Date   

Re: Home Page Pictures needed [1 Attachment]

Jim B. <btdtrf@...>
 

Thank you Ted.

It’s very nice.

 

Jim B.

 

From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... [mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@...]
Sent: Thursday, November 19, 2015 2:53 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Home Page Pictures needed [1 Attachment]

 

 

[Attachment(s) from Latheman included below]

Here's a picture of my lathe that I call "Latheman Special".

It is a customized 12 3/4" South Bend.

 



Ted






Re: Home Page Pictures needed

sblatheman
 

Here's a picture of my lathe that I call "Latheman Special".
It is a customized 12 3/4" South Bend.



Ted

On Nov 19, 2015, at 12:12 PM, 'Jim B.' btdtrf@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:

 

Having just changed the home page picture, I need further contributions.

 

I wish to thank George Burton for his contributions.

Let’s have some more from the group. They do not need to be pristine and can be a work in progress or a daily beater.

Working lathes are lively too.

 

Jim B.

 




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Home Page Pictures needed

Jim B. <btdtrf@...>
 

Having just changed the home page picture, I need further contributions.

 

I wish to thank George Burton for his contributions.

Let’s have some more from the group. They do not need to be pristine and can be a work in progress or a daily beater.

Working lathes are lively too.

 

Jim B.

 




Re: My first South Bend

Ondrej Krejci
 

Funny!


Re: My first South Bend

John Gallo
 

What ever you do, do not try to lift the lathe by the cast gear cover at the headstock end ( don't ask how I know this so well). It will eventually fall off and the machine will fall in the grass if you are lucky.


More Spam

Jim B. <btdtrf@...>
 

In the past few days the email accounts of two of our members have been hijacked.

In one case I have disallowed the member from posting and notified him of this action.

I have removed the offending message.

 

One of our member replied, quoting the malware URL. I have removed his reply.

 

In both cases the posts were caught by my ISP and did not make it to my computer or cell phone.

I usually check my ISP every few days for just such events, but not every day.

 

I do appreciate our members giving others a heads up when I don’t catch this, but they should not quote the offending message. That promulgates the spam.

 

The second message was directly to me and another member. The originator of that message has had spam sent from his account before. His account has been removed.

 

If you do not have a strong password on your ISP you are in danger of having your account hijacked.  If you password is listed HERE:

http://xato.net/passwords/more-top-worst-passwords/

It WILL BE HIJACKED.

 

This is a list of the 10,000 most common passwords.

 

If you wish to strengthen you password, or just feel good about the one you have,  you are safe in checking the strength of your new password here:

 

https://howsecureismypassword.net/

 

 

 

Jim B.

 




Re: Got me a new lathe [3 Attachments]

Jim B. <btdtrf@...>
 

The latest spread sheet for dating has some 14" data but not much. It is primarily based on SB yearly manufacturing data. Should be accurate for the year of manufacture  



Jim B,

On Nov 17, 2015, at 9:31 PM, mark.jonkman@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:

 

Last Saturday I broke down and bought another South Bend lathe.

I had planned on buying a Grizzly gunsmith lathe but my wife baulked at the price. So when she wasn't looking I bought a "used" lathe last weekend :-) I use the term "used" loosely. Its basically a brand new South Bend Fourteen gear head lathe with electronic variable speed from the 80's. And less then half the price of the gunsmith lathe.

Apparently the gentleman that owned it prior to the used equipment guy getting a hold of it from his widow - bought a house, dug a big basement shop, filled it up with brand new tools, then built an addition on top of the equipped shop or so the story goes. It appears that he hardly used the equipment, there is hardly even a layer of grim on it except the chip pan has some small amount of chips and cutting oil and gunk on it.  There is some light rust on part of the taper attachment and the top of the compound slide 

My Heavy 10 has more scratches and dirt on it then this thing has and I restored and repainted my lathe only a few years ago.

It came with an Aloris BXA tool post, the steady rest, small and large face plates and a Buck 4 jaw chuck that is huge - guessing 10". It had a Buck 3 jaw on it as well but he had sold it before i bought the lathe and honestly it was a 10" chuck and frankly wouldn't hold anything less then 3/4" or 1" stock the way the jaws were ground so while nice to say I have a buck chuck it would have not been of any value to me. So I got a reduced price on the lathe.

Powering this is going to be a bit of a nightmare but hopefully we'll do it on Friday when I pick it up. Because of the electronic variable speed it utilizes a mix of 3 phase and single phase circuits internally.

The guts of this are a Leeson 3hp 3 phase motor which I plan to connect to a VFD. The speed control operates a single phase circuit that has a DC motor on it that acts as a servo to operate a Reeve's drive.  Apparently folks have had issues with trying to run the whole mess off of a VFD because something interferes with the tach or something. So we plan on separating the motor circuit from the variable speed circuit. The guy I'm buying it form seems to know what he's talking about - I'm completely or nearly completely clueless.

I have no idea as to its actual date of manufacture as I can barely find any info other than a parts breakdown and some basic setup stuff which I have the originals for. It does appear to the be later date of manufacture as it has the shifter on the front of the bottom shroud vs on top next to the gear box.

Hopefully I'll get it home on Friday.



Got me a new lathe

Mark R. Jonkman
 

Last Saturday I broke down and bought another South Bend lathe.

I had planned on buying a Grizzly gunsmith lathe but my wife baulked at the price. So when she wasn't looking I bought a "used" lathe last weekend :-) I use the term "used" loosely. Its basically a brand new South Bend Fourteen gear head lathe with electronic variable speed from the 80's. And less then half the price of the gunsmith lathe.

Apparently the gentleman that owned it prior to the used equipment guy getting a hold of it from his widow - bought a house, dug a big basement shop, filled it up with brand new tools, then built an addition on top of the equipped shop or so the story goes. It appears that he hardly used the equipment, there is hardly even a layer of grim on it except the chip pan has some small amount of chips and cutting oil and gunk on it.  There is some light rust on part of the taper attachment and the top of the compound slide 

My Heavy 10 has more scratches and dirt on it then this thing has and I restored and repainted my lathe only a few years ago.

It came with an Aloris BXA tool post, the steady rest, small and large face plates and a Buck 4 jaw chuck that is huge - guessing 10". It had a Buck 3 jaw on it as well but he had sold it before i bought the lathe and honestly it was a 10" chuck and frankly wouldn't hold anything less then 3/4" or 1" stock the way the jaws were ground so while nice to say I have a buck chuck it would have not been of any value to me. So I got a reduced price on the lathe.

Powering this is going to be a bit of a nightmare but hopefully we'll do it on Friday when I pick it up. Because of the electronic variable speed it utilizes a mix of 3 phase and single phase circuits internally.

The guts of this are a Leeson 3hp 3 phase motor which I plan to connect to a VFD. The speed control operates a single phase circuit that has a DC motor on it that acts as a servo to operate a Reeve's drive.  Apparently folks have had issues with trying to run the whole mess off of a VFD because something interferes with the tach or something. So we plan on separating the motor circuit from the variable speed circuit. The guy I'm buying it form seems to know what he's talking about - I'm completely or nearly completely clueless.

I have no idea as to its actual date of manufacture as I can barely find any info other than a parts breakdown and some basic setup stuff which I have the originals for. It does appear to the be later date of manufacture as it has the shifter on the front of the bottom shroud vs on top next to the gear box.

Hopefully I'll get it home on Friday.

Sincerely
Mark R. Jonkman

http://bitsbytesandsawdust.blogspot.com


Re: SB 9A with Reground Bed

Gregg Eshelman
 

On 11/17/2015 4:31 PM, 'guycad@netzero.net' guycad@netzero.net [SOUTHBENDLATHE] wrote:


Third option is turcite as well.
Or Rulon or other sheet stuff that can be glued on. Those require machining and scraping like iron would to make it fit to the ground bed.

Moglice and Devcon Titanium Putty and similar products mold to the shape, no machining or scraping required.

Check out the application examples at http://www.moglice.com/ for methods of applying it.


Bison 6 Jaw Set Tru chuck for sale

G m
 

Does anyone have any interest in a like new Bison 6 jaw set tru chuck? 6" diameter, selling it with D1-4 backplate. Asking $1000 for the chuck and backplate. Both have only been used a few times. Had to buy it with the lathe, but will not need it.



Re: My first South Bend

carbure2003
 


Re: quick change tool post problem

carbure2003
 


Re: SB 9A with Reground Bed

carbure2003
 


Re: My first South Bend

Gregg Eshelman
 

On 11/17/2015 1:25 PM, Jerry Johnson jfjohn77@gmail.com [SOUTHBENDLATHE] wrote:


You are most likely correct about me doing this for the first time. I
will try to get by without removing the carriage if at all possible.
Unless you're built like Lou Ferigno in his prime, you'll want to take it down to a bare bed. All the sub-assemblies except the bed are manageable by a person of moderate strength. The bed is well over 100 pounds.

An assembled 9" will range from 250 to 500 pounds, depending on length and and features like a gearbox and power feeds.

One method I've used to relocate 10" and smaller lathes on iron legs is to slide them (on concrete floors) up to the back of a pickup. Next, support the end next to the truck (with a sturdy piece of wood and a jack or some strong people) then remove that leg (get the bolts loose first if using people for lifting) and slide the lathe onto the tailgate.

Push the lathe in as far as possible, remove second leg and push the lathe in farther. Reverse process to unload.

It's amazingly easy to slide heavy iron on a smooth concrete floor. Dad and I didn't have much trouble pushing around a 1920's 13" Sears Expert on iron legs. Dunno how much it weighed but the bare bed was heavier than dad and I together could lift.

That old made by South Bend* lathe was far heavier than a 9". It got loaded into our trailer for delivery by using a Bluebird KD1500 engine hoist. Picked up one end, backed the trailer under, picked up the other end then slid it in. Heavy V belts looped around the bed webs work great for lifting lathes of that weight or less.

*When South Bend was an "old", reliable manufacturer for about 10 years, according to one Sears ad for the Expert lathes.


Re: My first South Bend

Gregg Eshelman
 

On 11/17/2015 12:31 PM, jfjohn77@gmail.com [SOUTHBENDLATHE] wrote:


Well on this trip, my only help will be my wife and I think that would
be asking a little too much of her. The women I'm buying it from has
lost her husband.
It's not hard to break it down farther. The headstock is held on by two bolts from below. If it has a gearbox there are screws from the top, easier to get at with the headstock off.

Remove the gears from the banjo then once you have them and anything else obstructing it removed, it simply pulls out.

The gear cover on the end has a single bolt on its bed clamp.

It's rather straightfoward to take apart a South Bend 9". There's nothing hidden, no special tools required. The only thing one must be specially aware of is if you're completely taking one apart that has power feed. The screw in the middle of the clutch knob is left hand thread. All other fasteners on one are right hand thread.


Re: quick change tool post problem

Jim B. <btdtrf@...>
 

I have had similar issues.

I took a ship off the top of my cross slide, assuming it needed to be flatter. I don t think it helped.

I did use a thin piece of 220 grit sandpaper as a gasket under the TP.

It helps.

 

Jim B.

 

From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... [mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@...]
Sent: Tuesday, November 17, 2015 4:39 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] quick change toolpost problem

 

 

I have a Chinese AXA toolpost for my 9A. It suits my needs nicely (I wish I could afford an Aloris) but I really have to reef on the hold down nut to keep it from turning. Is there a fix for this or is it a result of buying cheap?Thanks, John.

 




Re: quick change toolpost problem

James Rice
 

I haven't had any issues with my Bostar Chinese tool post but I made a tall custom acorn nut and put a matching round knob handle on it so I won't have to keep chasing down the crescent wrench.  The acorn is deeply threaded.  I did this for all four of my lathes.



On Tue, Nov 17, 2015 at 3:39 PM, johnnyblock1@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:
 

I have a Chinese AXA toolpost for my 9A. It suits my needs nicely (I wish I could afford an Aloris) but I really have to reef on the hold down nut to keep it from turning. Is there a fix for this or is it a result of buying cheap?Thanks, John.




Re: quick change toolpost problem

soupy1951ca
 

I machined my own t-nut style base which solved a similar problem I had but the paper idea sounds much simpler. IMHO of course.

Mike from Canada

On Tue, Nov 17, 2015 at 4:39 PM, johnnyblock1@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:
 

I have a Chinese AXA toolpost for my 9A. It suits my needs nicely (I wish I could afford an Aloris) but I really have to reef on the hold down nut to keep it from turning. Is there a fix for this or is it a result of buying cheap?Thanks, John.





--

“People that know they are important think about others, people that think they are important, think about themselves.” – Hans F. Hansen

 

Learn from the mistakes of others, you might not live long enough to make them all yourself!!!


Re: quick change toolpost problem

Mark Hofer
 

I have no such troubles with mine.  Might I suggest you put a piece of paper between the post and the compound and try that?
M


On Nov 17, 2015, at 4:39 PM, johnnyblock1@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:

I have a Chinese AXA toolpost for my 9A. It suits my needs nicely (I wish I could afford an Aloris) but I really have to reef on the hold down nut to keep it from turning. Is there a fix for this or is it a result of buying cheap?Thanks, John.




quick change toolpost problem

John Gallo
 

I have a Chinese AXA toolpost for my 9A. It suits my needs nicely (I wish I could afford an Aloris) but I really have to reef on the hold down nut to keep it from turning. Is there a fix for this or is it a result of buying cheap?Thanks, John.


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