester. Thanks.
Joe, Your about 1 year too late! There was an auctioneer in your area
about a year ago who sold apox a dozen Heavy 10s and 13s from a BOCES
school in the buffalo area. I had bid on several of them but the prices
went too high for me to justify 18 hours of driving to get them.
However for a local dealer and especially for an end user they were
fantastic machines/prices.
I lived in Rochester for 8 years and used to find tons of deals in the
Rochester Swap Sheet newspaper that comes out weekly.
http://rochester.traderpub.com/books.html?i=h&v=misc

Jeff


Re: Face plate for Heavy 10L.

Jeff Beck
 

Hi John,
Thanks for the information. This is how i planned to machine the one
for my lathe as well. On my machine/plate the plate was aprox 2.26
and the spindle it 2.27.

The plate is based off of measurements i took from an original. I
layed out all the holes/slots based on that. The plate OD, thickness
and the hub thickness are also measured from an original. What i
didnt tell the mfg was any details on the ID area. I basically told
them to make me 10 with 1-1/2"-8 center and 10 with 2-1/4"-8 centers.
The 1-1/2"-8 ones fit well, the 2-1/4"-8 ones ended up 1-2
thousandths tight. I will also look into the amount of the hole that
is threaded vs the amount cleared for the register. Again, I didnt
spec this either. I figured it was some sort of standard that the
chuck mfg would know. I was mistaken.

Its sort of a multi tiered problem as many will tell you that you
should have as tight of a fit as possible to the register. I am
finding that the registers vary alot on various makes/models
machines. They even vary alot on the same make model machine. Logan
lathes for instance seem to have the largest register areas of any i
have run across.

So many will argue that the ideal way to mfg these is to make them
undersize and have people machine them. Unfourtantly, it seems people
are not too willing/interested in doing this. I think that my
statement in my auctions that this will/may have to be enlarged a few
thousandths has really hurt the sales of them. The 1-1/2"-8 ones sell
for much more money as they dont have to be clearenced. Seems the 9"
really doesnt have much of a registration surface to begin with
(relative to the heavy 10 anyway).

So long story short,for my next batch I am going to spec the length
and width of the registration area. The initial batch of 10 was just
to test the waters and see if there was interest in them.

Regards
Jeff


Face plate for Heavy 10L.

John Dammeyer
 

Hi all,

This is the story of the 10L large spindle face plate I bought off EBAY
from Jeff Beck at Tools 4 Cheap.

Nice faceplate. Wasn't 10" like I expected but in rechecking the EBAY
posting someone had asked what the size was and it was listed there as
8.5" Ah well live and learn. My bad.

Jeff had also mentioned that the shoulder for the registration part of
the spindle was slightly undersize on some. It was on mine. So I had
to figure out how to make it work.

What I did was:

1. Turn a ring was 5/8" thick and had an ID of my spindle registration
(about 2.25"). An OD of 2.75"

2. I slipped that onto the spindle and then threaded the faceplate on
backwards. That prevented the thread running into the unthreaded
register part of the spindle.

3. Indicating it showed it was out by about 0.001". Not bad but it
wasn't centered. So then I used a carbide boring tool and very
carefully removed enough until it was round. Total of about 0.0025"

4. Next I faced off the back shoulder, removed it and the ring and spun
the face plate on the right way. Nice. Sucked up to the back shoulder
perfectly.

5. On backwards again and I removed 0.165" of the back shoulder so that
about 0.375" of the recess was left before the threads started. That
results in one more thread of the spindle actually in the face plate and
now matched my chucks and drive plate.

6. Back on the right way. Time to face it off. I started taking a
shallow cut with a HSS tool and slow speed. Something went wrong about
half way out and I noticed sparking from the tool. It had also been
creating some pretty blue curls. Not cast iron for sure.

Tool bit was melted and had really screwed up the surface. Called it
quits for the night and started again the next morning with a roughing
carbide bit and slowest back gear. That's after I did the math and
realized that for that size plate at 8" I'd need 47 RPM.

After multiple passes of 0.005" each time I finally was able to set the
tool up for a thin shaving finishing pass and came out with a nice clean
flat surface. Bit of work to remove the ridges and I have a nice solid
face plate. Took forever but Yahoo!!!!.

BTW, delivery from Jeff was prompt and he always immediately replied to
my emails.

John Dammeyer


Re: 1923 63A 11"SB Drive question

Clive Foster
 

Gary

If you are tensioning a belt using the weight of the motor things go better with a slightly stiff, slightly resilient bearing as the motor pivot.

A friend found that sloppy holes in thin sheet on a well rusted bolt don't do the deed and that the motor danced around quite alarmingly with changes in loads or when the joint lump in the Vee belt ran over the pulley. (Ultra cheap no name belts can have quite an alarming lump where the circle completes, rare to be able to see it but the pulley sure notices.)

In the past I've found DIY rubber bushed pivots to be very effective. My method was to weld about an inch of old iron water pipe (inch or inch quarter bore) to a suitable length of inch by 1/8 thick strip making a P shaped thingy. Forcing a bit of thick wall rubber tube (car heater hose??) into the tube makes a nice rubber bush and selecting the size of the pivot rod through the middle allows you to choose the stiction force to anything between "just a tadge" and "moves if you really heave". Prolly best to lubricate the rod with red rubber grease. A pair with long stems suitably drilled to match the motor feet make nice motor mounts. A side benefit is that the rubber is very good at isolating the "single phase buzz" and similar small, high frequency vibrations. Personally I'd go for a bit stiff and add a spring to get a bit more tension.

Paired support bushings made this way aver very stiff across the plane of the rod.

Clive


Re: 1923 63A 11"SB Drive question

Gary
 

--- In southbendlathe@..., "Gary" <killercobretti@...>
wrote:

I am the new owner of an 1923 SB lathe and I was curious about how it
was originally driven. It now has a crudely fashioned motormount
bolted to the rear leg, using the weight of the motor to tension both
the v belt and the flat belt off of the jackshaft. Since it doesnt
appear to have a factory made motor mount location, I was curious how
it was driven back in the "Day". I was told by the previous owner that
it was run from a leather belt , off a common shaft in a factory, but
I didnt know if that was true. I thought someone here might know the
answer.
I was also wondering if tensioning the belt with the motors weight
was a generally accepted practice or if it was unsafe.

Thanks, Gary

Thanks for all the replies. I must confess, I've had this machine for
awhile. I've just been afraid to run it without completely going
through it and making sure everything is clean and lubricated well.
Before I found this site, I did carefully remove the spindle and
checked the bearings. They have seen better days, but I expected as
much with her age. I'd love to take it completely apart, clean, paint
and reassemble it. I havent run a lathe since I went to classes at a
community college in the 80's, so I need to do some reading and give it
another try. I will try to get some pictures this weekend and get them
posted. I have several accessories that I dont even know what they are
called.

Thanks, Gary


Cheese heads

krueger_cal <cal@...>
 

I found some PB blaster and will try that with heat. Kroils on order.
I figure that you guys like it so well I just need some.
My thanks to all who replied.
Cal


Heavy 10

joebass1977
 

Anybody know where there is a Heavy 10 in Western NY? I am just west of
Rochester. Thanks.