Date   

New Member

michael_host@bellsouth.net <michael_host@...>
 

This is my first post and I just happen to have a South Bend 9" lathe. I have looked at thousands of pictures on the web and have not found one just like mine. I have not run this lathe but have lots of projects in mind. After I reassembling I will tap into the knowledge of some of you to figure out just what I have.


Re: End gear noise

Steve Wells
 


Hi John,
I have another section of my website called "From the Experts" or FTE for short, that is not visible to the public yet.
I have been working on it for a couple of years and I'm still not ready to post the pages. In it are the posts and advise from other group members.
These are from different groups, e-mails and so on. Below I have listed the entry for the product I posted. Its from John Phillips.
 
Steve Wells
 
 
FTE
Lubrication:
 
An excellent lube for exposed gears I have found is a product called
Walter Hang-On adhesive lubricant. It comes in a spray can and works
great and doesn't fling oil. On the issue with a cone pulley on a 9"
lathe, be sure that the oil ports inside the cone pulley and the spiral groove
are clean. I have rebuilt several headstocks and found that the oil-grease ways
(the spiral grooves) were plugged. If you use grease or oil, the lack of lube
is generally your problem in this case. If after using your back gears and
the cone pulley gets hot, this is a good indication of a lack of lubrication.
John Phillips
****************


Re: End gear noise

Douglas Pollard <dougpol1@...>
 

Sorry! I forgot and Bottom posted as we do on Linux lists :-[                              Doug

On 03/06/2013 02:13 PM, Douglas Pollard wrote:
 

On 03/06/2013 12:29 PM, Douglas Pollard wrote:
 

Ed, I would say that.001 clearance may well be to tight.  I used to buld winches using and automobile differential with a brake in place of one whell the other side was attached to a winding drum.  Some times I had to set the clearance on the differential gears.  Now those are very very precision ground gears running at high speed.  I always used a groceries brown bag which is about .004 thick. Worked perfectly. I would say for the machined but unground gears on a South Bend lathe .003 to .005 clearance would be more nearly right.  Give it a try. you can tighten them up if they don't work better.       Doug


On 03/06/2013 11:17 AM, Ed wrote:
 

The gears have to have the proper clearance, about .001. Use a small
piece of printer paper meshed between the gears as a gage. Any
lubricant will quickly be pushed out. They will not wear in , only wear out.

Ed S

>On Mar 6, 2013, at 12:44 AM, machinist236 wrote:
>
>> Grease has been tried also, same result quiet for a minute then
>> noisy again. I would be grateful any help, thanks.
>
>_



-- 
                 Doug Pollard, 
      Sailor, Machinst, writer,artist 
                Visit me at:
     
     http://sailboatsfairandfine.blogspot.com/
     
Think about this If you have.001 clearance between the gear then each mating gear has to run ID  to gear mesh diameter with In .0005 or they will be running metal to metal in the high sides.
You can bet your bottom dollar the gears do not run that close.  If the gears are noisy they are running too tight there is no other reason unless they are not a matching pair.  Some may be stub gears and some full pitch gears.   Mostly though too tight is the cause of a noise problem.  Properly meshed gears  will run quiet if completely dry though they may wear some.  On very old lathes the sides of the gear teeth are straight instead of involute in shape they will never fit properly to roll on the tooth sides an will be noisy. They are still making those flat sided gears in Russia but we quit making them in the rest of the world about 1920.  So if your lathe was built before 1920 the gears may be straight sided on naturally noisy.        Doug


-- 
                 Doug Pollard, 
      Sailor, Machinst, writer,artist 
                Visit me at:
     
     http://sailboatsfairandfine.blogspot.com/
     


-- 
                 Doug Pollard, 
      Sailor, Machinst, writer,artist 
                Visit me at:
     
     http://sailboatsfairandfine.blogspot.com/
     


Re: End gear noise

armne@sbcglobal.net <armne@...>
 

All gears make noise, but are much louder when the clearance is too much or too little, old gears against new gears and don't grease them its a magnet for chips etc. use dry molly spray or such.
Good Luck
Alec Ryals
###########

--- In southbendlathe@..., john kling <jkling222@...> wrote:

Is this an endorsement. Like :" I found that it really reduces the noise from my
gears"? Or is it simply "I came across this product" type of suggestion.




________________________________
From: Steve Wells <wswells@...>
To: southbendlathe@...
Sent: Wed, March 6, 2013 1:20:21 PM
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] End gear noise


For your open gears try Walter Hang On

http://www.walter.com/Walter/en-us/mro-solutions/lubrication/bolt-release/hang-on


Steve Wells


Re: End gear noise

Mario Firmino
 

Hi There,

It is a caracteristic of that kind of gears, you will not get rid of the noise.
You should remember the noise of the gearbox of ancient trucks, the same problem.
Now the gears are helical, and much more silent.
Take a look:http://www.designworldonline.com/helical-gears-versus-traditional-worm-and-spur-gears/

Cheers
Mario

Em 06/03/2013 02:44, machinist236 escreveu:

 

I tried the search but couldn't find what I was looking for. I was wondering if anyone knew of something to use on the spindle gear, twin gears and reverse gear to quiet them. This a 16" machine, the gears do have some lash about .015" or so. They look good, no sharp or pointed teeth. They do not clatter but make more of a howling noise. There is no way to adjust these that I can see. The smaller lathe a 9" makes hardly any noise at all and the gears are much more worn. I keep the gears on both lubed. The lube works awhile (maybe a minute or so)on the 16" then it is noisy again. Grease has been tried also, same result quiet for a minute then noisy again. I would be grateful any help, thanks.



Re: End gear noise

Douglas Pollard <dougpol1@...>
 

On 03/06/2013 12:29 PM, Douglas Pollard wrote:
 

Ed, I would say that.001 clearance may well be to tight.  I used to buld winches using and automobile differential with a brake in place of one whell the other side was attached to a winding drum.  Some times I had to set the clearance on the differential gears.  Now those are very very precision ground gears running at high speed.  I always used a groceries brown bag which is about .004 thick. Worked perfectly. I would say for the machined but unground gears on a South Bend lathe .003 to .005 clearance would be more nearly right.  Give it a try. you can tighten them up if they don't work better.       Doug


On 03/06/2013 11:17 AM, Ed wrote:
 

The gears have to have the proper clearance, about .001. Use a small
piece of printer paper meshed between the gears as a gage. Any
lubricant will quickly be pushed out. They will not wear in , only wear out.

Ed S

>On Mar 6, 2013, at 12:44 AM, machinist236 wrote:
>
>> Grease has been tried also, same result quiet for a minute then
>> noisy again. I would be grateful any help, thanks.
>
>_



-- 
                 Doug Pollard, 
      Sailor, Machinst, writer,artist 
                Visit me at:
     
     http://sailboatsfairandfine.blogspot.com/
     
Think about this If you have.001 clearance between the gear then each mating gear has to run ID  to gear mesh diameter with In .0005 or they will be running metal to metal in the high sides.
You can bet your bottom dollar the gears do not run that close.  If the gears are noisy they are running too tight there is no other reason unless they are not a matching pair.  Some may be stub gears and some full pitch gears.   Mostly though too tight is the cause of a noise problem.  Properly meshed gears  will run quiet if completely dry though they may wear some.  On very old lathes the sides of the gear teeth are straight instead of involute in shape they will never fit properly to roll on the tooth sides an will be noisy. They are still making those flat sided gears in Russia but we quit making them in the rest of the world about 1920.  So if your lathe was built before 1920 the gears may be straight sided on naturally noisy.        Doug


-- 
                 Doug Pollard, 
      Sailor, Machinst, writer,artist 
                Visit me at:
     
     http://sailboatsfairandfine.blogspot.com/
     


Re: End gear noise

john kling
 

Is this an endorsement. Like :" I found that it really reduces the noise from my gears"? Or is it simply "I came across this product" type of suggestion.


From: Steve Wells
To: southbendlathe@...
Sent: Wed, March 6, 2013 1:20:21 PM
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] End gear noise

 

For your open gears try Walter Hang On
 
 
Steve Wells
 
 


Re: End gear noise

Steve Wells
 

For your open gears try Walter Hang On
 
 
Steve Wells
 
 


Re: End gear noise

Douglas Pollard <dougpol1@...>
 

Ed, I would say that.001 clearance may well be to tight.  I used to buld winches using and automobile differential with a brake in place of one whell the other side was attached to a winding drum.  Some times I had to set the clearance on the differential gears.  Now those are very very precision ground gears running at high speed.  I always used a groceries brown bag which is about .004 thick. Worked perfectly. I would say for the machined but unground gears on a South Bend lathe .003 to .005 clearance would be more nearly right.  Give it a try. you can tighten them up if they don't work better.       Doug


On 03/06/2013 11:17 AM, Ed wrote:
 

The gears have to have the proper clearance, about .001. Use a small
piece of printer paper meshed between the gears as a gage. Any
lubricant will quickly be pushed out. They will not wear in , only wear out.

Ed S

>On Mar 6, 2013, at 12:44 AM, machinist236 wrote:
>
>> Grease has been tried also, same result quiet for a minute then
>> noisy again. I would be grateful any help, thanks.
>
>_



-- 
                 Doug Pollard, 
      Sailor, Machinst, writer,artist 
                Visit me at:
     
     http://sailboatsfairandfine.blogspot.com/
     


Re: End gear noise

Flash Gordon
 

The gears have to have the proper clearance, about .001. Use a small piece of printer paper meshed between the gears as a gage. Any lubricant will quickly be pushed out. They will not wear in , only wear out.

Ed S

On Mar 6, 2013, at 12:44 AM, machinist236 wrote:

Grease has been tried also, same result quiet for a minute then noisy again. I would be grateful any help, thanks.
_


Re: End gear noise

Eggleston Lance <wheezer606@...>
 

Try a little bit of STP.

lance
++++

On Mar 6, 2013, at 12:44 AM, machinist236 wrote:

 Grease has been tried also, same result quiet for a minute then noisy again. I would be grateful any help, thanks.


End gear noise

machinist236
 

I tried the search but couldn't find what I was looking for. I was wondering if anyone knew of something to use on the spindle gear, twin gears and reverse gear to quiet them. This a 16" machine, the gears do have some lash about .015" or so. They look good, no sharp or pointed teeth. They do not clatter but make more of a howling noise. There is no way to adjust these that I can see. The smaller lathe a 9" makes hardly any noise at all and the gears are much more worn. I keep the gears on both lubed. The lube works awhile (maybe a minute or so)on the 16" then it is noisy again. Grease has been tried also, same result quiet for a minute then noisy again. I would be grateful any help, thanks.


Re: Compound Rest Disassembly

Jim B. <btdtrf@...>
 

I have removed the gib, the ball crank assembly, and the graduated collar. Any help will be appreciated.

There is also a collar with the zero mark on it. This is threaded into the casting.
It must also be removed. There is a hole on the bottom for a pin spanner.
If you dont have one, an OLD tight fitting drill can be inserted and tapped with a plastic hammer. This will bend the drill so OLD. Sometimes a small strap wrench will work.
Jim B
Sent from my DROID RAZR MAXX


Re: Cutting stud gears to turn metric on SB

Jan Monroe
 

Thanks for posting this. I have it bookmarked now. Jan


Re: South Bend Junior Rebuild kit

ww_big_al
 

I bought a set for my 9A. Well worth it. It saves on the hassle factor.

 

 

From: southbendlathe@... [mailto:southbendlathe@...] On Behalf Of admiralcashbar
Sent: Monday, March 04, 2013 3:42 PM
To: southbendlathe@...
Subject: [southbendlathe] South Bend Junior Rebuild kit

 

 

Hello everybody,

Was looking on ebay at lathe rebuild kits sold by SteveWB. Are these kits worth picking up for the felt and oil wicks?

Which kit would work for a nine inch Junior? I know they are different in a few ways from any other bench lathes but I don't know enough about them to tell how.

Evan


Re: South Bend Junior Rebuild kit

m. allan noah
 

The 9 Jr was made for many years, with significant changes to the headstock and apron over that time. The early ones have almost no felt in them at all, and don't use the capillary oilers. The apron of a later one might have more felts in it, but probably not enough to justify the kit. They are also different enough from a 10L that I doubt the book will be of much help.

allan
--
"The truth is an offense, but not a sin"


Re: South Bend Junior Rebuild kit

Wally Murray <wally.murray3@...>
 

I just recently received a kit for a 10L. I was very impressed with the quality and content (which included a "bump" washer for the tail stock - something I didn't know existed, but is obviously needed - different width wicks to allow for production changes in groove size). I suppose I could spend half a day (likely more) cobbing up my own creations but for the make/buy decision, it's a no-brainer.


South Bend Junior Rebuild kit

admiralcashbar
 

Hello everybody,

Was looking on ebay at lathe rebuild kits sold by SteveWB. Are these kits worth picking up for the felt and oil wicks?

Which kit would work for a nine inch Junior? I know they are different in a few ways from any other bench lathes but I don't know enough about them to tell how.

Evan


Re: Cutting stud gears to turn metric on SB

Robert H. Blodinger
 

Neat, and thank you.  In the printer now.

Bob

2


On Mar 3, 2013, at 6:16 PM, "Mar" <martik777@...> wrote:

 

http://www.cgtk.co.uk/metalwork/divider

This will generate an accurate dividing wheel for any number of divisions.

I made an Aluminum gear for my backgear and it has been working fine for a couple years so it should be no problem with your stud gear.


Re: Cutting stud gears to turn metric on SB

David Rysdam <david@...>
 

On Sun, 03 Mar 2013 23:16:39 -0000, "Mar" <martik777@...> wrote:
http://www.cgtk.co.uk/metalwork/divider

This will generate an accurate dividing wheel for any number of divisions.
You actually don't need to be that accurate when making a plate. Fairly
accurate, yes, but not super accurate. The errors get reduced by the
ratio of the worm gear. You can make a second plate with the same
divisions by more accurate by a huge factor.

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