Date   

Re: Rapid AM toolpost, does it fit on a SB heavy 10?

armne@sbcglobal.net <armne@...>
 

 No I havent bought one yet but 200.00 for tool post with 3 holders seems a great deal

Aa Set
Price:200.00USD
Standard set:1 set including 5 pieces
1 x Aa toolpost,3 x AaD1250,1 x AaH1250
Click "MORE" to visit Technic Data and Parameter.



From: "paulguenter@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]"
To: "SOUTHBENDLATHE@..."
Sent: Monday, March 6, 2017 1:17 PM
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Rapid AM toolpost, does it fit on a SB heavy 10?

 
I bet you paid a tall dollar
 
GP



From: "silverrs@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]"
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Sent: Monday, March 6, 2017 2:29 PM
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Rapid AM toolpost, does it fit on a SB heavy 10?

 
After checking out the net for information on the AXA Multifix. Decided to buy a AXA Multifix Type A including 4 holders, made in Germeny, no Chinese copy. It came in last saterday and after some modifications it fits the original toolpost. So now both type toolpostholders can be used on the lathe.





Re: Rapid AM toolpost, does it fit on a SB heavy 10?

Guenther Paul
 

I bet you paid a tall dollar
 
GP



From: "silverrs@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]"
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Sent: Monday, March 6, 2017 2:29 PM
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Rapid AM toolpost, does it fit on a SB heavy 10?

 
After checking out the net for information on the AXA Multifix. Decided to buy a AXA Multifix Type A including 4 holders, made in Germeny, no Chinese copy. It came in last saterday and after some modifications it fits the original toolpost. So now both type toolpostholders can be used on the lathe.



Re: headstock stock run out?

Nfwood
 

Go onto eBay and buy one or more, clean them up and learn.  

Nelson W.


-----Original Message-----
From: johnnyblock1@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE
Sent: Mon, Mar 6, 2017 1:19 pm
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] headstock stock run out?



Bill, where did you find a school that teaches machining? I have been looking for one for a long time. By the way, I don't think you have to justify buying a super precision, beautiful tool that will last you the rest of yours and your children's lives if taken care of. If you can afford it, buy it.


Re: Rapid AM toolpost, does it fit on a SB heavy 10?

Ruud
 

After checking out the net for information on the AXA Multifix. Decided to buy a AXA Multifix Type A including 4 holders, made in Germeny, no Chinese copy. It came in last saterday and after some modifications it fits the original toolpost. So now both type toolpostholders can be used on the lathe.


Re: headstock stock run out?

John Gallo
 

Bill, where did you find a school that teaches machining? I have been looking for one for a long time. By the way, I don't think you have to justify buying a super precision, beautiful tool that will last you the rest of yours and your children's lives if taken care of. If you can afford it, buy it.


Map of SB owners

Flash Gordon
 

Here is a map of some of he owners of SB lathes. I post this every so often so you can add you location if you like.

It is up to you to add your marker. We do not do it. It is a public site so do not add to much info.

https://www.zeemaps.com/South_Bend_Lathe_Owners_Map

Ed S



Re: headstock stock run out?

ken campbell
 

remember to allow for the bending away from your cutting tool the work piece ... a general rule is that stock should not be unsupported more than 2 to 3 diameters from the chuck . the result of the vector of the cutting force is that the outboard end is larger ...it bends away from the cutter more.

either support the outboard end, or cut at a remedial angle ... according to the tolerance you need . even threading with many passes can show tapered threads ....

wider tolerances can be our friend .... but still unplanned tapered cuts leave us a little depressed .....we know they are there .

so include in your testing kit some known straight ground shafts to sweep when " chucked " .

ken


Re: headstock stock run out?

William R Meyers <wmrmeyers@...>
 

You have better equipment than I own. My tenths mike is a Harbor Freight. I've tested it against the good set of gage blocks at school and it's accurate to its specified limits, but who knows how long it will last. OTH when I got it, it was better than I am. :) I'm doing better and hope one day soon to be able to justify upgrading. When I got it, a year and a half or so ago, I was afraid I'd ruin a better quality tool. I have since learned better technique, and developed a better feel for the "right" amount of pressure to get a good measurement. Maybe I won't be so ham-handed when I finally get good measuring tools.




Bill in OKC
William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)

Guard your women and children well,
Send These Bastards Back to Hell
We'll teach them the ways of war,
They Won't Come Here Any More
Use your shield and use your head,
Fight till Every One is Dead
Raise the flag up to the sky,
How Many of Them Can We Make Die!

Heather Alexander, March of Cambredth

--------------------------------------------

On Mon, 3/6/17, johnnyblock1@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:

Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] headstock stock run out?
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Date: Monday, March 6, 2017, 2:21 AM

I am using a Starrett
micrometer with .0001 graduations. I repeated the
measurements enough times to be confident of the values.
Also, after testing a 3 inch piece, the difference was
pretty much 3 times the results of the 1 inch piece. I
certainly am no expert, but this is pretty clear.

Normally I wouldn't worry
about a .0005 tolerance. However, the plans for the  small
IC engine I am building call for the piston to be no more
than .0012 smaller than the cylinder. With an inch and a
half long cylinder, a .0007 difference in diameters to start
with seems to be too much.


Please feel free to correct
me if I am missing some thing here. I am teaching myself and
can use all the help I can get. Thanks, John.


Re: Newbie (New Member, New to me South Bend)

Flash Gordon
 

Don,

Method 2. I have not tried this but I have heard good things about it. See attached:

At 09:39 AM 3/6/2017, you wrote:



If the table top is not nice and flat, what is the procedure for leveling, or mounting the lathe so that bed twist is not an issue?

Thanks for the suggestion!
Don


Re: Newbie (New Member, New to me South Bend)

Nick Jonkman
 

Hi guys
Attached is a photo of the bench I built for my 9A. It is very rigid and has lots of weight too. Legs are 2" square tubing 3/16 wall, plates are 1/4" and 3/16" for the webs. The shelf is 6 or 8" channel iron so all in all very rigid. The tool box loaded probably weighs another 150 or more pounds. Top frame around the tool box is heavy 2 1/2" angle iron. I get no flex and was able level and maintain that once set up. There is only one leg on the right end and four on the left side. I have the four legs leveled and then brought the single leg up to match the height. Works great.
Nick


Re: Newbie (New Member, New to me South Bend)

Don Hubbard
 

Thanks Eddie.

Flat, rigid and vibration damping. More things to consider when I get around to building the bench.

Thanks again,
Don


Re: Newbie (New Member, New to me South Bend)

eddie.draper@btinternet.com
 

There are 3 issues here, which should not be confused with each other, namely mass, stiffness and damping.

If something rings when you hit it, it doesn't contain much damping.  If it just goes thud or squelch, it has lots.  Concrete damps much better than steel, as, incidentally, does cast iron.  All 3 together can help if your machining problem is vibration.

If your machining problem is persuading your machine to maintain alignment despite a built in natural tendency to do otherwise, then the only necessary parameter in its mounting is stiffness, so it can be forced into shape rather than it forcing its flimsy foundation into its preferred shape.  Beware wood, as while it is thermally stable, its shape changes with humidity, to quite a significant extent, so it and high precision are mutually exclusive.  To be honest, for a hobby lathe, a rectangular framework of substantial angle iron, having diagonals in both directions in every plane, attached close to the holding down points for the machine, ought to be stiff enough to provide the required result.  I would recomend bolting rather than welding, as welded articles change shape over years due to their working stresses stress relieving the welds (unless you have a big enough and hot enough oven in which it can be stress relieved!).

Granite (the type of rock does matter) is used for high precision surface plates as it is more stable than the common alternative, cast iron.  It can also be used for the guide ways of the sorts of machine tools that are part of a building.

Eddie



From: "don.hubbard@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]"
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Sent: Monday, 6 March 2017, 14:39
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Newbie (New Member, New to me South Bend)

 
Thanks Ed! 

I have read that adding a concrete base to an existing table was a recommended solution for these smaller lathes such that they could more easily build high tolerance parts for the war effort. A 3" thick concrete slab and a 1" steel plate weigh about the same. I don't know which I worry about more... my ability to pour a flat slab on concrete or prying my wallet open enough to pay for a 1" thick slab of CRS!  :)

If the table top is not nice and flat, what is the procedure for leveling, or mounting the lathe so that bed twist is not an issue?

Thanks for the suggestion!
Don 
 


---In SOUTHBENDLATHE@..., wrote :

Hi Don,

If you are going to make a steel leg table then you would want to add more mass o the top. Many machine shops have a large stone that is ground and used for measuring and refererence. And they are very expensive. With that in mind way not pour a concrete table top. Just build a box on top of the legs and fill it with ready mix concrete. It will not be perfectly flat but gravity will make it pretty close to level.






 At 11:05 PM 3/5/2017, you wrote:


Hi All,


I've been in the process of building a workshop for a while now... and while the workshop project has been slowly dragging along, I have collected so ut me equipment. I found a refurbished Benchmaster mill and a South Bend lathe. My South Bend lathe is a 9", 3.5', catalog no. 480ZN and serial no. 70504, which I've calculated to be, roughly, 1935 +/-.


It looks very much like the "480Z" lathe on page 11 of this 1933 catalog: http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/1617/3753.pdf

But, I haven't yet found a catalog with a 480ZN lathe. I have no idea what the N indicates. However, this pic has made me think that I should paint it black as opposed to a gray-green.


I'm in Central Texas, i.e. a desert for used vintage lathes and the machine I purchased looks reasonably good and mostly unabused, but was a little looser than I had hoped... oh well, I'll have an excuse to go through it! Reconditioning this lathe will be a learning experience for me. I haven't used a lathe in quite a long time either... 


I'll also have to build a bench for it. Welded steel frame. But, I have no idea what I'll do for the top. I had been thinking that I'd use butcher block, but then I've read that more mass might be better... maybe ~1" steel plate? Suggestions?


The workshop will be a hobby space and the lathe will be used to make random bits, mostly to support my motorcycle and car habit. I still have a bit more work to do on the shop space, but I should be able to dive into the South Bend sometime in the next few months.


If anyone has a 480ZN, or has rebuilt a 480ZN, I would really appreciate a link to it, if possible!


Thanks in advance!

Don

 

 





Re: Newbie (New Member, New to me South Bend)

Don Hubbard
 

Thanks Ed! 

I have read that adding a concrete base to an existing table was a recommended solution for these smaller lathes such that they could more easily build high tolerance parts for the war effort. A 3" thick concrete slab and a 1" steel plate weigh about the same. I don't know which I worry about more... my ability to pour a flat slab on concrete or prying my wallet open enough to pay for a 1" thick slab of CRS!  :)

If the table top is not nice and flat, what is the procedure for leveling, or mounting the lathe so that bed twist is not an issue?

Thanks for the suggestion!
Don 
 


---In SOUTHBENDLATHE@..., <eschwerkolt@...> wrote :

Hi Don,

If you are going to make a steel leg table then you would want to add more mass o the top. Many machine shops have a large stone that is ground and used for measuring and refererence. And they are very expensive. With that in mind way not pour a concrete table top. Just build a box on top of the legs and fill it with ready mix concrete. It will not be perfectly flat but gravity will make it pretty close to level.






 At 11:05 PM 3/5/2017, you wrote:


Hi All,


I've been in the process of building a workshop for a while now... and while the workshop project has been slowly dragging along, I have collected so ut me equipment. I found a refurbished Benchmaster mill and a South Bend lathe. My South Bend lathe is a 9", 3.5', catalog no. 480ZN and serial no. 70504, which I've calculated to be, roughly, 1935 +/-.


It looks very much like the "480Z" lathe on page 11 of this 1933 catalog: http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/1617/3753.pdf

But, I haven't yet found a catalog with a 480ZN lathe. I have no idea what the N indicates. However, this pic has made me think that I should paint it black as opposed to a gray-green.


I'm in Central Texas, i.e. a desert for used vintage lathes and the machine I purchased looks reasonably good and mostly unabused, but was a little looser than I had hoped... oh well, I'll have an excuse to go through it! Reconditioning this lathe will be a learning experience for me. I haven't used a lathe in quite a long time either... 


I'll also have to build a bench for it. Welded steel frame. But, I have no idea what I'll do for the top. I had been thinking that I'd use butcher block, but then I've read that more mass might be better... maybe ~1" steel plate? Suggestions?


The workshop will be a hobby space and the lathe will be used to make random bits, mostly to support my motorcycle and car habit. I still have a bit more work to do on the shop space, but I should be able to dive into the South Bend sometime in the next few months.


If anyone has a 480ZN, or has rebuilt a 480ZN, I would really appreciate a link to it, if possible!


Thanks in advance!

Don

 

 



Re: Newbie (New Member, New to me South Bend)

Don Hubbard
 

Thanks Allan!


---In SOUTHBENDLATHE@..., <kitno455@...> wrote :

Don- during that period, the 'N' indicated that the lathe shipped with an adjustable horizontal motor drive, instead of an overhead lineshaft. See this price list:

http://www.wswells.com/data/catalog/1934_price_list_No6/album/slides/scan0001.html

allan

On Sun, Mar 5, 2017 at 11:05 PM, don.hubbard@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:
 

Hi All,


I've been in the process of building a workshop for a while now... and while the workshop project has been slowly dragging along, I have collected some equipment. I found a refurbished Benchmaster mill and a South Bend lathe. My South Bend lathe is a 9", 3.5', catalog no. 480ZN and serial no. 70504, which I've calculated to be, roughly, 1935 +/-


It looks very much like the "480Z" lathe on page 11 of this 1933 catalog: http:// vintagemachinery.org/pubs/ 1617/3753.pdf 

But, I haven't yet found a catalog with a 480ZN lathe. I have no idea what the N indicates. However, this pic has made me think that I should paint it black as opposed to a gray-green. 


I'm in Central Texas, i.e. a desert for used vintage lathes and the machine I purchased looks reasonably good and mostly unabused, but was a little looser than I had hoped... oh well, I'll have an excuse to go through it! Reconditioning this lathe will be a learning experience for me. I haven't used a lathe in quite a long time either...  


I'll also have to build a bench for it. Welded steel frame. But, I have no idea what I'll do for the top. I had been thinking that I'd use butcher block, but then I've read that more mass might be better... maybe ~1" steel plate? Suggestions?


The workshop will be a hobby space and the lathe will be used to make random bits, mostly to support my motorcycle and car habit. I still have a bit more work to do on the shop space, but I should be able to dive into the South Bend sometime in the next few months.


If anyone has a 480ZN, or has rebuilt a 480ZN, I would really appreciate a link to it, if possible!


Thanks in advance! 

Don

 

 




--
"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge of my hand"


Re: Newbie (New Member, New to me South Bend)

m. allan noah
 

Don- during that period, the 'N' indicated that the lathe shipped with an adjustable horizontal motor drive, instead of an overhead lineshaft. See this price list:

http://www.wswells.com/data/catalog/1934_price_list_No6/album/slides/scan0001.html

allan

On Sun, Mar 5, 2017 at 11:05 PM, don.hubbard@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:
 

Hi All,


I've been in the process of building a workshop for a while now... and while the workshop project has been slowly dragging along, I have collected some equipment. I found a refurbished Benchmaster mill and a South Bend lathe. My South Bend lathe is a 9", 3.5', catalog no. 480ZN and serial no. 70504, which I've calculated to be, roughly, 1935 +/-


It looks very much like the "480Z" lathe on page 11 of this 1933 catalog: http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/1617/3753.pdf 

But, I haven't yet found a catalog with a 480ZN lathe. I have no idea what the N indicates. However, this pic has made me think that I should paint it black as opposed to a gray-green. 


I'm in Central Texas, i.e. a desert for used vintage lathes and the machine I purchased looks reasonably good and mostly unabused, but was a little looser than I had hoped... oh well, I'll have an excuse to go through it! Reconditioning this lathe will be a learning experience for me. I haven't used a lathe in quite a long time either...  


I'll also have to build a bench for it. Welded steel frame. But, I have no idea what I'll do for the top. I had been thinking that I'd use butcher block, but then I've read that more mass might be better... maybe ~1" steel plate? Suggestions?


The workshop will be a hobby space and the lathe will be used to make random bits, mostly to support my motorcycle and car habit. I still have a bit more work to do on the shop space, but I should be able to dive into the South Bend sometime in the next few months.


If anyone has a 480ZN, or has rebuilt a 480ZN, I would really appreciate a link to it, if possible!


Thanks in advance! 

Don

 

 




--
"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge of my hand"


Re: headstock stock run out?

John Gallo
 

I am using a Starrett micrometer with .0001 graduations. I repeated the measurements enough times to be confident of the values. Also, after testing a 3 inch piece, the difference was pretty much 3 times the results of the 1 inch piece. I certainly am no expert, but this is pretty clear.

Normally I wouldn't worry about a .0005 tolerance. However, the plans for the  small IC engine I am building call for the piston to be no more than .0012 smaller than the cylinder. With an inch and a half long cylinder, a .0007 difference in diameters to start with seems to be too much.

Please feel free to correct me if I am missing some thing here. I am teaching myself and can use all the help I can get. Thanks, John.


Re: Newbie (New Member, New to me South Bend)

Flash Gordon
 

Hi Don,

If you are going to make a steel leg table then you would want to add more mass o the top. Many machine shops have a large stone that is ground and used for measuring and refererence. And they are very expensive. With that in mind way not pour a concrete table top. Just build a box on top of the legs and fill it with ready mix concrete. It will not be perfectly flat but gravity will make it pretty close to level.






 At 11:05 PM 3/5/2017, you wrote:


Hi All,


I've been in the process of building a workshop for a while now... and while the workshop project has been slowly dragging along, I have collected so ut me equipment. I found a refurbished Benchmaster mill and a South Bend lathe. My South Bend lathe is a 9", 3.5', catalog no. 480ZN and serial no. 70504, which I've calculated to be, roughly, 1935 +/-.


It looks very much like the "480Z" lathe on page 11 of this 1933 catalog: http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/1617/3753.pdf

But, I haven't yet found a catalog with a 480ZN lathe. I have no idea what the N indicates. However, this pic has made me think that I should paint it black as opposed to a gray-green.


I'm in Central Texas, i.e. a desert for used vintage lathes and the machine I purchased looks reasonably good and mostly unabused, but was a little looser than I had hoped... oh well, I'll have an excuse to go through it! Reconditioning this lathe will be a learning experience for me. I haven't used a lathe in quite a long time either... 


I'll also have to build a bench for it. Welded steel frame. But, I have no idea what I'll do for the top. I had been thinking that I'd use butcher block, but then I've read that more mass might be better... maybe ~1" steel plate? Suggestions?


The workshop will be a hobby space and the lathe will be used to make random bits, mostly to support my motorcycle and car habit. I still have a bit more work to do on the shop space, but I should be able to dive into the South Bend sometime in the next few months.


If anyone has a 480ZN, or has rebuilt a 480ZN, I would really appreciate a link to it, if possible!


Thanks in advance!

Don

 

 



Newbie (New Member, New to me South Bend)

Don Hubbard
 

Hi All,


I've been in the process of building a workshop for a while now... and while the workshop project has been slowly dragging along, I have collected some equipment. I found a refurbished Benchmaster mill and a South Bend lathe. My South Bend lathe is a 9", 3.5', catalog no. 480ZN and serial no. 70504, which I've calculated to be, roughly, 1935 +/-


It looks very much like the "480Z" lathe on page 11 of this 1933 catalog: http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/1617/3753.pdf 

But, I haven't yet found a catalog with a 480ZN lathe. I have no idea what the N indicates. However, this pic has made me think that I should paint it black as opposed to a gray-green. 


I'm in Central Texas, i.e. a desert for used vintage lathes and the machine I purchased looks reasonably good and mostly unabused, but was a little looser than I had hoped... oh well, I'll have an excuse to go through it! Reconditioning this lathe will be a learning experience for me. I haven't used a lathe in quite a long time either...  


I'll also have to build a bench for it. Welded steel frame. But, I have no idea what I'll do for the top. I had been thinking that I'd use butcher block, but then I've read that more mass might be better... maybe ~1" steel plate? Suggestions?


The workshop will be a hobby space and the lathe will be used to make random bits, mostly to support my motorcycle and car habit. I still have a bit more work to do on the shop space, but I should be able to dive into the South Bend sometime in the next few months.


If anyone has a 480ZN, or has rebuilt a 480ZN, I would really appreciate a link to it, if possible!


Thanks in advance! 

Don

 

 


Re: headstock stock run out?

Nelson Collar
 

Johnny
I'm no pro but a half of a thousandths on an old machine to me is good. A light emery sanding and knock the half thousand away. 
My opinion
Nelson



From: "johnnyblock1@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]"
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Sent: Sunday, March 5, 2017 12:32 PM
Subject: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] headstock stock run out?

 
Hi, my 9a is cutting a taper with a piece of 3/4 steel held in a 4 jaw chuck. Over a 1 inch long cut the dimension near the head stock is consistently .0005" less than a measurement 1 inch further towards the tail stock. This seems excessive but I don't know how to proceed. Are there any other tests I should do to confirm the taper, and if it is indeed off, how do I go about fixing it?

The lathe seems to be in great shape. After I bought it, the only thing I did to it was to take the spindle out and replace the felts. It turned out that it wasn't necessary as the old ones were fine. I didn't touch the shim packs, The spindle runs in bronze bushings and the deflection was .001 when doing the 2 foot bar test.

I really am at a loss as to what to do next, and any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks, John.



Re: headstock stock run out?

William R Meyers <wmrmeyers@...>
 

I am not an expert machinist. I'm a student. Feel free to ignore me. What are you using to measure your .0005" difference? What graduations is your measuring tool graduated in? Do you have enough experience in making close tolerance measurements to actually make a consistant measurement in that range? I am really asking "Are you and your tools really capable of making such a measurement?"

I have been going to school for over two years now and am just beginning to develop the physical skills to consistantly make such measurements. I also have very few tools capable of those measurements, too. When I think I need them I have to use the school equipment. And only one of my micrometers is rated to read in .0001" increments.

What kind of measurement do you get when you cut a 4" length? Oh, and is your surface after cutting smooth enough to trust that .0005" measurement. If you measure the diameter at the same location but 90 degrees around the stock do you get the same reading?

Those are things I have to evaluate on everything I do.

HTH!

Bill in OKC
William R. Meyers, MSgt, USAF(Ret.)

Guard your women and children well,
Send These Bastards Back to Hell
We'll teach them the ways of war,
They Won't Come Here Any More
Use your shield and use your head,
Fight till Every One is Dead
Raise the flag up to the sky,
How Many of Them Can We Make Die!

Heather Alexander, March of Cambredth

--------------------------------------------

On Sun, 3/5/17, johnnyblock1@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:

Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] headstock stock run out?
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Date: Sunday, March 5, 2017, 12:38 PM

George, I switched the
work to a 3 jaw chuck and took a light cut. There was no
measurable difference in the two test diameters. I know I
took a light cut when it was in the 4 jaw and it was out
.0005. Is it possible that there was some sort of spring in
the jaws due to them not being perfectly square to the
stock? I know that when truing up work in the 4 jaw with a
dial indicator the dial will suddenly jump a few thou when I
slacken one jaw. Might this have some thing to do with it?
Thanks for your input, John.

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