Date   
Re: Attaching A Face Plate

Guenther Paul
 

Yes use a 4 jaw indicate the bore and create more relief so the plate goes on all the way. you can test it by removing the 4 jaw with the plate still in it.After you get the plate to go on all the way remove it from the chuck face the plate and true cut the OD of the plate. I would not play around on a mill 
 
GP



From: "Nelson Collar nel2lar@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]"
To: "kernbigo@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]"
Sent: Thursday, December 7, 2017 1:28 PM
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Attaching A Face Plate

 
If the metal is cut away on the mill you will have a better chance to true it up by mounting the face of the face plate and it can be cut accurately and measured. If done on the lathe there is always a chance it is not on straight. After cutting use bluing to check for high spots and hand scrape them until parallel. I have tried to adjust an old chuck mounting plate just to make it worse.   
Nelson

On Thursday, December 7, 2017, 9:40:36 AM EST, kernbigo@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] wrote:


 
why use a mill put the face plate on back wards bore out a few threads, reverse it and if it goes on all the way , now face cut it and it should work fine 


Re: Attaching A Face Plate

Nelson Collar
 

If the metal is cut away on the mill you will have a better chance to true it up by mounting the face of the face plate and it can be cut accurately and measured. If done on the lathe there is always a chance it is not on straight. After cutting use bluing to check for high spots and hand scrape them until parallel. I have tried to adjust an old chuck mounting plate just to make it worse.   
Nelson

On Thursday, December 7, 2017, 9:40:36 AM EST, kernbigo@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] wrote:


 

why use a mill put the face plate on back wards bore out a few threads, reverse it and if it goes on all the way , now face cut it and it should work fine 

Re: Attaching A Face Plate

Jim_B
 

But it could be tight on the registration bore. 
Need to see what is tight first. 

-8
Jim B,

On Dec 7, 2017, at 9:40 AM, kernbigo@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:

 

why use a mill put the face plate on back wards bore out a few threads, reverse it and if it goes on all the way , now face cut it and it should work fine 

Re: Attaching A Face Plate

oscar kern
 

why use a mill put the face plate on back wards bore out a few threads, reverse it and if it goes on all the way , now face cut it and it should work fine 

Re: Attaching A Face Plate

Jim_B
 

There are two or three lines of thought here. 
One says butting against the step is what aligns the faceplate/Chuck. Another says it’s the unthreaded section on the spindle just before the step. But for this you need a tight fit on the registration diameter. 
If you do not but up to the step, even if the plate runs true, you take the chance that the plate will move      or even get stuck. 
If you use a ring it should have parallel faces. 
Better to find out what is tight. 
Try using Prussian Blue to sort out what is tight. 


-8
Jim B,

On Dec 6, 2017, at 10:04 PM, Stephen Bartlett tower.op@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:

 

I am looking at a boring job using the face plate that came with my 9C.
I have not had occasion to use this face plate before.

When I screw the plate onto the spindle, it runs out of thread leaving
about 1/8 inch gap between the back of the face plate hub and the step
face of the spindle, so only the threads are stopping the screwing of
the face plate on the spindle.

Would it be advisable to have a shim between the face plate hub and the
spindle face so that the face plate will be seated before it runs out of
thread?

I am uncomfortable with the idea of having the end of threads stop the
motion of the face plate.

Thanks,

Steve Bartlett

Re: Attaching A Face Plate

Nelson Collar
 

Stephen
If you have a mill, place the face plate, face side down on the bed and use indicators to dial it in then use a boring head to remove the threads that are restricting the seat. This will make the short step so the face plate would register on the spindle. The thread will not set a face plate true it must tighten to the register which make it align. After doing that you might need to take a fine pass over the face on the lathe to true it up.
Good Luck
Nelson  

On Wednesday, December 6, 2017, 10:04:05 PM EST, Stephen Bartlett tower.op@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] wrote:


 

I am looking at a boring job using the face plate that came with my 9C.
I have not had occasion to use this face plate before.

When I screw the plate onto the spindle, it runs out of thread leaving
about 1/8 inch gap between the back of the face plate hub and the step
face of the spindle, so only the threads are stopping the screwing of
the face plate on the spindle.

Would it be advisable to have a shim between the face plate hub and the
spindle face so that the face plate will be seated before it runs out of
thread?

I am uncomfortable with the idea of having the end of threads stop the
motion of the face plate.

Thanks,

Steve Bartlett

Re: Attaching A Face Plate

ww_big_al
 

I think I would  place the shim in as you suggested. Even better would be to install an oversize shim and use a boring bar to increase the depth of your thread. Doing that would allow the plate to rest directly on the spindle stop.

Al

 

From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... [mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@...]
Sent: Wednesday, December 6, 2017 10:04 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Attaching A Face Plate

 

 

I am looking at a boring job using the face plate that came with my 9C.
I have not had occasion to use this face plate before.

When I screw the plate onto the spindle, it runs out of thread leaving
about 1/8 inch gap between the back of the face plate hub and the step
face of the spindle, so only the threads are stopping the screwing of
the face plate on the spindle.

Would it be advisable to have a shim between the face plate hub and the
spindle face so that the face plate will be seated before it runs out of
thread?

I am uncomfortable with the idea of having the end of threads stop the
motion of the face plate.

Thanks,

Steve Bartlett

Attaching A Face Plate

Stephen Bartlett
 

I am looking at a boring job using the face plate that came with my 9C. I have not had occasion to use this face plate before.

When I screw the plate onto the spindle, it runs out of thread leaving about 1/8 inch gap between the back of the face plate hub and the step face of the spindle, so only the threads are stopping the screwing of the face plate on the spindle.

Would it be advisable to have a shim between the face plate hub and the spindle face so that the face plate will be seated before it runs out of thread?

I am uncomfortable with the idea of having the end of threads stop the motion of the face plate.

Thanks,

Steve Bartlett

Re: step collet - 3c

Jim_B
 

I found these pictures of a project.

The seats on my MG are fastened to the (wooden) floor with special T-Nuts.

I made some out of 303/304 SS.

 

First I machined a step. This is a 3C directly inserted into the collet holder of a 9” workshop lathe.

You can see the brass shims setting the gap. That is a 0.875 by 0.040 step.

 

 

Then I faced the blank and bored the center hole. The blank had been parted off a round bar.

 

 

Jim B.

 


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SB-1002 Owners?

borpe2008
 

There aren't many of us SB-1002 owners. I know of only three, including Doug Ripka, author of the article "Review and Teardown of the South Bend SB-1002 — the "New" 10K Lathe", in HSM, [July/August 2017].


We would like to gather a mailing list of SB-1002 owners, to exchange tips and information.

If you're an owner of the SB-1002, please get in touch with me by private message.



Re: SB Lathe 9 x 36 Mod# CL 277Y Ser# 43116NBR9

Steve Wells
 


43078NKR9, 9/12/1958,  9, 3.5, Z, Workshop-9A, CL344-Z, UMD, FFA, QCG,
43100N,                         ,  9,      ,    , Workshop-9   ,                ,         ,        ,          ,
43116NBR9,       ,  9, 3,  Y, Workshop-9B ,CL277-Y FL-LEGS, HMD, FFA, SCG
43200N,       ,  9     
43300N,       ,  9     
43400N,       ,  9     
43482NBR9,       ,  9,   ,    ,  ,Workshop-9B, CL677   
43500N,       ,  9       
43511NAX9, 12/12/1958, 9, 3, Y, Workshop-9A, CL644-Y 12 spd, HMD, FFA, QCG

Re: SB Lathe 9 x 36 Mod# CL 277Y Ser# 43116NBR9

Steve Wells
 



SN in subject line; looks as if maybe 1959 or so???   Ser# 43116NBR9

9/58 TO 10/58
 
Steve
 
 

Re: SB 9" vs Sherline

Paul Alciatore
 

I have a SB9 and an Unimat, which is similar in size to the Sherline. I think one reason for a good finish on the Unimat is just a factor of scale: the machine is smaller so the errors are smaller. I can get a good surface on the SB if I do it right. There are many factors and the headstock bearings are only two of them. All the other adjustments must be made properly: carriage, cross feed, compound, etc. Another factor is the tool holder. I made my own and I think it is a lot sturdier than any of the others.

http://www.homemadetools.net/forum/quick-change-tool-post-lathe-52118#post75787

Another factor that many do not consider is the consistency of the feed rate. I had trouble with the finish on some parts with a facing cut. I found that by making an attachable, accessory handle for the cross feed handle with a much larger radius, I was able to get a MUCH better finish. The feed rate was a lot more constant and it showed in the parts. This could be done on the carriage movements also. Of course, if you have power feed that should do much the same thing.

Re: Material for replacement gib, SB 9 cross slide

ds-in-wa
 

It's a little embarrassing, but just a little better searching would have answered my question without having to post it.  A search on "gib material" yielded several posts by Dennis Turk in which he says that the original material was cold rolled steel, and that for making replacements he uses either O-1 or W-1 ground stock, or flat ground low carbon steel.

dsymes 

Re: New subscriber

john kling
 

I visit the round house at the Henry Ford[museum]  Greenfield Village in Dearborn Mi on occasion. There they have assembled some very large and some special purpose lathe for maintenance on engines including the large wheels. They also as I recall have old large shapers and other machines. Do you have any big iron?

Re: New subscriber

Stuart <stu482002@...>
 

Hi Jim B,

I'll take photos on Tuesday evening and examine it for identifying marks.

Stuart


On Friday, 1 December 2017, 15:32, "Jim Jim@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" wrote:


 
Welcome Stuart. 

Please post a picture. 
Also look for a serial number on the tailstock end between the front ways. 
We/you can date it from that. 
Also measure the swing. 

-8
Jim B,

On Dec 1, 2017, at 1:53 AM, Stuart stu482002@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:

 
Hello,

My name is Stuart. I have been interested in engineering for most of my life. I'm retired now and spend a fair bit of time in one workshop or another. I work at the Gwili Railway's Carriage and Wagon Department ( http://www.gwili-railway.co.uk/ ) doing repair and renovation work to carriages and wagons, as well as looking after the stores. I'm also a member of the Ferryside Men's Shed ( available on Facebook ) where I have taken up organising and maintaining the engineering area - most of the work done by members there is woodwork but there is interest in engineering and I hope that with properly working equipment the interest will grow.

I am currently working at refurbishing three lathes at the Men's Shed and while researching one of them found that it's a South Bend lathe - or one that was made to look just like a South Bend lathe! I came across this Yahoo Group while searching the 'net for information on South Bend lathes, and thought it might prove a useful resource.

I can't give more information about our lathe yet, but next Tuesday I'll take another, closer look at it, and see just what model it might be. I'll get some photos too that might help with identification.

Stuart




Re: gibs

Jim_B
 

CI would provide better lubrication than steel, but the gib on the SB is very thin. I am afraid CI would easily brake at that thickness.

I do believe that SB used, at least on my (Former) 405 dating from 1934 some form of steel. It would need to be straight flat and smooth. If not ground lapped on a glass plate.

 

You said it’s a 9” from 1934. There were several series of 9” lathes, the first Workshop and the older Wide bed were the most common.

What kind are you working on.

Is the gib straight or tapered. ( And I don’t know if tapered gibs appeared that early!)

 

 

Jim B.

 

From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... [mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@...]
Sent: Sunday, December 03, 2017 9:18 AM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] gibs

 

 

low carbon ground stock will work just fine 


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gibs

oscar kern
 

low carbon ground stock will work just fine 

Re: Material for replacement gib, SB 9 cross slide

armne@sbcglobal.net <armne@...>
 

Wow what did SB use ? 


)(

Re: Material for replacement gib, SB 9 cross slide

m. allan noah
 

None of the above- cast iron, or, if you are feeling flush with cash, bronze.

allan

On Sat, Dec 2, 2017 at 9:42 PM, dsymes@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:
 

I'm scraping in the cross slide and compound on my 1934 South Bend 9" lathe.  Rather than straighten, lap, then grind the cross slide gib, making a replacement from flat ground stock seems like a better idea.  However, I'm not sure which material would be most appropriate: O-1, or low carbon 1018?  Any advice appreciated.


Douglas


  




--
"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge of my hand"