Date   

Re: Sbl 16" circa 1942 countershaft bearings

S Clearman <sclearman@...>
 

I've got a 16" also. Mine is currently in pieces. I found the pour holes for the bearing material on the outside of the motor cabinet.  Mine is a '42 by the way.  I'm willing to bet that you have the same thing I do, I'd doubt very much that SB would do it differently on the same model.   I would try again to melt them, taking into account the cast iron base will soak up an enormous amount of heat.  That may be why they are hard to melt out.  I bet they are in fact babbit and the cabinet is acting like a heat sink.  How are you trying to melt them?

On Dec 23, 2017 9:41 PM, "Jim Jim@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:
 

Here is a SB note on cylinder boring m




-8
Jim B,


Re: taper sleeves

Roger Bickers
 

Jim, the old lathe with the #6 jarno is a Fay and Scott and theres no mistake its a jarno taper. The end of the spindle measures exactly .75.  With that being said, i did try a mt2 and the fit was sloppy enough i could easily tell the taper only had bearing on the end of the spindle. Not a good fit for a 20" lathe turning out of balanced chunks of wood, or a good idea to do. Any ideas im not aware of?

On Sat, Dec 16, 2017 at 5:04 PM, 'Jim B. ' Jim@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]
<SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:
 

 

The MT-2 is very close to a JARNO #6

The specs say the JARNO large end is 0.750, the small end is 0.600 and the taper is -0.6000 in/ft.

The MT2 is 0.700 large end, 0.572 small end and 0.5994 in/ft.

 

Since the tapers are almost identical, I would put a MT2 tool into the spindle and see what you get.

 

There is a wide variation in the way MT tapers are made, some hang way out from the SB spindles. If you can find the right tooling I am almost certain it would work for you.

 

Its actually hard to find a center that is not too long for a SB-9.

 

Jim B.

 

From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... [mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@...]
Sent: Saturday, December 16, 2017 2:53 PM
To: southbendlathe@...
Subject: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] taper sleeves

 

 

Ive got an old wood lathe that has a #6 jarno on the spindle, and im wondering if anyone has a taper adapter theyd sell, or if i should just buy a #3 to #2 morse taper adapter and turn the outside down to .75 at the perscribed length for a jarno taper?  Thanks guys. Roger 


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Re: Sbl 16" circa 1942 countershaft bearings

Jim_B
 

Here is a SB note on cylinder boring m



Sent from my iPhone-8
Jim B,


Re: Sbl 16" circa 1942 countershaft bearings

Bill in OKC too
 

See if you can find one of the Model Engineer articles on line-boring a cylinder. Might give you some ideas.

On Sat, Dec 23, 2017 at 6:24 PM, johnandshell@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]
wrote:
 

Thank you one and all. It would appear that the Cast bearing surface for the drive rod is actually part of the overall casting! I could be wrong, but it looks like its all part of the same casting. If so, its one heck of a mold making accomplishment. Regardless, my first solution is to go with needle bearing of the same OD as the ID of the bearing surface. This takes my shaft down to 1", which no doubt will make it weaker that intended. Plan B is to bore the bearing surface to a diameter that will accept larger bearing, thereby allowing for a 1.25" shaft as originally specified. I think keeping the shaft at 1.25 is desirable, but I need to find someone with a Horizontal boring machine to achieve that OR fabricate a really healthy bracket to hold the mounting plate at a 90 degree angle under my vertical mill while I bore it out. I'll post photos if interested. Certainly, someone has encountered this before?


Re: Sbl 16" circa 1942 countershaft bearings

John and Rochelle Wilkerson
 

seems like a quick fix. I'll let ya know how it works.


Re: Sbl 16" circa 1942 countershaft bearings

John and Rochelle Wilkerson
 

Thank you one and all. It would appear that the Cast bearing surface for the drive rod is actually part of the overall casting! I could be wrong, but it looks like its all part of the same casting. If so, its one heck of a mold making accomplishment. Regardless, my first solution is to go with needle bearing of the same OD as the ID of the bearing surface. This takes my shaft down to 1", which no doubt will make it weaker that intended. Plan B is to bore the bearing surface to a diameter that will accept larger bearing, thereby allowing for a 1.25" shaft as originally specified. I think keeping the shaft at 1.25 is desirable, but I need to find someone with a Horizontal boring machine to achieve that OR fabricate a really healthy bracket to hold the mounting plate at a 90 degree angle under my vertical mill while I bore it out. I'll post photos if interested. Certainly, someone has encountered this before?


Re: Sbl 16" circa 1942 countershaft bearings

John and Rochelle Wilkerson
 

Not a bit


Re: New member introduction

scott sunday
 

So…after reading the faq’s and some of the other files I think I have the feed speed figured out on my 9c. If I’m reading the chart on the cover of my lathe right if I want to change the feed speed  to .0021 inches of travel per 1 revolution of spindle revolution I would use a 16 stud gear and a 80 screw gear. Or if I wanted to do a travel speed of .0139 per revolution of spindle I would use a 16 stud gear and a 36 screw gear. Have I finally figured it out?? 
Scott

On Dec 23, 2017, at 3:52 PM, Gregg Eshelman g_alan_e@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:


The back gear doesn't change the ratio of the leadscrew to spindle. It just makes the spindle turn slower, with more torque.


On Saturday, December 23, 2017, 12:03:00 PM MST, scott sunday spivey250@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:


Hello

My name is Scott Sunday.. I joined this group yesterday. I found it as I was looking for information on my lathe. I own a model c9-10jr.  I’ve owned this lathe for several years and have turned a few pieces on it, but nothing that I am real proud of. As a younger man I ran a Clausing Colchester lathe in a machine shop trade class. I sort of remember some of the basics about lathe operation but machine shop was so long ago I have forgotten most of what I was taught. I am strictly a hobbyiest operator.  I use my lathe for making motorcycle parts like wheel spacers or bushings for bikes I am building.  I’m getting ready to start turning some stainless hex stock into bolts for a project because I can’t find the bolts I need anywhere. One of the thinngs I’m hoping to finds an answer to on the forum are about the gears on the back of the lathe and how they work as far as speed and feed and thread turning are conserned.

Thanks for letting me join this group.  This is my first post and I’m including some pics of my lathe.  Hopefully you guys with more experience than me with these lathes can guide me to a better understanding of my lathe and how to make it work better. 




Re: Motor starting jolt

Nelson Collar
 

A lower compositor will soften the start but you might wear them out quicker. 

On Saturday, December 23, 2017, 3:19:34 PM EST, obolt@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] wrote:


 

I finally got my 9b on line, new felts and belts all set. Part of the process included a new Leeson 1hp capacitor start motor, which I was really looking forward to. But, the damn thing starts with such a jolt that it almost seems dangerous for the lathe, or at the least, disruptive to doing close tolerance work. 

I’m thinking I must need a smaller start capacitor, but I don’t see much discussion of this on the internet. Most info is about increasing capacitor size...


Any ideas? Should I try to mount the motor in a non standard way in order to isolate it?

Any advice will be greatly appreciated. 


seneca falls 12 steady rest on a south bend 13?

Christopher Switzer
 

I'd like to ask if anyone has used a seneca falls 12 steady rest on a south bend 13 lathe. My SB 13 was built in 1979, and I can see the basic measurements look pretty close. I'm interested if anyone has any direct experience. Thanks.



Re: Motor starting jolt

Gregg Eshelman
 

Look up a soft starter or slow starter. Might find one surplus or used for less than new $


On Saturday, December 23, 2017, 1:20:00 PM MST, obolt@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] wrote:



I finally got my 9b on line, new felts and belts all set. Part of the process included a new Leeson 1hp capacitor start motor, which I was really looking forward to. But, the damn thing starts with such a jolt that it almost seems dangerous for the lathe, or at the least, disruptive to doing close tolerance work. 

I’m thinking I must need a smaller start capacitor, but I don’t see much discussion of this on the internet. Most info is about increasing capacitor size...


Any ideas? Should I try to mount the motor in a non standard way in order to isolate it?

Any advice will be greatly appreciated.


Re: New member introduction

Gregg Eshelman
 

The back gear doesn't change the ratio of the leadscrew to spindle. It just makes the spindle turn slower, with more torque.


On Saturday, December 23, 2017, 12:03:00 PM MST, scott sunday spivey250@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] wrote:


Hello

My name is Scott Sunday.. I joined this group yesterday. I found it as I was looking for information on my lathe. I own a model c9-10jr.  I’ve owned this lathe for several years and have turned a few pieces on it, but nothing that I am real proud of. As a younger man I ran a Clausing Colchester lathe in a machine shop trade class. I sort of remember some of the basics about lathe operation but machine shop was so long ago I have forgotten most of what I was taught. I am strictly a hobbyiest operator.  I use my lathe for making motorcycle parts like wheel spacers or bushings for bikes I am building.  I’m getting ready to start turning some stainless hex stock into bolts for a project because I can’t find the bolts I need anywhere. One of the thinngs I’m hoping to finds an answer to on the forum are about the gears on the back of the lathe and how they work as far as speed and feed and thread turning are conserned.

Thanks for letting me join this group.  This is my first post and I’m including some pics of my lathe.  Hopefully you guys with more experience than me with these lathes can guide me to a better understanding of my lathe and how to make it work better.


Re: New member introduction

fwhite913
 

In addition to information here, searcj "lathe operation" on the internet.  There are many good articles to read there.

 

 

On 12/23/2017 12:46 PM, scott sunday spivey250@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] wrote:



Hello

My name is Scott Sunday.. I joined this group yesterday. I found it as I was looking for information on my lathe. I own a model c9-10jr.  I’ve owned this lathe for several years and have turned a few pieces on it, but nothing that I am real proud of. As a younger man I ran a Clausing Colchester lathe in a machine shop trade class. I sort of remember some of the basics about lathe operation but machine shop was so long ago I have forgotten most of what I was taught. I am strictly a hobbyiest operator.  I use my lathe for making motorcycle parts like wheel spacers or bushings for bikes I am building.  I’m getting ready to start turning some stainless hex stock into bolts for a project because I can’t find the bolts I need anywhere. One of the thinngs I’m hoping to finds an answer to on the forum are about the gears on the back of the lathe and how they work as far as speed and feed and thread turning are conserned.
 
Thanks for letting me join this group.  This is my first post and I’m including some pics of my lathe.  Hopefully you guys with more experience than me with these lathes can guide me to a better understanding of my lathe and how to make it work better. 
 
Regards
 
Scott Sunday
 


 


Re: New member introduction

Jim_B
 

Forgot picture. \

 

 

Jim B.

 


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Re: New member introduction

Jim_B
 

Welcome Scott.

Thanks for your initial post.

I wish all our new members would take the time to do that.

If you post your serial number we can give you a good idea of the date of  your lathe.

Your spindle oilers appear to be on the side rather than on the top of the journals.

That dates it to after 1939

Your lathe would be commonly called a Workshop Model C or a Workshop change gear lathe.

Please visit the home page and look into the files section, particularly the “Techinfo” folder which contains a lot of information on your lathe.

 

I have two suggestions for you.

Don’t use the WD-40 as a lathe lubricant. It’s a good fluid for turning Aluminum, but not for the lathe.

 

You may want to consider a shop made chip tray.

Attached is a picture of one I made for a similar lathe. My Lathe dated from 1934.  The base is Melamind covered masonite, similar to what you have on the wall behind your lathe. The edges are just scrap wood. One end is open so you can just slide it out and dump the chips into the dust bin.

 

Merry Christmas, Happy New Year and Be Safe.

Jim B.

 

From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... [mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@...]
Sent: Saturday, December 23, 2017 1:46 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] New member introduction

 

 

Hello

 

My name is Scott Sunday. I joined this group yesterday. I found it as I was looking for information on my lathe. I own a model c9-10jr.  I’ve owned this lathe for several years and have turned a few pieces on it, but nothing that I am real proud of. As a younger man I ran a Clausing Colchester lathe in a machine shop trade class. I sort of remember some of the basics about lathe operation but machine shop was so long ago I have forgotten most of what I was taught. I am strictly a hobbyiest operator.  I use my lathe for making motorcycle parts like wheel spacers or bushings for bikes I am building.  I’m getting ready to start turning some stainless hex stock into bolts for a project because I can’t find the bolts I need anywhere. One of the thinngs I’m hoping to finds an answer to on the forum are about the gears on the back of the lathe and how they work as far as speed and feed and thread turning are conserned.

 


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Motor starting jolt

Oren
 

I finally got my 9b on line, new felts and belts all set. Part of the process included a new Leeson 1hp capacitor start motor, which I was really looking forward to. But, the damn thing starts with such a jolt that it almost seems dangerous for the lathe, or at the least, disruptive to doing close tolerance work. 

I’m thinking I must need a smaller start capacitor, but I don’t see much discussion of this on the internet. Most info is about increasing capacitor size...


Any ideas? Should I try to mount the motor in a non standard way in order to isolate it?

Any advice will be greatly appreciated. 


New member introduction

scott sunday
 

Hello

My name is Scott Sunday. I joined this group yesterday. I found it as I was looking for information on my lathe. I own a model c9-10jr.  I’ve owned this lathe for several years and have turned a few pieces on it, but nothing that I am real proud of. As a younger man I ran a Clausing Colchester lathe in a machine shop trade class. I sort of remember some of the basics about lathe operation but machine shop was so long ago I have forgotten most of what I was taught. I am strictly a hobbyiest operator.  I use my lathe for making motorcycle parts like wheel spacers or bushings for bikes I am building.  I’m getting ready to start turning some stainless hex stock into bolts for a project because I can’t find the bolts I need anywhere. One of the thinngs I’m hoping to finds an answer to on the forum are about the gears on the back of the lathe and how they work as far as speed and feed and thread turning are conserned.

Thanks for letting me join this group.  This is my first post and I’m including some pics of my lathe.  Hopefully you guys with more experience than me with these lathes can guide me to a better understanding of my lathe and how to make it work better. 

Regards

Scott Sunday


Re: Hello from East Texas

Jim_B
 

We can thank Dennis Turk for that one. 

-8
Jim B,

On Dec 22, 2017, at 12:05 PM, 'acmeflyer@...' acmeflyer@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:

 

Thank you for the welcome!
Thank's Jim B. for the link. I did find the plans and got them downloaded and printed. 

Many thanks to the creator and sharing of these files. I seem to remember a reference from the SBL practical Machinist forum but did not see a reference  in the files section. 
Thanks again!


On Wednesday, December 20, 2017, 6:31:35 PM CST, 'Jim B. ' Jim@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:


 

Look here:

https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/SOUTHBENDLATHE/files/SB%20Bench/

 

 

 

Jim B.

 

From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... [mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@...]
Sent: Wednesday, December 20, 2017 3:41 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Hello from East Texas

 

 

Hello to all. I believe this is the first successful logon to the group. Probably my own technical ineptness.

I am a hobby machinist and have a 1933 408Y 8" x 36" South Bend that I have cut my teeth on. I have a lot of fun and try to be safe but I would starve if I had to make a living doing this work. I am so slow! I hope I have learned enough to help with my new project a CL-187ZB. I have it mostly disassembled and hope to start the cleaning, electrolysis, painting and rebuilding as needed. I hope to share some and hopefully tag some of you as a resource.

I am a Corporate Pilot by trade and hopefully 10 years before retirement.This is what I plan to occupy my time after. I live near Longview, Texas if anyone else is in the area.

I originally joined this group to get plans for a period correct bench for my 408 Southbend. I will see if I can access that now.

 

 

Merry Christmas & Happy Holidays

 


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Re: Hello from East Texas

Steve Ligon
 

Thank you for the welcome!
Thank's Jim B. for the link. I did find the plans and got them downloaded and printed. 

Many thanks to the creator and sharing of these files. I seem to remember a reference from the SBL practical Machinist forum but did not see a reference  in the files section. 
Thanks again!


On Wednesday, December 20, 2017, 6:31:35 PM CST, 'Jim B. ' Jim@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] wrote:


 

Look here:

https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/SOUTHBENDLATHE/files/SB%20Bench/

 

 

 

Jim B.

 

From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... [mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@...]
Sent: Wednesday, December 20, 2017 3:41 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Hello from East Texas

 

 

Hello to all. I believe this is the first successful logon to the group. Probably my own technical ineptness.

I am a hobby machinist and have a 1933 408Y 8" x 36" South Bend that I have cut my teeth on. I have a lot of fun and try to be safe but I would starve if I had to make a living doing this work. I am so slow! I hope I have learned enough to help with my new project a CL-187ZB. I have it mostly disassembled and hope to start the cleaning, electrolysis, painting and rebuilding as needed. I hope to share some and hopefully tag some of you as a resource.

I am a Corporate Pilot by trade and hopefully 10 years before retirement.This is what I plan to occupy my time after. I live near Longview, Texas if anyone else is in the area.

I originally joined this group to get plans for a period correct bench for my 408 Southbend. I will see if I can access that now.

 

 

Merry Christmas & Happy Holidays

 


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Re: south bend electric leadscrew [1 Attachment]

Seth Hensel
 

That’s a nice clean modification.  I can think of at least one application I’d use that for:  2 TPI large diameter wood screws.  Apparently running the gear train at that pitch can blow it up.  Running it backwards from the lead screw might work without blowing up the lathe. 

What do you make with that set-up? 


On Dec 22, 2017, at 10:20 AM, kernbigo@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:

 

Here is a picture of my electric lead screw on my south bend 9" wide bed. I have a total invested in it of $27, works good. Power supply off a lap top ,$5, $8 for the controller on ebay, and $14 for the dc motor and gear reducer. Running 19 volts to the motor, with about a 4-1 timing belt gear ratio. 

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