Date   

Re: What year model lathe does this serial number reflect?

Steve Wells
 


Yes, the A's were all O series 9" Juniors starting in 1928 sometime, could be the same thing, having the newer headstock.
 
Steve Wells

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, April 01, 2016 8:00 PM
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] What year model lathe does this serial number reflect?

 

For some reason in the late 20's and early 30's, a number of SB lathes had either an 'A' or an 'S' at the end of the serial number. I have no idea what it means. 47036S sounds like mid to late 1930. It is probably a wide bed 9", either a Jr or a Series O.

allan

On Fri, Apr 1, 2016 at 6:50 PM, nick@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:
 

Hi there -

I am looking at a 9" South Bend lathe that that has a 12" distance between centers. It looks like to my novice eye a cross between a 10" and a 9"  Its serial number is 47036S

Thoughts?

Thank you

-Nick





--
"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge of my hand"


Re: What year model lathe does this serial number reflect?

Steve Wells
 


the s stamped at the front of the serial number were special low cost 10" lathes in the early 20's. the S stamped after the serial were
mostly all silent chain overhead drives in the base model 80, 9"...80...380...1080 with the newer headstock on floor legs.
 
Steve Wells
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, April 01, 2016 6:50 PM
Subject: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] What year model lathe does this serial number reflect?

 

Hi there -

I am looking at a 9" South Bend lathe that that has a 12" distance between centers. It looks like to my novice eye a cross between a 10" and a 9"  Its serial number is 47036S

Thoughts?

Thank you

-Nick



Re: 1925 11 x 5 spindle/bearing wear/grooves/clearance issues....

Steve Wells
 


Take the shells out and check for shims under them. if the front has them take them out and shim under the caps evenly.
If the rear has no shims, shim them to correct the clearence, then file the tops of the shells flush so the caps can be shimmed as required.
check your spindle alignment with a test bar and shim under the shells to correct....repeat... blue the shells and and check for egging on the back side
toward the belt tension side. you will have to scrape if they are way out and need more surface contact. the older lathes require a little more clearence
and should'nt run over 600 rpm for extended periods, 200-300 is a normal high end speed. total loss oil systems run out of oil quickly without drip oilers.
 
Steve Wells
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, March 31, 2016 5:47 PM
Subject: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] 1925 11 x 5 spindle/bearing wear/grooves/clearance issues....

 

I'm working on my 1925 11x5 and have an issue with my spindle bearings. Was hoping to get some expert advice. I took some measurements and also some pics (also posted this issue on another forum, so some of you might have already seen it). Using the bar method shown in the SB manual, I measured no more than 0.0005" (1/2 thousandths) play on the front spindle (front being by the threaded chuck side). So it appeared to be pretty tight and possibly in need of a shim or two in the front. But on the back side, this time I noticed obvious play. I put the indicator on it and measured a full 5 thousandths (0.005"), which obviously is excessive. There are no shims on either cap, so they are essentially bottomed out. 


I then removed the caps and gently removed the spindle and had a look (see pics). I do see some scoring that seems to correlate well with that shown in the bearing cap pictures. The front spindle has light scoring similar to that seen on the front bearing journal. You can feel it by running your fingernail across the surface. Not horrible, but there. The rear spindle had more significant scoring, again proportional to what is seen in the rear bearing journal. I took new pics of everything so you can see below. The rear one is definitely going to need work of some type. I't possible the spindle needs polishing on both ends too. Not sure if that's something I should attempt myself or sub out or even do at all? Any advice or suggestions would be appreciated.


http://i289.photobucket.com/albums/ll224/my-pics-are-here/lathe/IMG_1863_zpskvqop6ct.jpg


http://i289.photobucket.com/albums/ll224/my-pics-are-here/lathe/IMG_1864_zpslphsconk.jpg


http://i289.photobucket.com/albums/ll224/my-pics-are-here/lathe/IMG_1866_zpsvd1ur9wp.jpg


http://i289.photobucket.com/albums/ll224/my-pics-are-here/lathe/IMG_1867_zpsmgk7lzhr.jpg



http://i289.photobucket.com/albums/ll224/my-pics-are-here/lathe/IMG_1868_zps7aeewstj.jpg


http://i289.photobucket.com/albums/ll224/my-pics-are-here/lathe/IMG_1869_zpstxvjbzjz.jpg


http://i289.photobucket.com/albums/ll224/my-pics-are-here/lathe/IMG_1870_zpsqotmvzoz.jpg


http://i289.photobucket.com/albums/ll224/my-pics-are-here/lathe/IMG_1871_zpsrjakerg6.jpg



Re: 1925 11 x 5 spindle/bearing wear/grooves/clearance issues....

hep_cat83@...
 

Today I made the call and decided to file the rear cap down as Allan suggested. Seemed like the most practical solution for now. I was going to try and get a machine shop to to mill it down precisely, but I wasn't sure how much it would take to do the job, so I just went ahead with a file. Worked out OK.



After filing the cap down maybe ~5 thousandths or so, I put the spindle back in and the caps on top. This time I could feel the cap start to bottom on the spindle before bottoming on the lower iron cap surface. I tried to rotate the spindle and I could feel a lot of resistance, so I knew it was now making full contact with it. I wanted to measure the play without an oil film interfering with the reading, so the spindle and bearing were dry. Basically, by tightening or loosening the cap bolts I could make the clearance whatever I wanted. So I backed the bolts off until I read about 1.5 thousandth of clearance. Since you guys seem to say the normal Mobil spindle oil I have is too thin for this older lathe, I put some 3-1 oil into the oilers on both caps (a lot just to make sure). My understanding is that I should use 20W non-detergent oil, and from what I've read that's what 3-1 is (let me know if this is a cardinal sin). I worked it in by turning the spindle back and forth by hand. It was never as loosey goosey as it was before with 5 thou of clearance, but it still turned relatively freely. 

I powered the machine up briefly in fwd and rev to work the oil in. Added some more oil to be sure. Turned it on again and let it run for about 5 minutes one direction and about 5 minutes in the other direction. Got the oil racing stripe on my floor and back wall I see you guys writing about. After a good run (with no load) I felt the bearing caps and they were absolutely cool to the touch, with no signs of heating at all. 

Overall I think the lathe is good for usage, although I am considering trying to polish the spindle. I need another lathe to do that though. Thinking about picking up a junk wood lathe on craigslist or something. Once I get the machine more sorted and learn more about using it (now that I'm done reading How to Run a Lathe) I do plan on checking it over for accuracy, including spindle/bed alignment.

So thanks to everyone for the help, especially Allan. Your advice was right on, a very simple and practical fix that certainly did the trick for my old lathe. THANKS! 


Re: What year model lathe does this serial number reflect?

m. allan noah
 

For some reason in the late 20's and early 30's, a number of SB lathes had either an 'A' or an 'S' at the end of the serial number. I have no idea what it means. 47036S sounds like mid to late 1930. It is probably a wide bed 9", either a Jr or a Series O.

allan

On Fri, Apr 1, 2016 at 6:50 PM, nick@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:
 

Hi there -

I am looking at a 9" South Bend lathe that that has a 12" distance between centers. It looks like to my novice eye a cross between a 10" and a 9"  Its serial number is 47036S

Thoughts?

Thank you

-Nick





--
"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge of my hand"


Re: What year model lathe does this serial number reflect?

Nick Hayer
 

I will get a pic within the next few days. Yup - for sure it is a SB 12" between centers.  Appreciate the response.
 
Thanks -
 
-Nick

 

 


From: "Jim B.' btdtrf@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]"
Sent: Friday, April 01, 2016 7:06 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: RE: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] What year model lathe does this serial number reflect?
 
 

 

I don’t understand the letter “S” in the serial number.

Are you sure it’s a south bend? A picture is worth 1000 posts.

47036 (no “S”) dates t0 8/1930. If it’s a 9” it would be a wide bed.

470368 is not a valid number

 

 

Jim B.

 

From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... [mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@...]
Sent: Friday, April 01, 2016 6:51 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] What year model lathe does this serial number reflect?

 

 

Hi there -

I am looking at a 9" South Bend lathe that that has a 12" distance between centers. It looks like to my novice eye a cross between a 10" and a 9"  Its serial number is 47036S

Thoughts?

Thank you

-Nick

 

 
No threats detected. www.avast.com

 


Re: What year model lathe does this serial number reflect?

Jim B. <btdtrf@...>
 

I don’t understand the letter “S” in the serial number.

Are you sure it’s a south bend? A picture is worth 1000 posts.

47036 (no “S”) dates t0 8/1930. If it’s a 9” it would be a wide bed.

470368 is not a valid number

 

 

Jim B.

 

From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... [mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@...]
Sent: Friday, April 01, 2016 6:51 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] What year model lathe does this serial number reflect?

 

 

Hi there -

I am looking at a 9" South Bend lathe that that has a 12" distance between centers. It looks like to my novice eye a cross between a 10" and a 9"  Its serial number is 47036S

Thoughts?

Thank you

-Nick

 


No threats detected. www.avast.com


What year model lathe does this serial number reflect?

Nick Hayer
 

Hi there -

I am looking at a 9" South Bend lathe that that has a 12" distance between centers. It looks like to my novice eye a cross between a 10" and a 9"  Its serial number is 47036S

Thoughts?

Thank you

-Nick



Re: 1925 11 x 5 spindle/bearing wear/grooves/clearance issues....

Gregg Eshelman
 

First thing to do is check to see if the spindle is currently parallel to the bed. If it is, then you could add shims between the upper bearing halves and the caps. If needed, cut the ends of the bearing halves down a bit.

If the spindle is not parallel to the bed, shim under the low bearing and on top of the higher one. The most likely one to be low is the right end due to the weight of chucks etc.

I wouldn't use plastic shim material, especially not under the bearings. As I mentioned before about the 1914 Sears Expert I had, it had many layers of thin shim metal under the bottom bearing halves, graduated in width to fill the crescent shaped gap created by raising the bearing.

With these bearings you can easily do a modification for zero spindle end play by milling a bit off the thick ends of the bearing halves to make room for thin hardened washers and radial needle bearings from McMaster Carr. That wasn't the only reason I did that on the Expert lathe, it had no thrust washer at all, the gear etc were pinned directly to the cone pulley and badly wore the end of the left bearing. That made it an easy choice to include the hardened washers and radial bearings on both sides of the left bearing with the rest of the repairs.

Something to check on the antique South Bend lathes with the removable bearing blocks is that the small gear is firmly attached to the cone pulley. On the Expert it had been pinned, with only two pins 120 degrees apart and they'd come loose, which helped cause some damage. I very securely mounted that gear by drilling a third hole and drilling and tapping all three holes for long set screws into the end of the pulley so the gear could not come loose.




From: "hep_cat83@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]"
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Sent: Friday, April 1, 2016 2:10 PM
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Re: 1925 11 x 5 spindle/bearing wear/grooves/clearance issues....



Thanks for all the responses. So apparently these bearings were originally intended to be "adjustable" from the factory by adding or removing shims that are actually under the bearing shells? Is that right? It says in the old SB catalogs that the bearings were adjustable, but doesn't mention how. The thing I worry about raising the rear bearing is mis-aligning the spindle with the bed, even if slightly. Although I guess I could raise both at the same time by the same amount. Hmm.

After receiving what I think is good advice elsewhere, I was thinking of just keeping it simple and shaving off a few thousandths on the rear cap's mounting surfaces and thereby reducing the spindle to bearing clearance that way. I was thinking that would fix it well enough to use with good accuracy. If not, I was pondering machining some brass stock into two blank bushings that fit the front and rear headstock journals. Then rig up a line bore system on the bed and, after carefully aligning the cutter shaft with the ways, bore the two bushings in the headstock. Have the spindle ground and polished to match the new bearings. Does that seem reasonable or much harder said than done?


Re: 1925 11 x 5 spindle/bearing wear/grooves/clearance issues....

m. allan noah
 

He cannot avoid removing some of the material from the small cap.  He has 5 thou clearance on the spindle. The only way to reduce the clearance is to get the bearing halves closer together. The sides of the two halves of the bearing are in contact with one another. The only way to get them closer is to shave down the sides slightly. Now, he could raise the lower bearing shell up out of the headstock, and just shave the sides of the lower bearing. But, I'm inclined to leave bearings in their bores. Less chance of them moving around. Yes- given the wear, it is possible that this means the left side of the spindle is too low, making the spindle non-parallel with the ways. But, other factors like bed sag or headstock mounting surfaces might mitigate or exacerbate that condition. Don't assume that raising the bearing is the right answer until you have measured.

allan

On Fri, Apr 1, 2016 at 4:17 PM, Richard Sheckler rishelaverne@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:
 

Best not machine anything off the bearing caps. After you discover it to be a mistake, it will be difficult to put it back on.




From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> on behalf of hep_cat83@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...>
Sent: Friday, April 1, 2016 4:10 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Re: 1925 11 x 5 spindle/bearing wear/grooves/clearance issues....
 
 

Thanks for all the responses. So apparently these bearings were originally intended to be "adjustable" from the factory by adding or removing shims that are actually under the bearing shells? Is that right? It says in the old SB catalogs that the bearings were adjustable, but doesn't mention how. The thing I worry about raising the rear bearing is mis-aligning the spindle with the bed, even if slightly. Although I guess I could raise both at the same time by the same amount. Hmm.


After receiving what I think is good advice elsewhere, I was thinking of just keeping it simple and shaving off a few thousandths on the rear cap's mounting surfaces and thereby reducing the spindle to bearing clearance that way. I was thinking that would fix it well enough to use with good accuracy. If not, I was pondering machining some brass stock into two blank bushings that fit the front and rear headstock journals. Then rig up a line bore system on the bed and, after carefully aligning the cutter shaft with the ways, bore the two bushings in the headstock. Have the spindle ground and polished to match the new bearings. Does that seem reasonable or much harder said than done?




--
"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge of my hand"


Re: 1925 11 x 5 spindle/bearing wear/grooves/clearance issues....

Richard
 

Best not machine anything off the bearing caps. After you discover it to be a mistake, it will be difficult to put it back on.




From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... on behalf of hep_cat83@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]
Sent: Friday, April 1, 2016 4:10 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Re: 1925 11 x 5 spindle/bearing wear/grooves/clearance issues....
 
 

Thanks for all the responses. So apparently these bearings were originally intended to be "adjustable" from the factory by adding or removing shims that are actually under the bearing shells? Is that right? It says in the old SB catalogs that the bearings were adjustable, but doesn't mention how. The thing I worry about raising the rear bearing is mis-aligning the spindle with the bed, even if slightly. Although I guess I could raise both at the same time by the same amount. Hmm.


After receiving what I think is good advice elsewhere, I was thinking of just keeping it simple and shaving off a few thousandths on the rear cap's mounting surfaces and thereby reducing the spindle to bearing clearance that way. I was thinking that would fix it well enough to use with good accuracy. If not, I was pondering machining some brass stock into two blank bushings that fit the front and rear headstock journals. Then rig up a line bore system on the bed and, after carefully aligning the cutter shaft with the ways, bore the two bushings in the headstock. Have the spindle ground and polished to match the new bearings. Does that seem reasonable or much harder said than done?


Re: 1925 11 x 5 spindle/bearing wear/grooves/clearance issues.... [1 Attachment]

hep_cat83@...
 

Thanks for all the responses. So apparently these bearings were originally intended to be "adjustable" from the factory by adding or removing shims that are actually under the bearing shells? Is that right? It says in the old SB catalogs that the bearings were adjustable, but doesn't mention how. The thing I worry about raising the rear bearing is mis-aligning the spindle with the bed, even if slightly. Although I guess I could raise both at the same time by the same amount. Hmm.

After receiving what I think is good advice elsewhere, I was thinking of just keeping it simple and shaving off a few thousandths on the rear cap's mounting surfaces and thereby reducing the spindle to bearing clearance that way. I was thinking that would fix it well enough to use with good accuracy. If not, I was pondering machining some brass stock into two blank bushings that fit the front and rear headstock journals. Then rig up a line bore system on the bed and, after carefully aligning the cutter shaft with the ways, bore the two bushings in the headstock. Have the spindle ground and polished to match the new bearings. Does that seem reasonable or much harder said than done?


Re: 1925 11 x 5 spindle/bearing wear/grooves/clearance issues.... [1 Attachment]

kernbigo@...
 

This is being over thought, if you don't have the skill to scrap in the bearings, don't attempt it,. Another and simpler way to fix it would be, mark the bearing not to get them mixed up, remove them and put plastic shim under them to bring them back up to contact the spindle. Looking at the picture they don't look that bad.Be sure to polish the spindle before re assembling. 


Re: 1925 11 x 5 spindle/bearing wear/grooves/clearance issues....

oscar kern <kernbigo@...>
 

I use mobile velocite #10
--------------------------------------------

On Fri, 4/1/16, kaleb sells kalebasells@gmail.com [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Re: 1925 11 x 5 spindle/bearing wear/grooves/clearance issues....
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@yahoogroups.com
Date: Friday, April 1, 2016, 7:14 AM


 









Oscar

With your tighter clearance, do you still use the same oil
for the spindle or do you use something thinner? I remember
you mentioning one time that you worked on a surface grinder
that used kerosene as the spindle lube for much tighter
tolerance.
Kaleb Sells

Oklahoma
On Mar 31, 2016 6:38 PM,
"kernbigo@yahoo.com
[SOUTHBENDLATHE]" <SOUTHBENDLATHE@yahoogroups.com>
wrote:















 









[Attachment(s) from
kernbigo@yahoo.com
[SOUTHBENDLATHE] included below]


My bearings looked very similar to yours.I would
suggest you polish the spindle, start with 300 or 400 wet
and dry and work up tell you get to at least 1500 grit.Now
get a spoon scraper and put some oil pockets in the
bearings. I f you new how to hand scrap i would suggest
that, like i did, but try the oil pockets first.The back
bearing cap is going to half to be milled down in order to
get your contact back. A little than try it and than you
should be able to add some shim, i like plastic shim. I
torque my bolts that way i can control the lift on the
bearings, by the amount of torque and the amount of shim
stock.






























#yiv2632591557 #yiv2632591557 --
#yiv2632591557ygrp-mkp {
border:1px solid #d8d8d8;font-family:Arial;margin:10px
0;padding:0 10px;}

#yiv2632591557 #yiv2632591557ygrp-mkp hr {
border:1px solid #d8d8d8;}

#yiv2632591557 #yiv2632591557ygrp-mkp #yiv2632591557hd {
color:#628c2a;font-size:85%;font-weight:700;line-height:122%;margin:10px
0;}

#yiv2632591557 #yiv2632591557ygrp-mkp #yiv2632591557ads {
margin-bottom:10px;}

#yiv2632591557 #yiv2632591557ygrp-mkp .yiv2632591557ad {
padding:0 0;}

#yiv2632591557 #yiv2632591557ygrp-mkp .yiv2632591557ad p {
margin:0;}

#yiv2632591557 #yiv2632591557ygrp-mkp .yiv2632591557ad a {
color:#0000ff;text-decoration:none;}
#yiv2632591557 #yiv2632591557ygrp-sponsor
#yiv2632591557ygrp-lc {
font-family:Arial;}

#yiv2632591557 #yiv2632591557ygrp-sponsor
#yiv2632591557ygrp-lc #yiv2632591557hd {
margin:10px
0px;font-weight:700;font-size:78%;line-height:122%;}

#yiv2632591557 #yiv2632591557ygrp-sponsor
#yiv2632591557ygrp-lc .yiv2632591557ad {
margin-bottom:10px;padding:0 0;}

#yiv2632591557 #yiv2632591557actions {
font-family:Verdana;font-size:11px;padding:10px 0;}

#yiv2632591557 #yiv2632591557activity {
background-color:#e0ecee;float:left;font-family:Verdana;font-size:10px;padding:10px;}

#yiv2632591557 #yiv2632591557activity span {
font-weight:700;}

#yiv2632591557 #yiv2632591557activity span:first-child {
text-transform:uppercase;}

#yiv2632591557 #yiv2632591557activity span a {
color:#5085b6;text-decoration:none;}

#yiv2632591557 #yiv2632591557activity span span {
color:#ff7900;}

#yiv2632591557 #yiv2632591557activity span
.yiv2632591557underline {
text-decoration:underline;}

#yiv2632591557 .yiv2632591557attach {
clear:both;display:table;font-family:Arial;font-size:12px;padding:10px
0;width:400px;}

#yiv2632591557 .yiv2632591557attach div a {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv2632591557 .yiv2632591557attach img {
border:none;padding-right:5px;}

#yiv2632591557 .yiv2632591557attach label {
display:block;margin-bottom:5px;}

#yiv2632591557 .yiv2632591557attach label a {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv2632591557 blockquote {
margin:0 0 0 4px;}

#yiv2632591557 .yiv2632591557bold {
font-family:Arial;font-size:13px;font-weight:700;}

#yiv2632591557 .yiv2632591557bold a {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv2632591557 dd.yiv2632591557last p a {
font-family:Verdana;font-weight:700;}

#yiv2632591557 dd.yiv2632591557last p span {
margin-right:10px;font-family:Verdana;font-weight:700;}

#yiv2632591557 dd.yiv2632591557last p
span.yiv2632591557yshortcuts {
margin-right:0;}

#yiv2632591557 div.yiv2632591557attach-table div div a {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv2632591557 div.yiv2632591557attach-table {
width:400px;}

#yiv2632591557 div.yiv2632591557file-title a, #yiv2632591557
div.yiv2632591557file-title a:active, #yiv2632591557
div.yiv2632591557file-title a:hover, #yiv2632591557
div.yiv2632591557file-title a:visited {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv2632591557 div.yiv2632591557photo-title a,
#yiv2632591557 div.yiv2632591557photo-title a:active,
#yiv2632591557 div.yiv2632591557photo-title a:hover,
#yiv2632591557 div.yiv2632591557photo-title a:visited {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv2632591557 div#yiv2632591557ygrp-mlmsg
#yiv2632591557ygrp-msg p a span.yiv2632591557yshortcuts {
font-family:Verdana;font-size:10px;font-weight:normal;}

#yiv2632591557 .yiv2632591557green {
color:#628c2a;}

#yiv2632591557 .yiv2632591557MsoNormal {
margin:0 0 0 0;}

#yiv2632591557 o {
font-size:0;}

#yiv2632591557 #yiv2632591557photos div {
float:left;width:72px;}

#yiv2632591557 #yiv2632591557photos div div {
border:1px solid
#666666;height:62px;overflow:hidden;width:62px;}

#yiv2632591557 #yiv2632591557photos div label {
color:#666666;font-size:10px;overflow:hidden;text-align:center;white-space:nowrap;width:64px;}

#yiv2632591557 #yiv2632591557reco-category {
font-size:77%;}

#yiv2632591557 #yiv2632591557reco-desc {
font-size:77%;}

#yiv2632591557 .yiv2632591557replbq {
margin:4px;}

#yiv2632591557 #yiv2632591557ygrp-actbar div a:first-child {
margin-right:2px;padding-right:5px;}

#yiv2632591557 #yiv2632591557ygrp-mlmsg {
font-size:13px;font-family:Arial, helvetica, clean,
sans-serif;}

#yiv2632591557 #yiv2632591557ygrp-mlmsg table {
font-size:inherit;font:100%;}

#yiv2632591557 #yiv2632591557ygrp-mlmsg select,
#yiv2632591557 input, #yiv2632591557 textarea {
font:99% Arial, Helvetica, clean, sans-serif;}

#yiv2632591557 #yiv2632591557ygrp-mlmsg pre, #yiv2632591557
code {
font:115% monospace;}

#yiv2632591557 #yiv2632591557ygrp-mlmsg * {
line-height:1.22em;}

#yiv2632591557 #yiv2632591557ygrp-mlmsg #yiv2632591557logo {
padding-bottom:10px;}


#yiv2632591557 #yiv2632591557ygrp-msg p a {
font-family:Verdana;}

#yiv2632591557 #yiv2632591557ygrp-msg
p#yiv2632591557attach-count span {
color:#1E66AE;font-weight:700;}

#yiv2632591557 #yiv2632591557ygrp-reco
#yiv2632591557reco-head {
color:#ff7900;font-weight:700;}

#yiv2632591557 #yiv2632591557ygrp-reco {
margin-bottom:20px;padding:0px;}

#yiv2632591557 #yiv2632591557ygrp-sponsor #yiv2632591557ov
li a {
font-size:130%;text-decoration:none;}

#yiv2632591557 #yiv2632591557ygrp-sponsor #yiv2632591557ov
li {
font-size:77%;list-style-type:square;padding:6px 0;}

#yiv2632591557 #yiv2632591557ygrp-sponsor #yiv2632591557ov
ul {
margin:0;padding:0 0 0 8px;}

#yiv2632591557 #yiv2632591557ygrp-text {
font-family:Georgia;}

#yiv2632591557 #yiv2632591557ygrp-text p {
margin:0 0 1em 0;}

#yiv2632591557 #yiv2632591557ygrp-text tt {
font-size:120%;}

#yiv2632591557 #yiv2632591557ygrp-vital ul li:last-child {
border-right:none !important;
}
#yiv2632591557


File - Reminder.txt

SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
 

Reminder To All SBL Group Members

The FAQ will answer many of your questions. READ IT FIRST!

All discussion relating to South Bend and similar lathes is welcome: lathes, tooling, methods of work, repair, restoration, projects, the saving of SBL by LeBlond, where you found your old SBL, when you first started working with one of these beasts, etc.

Picture attachments are fine but try to keep file sizes small. Be kind to our dial-up members. When posting materials from other sources, be aware of the Copyright restrictions. If you know the material is copyright free its permissible to post it. If you are unaware if its Copyright stats its best to offer to send individual copies.


Please remember to trim your posts. Quote only enough of the previous message to maintain the continuity of the thread.

Brief postings by members on items for sale/trade/need are fine. Please offer them here first then eBay.


This is not a commercial group, but members "in the business" are welcome to let the group know about on-topic services. Please note however, that SPAMMERS will be banned.

FOR SALE POLICY

Sale of personal items may be advertised to the list. However, it is asked that all transactions take place in private. This includes replying to sellers and pricing information. It is suggested that sellers include geographic information and shipping policy in their posting.

Commercial activity is expressly prohibited by Yahoo Groups Terms of Service. However, discussions by members "in the business" are welcome to let the group know about on-topic services.

Please note however, that SPAMMERS will be banned without recourse.

AUCTION POLICY

It is asked that before any list member places an item for sale on an online auction service such as Yahoo, Ebay, etc that they offer it to the group first as a courtesy to the membership. Publicizing of personal auctions not offered to the group first not only is in bad taste, but is highly discouraged. See section on For Sale Policy for further information.

From time to time, there are unscrupulous sellers encountered through online services. It is permissible for members report the actions of these sellers, however please refrain for making any disparaging remarks about these individuals. The proper place for leaving feedback is at those online services.

Quick Links:

The FAQ is available at:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/southbendlathe/files/SouthBendLatheFAQ.html

Contributors to the guide and FAQ are always welcome.

Click on http://groups.yahoo.com/group/southbendlathe/ to get to the group.

To unsubscribe, send an email to:
mailto:southbendlathe-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com


Re: 1925 11 x 5 spindle/bearing wear/grooves/clearance issues.... [1 Attachment]

kaleb sells
 

Oscar
With your tighter clearance, do you still use the same oil for the spindle or do you use something thinner? I remember you mentioning one time that you worked on a surface grinder that used kerosene as the spindle lube for much tighter tolerance.

Kaleb Sells
Oklahoma

On Mar 31, 2016 6:38 PM, "kernbigo@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:
 
[Attachment(s) from kernbigo@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] included below]

My bearings looked very similar to yours.I would suggest you polish the spindle, start with 300 or 400 wet and dry and work up tell you get to at least 1500 grit.Now get a spoon scraper and put some oil pockets in the bearings. I f you new how to hand scrap i would suggest that, like i did, but try the oil pockets first.The back bearing cap is going to half to be milled down in order to get your contact back. A little than try it and than you should be able to add some shim, i like plastic shim. I torque my bolts that way i can control the lift on the bearings, by the amount of torque and the amount of shim stock.


Re: 1925 11 x 5 spindle/bearing wear/grooves/clearance issues.... [1 Attachment]

eddie.draper@btinternet.com
 

What is being suggested here will result in the lowering of the spindle in the headstock by a different amount front and back, depending upon how much each bearing cap is lowered.  Not good (apart from the polishing the spindle bit, that is).

The spindle needs to be reset to its standard height above the bed, i.e. the same as tailstock centre height and parallel to the bed.  My solution to this is to whitemetal (Babbit) your exiting brasses or make / acquire new ones, then bore to dead on spindle size with maximum shims between after truing the external surface to concentric and parallel in a 4 jaw (sorry, needs a second, good, lathe).  You're lucky in that you do have removable brasses, and don't have the mandrel just running in the cast iron like a lot of SB lathes.  With one of those, the only solution is to take the headstock casting off the bed and get it line bored to the right alignment.  Converting to brasses at the same time would save any future need for a repeat.

The whitemetal does not need to be thick, in fact it is stronger if it isn't, but it does pay to carve a bit of brass away to make room for about 10 - 30 thou of it.  Can't speak for the rest of the world, but an acceptable grade of WM for this duty is available in the UK.  I bought some lead free solder for potable water plumbing from Aldi, solely on the basis that it is 97% tin, 3% copper.  Use it like solder, just build up a bit of a layer by puddling.  6 or 7% copper would be a better bearing metal, but the duty of these bearings is very light, so it should contain enough reinforcement in the shape of copper/tin cuboids in its tin matrix.  I use the lead free solder for tinning bearings before pouring whitemetal of whatever grade I am using for bearings on a 2' gauge railway, including axleboxes and crank bearings on locomotives.

Before you start carving oil grooves in ANY bearing, do please read a bit about hydrodynamic thick film lubrication.  For the most part, this will stop you doing it!

Cheers,

Eddie



From: "kernbigo@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]"
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Sent: Friday, 1 April 2016, 0:38
Subject: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Re: 1925 11 x 5 spindle/bearing wear/grooves/clearance issues.... [1 Attachment]

 
[Attachment(s) from kernbigo@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] included below]
My bearings looked very similar to yours.I would suggest you polish the spindle, start with 300 or 400 wet and dry and work up tell you get to at least 1500 grit.Now get a spoon scraper and put some oil pockets in the bearings. I f you new how to hand scrap i would suggest that, like i did, but try the oil pockets first.The back bearing cap is going to half to be milled down in order to get your contact back. A little than try it and than you should be able to add some shim, i like plastic shim. I torque my bolts that way i can control the lift on the bearings, by the amount of torque and the amount of shim stock.



Re: Jarno Taper

ov10fac
 

Thanks to everyone. I do have a dead center that I found mounted in the head spindle. I'll measure that and confirm the taper.

As for the bearings, there were no shims when I pulled the journal blocks. I'll do a lift test on it when I get everything assembled.

Again thanks for all the information and advice.


Re: NewMember

k7yooam@...
 

Thanks for the nice presentation on thr VFD. I have one set up and ready to go. We have 3 phase in our shop so the main purpose will be to give us some the easy speed changes. 3 phase motors definitely produce less vibration and better finishes. it seems to me that the two drawbacks of the belt drive lathe are speed changes and speed limitations. A vfd pretty much solves the speed change issue without having to listen to whining gears. The speed limitations would seem to be a function of the bushings on the 16" lathe I purchased. My feeling is that going much above 1200 rpm would not be good. Other than that I can't see what I am giving up by not buying a LeBlond or the 17x60 SB Turnado I passed up. Have I missed anything?


Re: 1925 11 x 5 spindle/bearing wear/grooves/clearance issues.... [1 Attachment]

Gregg Eshelman
 

On the 1914 13" I had with bearings like these, the shims under them were done in strips of increasing width to better support the bearing. When you raise this type of bearing up out of the headstock, the space is largest at the bottom, tapering to both sides.




From: "kernbigo@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]"
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Sent: Thursday, March 31, 2016 5:38 PM
Subject: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Re: 1925 11 x 5 spindle/bearing wear/grooves/clearance issues.... [1 Attachment]

[Attachment(s) from kernbigo@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] included below]

My bearings looked very similar to yours.I would suggest you polish the spindle, start with 300 or 400 wet and dry and work up tell you get to at least 1500 grit.Now get a spoon scraper and put some oil pockets in the bearings. I f you new how to hand scrap i would suggest that, like i did, but try the oil pockets first.The back bearing cap is going to half to be milled down in order to get your contact back. A little than try it and than you should be able to add some shim, i like plastic shim. I torque my bolts that way i can control the lift on the bearings, by the amount of torque and the amount of shim stock.

9321 - 9340 of 105850