Date   

Re: Sketching Software

Kerri Duncan <silverforgestudio@...>
 

Gary- depending on how far you are looking to take it and what your "learning style" is you may want to try MOI (Moment of Inspiration). It is an "artists' CAD" style program that has some really good functionality at a lower price point.

If you intend on moving on later to higher functionality program then MOI is a good start point as its creator helped design RhinoCAD and the Rhino NURBS suite of products... MOI has a lot of the parallels and same command functions in their UI as Rhino- so converting from one to another is more intuitive and less of a learning curve. Good user base and interactive forums as well.

Just my .02- Im not any sort of a power user or pro level... but for tinkering around and knowing I want to go further- it was an easier choice knowing my end-goal was Rhino... So making my transition to Rhino was a deciding factor.

Kerri

On 05/04/2015 01:46 PM, gmjar@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] wrote:
 
I am looking for some simple drawing - drafting software that I can sketch up my projects prior to starting on them. Now I am using just normal 1/4x1/4 ruled paper and sometimes do not even use a straight edge. I would like to be able to think it out and draw it out a little neater. Free is always good but for something simple to use, I would be willing to pay for it.

Thanks for your thoughts
Gary
AE5VO
In the Beautiful Ozark Mountains




Re: Metal Spinning.

Jim B. <btdtrf@...>
 

You can make a table of “X” and “Y” coordinates, in suitable increments, and generate a “Stepped” approximation, later blending the shape with a file.

 

If the LED is not a true “point” source this may be close enough.

 

Attached are two pictures of how I used this approach on a large dial for my compound.

 

Jim B. 


From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... [mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@...]
Sent: Friday, May 08, 2015 3:47 AM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Re: Metal Spinning. [1 Attachment]

 

 

 

And a parabola is the shape generated by the equation y = x squared.  It would therefore be dead easy to generate using CMM, or equally simple but a lot more tedious to generate using the dials on 2 slides set at 90 degrees.  See attached xls.  For accuracy, the tool used for generating must touch the work only at a point, i.e. have no tip radius.  A tip radius could be calculated in as a correction to the basic equation, but I'll leave that to others.

 

Interestingly, all parabolas are identical.  If you make or draw only part of your first one, it is found that by scaling what remains in the 2 directions, you can get it back to fitting exactly the full original.

 

Eddie




From: "willray@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]"
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Sent: Friday, 8 May 2015, 3:30
Subject: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Re: Metal Spinning.

 

 

If generating the shape of a parabola is actually interesting, it's easy enough to do with just a square and a compass.

 

A parabola is the locus of points equidistant from a fixed point, and a fixed line.

 

Draw a horizontal line.

 

Pick a point above the line for the focus.

 

Use your compass to draw a circle with any radius you choose around the focus.

 

Use your compass to mark your square at that radius (or, just use it to indicate the radius along the square and remember that).

 

Slide the square along your baseline, until the point on it that you've marked with the radius, lands on the circle you drew around the focus.  That's one point on your parabola.  If you feel like generating both sides (not necessary for a template), do this on both sides of the focus.

 

Pick another radius, draw the ci rcle, re-mark your square, and again pick the "straight up from the line" point on the circle that coincides with the new radius mark on the square.

 

Repeat as necessary.

 

Sanity check : pick one radius that's half the distance between your focus and the line, pick another radius that's equal to the distance between the focus and the line.  Mark points using this process for these.  You should find that one is half-way between the focus and the line, and the other is at the height of the focus, straight right or left of it.

 

 

Again, given that the LED source isn't a point source, a parabola isn't going to to do "the right thing" with it, so you can take this as far as you like and mark as many points as you like, but beyond probably 4 or 5 points, you won't be making the reflector perform better for your purposes by doing so.

 


somebodys lucky day

David Jolly
 

   have two end gear covers,one reverencing gear set up and 3 gears,24-54-a 1 to 6 compound gear,9/16 hole,d.p. 18,was going to sell on e-bay but thought someone in the group might need.will ship for postage
thanks
Dave Jolly



Re: Metal Spinning.

William Ray
 

Of course - the only thing that's particularly handy about the graphical construction, is that it's easy to fit and adjust to the shape one wants for a particular real object, at the workbench.  The conic-section math is a bit harder for most people to intuitively see how to adjust, to produce exactly what they want.


Re: Sketching Software

Curt Wuollet
 

I use LibreCad it's free and has fairly goo interchange with the old Autocad format.
And it's a pretty serious 2D CAD program.

Regards

cww

On 05/04/2015 01:46 PM, gmjar@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] wrote:
 

I am looking for some simple drawing - drafting software that I can sketch up my projects prior to starting on them. Now I am using just normal 1/4x1/4 ruled paper and sometimes do not even use a straight edge. I would like to be able to think it out and draw it out a little neater. Free is always good but for something simple to use, I would be willing to pay for it.


Thanks for your thoughts

Gary

AE5VO

In the Beautiful Ozark Mountains



Re: heavy 10 thrust bearing PT2O7R1

Jasper McConnell
 

When I get the radial bearing set in hand, I will check and see what fits and how much more washer I need. The old outer ring is the race of the original bearing if I read you right and it is so hard I don't think it can be turned.I will get back with the topic after the radial brg arrives. I have calculated with all sorts of washers , inch ,metric,old bearing races and otherwise and the closest I came was withing .004 . I also ordered some shim stock to try and rework the spindle caps a little more evenly shimmed. Right now my biggest concern is the wear rings on the large bearing. I seem to have some material transfer from the bearing to the spindle and am not knowledgeable enough to do what needs doing to that. I  "may" be able to get it to another lathe and spin and polish it a bit but the bearing ?????
Jasper


-----Original Message-----
From: oscar kern kernbigo@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE
Sent: Fri, May 8, 2015 8:45 am
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Re: heavy 10 thrust bearing PT2O7R1

 
no you use the old outer ring



On Friday, May 8, 2015 6:58 AM, "hotrodjap@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:


 
Thanks Greg. If I had thought of that I wouldn't be so red faced now. Since it will be done in one setup,it will probably be very parallel on the faces.
I wasn't considering putting my lathe back together before I resolved the problems. Suppose it won't be any worse off than it was for such a short job.
Jasper



-----Original Message-----
From: Gregg Eshelman g_alan_e@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...>
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...>
Sent: Fri, May 8, 2015 12:33 am
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Re: heavy 10 thrust bearing PT2O7R1

 
On 5/7/2015 9:10 AM, hotrodjap@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] wrote:

> The radial needle
> bearing require more than two washers to even come close to the setpoint
> of the spindle location to OEM specs.

You have a lathe so make spacer rings of the thickness you need to fill
up the space after the pair of hardened washers and radial bearing are
in place.

---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
http://www.avast.com




Re: heavy 10 thrust bearing PT2O7R1

oscar kern <kernbigo@...>
 

no you use the old outer ring



On Friday, May 8, 2015 6:58 AM, "hotrodjap@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" wrote:


 
Thanks Greg. If I had thought of that I wouldn't be so red faced now. Since it will be done in one setup,it will probably be very parallel on the faces.
I wasn't considering putting my lathe back together before I resolved the problems. Suppose it won't be any worse off than it was for such a short job.
Jasper



-----Original Message-----
From: Gregg Eshelman g_alan_e@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE
Sent: Fri, May 8, 2015 12:33 am
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Re: heavy 10 thrust bearing PT2O7R1

 
On 5/7/2015 9:10 AM, hotrodjap@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] wrote:

> The radial needle
> bearing require more than two washers to even come close to the setpoint
> of the spindle location to OEM specs.

You have a lathe so make spacer rings of the thickness you need to fill
up the space after the pair of hardened washers and radial bearing are
in place.

---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
http://www.avast.com




Re: heavy 10 thrust bearing PT2O7R1

Jasper McConnell
 

Thanks Greg. If I had thought of that I wouldn't be so red faced now. Since it will be done in one setup,it will probably be very parallel on the faces.
I wasn't considering putting my lathe back together before I resolved the problems. Suppose it won't be any worse off than it was for such a short job.
Jasper



-----Original Message-----
From: Gregg Eshelman g_alan_e@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE
Sent: Fri, May 8, 2015 12:33 am
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Re: heavy 10 thrust bearing PT2O7R1

 
On 5/7/2015 9:10 AM, hotrodjap@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] wrote:

> The radial needle
> bearing require more than two washers to even come close to the setpoint
> of the spindle location to OEM specs.

You have a lathe so make spacer rings of the thickness you need to fill
up the space after the pair of hardened washers and radial bearing are
in place.

---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
http://www.avast.com


Re: Metal Spinning.

eddie.draper@btinternet.com
 

And a parabola is the shape generated by the equation y = x squared.  It would therefore be dead easy to generate using CMM, or equally simple but a lot more tedious to generate using the dials on 2 slides set at 90 degrees.  See attached xls.  For accuracy, the tool used for generating must touch the work only at a point, i.e. have no tip radius.  A tip radius could be calculated in as a correction to the basic equation, but I'll leave that to others.

Interestingly, all parabolas are identical.  If you make or draw only part of your first one, it is found that by scaling what remains in the 2 directions, you can get it back to fitting exactly the full original.

Eddie


From: "willray@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]"
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Sent: Friday, 8 May 2015, 3:30
Subject: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Re: Metal Spinning.

 
If generating the shape of a parabola is actually interesting, it's easy enough to do with just a square and a compass.

A parabola is the locus of points equidistant from a fixed point, and a fixed line.

Draw a horizontal line.

Pick a point above the line for the focus.

Use your compass to draw a circle with any radius you choose around the focus.

Use your compass to mark your square at that radius (or, just use it to indicate the radius along the square and remember that).

Slide the square along your baseline, until the point on it that you've marked with the radius, lands on the circle you drew around the focus.  That's one point on your parabola.  If you feel like generating both sides (not necessary for a template), do this on both sides of the focus.

Pick another radius, draw the ci rcle, re-mark your square, and again pick the "straight up from the line" point on the circle that coincides with the new radius mark on the square.

Repeat as necessary.

Sanity check : pick one radius that's half the distance between your focus and the line, pick another radius that's equal to the distance between the focus and the line.  Mark points using this process for these.  You should find that one is half-way between the focus and the line, and the other is at the height of the focus, straight right or left of it.


Again, given that the LED source isn't a point source, a parabola isn't going to to do "the right thing" with it, so you can take this as far as you like and mark as many points as you like, but beyond probably 4 or 5 points, you won't be making the reflector perform better for your purposes by doing so.




Re: heavy 10 thrust bearing PT2O7R1

Gregg Eshelman
 

On 5/7/2015 9:10 AM, hotrodjap@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] wrote:

The radial needle
bearing require more than two washers to even come close to the setpoint
of the spindle location to OEM specs.
You have a lathe so make spacer rings of the thickness you need to fill up the space after the pair of hardened washers and radial bearing are in place.


Re: Need Opinions On Quick Change Tool Post Holders

jimsta1942@...
 

O.K. For those wanting to see a picture of my three sided TP here it is. I dug it out and was surprised to see that as designed, it's not a quick change model. The maker used a 'locking washer designed to minimize chatter when locking it down. As you see, this precludes simultaneously using the other two slots. If I ever were to try it I'd replace the nut and washer with a 4 way style handle. While not visible, the two covered up sides are drilled and tapped. This particular example fits nicely on 9 and 10 inch lathes. For those interested, the slot width is 1 5/8" leaving lots of room for shims and allowing up to 1/2 inch holders. The upper surface is 3/4 inch thick and 3 1/8 inches long As I've said, other then as a novelty I don't see a need for it at all. Apologies for the poor photos. I'm still working out how to use all the features of my new camera. As currently configured this is the almost equivalent of a lantern tool post so I can't add much to the discussion on where it fits on the clumsyi scale. I've added a picture of it mounted on a SB9 lathe. which having never been rechristened since the day I found it 4 yrs ago still awaits a cleanup and re-activetion. Use your imagination to picture an upclose operation as the lathe is not fully accessible without moving small mountains of stuff out of the way.







or those requesting pictures of the triangula tool pos
---- "palciatore@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:

Was there an image with this? All I see is a blank screen.



---In SOUTHBENDLATHE@..., <btdtrf@...> wrote :



Here the tool is not exactly “In the Way”, but it certainly is not where it would like to be. I am cutting a 1X4 tip square thread. I would want the tool opposite the traveling rest. To even get close I have turned the QCTP 1180 degrees so I can put the tool on the right side and adjusted the compound so I can get close to opposite the rest.
To me all the QCTP’s were not designed with traveling rest in mind.

Or

All the traveling rests were not designed with a QCTP in mind.

Jim B.


From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... [mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@...]
Sent: Tuesday, May 05, 2015 2:45 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Re: Need Opinions On Quick Change Tool Post Holders




I would love to see a photo of some work where even a standard post
gets in the way. In the way of what? Where? How?








Re: Metal Spinning.

William Ray
 

If generating the shape of a parabola is actually interesting, it's easy enough to do with just a square and a compass.

A parabola is the locus of points equidistant from a fixed point, and a fixed line.

Draw a horizontal line.

Pick a point above the line for the focus.

Use your compass to draw a circle with any radius you choose around the focus.

Use your compass to mark your square at that radius (or, just use it to indicate the radius along the square and remember that).

Slide the square along your baseline, until the point on it that you've marked with the radius, lands on the circle you drew around the focus.  That's one point on your parabola.  If you feel like generating both sides (not necessary for a template), do this on both sides of the focus.

Pick another radius, draw the circle, re-mark your square, and again pick the "straight up from the line" point on the circle that coincides with the new radius mark on the square.

Repeat as necessary.

Sanity check : pick one radius that's half the distance between your focus and the line, pick another radius that's equal to the distance between the focus and the line.  Mark points using this process for these.  You should find that one is half-way between the focus and the line, and the other is at the height of the focus, straight right or left of it.


Again, given that the LED source isn't a point source, a parabola isn't going to to do "the right thing" with it, so you can take this as far as you like and mark as many points as you like, but beyond probably 4 or 5 points, you won't be making the reflector perform better for your purposes by doing so.


10K swivel lamp

David Rysdam <david@...>
 

I've got a 1956 10K, rear-mounted motor on a steel bench. It came with a
lamp that I think is original, but I can't figure out how it attaches.

The base has a ball and socket joint with 3 half-sockets:

http://david.rysdam.org/pictures/equipment/10K-lamp-base.jpg

this attaches to a flange on the bench:

http://david.rysdam.org/pictures/equipment/10K-lamp-flange.jpg

(right now I have an aluminum block holding a different lamp there)

I *think* the black rubberized ball gets clamped between the two
clamshell pieces and then the bottom hemisphere rides in the base
socket. That piece is threaded, but I don't have whatever was on the
threads. I'm thinking maybe something that matches the radius of the
bottom of the two clamshells.

Does anyone have a picture of this that I can consult?


Re: 3 phase motor wiring [1 Attachment]

eddie.draper@btinternet.com
 

OK, I think I've worked out what goes on here with Jim's motor.  There are 2 sets of 3 phase windings, one of which is permanently coupled in star, the other set has both ends of each coil exposed.  These are are connected in parallel for 220V and series for 440V.  Terminals 7, 8 & 9 are each one end of one set of windings, the other ends of these are connected together internally as their star point with no access to it.  The other set of windings run from 1 to 4, 2 to 5 and 3 to 6.  Connecting 4, 5 and 6 together makes the star point for this set, which is not connected to the star point for the other set (it doesn't need to be in the parallel arrangement as both will be at 0 voltage).  Jim doesn't say whether his motor is the same brand as Dimitar's but if it is, problem should now be solved.

REMEMBER:  ANY electric motor when first connected will run in reverse.  (One of the corollories to Murphy's law).  To reverse a 3 phase motor, just switch over any 2 of the incoming line connections.

Eddie


From: "'Jim B. ' btdtrf@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]"
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Sent: Thursday, 7 May 2015, 20:38
Subject: RE: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] 3 phase motor wiring [1 Attachment]

 
[Attachment(s) from Jim B. included below]
Attached is the wiring diagram off my 3 ph mill motor.
It should help
 
Jim B. 

From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... [mailto: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... ]
Sent: Thursday, May 07, 2015 3:14 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] 3 phase motor wiring
 
 
I had disconnected my motor so that it could be inspected. This SB 14-1/2" lathe has the original 1945 vintage Westinghouse 3 phase motor, which matches SouthBends data card.

I found out that it was setup for 440 V usage.  The motor has 9 numbered electrcial leads. Though I kept track of how it was connected, I'm thoroughly confused to reconnect (reconfigure) the motor for 220 V usage.  I'm planning on using a VFD unless I get 3 phase power to my shop.

I'm confused about wye, delta, star configurations. Does it matter? Which wires do I need to connect to power and each other?

I would appreciate the help, since I know enough about electricity to be dangerous.

thanks, Dimitar



Re: 3 phase motor wiring

Jim B. <btdtrf@...>
 

Attached is the wiring diagram off my 3 ph mill motor.

It should help

 

Jim B. 


From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... [mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@...]
Sent: Thursday, May 07, 2015 3:14 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] 3 phase motor wiring

 

 

I had disconnected my motor so that it could be inspected. This SB 14-1/2" lathe has the original 1945 vintage Westinghouse 3 phase motor, which matches SouthBends data card.

I found out that it was setup for 440 V usage.  The motor has 9 numbered electrcial leads. Though I kept track of how it was connected, I'm thoroughly confused to reconnect (reconfigure) the motor for 220 V usage.  I'm planning on using a VFD unless I get 3 phase power to my shop.

I'm confused about wye, delta, star configurations. Does it matter? Which wires do I need to connect to power and each other?

I would appreciate the help, since I know enough about electricity to be dangerous.

thanks, Dimitar


Re: 3 phase motor wiring

John Luhn
 

Does the motor not have any sort of a wiring picture? Usually they have a part of the nameplate that shows which wires to connect for each voltage, though I'll admit I've never looked at anything that old. Have you tried searching for a wiring plan? 

IIRC, most setups are wye type wiring. You should be able to just hook it up for a 230v 3-ph configuration per the data plate and have it work. 

You should be able to hook it up, but will need to know which wire goes to which coil. May wind up having to do some trial and error based on whatever info you can find. 

On Thu, May 7, 2015 at 12:13 PM, Rangelov rangelov@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:
 

I had disconnected my motor so that it could be inspected. This SB 14-1/2" lathe has the original 1945 vintage Westinghouse 3 phase motor, which matches SouthBends data card.

I found out that it was setup for 440 V usage.  The motor has 9 numbered electrcial leads. Though I kept track of how it was connected, I'm thoroughly confused to reconnect (reconfigure) the motor for 220 V usage.  I'm planning on using a VFD unless I get 3 phase power to my shop.

I'm confused about wye, delta, star configurations. Does it matter? Which wires do I need to connect to power and each other?

I would appreciate the help, since I know enough about electricity to be dangerous.

thanks, Dimitar



3 phase motor wiring

Rangelov
 

I had disconnected my motor so that it could be inspected. This SB 14-1/2" lathe has the original 1945 vintage Westinghouse 3 phase motor, which matches SouthBends data card.

I found out that it was setup for 440 V usage.  The motor has 9 numbered electrcial leads. Though I kept track of how it was connected, I'm thoroughly confused to reconnect (reconfigure) the motor for 220 V usage.  I'm planning on using a VFD unless I get 3 phase power to my shop.

I'm confused about wye, delta, star configurations. Does it matter? Which wires do I need to connect to power and each other?

I would appreciate the help, since I know enough about electricity to be dangerous.

thanks, Dimitar


Re: Metal Spinning.

RJ White
 

 have seen this done before on a metal lathe , The had the form mounted in the chuck and a wooden dowel about 3/4 inthe tool post and used the lathe as you would to cut metal to form  the sheet metal .

let us know how it goes  
 
RJ  White
619-405-1699



On Thursday, May 7, 2015 4:00 AM, "Andrew Noyes andrewlnoyes@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" wrote:


 
If you want to form a more accurate parabola, I wonder if the little ellipse drawing gadget could be leveraged. It seems that one half of an ellipse has a focus, and might be an approximation of a parabola. Been a long time since I did the math.
http://www.daube.ch/docu/graphics/drawing_ellipsecompas.gif
Obviously you'd have to make an implementation of this idea, similar to a radius tool. If you're not familiar with the idea in the photo, the cross represents sliding ways, and the arm has slides that move along the ways as the arm rotates.

I don't know, just a thought.
Andy




Re: Metal Spinning.

lance
 

John,

I have spun aluminum alloy onto maple form in shape of ogee,
conical top with flared skirt. Aluminum work hardens. 
Anneal it to dead soft at 700 F in your barbie.
Expect about 2-3 passes before it gets hard, depending on its thickness.
If you make the form from steel, you can torch anneal on the lathe,
else you will have to remove the work from the wooden form to anneal.
One pass to the headstock to lay the work to 45*, one pass back to TS to flatten it.
Work in sections. Use the backstick to keep the lip from folding, hold edge at 45*.
Use lube on the work and the backstick. Can't use to much, you’ll just wear it.
I am 6’1” I find I need a 6” platform to stand on while spinning so to get a god angle
with the tool. If you hitch your arm up and apply the pressure, you will get a very sore neck.
BTDT.

You will need:
a duckbill
a fingernail
a round or ball end
a round-over
a trimmer

These can be made DIY to a size convenient for you if you have the steel rod, 
about 3/4 -1” OD, a grinder, a polisher and a way to heat treat and quench.
I have 3 I will sell, have to look at what shape they are…80USD ea + shipping
I am leaving in 4 hours for 6 days, so if interested, I’ll get back to you next Weds.

You will need hard wood back stick about 1-2” wide with a flat side and the other side rounded over to meet the edge.
Lube, toilet bowl is good, esp if made to a paste with kero
Also saw blade wax or neutogena brand face soap is good < Also good for metal parting>

There are lots of tricks, so search the web for video.
I used aluminum flashing to practice on, thin so it develops a light touch.
Thick stock, anneal more often, use more pressure.

lance
++++


On May 6, 2015, at 9:30 PM, 'John Dammeyer' johnd@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:

Is it a good idea to use a South Bend Heavy 10L for metal spinning? I want to make some parabolic cones about 5" diameter and 3" tall. Polished and clear coated to reflect LED Lights.
There's lots on the web on spinning but everyone seems to be using a wood lathe or something really big.  
Also haven't found any sites on how to make the tools.
Thanks
John Dammeyer



Re: heavy 10 thrust bearing PT2O7R1

Jasper McConnell
 

Thanks Jim,
I had forgotten about that discussion on the fiber washer and I had read it before. My lathe uses a metal washer on the takeup nut side but it applies equally well as replacing it will alollow a thrust bearing on both sides of the small bearing cap to take the end play both directions on the spindle. It would seem to take the harmonics out of the spindle which occasionally shows in the finish on a part.
 My frustration of sorts is that ball thrust bearings go away at the threshold size of what would replace the OEM bearing. The radial needle bearing require more than two washers to even come close to the setpoint of the spindle location to OEM specs. I'll play with the numbers a bit more and even look at metric washers to see if I can come up with something that will work. I don't have a surface grinder to help with that. Maybe I can turn the groove side of the original bearings toward each other and sandwich the needle thrust bearing where the old ball and race were.
Jasper


-----Original Message-----
From: 'Jim B. ' btdtrf@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] To: SOUTHBENDLATHE
Sent: Wed, May 6, 2015 9:32 pm
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Re: heavy 10 thrust bearing PT2O7R1

 
Go to the FILES section. It's in the main folder. 


On May 6, 2015, at 10:21 PM, 'Jim B. ' btdtrf@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] < SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:

< div>  
There is a conversion for the Heavy 10. The bearing has a slightly larger ID and requires turning a bushing. I thought it was on this site but perhaps it's on the southbendheavy10 site. 
I will look and get back. I can't get to the files section on the iPhone. 

Jim B,

On May 6, 2015, at 10:02 PM, hotrodjap@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] < SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:

 
I have read the article about replacing the thrust bearing on a Model A lathe which has a smaller spindle than the 10L. That's where the problem starts. I have searched all the usual suppliers for a 1 7/8 x 2 1/2 thrust bearing to replace the ones on my lathe. They offer needle roller 1 3/4 x 2 1/2 5909K42 or 2 x 2 3/4 5909K43 .Can't get closer in metric either. Both are very thin ( 0.078 plus 2 each .126 washers plus 3 each .032 washers=.426 ) in comparison to the approx .435 thickness of the regular bearing.. McMaster sells a roller thrust bearing exactly the right thickness but stops at 1 1/2 inch ID x 2 1/8 OD. That gets me as far as I got.
Replacing the takeup washer with the needle bearing will require turning the takeup nut down more parallel than I think my lathe ( now out of commission ) would do and the same size dilemma exists for it.

Jasper


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