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Re: Multi-V Serpentine Belt Splicing for Flat Belt Lathes

oscar kern <kernbigo@...>
 

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On Sunday, November 22, 2015 9:55 AM, "oscar kern kernbigo@yahoo.com [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" <SOUTHBENDLATHE@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


 
Vintage Detroit 4" Belt Lacer and Box of Clipper Hooks

- $58.50 e bay
-



On Sunday, November 22, 2015 9:06 AM, "'ARKnack' arknack@comcast.net [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" <SOUTHBENDLATHE@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


  I would be concerned about the metal strips breaking do to fatigue. There is a lot of flexing in the belt.    From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Saturday, November 21, 2015 7:58 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Multi-V Serpentine Belt Splicing for Flat Belt Lathes [3 Attachments]    [Attachment(s) from circ01@frontier.com [SOUTHBENDLATHE] included below] I mentioned my splicing method for a multi-v belt in another thread, so I am starting a new one to explain.  I wanted to use a multi-v belt on my 13" South Bend lathe because they grip well when used as a flat belt, but the radial cords in these belts provide little strength when splicing using lacing.  You are only lacing into rubber.  My method does 2 things:  1) It distributes the load to 9 holes on each side to reduce stress on the holes and 2) This is the key secret, I use a metal strip with holes in it at the butt joint to keep the lacing close to the belt.  On the underside, the lacing lays in the grooves so it doesn't rub on the pulley.  I am still playing with the lacing material, but it has held up pretty well so far.  In the photos, you can see that it has stretched a little, but that is ok.  Make sure you deburr the holes in the metal strip so they don't wear the lacing.  

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Re: Multi-V Serpentine Belt Splicing for Flat Belt Lathes

oscar kern <kernbigo@...>
 

On Sunday, November 22, 2015 9:06 AM, "'ARKnack' arknack@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" wrote:


 
I would be concerned about the metal strips breaking do to fatigue. There is a lot of flexing in the belt.
 
 
From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... [mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@...]
Sent: Saturday, November 21, 2015 7:58 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Multi-V Serpentine Belt Splicing for Flat Belt Lathes [3 Attachments]
 
 
[Attachment(s) from circ01@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] included below]
I mentioned my splicing method for a multi-v belt in another thread, so I am starting a new one to explain.  I wanted to use a multi-v belt on my 13" South Bend lathe because they grip well when used as a flat belt, but the radial cords in these belts provide little strength when splicing using lacing.  You are only lacing into rubber.  My method does 2 things:  1) It distributes the load to 9 holes on each side to reduce stress on the holes and 2) This is the key secret, I use a metal strip with holes in it at the butt joint to keep the lacing close to the belt.  On the underside, the lacing lays in the grooves so it doesn't rub on the pulley.  I am still playing with the lacing material, but it has held up pretty well so far.  In the photos, you can see that it has stretched a little, but that is ok.  Make sure you deburr the holes in the metal strip so they don't wear the lacing.
 



Re: Multi-V Serpentine Belt Splicing for Flat Belt Lathes [3 Attachments]

ww_big_al
 

I would be concerned about the metal strips breaking do to fatigue. There is a lot of flexing in the belt.

 

 

From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... [mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@...]
Sent: Saturday, November 21, 2015 7:58 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Multi-V Serpentine Belt Splicing for Flat Belt Lathes [3 Attachments]

 

 

[Attachment(s) from circ01@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] included below]

I mentioned my splicing method for a multi-v belt in another thread, so I am starting a new one to explain.  I wanted to use a multi-v belt on my 13" South Bend lathe because they grip well when used as a flat belt, but the radial cords in these belts provide little strength when splicing using lacing.  You are only lacing into rubber.  My method does 2 things:  1) It distributes the load to 9 holes on each side to reduce stress on the holes and 2) This is the key secret, I use a metal strip with holes in it at the butt joint to keep the lacing close to the belt.  On the underside, the lacing lays in the grooves so it doesn't rub on the pulley.  I am still playing with the lacing material, but it has held up pretty well so far.  In the photos, you can see that it has stretched a little, but that is ok.  Make sure you deburr the holes in the metal strip so they don't wear the lacing.

 


Re: Multi-V Serpentine Belt Splicing for Flat Belt Lathes

ken campbell
 


way back my flat belt on my B&S screw machine ...splice came apart ... after several attempts/materials i used **** catgut   **** lacing ... ran for several years when i traded off the machine ...
 
ken


Re: Multi-V Serpentine Belt Splicing for Flat Belt Lathes

John Dammeyer
 

What’s the point of the metal strip?

 

From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... [mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@...]
Sent: November-21-15 5:02 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Re: Multi-V Serpentine Belt Splicing for Flat Belt Lathes

 



I think I used a stainless steel metal strip out of a windshield wiper to make the metal strip. 



Re: Multi-V Serpentine Belt Splicing for Flat Belt Lathes

bill webster
 

I think I used a stainless steel metal strip out of a windshield wiper to make the metal strip. 


Multi-V Serpentine Belt Splicing for Flat Belt Lathes

bill webster
 

I mentioned my splicing method for a multi-v belt in another thread, so I am starting a new one to explain.  I wanted to use a multi-v belt on my 13" South Bend lathe because they grip well when used as a flat belt, but the radial cords in these belts provide little strength when splicing using lacing.  You are only lacing into rubber.  My method does 2 things:  1) It distributes the load to 9 holes on each side to reduce stress on the holes and 2) This is the key secret, I use a metal strip with holes in it at the butt joint to keep the lacing close to the belt.  On the underside, the lacing lays in the grooves so it doesn't rub on the pulley.  I am still playing with the lacing material, but it has held up pretty well so far.  In the photos, you can see that it has stretched a little, but that is ok.  Make sure you deburr the holes in the metal strip so they don't wear the lacing.



Re: Anyone interested in a Bison 6 jaw chuck?

Nelson Collar
 

I like you do not need a D-1 chuck backplate. So as far as I am concerned there is no deal there. Sometimes extras sweeten the pot other the opposite. There is one on fleabay for $289-6 1/4" and $250-6 1/4". What is it really worth? 
Good Luck
Nelson Collar




Anyone interested in a Bison 6 jaw chuck?

G m
 

I purchased a Heavy 10 and the seller wanted to include all his tooling with the sale. The chuck was only used a few times and is in like new condition. I'm selling the D1-4 backplate with it. Chuck is 6" diameter. I am asking $950/bo for the chuck and backplate.



Re: Home Page Pictures needed [1 Attachment]

Nick Jonkman
 

Here is what she looks like today after last winter's restoration and 8 months of use.
Nick


Re: Home Page Pictures needed

Ondrej Krejci
 

The case with someone else's reground bed probably doesn't allow one to keep track of material removal.  Depending on how much use and abuse the lathe experienced, the lowered apron position may not have any horrible effect on performance, most likely, it'll be negligible.  Once the lathe was put to work, everything on it started wearing out of manufacturing specifications until dis-assembly for bed grinding, so there's enough slop everywhere.



On Friday, November 20, 2015 12:31 PM, "oscar kern kernbigo@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" wrote:


 
what ever you machine off, keep track of the amount and build it back up with turcite 



On Friday, November 20, 2015 11:04 AM, "okrejci@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" wrote:


 
Machine tools were rebuilt before epoxy filler.  Parts had to be re-aligned by material removal and shimming.  I believe many SB lathes have their racks held on by vertical screws through the top of the bed; hence, the total amount of stock removed from the bed and carriage surfaces is the shim thickness required to lower the rack.  If the rack is not lowered, greater gear lash is certain; which may or may not be a concern, generally 0.005" to 0.008" is best:  thickness of U.S.A. paper money to two thicknesses of cheap typing paper.

As for saddles, they are designed to wear to the middle; i.e.  the right and left ends, both front and back, make contact with the bed ways with the centres being cast or machined deeper for no contact.  Wear is contained to four corners in this manner to avoid rocking or tipping and ensuring flatter travel by averaging deviations of the bed.  This should be kept in mind during a rebuild.  Buying a NOS saddle would seem as a waste of money, because it too would have to be fitted to the ways.

For more information, there is always Connelly's "Machine Tool Reconditioning".

Best of luck,


OK





Re: Home Page Pictures needed

oscar kern <kernbigo@...>
 

what ever you machine off, keep track of the amount and build it back up with turcite 



On Friday, November 20, 2015 11:04 AM, "okrejci@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" wrote:


 
Machine tools were rebuilt before epoxy filler.  Parts had to be re-aligned by material removal and shimming.  I believe many SB lathes have their racks held on by vertical screws through the top of the bed; hence, the total amount of stock removed from the bed and carriage surfaces is the shim thickness required to lower the rack.  If the rack is not lowered, greater gear lash is certain; which may or may not be a concern, generally 0.005" to 0.008" is best:  thickness of U.S.A. paper money to two thicknesses of cheap typing paper.

As for saddles, they are designed to wear to the middle; i.e.  the right and left ends, both front and back, make contact with the bed ways with the centres being cast or machined deeper for no contact.  Wear is contained to four corners in this manner to avoid rocking or tipping and ensuring flatter travel by averaging deviations of the bed.  This should be kept in mind during a rebuild.  Buying a NOS saddle would seem as a waste of money, because it too would have to be fitted to the ways.

For more information, there is always Connelly's "Machine Tool Reconditioning".

Best of luck,


OK



Re: Home Page Pictures needed

Ondrej Krejci
 

Machine tools were rebuilt before epoxy filler.  Parts had to be re-aligned by material removal and shimming.  I believe many SB lathes have their racks held on by vertical screws through the top of the bed; hence, the total amount of stock removed from the bed and carriage surfaces is the shim thickness required to lower the rack.  If the rack is not lowered, greater gear lash is certain; which may or may not be a concern, generally 0.005" to 0.008" is best:  thickness of U.S.A. paper money to two thicknesses of cheap typing paper.

As for saddles, they are designed to wear to the middle; i.e.  the right and left ends, both front and back, make contact with the bed ways with the centres being cast or machined deeper for no contact.  Wear is contained to four corners in this manner to avoid rocking or tipping and ensuring flatter travel by averaging deviations of the bed.  This should be kept in mind during a rebuild.  Buying a NOS saddle would seem as a waste of money, because it too would have to be fitted to the ways.

For more information, there is always Connelly's "Machine Tool Reconditioning".

Best of luck,


OK


Re: Home Page Pictures needed

The Mouse
 

On 11/20/2015 12:32 AM, 'Ron Goodger' wrote:


I talked to a man today who was a machining school instructor for
many years. He said NOT to machine the bottom of my saddle to fix
the wear because that will make it sit hard on the apron gear. I
guess it will have to be built up in some manner to fix it, or just
replace it if I can find one.

I am not sure what he meant by "apron gear". If you machine the saddle
surface that the apron mounts to you may be able to restore the apron to
bed relationship, but you will change how the power cross slide gears
mesh. This seems like a bad idea on lathes with power cross slides.

...on lathes with flat ways the same machining operation might clean up
the saddle ways and tighten the cross slide drive gears. But south bend
lathes don't have flat ways...

If you leave the apron mounting surface as it is but scrape in the
saddle ways you change the apron height, and you should consider the
relationship with the leadscrew and rack mounted to the bed. (If the
saddle is worn then the apron may already be rubbing on the leadscrew
and have too much lash on the rack.)

If you machine the saddle ways and then build them back up with new
material then you should find that the leadscrew and rack are aligned
properly. But you should still check, someone may have shimmed something
already...

It seems that south bend did not build all the lathes to the same
standards, so swapping parts like saddles is a roll of the dice, you may
end up with a worse fit than you have, now.

...if you do anything to the ways you can change the relationship of the
saddle and cross slide movements (Z axis and Y axis.) You want to keep
the movements in parallel planes and perpendicular to each other.
Luckily, manual lathes are fairly forgiving in this respect, but if you
do large facing it might be pretty important to you...

-mouse


Re: Home Page Pictures needed

Gregg Eshelman
 

On 11/19/2015 10:32 PM, 'Ron Goodger' lrgoodger@gmail.com [SOUTHBENDLATHE] wrote:


Wow! Can I come and see that? I need some tips on how to make mine
look like that, seeing as how it’s almost completely torn down right now
for the rebuild.

I talked to a man today who was a machining school instructor for many
years. He said NOT to machine the bottom of my saddle to fix the wear
because that will make it sit hard on the apron gear. I guess it will
have to be built up in some manner to fix it, or just replace it if I
can find one.
If you grind or scrape or whatever the bed to make the ways straight, you have to do something to the saddle to raise it back up so the distance down to the lead screw stays the same.

An alternate way is to lower the lead screw support at the right end and the gearbox at the left end. The gear banjo can accommodate the slight position difference of the headstock etc.

Lathe saddles tend to wear in a curve, more at each end than in the middle, especially when the bed wear is in a short area. That indicates the lathe was mostly used for short work.

Standard practice when using non-metallic substances to build up the bottom of a lathe saddle is to mill the bearing surfaces straight so the added material will all be the same thickness.


Re: Home Page Pictures needed [1 Attachment]

Ron Goodger
 

Wow!  Can I come and see that?  I need some tips on how to make mine look like that, seeing as how it’s almost completely torn down right now for the rebuild.

 

I talked to a man today who was a machining school instructor for many years.  He said NOT to machine the bottom of my saddle to fix the wear because that will make it sit hard on the apron gear.  I guess it will have to be built up in some manner to fix it, or just replace it if I can find one.

 

Ron

 

From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... [mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@...]
Sent: Thursday, November 19, 2015 2:53 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Home Page Pictures needed [1 Attachment]

 

 

[Attachment(s) from Latheman included below]

Here's a picture of my lathe that I call "Latheman Special".

It is a customized 12 3/4" South Bend.

 



Ted


On Nov 19, 2015, at 12:12 PM, 'Jim B.' btdtrf@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:

 

Having just changed the home page picture, I need further contributions.

 

I wish to thank George Burton for his contributions.

Let’s have some more from the group. They do not need to be pristine and can be a work in progress or a daily beater.

Working lathes are lively too.

 

Jim B.

 

 


This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
www.avast.com

 




Re: Home Page Pictures needed

Charles Ugenti
 

Hi Mark,
The motor is the original westinghouse 1HP 3 phase. I have a Teco VFD. I used the original reverse switch and the start stop switch. On the reverse switch I installed a I believe a 10K pot for speed control. The other motor I think was a 1/10 Hp it also was 3 phase with a I believe 3MF cap.
Charlie



On Thursday, November 19, 2015 5:49 PM, "Fred Flintstone stoeger666@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" wrote:


 
Hi,

So what motor are you using in your SB13? I am not happy with mine.

Take care,
Mark



On Thursday, November 19, 2015 2:59 PM, "Chazzz Ugenti keys_46@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" wrote:


 
[Attachment(s) from Chazzz Ugenti included below]
Hi Jim,
I enclosed a pic of my SB13. It has the spring in it that George Burton sent me. It also has parts that I used from a SB 10 to make a compound since my SB didn't have a compound.
TY
Charlie



On Thursday, November 19, 2015 3:08 PM, "'Jim B.' btdtrf@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" wrote:


 
Thank you Ted.
It’s very nice.
 
Jim B.
 
From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... [mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@...]
Sent: Thursday, November 19, 2015 2:53 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Home Page Pictures needed [1 Attachment]
 
 
[Attachment(s) from Latheman included below]
Here's a picture of my lathe that I call "Latheman Special".
It is a customized 12 3/4" South Bend.
 


Ted





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Re: Home Page Pictures needed [1 Attachment]

Nick Jonkman
 

Sorry, That was before the restoration. Guess I need to take another picture.Nick

On 15-11-19 9:49 PM, njonkman@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] wrote:
 

Hi Jim
Here is my 9"A after it's restoration. I built the stand originally for a 6" Atlas.
Nick



Re: Home Page Pictures needed [1 Attachment]

Jim B. <btdtrf@...>
 

Thanks Nick

Jim B,

On Nov 19, 2015, at 9:49 PM, njonkman@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:

 

Hi Jim
Here is my 9"A after it's restoration. I built the stand originally for a 6" Atlas.
Nick


Re: Home Page Pictures needed

Nick Jonkman
 

Hi Jim
Here is my 9"A after it's restoration. I built the stand originally for a 6" Atlas.
Nick

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