Date   

Re: New Member, New Lathe

Matthew Lewis
 

Lance, thanks.

 

No bushings that I saw, but it does have the screw in end cap that seems to act as a bearing, complete with an oil hole.

 

Matt

 


 


Re: New Member, New Lathe

lance
 

This sounds like a very versatile lathe.

I can not image that rubber parts in the TS ram would be
stock. What is used to support the front and back of the ram screw?

The front screws into the ram, any bushings?
The rear should have bushings or bearings to support the screw, then a screw in end- cap to preload the screw?

lance
++++

On Oct 23, 2014, at 4:18 PM, mlewis@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:

This is a 54"  unified bed, without seperate feet.  It is very deep and the cross bracing between the ways is latice work (XXXXX) style.  There a gap about 2.5" deep by 2.5 " wide between the headstock and bed and what looks like a removable section an additional 4" or so wide (measurements from memory) just to the right of the gap, with a small sheet metal debris cover between the ways. 


Re: New Member, New Lathe

Matthew Lewis
 

Just posted a photo of the lathe in all its filthy (and this after some serious cleaing effort on the bed and compound) glory under 9" Gap Bed Lathe.

 

Matt


Re: New Member, New Lathe

Matthew Lewis
 

Thank you Jim

 

I will certainly check the serial number after work and post it.

 

This is a 54"  unified bed, without seperate feet.  It is very deep and the cross bracing between the ways is latice work (XXXXX) style.  There a gap about 2.5" deep by 2.5 " wide between the headstock and bed and what looks like a removable section an additional 4" or so wide (measurements from memory) just to the right of the gap, with a small sheet metal debris cover between the ways. 

 

One heavy hunk of iron. 

 

Matt


Re: Leveling

eddie.draper@btinternet.com
 


Hi Jack,
 
Firstly, assume an unworn bed but one which is uniformly twisted.  As the saddle is cranked along, its position twists with the bed, and you can verify and correct this using a spirit level nailed somewhere onto the carriage and tweaking the holding down or support bolts.
 
If the tailstock is truly centred, a parallel bar held between centres, regardless of length, will show the bed twist.  However, if the tailstock slides are twisted the same as the saddle slides, the DTI will show no twist as you crank the saddle along.  The latter is the preferable condition, as you can't change one just by adjusting the holding down bolts without the other.  Whatever, first fix the twist.
 
If the tailstock is offset (fortunately not needed if you have a taper turning attachment) for the deliberate turning of a taper, you can tell that this is not bed twist if you have a long and a short cylinder between centres, as the AMOUNT of offset, not the RATE of offset will be the same in both cases.  It's correction of tailstock offset where you really want the long and short bars between centres.  Second, fix the tailstock offset.
 
Now consider a worn bed, after you've corrected all the above.  You want a fairly long cylinder (considered in the context of the saddle travel)rigidly held in the chuck, overhanging without the tailstock centre.  Chucks can usually be relied upon to be pretty horrible, so it will  gyrate a bit as you rotate it, but that doesn't matter.  Just rotate the chuck manually and take the middle of the DTI reading at each position you measure as you crank the saddle along the bed.  It might help to draw a graph of mean (= (max +min)/2) DTI reading v position of the saddle.  If the headstock mandrel is not parallel to the slideways when seen from above, you'll see a change in the mean DTI reading as you crank the saddle along and if linear it is almost certainly mandrel v slide alignment (in the absence of twist, as corrected earlier).  A bodger like myself would split the difference and put a bit of twist into the bed to compensate, but note that this is a compromise solution, making one thing worse to make another better.   If it varies at an unsteady rate (usually more rapid near the headstock, as that is where most work is undertaken), then it is slideway wear.  In either case you've got a much bigger job than just setting the tailstock to centre or twisting the bed a bit.
 
I have to say how impressed I have been with the dedication of some of the lathe restorers on this forum.  I would never dream of hand scraping a bed back to profile, but just find a way of getting it ground, and if I found the mandrel was pointing in the wrong direction, I'd probably live with it and compensate when cutting (every lathe I've ever used makes cones, not cylinders!  But then, they've all been old bangers - you should see the bed wear near the chuck on our 18" centre height (36" "swing") by 10' between centres Broadbent at our railway.)  If desperate enough, and the headstock was cast one with the bed and therefore not movable, I would whitemetal the nose end bearing bush and contrive some sort of boring bar thingy between the tail bearing of the headstock and tailstock.  But first you have to align the tailstock centre with the headstock's tail bearing, so perhaps it isn't that simple...
 
Hope this helps, if any further help is needed with the 3D geometry or trigonometry homework, don't hesitate.
 
Eddie

From: Jack Dinan
To: eddie.draper@...
Sent: Thursday, October 23, 2014 7:19 PM
Subject: Leveling

Eddie: I read with great interest your suggestions for removing twist
/ checking for wear. I'll adopt the idea of clamping the level on the
cross slide.

Please clarify for me the procedure for using the long and the short bars.
Both just in a HS chuck? Both between centers?
How does this procedure reveal bed wear?

Thanks
jack



Re: New Member, New Lathe

Jim B. <btdtrf@...>
 

Welcome to the group Matt.

Gap bed lathes are rare.

Just to be sure you have what you think you have could you post the serial number.

 

Jim B.


From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... [mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@...]
Sent: Thursday, October 23, 2014 3:01 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] New Member, New Lathe

 

 

 Hi all:

 

After looking on and off for a good home shop unit for many years, I just picked up a 9" Model A Gap Bed last week.  It had been sitting for decades so it is pretty rusty and dirty, but as far as I can tell, only moderate wear.  I have started to break it down and clean, derust, paint and oil with the help of the Ilion book and parts, and, I hope, this group. 

 

I am working from tailstock to headstock and already have a question:  The screw for the ram had both what apprears to be a rubber O ring and a rubber cone ring (like in a faucet) around the shaft, but I can't find any parts lists or drawings showing these.  These rings are in terrible shape and I want to replace them if they are factory parts but wonder if these are later owner additions.  Any thoughts?

 

Thanks.

 

Matt


New Member, New Lathe

Matthew Lewis
 

 Hi all:

 

After looking on and off for a good home shop unit for many years, I just picked up a 9" Model A Gap Bed last week.  It had been sitting for decades so it is pretty rusty and dirty, but as far as I can tell, only moderate wear.  I have started to break it down and clean, derust, paint and oil with the help of the Ilion book and parts, and, I hope, this group. 

 

I am working from tailstock to headstock and already have a question:  The screw for the ram had both what apprears to be a rubber O ring and a rubber cone ring (like in a faucet) around the shaft, but I can't find any parts lists or drawings showing these.  These rings are in terrible shape and I want to replace them if they are factory parts but wonder if these are later owner additions.  Any thoughts?

 

Thanks.

 

Matt


Re: Leveling a SB9; Again.

Davis Johnson
 

Absolutely correct thinking.

The idea behind the V blocks or a special fixture to sit on the sides of the V ways is to support the level on the same surface that supports the saddle. That, and on my wartime 9A at the least, the tops of the Vs may not be in the best condition.

The saddle is a perfect fixture to sit on the surfaces that support the saddle. If you remove the cross slide any of the horizontal surfaces of the cross slide dovetail are available for setting the level. Removing the cross slide on a 9 with no taper attachment is trivial, just don't loose the gib!

On 10/23/2014 3:49 AM, Edward Draper eddie.draper@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] wrote:
 
Has nobody thought of just clamping the level to the saddle, cross slide or toolpost and then cranking the saddle end to end?  Since the tailstock is on separate slideways, do that also, and the differential will pick up alignment affecting wear on the saddle ways, usually near the chuck.
 
And in response to another item, you don't need to take a cut to check for parallel.  Make and keep a cylindrical bar with acurate centres.  Use a DTI on it both between centres and in the chuck.  If you have 2, a shortish one and a longish one (wrt the bed length) you can spot the diference between an off centre tailstock which you can adjust out by slewing that, and a twisted bed.  If your cylinder appears +ve or -ve barrel shaped, you have bed wear.  (Or a seriously off centre height DTI!)
 
Eddie

From: "'guycad@...' guycad@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]"
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Sent: Thursday, October 23, 2014 2:12 AM
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Re: Leveling a SB9; Again.
 
In my case, I machined a block of steel that fits both inverted V ways. The block was then hand scraped to have a perfect match with the ways, with the top surface  scraped flat,  When inverting the block, I have the same level readings.  (would be the same thing as with 2 matched V blocks.
 
No, I am not crazy, I machined this block in order to monitor progress when I re-scraped the beds on my lathes.  (dual monitoring with master precision straight edge and master precision level)  With this block, I can take readings at both ends and ensure I have no twist on the bed.  Later I levelled other SB lathes with it in our model engineering club.
 
Additional check after:   Test bar MT3 in the  spindle nose.  I also have a 20" long scrap hydraulic ram with chromed and ground surface that I modified in order to use it as test bar. (tailstock alignment, parallelism error on the full carriage travel length)
 
A 62 year old machine performs better than a brand new taiwan/chienese lathe!!!!! Unfortunately I will have to dismantle it...... I have to paint it
 
Guy
 
 
 
---------- Original Message ----------From: "oscar kern kernbigo@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" To: "SOUTHBENDLATHE@..." Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Re: Leveling a SB9; Again.Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 16:36:09 -0700
 
cutting a piece between centers proved noting you have to cut a p iece off the chuck alone to see if your leveling really worked 

On Wednesday, October 22, 2014 11:55 AM, "Jack Dinan jdinan@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" wrote:
 
> very helpful.>>I used a matched pair of "v" blocks on the "v" ways and a Starrett >199 master level on them. I leveled it out to 0 "ticks" on both ends >and center. The saddle is one tick high on the apron side and one >tick high on the tailstock side. the bed is dead level on every >bearing surface. The Connelly book is absolutely worth it's weight >in gold!!!!>>Surprising how little torque on the pedestal fastening bolts is >needed to get the level in... the final adjustment is literally a >twelfth turn of the mounting hardware combo.>>I cut a test bar between centers and the taper was between 3 or 4 >tenths. Better than my eyes can see on my mic...way better than my >best hopes.>>Used Gorilla glue to bond the scarfed leather belt. First attempt >failed ! I think because i didn't dampen the scarf surfaces. Second >attempt successful. Foamed up real good and seems to be damn strong.>>I put a Torrington bearing thrust bearing in the place of the >phenolic washer in the headstock. and that really is sweet. The >measured spindle bearing clearance came out to .0016" and precisely >.001" thrust.>>Now If I had a little bigger genset than the 2000 watt Yamaha, I >could really get busy. The lathe runs but there is just not enough >juice to make a decent cut more than 20 thou. That is the next >project.>>I'm really happy to have my lathe back in good order. I'm sure glad >I resisted the urge to buy a chinese import.>>I still need to slot the "C" leadscrew for the "B"style apron. I >still thinking about how to set that up. The bridge port at work >has 28 inches of travel. So, I'm thinking of 3 "v" blocks and > clamps lined up using a ground 36 inch straight edge. First >Indicate the straight edge on the table and clamp it. Then set up >the blocks and clamp them and the leadscrew. I am thinking of using >and endmill and shifting the center block as needed to do the >overlap section. Or would cutting the slot with a woodruff key >cutter be simpler?>>Thanks for the advice all along the way!!!>>mike>>
 
 
 
____________________________________________________________Odd Trick Fights Diabetes
"Unique" Proven Method To Control Blood Sugar In 3 Weeks. Watch Video.
DiabetesProtocol.com


Re: Leveling a SB9; Again.

eddie.draper@btinternet.com
 

Has nobody thought of just clamping the level to the saddle, cross slide or toolpost and then cranking the saddle end to end?  Since the tailstock is on separate slideways, do that also, and the differential will pick up alignment affecting wear on the saddle ways, usually near the chuck.
 
And in response to another item, you don't need to take a cut to check for parallel.  Make and keep a cylindrical bar with acurate centres.  Use a DTI on it both between centres and in the chuck.  If you have 2, a shortish one and a longish one (wrt the bed length) you can spot the diference between an off centre tailstock which you can adjust out by slewing that, and a twisted bed.  If your cylinder appears +ve or -ve barrel shaped, you have bed wear.  (Or a seriously off centre height DTI!)
 
Eddie

From: "'guycad@...' guycad@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]"
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Sent: Thursday, October 23, 2014 2:12 AM
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Re: Leveling a SB9; Again.
 
In my case, I machined a block of steel that fits both inverted V ways. The block was then hand scraped to have a perfect match with the ways, with the top surface  scraped flat,  When inverting the block, I have the same level readings.  (would be the same thing as with 2 matched V blocks.
 
No, I am not crazy, I machined this block in order to monitor progress when I re-scraped the beds on my lathes.  (dual monitoring with master precision straight edge and master precision level)  With this block, I can take readings at both ends and ensure I have no twist on the bed.  Later I levelled other SB lathes with it in our model engineering club.
 
Additional check after:   Test bar MT3 in the  spindle nose.  I also have a 20" long scrap hydraulic ram with chromed and ground surface that I modified in order to use it as test bar. (tailstock alignment, parallelism error on the full carriage travel length)
 
A 62 year old machine performs better than a brand new taiwan/chienese lathe!!!!! Unfortunately I will have to dismantle it...... I have to paint it
 
Guy
 
 
 
---------- Original Message ----------From: "oscar kern kernbigo@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" To: "SOUTHBENDLATHE@..." Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Re: Leveling a SB9; Again.Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2014 16:36:09 -0700
 
cutting a piece between centers proved noting you have to cut a p iece off the chuck alone to see if your leveling really worked 

On Wednesday, October 22, 2014 11:55 AM, "Jack Dinan jdinan@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" wrote:
 
> very helpful.>>I used a matched pair of "v" blocks on the "v" ways and a Starrett >199 master level on them. I leveled it out to 0 "ticks" on both ends >and center. The saddle is one tick high on the apron side and one >tick high on the tailstock side. the bed is dead level on every >bearing surface. The Connelly book is absolutely worth it's weight >in gold!!!!>>Surprising how little torque on the pedestal fastening bolts is >needed to get the level in... the final adjustment is literally a >twelfth turn of the mounting hardware combo.>>I cut a test bar between centers and the taper was between 3 or 4 >tenths. Better than my eyes can see on my mic...way better than my >best hopes.>>Used Gorilla glue to bond the scarfed leather belt. First attempt >failed ! I think because i didn't dampen the scarf surfaces. Second >attempt successful. Foamed up real good and seems to be damn strong.>>I put a Torrington bearing thrust bearing in the place of the >phenolic washer in the headstock. and that really is sweet. The >measured spindle bearing clearance came out to .0016" and precisely >.001" thrust.>>Now If I had a little bigger genset than the 2000 watt Yamaha, I >could really get busy. The lathe runs but there is just not enough >juice to make a decent cut more than 20 thou. That is the next >project.>>I'm really happy to have my lathe back in good order. I'm sure glad >I resisted the urge to buy a chinese import.>>I still need to slot the "C" leadscrew for the "B"style apron. I >still thinking about how to set that up. The bridge port at work >has 28 inches of travel. So, I'm thinking of 3 "v" blocks and > clamps lined up using a ground 36 inch straight edge. First >Indicate the straight edge on the table and clamp it. Then set up >the blocks and clamp them and the leadscrew. I am thinking of using >and endmill and shifting the center block as needed to do the >overlap section. Or would cutting the slot with a woodruff key >cutter be simpler?>>Thanks for the advice all along the way!!!>>mike>>
 
 
 
____________________________________________________________Odd Trick Fights Diabetes
"Unique" Proven Method To Control Blood Sugar In 3 Weeks. Watch Video.
DiabetesProtocol.com


Re: Leveling a SB9; Again.

carbure2003
 


Re: Leveling a SB9; Again.

oscar kern <kernbigo@...>
 

cutting a piece between centers proved noting you have to cut a piece off the chuck alone to see if your leveling really worked 


On Wednesday, October 22, 2014 11:55 AM, "Jack Dinan jdinan@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" wrote:


 
> very helpful.

>
>I used a matched pair of "v" blocks on the "v" ways and a Starrett
>199 master level on them. I leveled it out to 0 "ticks" on both ends
>and center. The saddle is one tick high on the apron side and one
>tick high on the tailstock side. the bed is dead level on every
>bearing surface. The Connelly book is absolutely worth it's weight
>in gold!!!!
>
>Surprising how little torque on the pedestal fastening bolts is
>needed to get the level in... the final adjustment is literally a
>twelfth turn of the mounting hardware combo.
>
>I cut a test bar between centers and the taper was between 3 or 4
>tenths. Better than my eyes can see on my mic...way better than my
>best hopes.
>
>Used Gorilla glue to bond the scarfed leather belt. First attempt
>failed ! I think because i didn't dampen the scarf surfaces. Second
>attempt successful. Foamed up real good and seems to be damn strong.
>
>I put a Torrington bearing thrust bearing in the place of the
>phenolic washer in the headstock. and that really is sweet. The
>measured spindle bearing clearance came out to .0016" and precisely
>.001" thrust.
>
>Now If I had a little bigger genset than the 2000 watt Yamaha, I
>could really get busy. The lathe runs but there is just not enough
>juice to make a decent cut more than 20 thou. That is the next
>project.
>
>I'm really happy to have my lathe back in good order. I'm sure glad
>I resisted the urge to buy a chinese import.
>
>I still need to slot the "C" leadscrew for the "B"style apron. I
>still thinking about how to set that up. The bridge port at work
>has 28 inches of travel. So, I'm thinking of 3 "v" blocks and
> clamps lined up using a ground 36 inch straight edge. First
>Indicate the straight edge on the table and clamp it. Then set up
>the blocks and clamp them and the leadscrew. I am thinking of using
>and endmill and shifting the center block as needed to do the
>overlap section. Or would cutting the slot with a woodruff key
>cutter be simpler?
>
>Thanks for the advice all along the way!!!
>
>mike
>
>




Re: Leveling a SB9; Again.

Jack Dinan <jdinan@...>
 

very helpful.



I used a matched pair of "v" blocks on the "v" ways and a Starrett 199 master level on them. I leveled it out to 0 "ticks" on both ends and center. The saddle is one tick high on the apron side and one tick high on the tailstock side. the bed is dead level on every bearing surface. The Connelly book is absolutely worth it's weight in gold!!!!

Surprising how little torque on the pedestal fastening bolts is needed to get the level in... the final adjustment is literally a twelfth turn of the mounting hardware combo.

I cut a test bar between centers and the taper was between 3 or 4 tenths. Better than my eyes can see on my mic...way better than my best hopes.

Used Gorilla glue to bond the scarfed leather belt. First attempt failed ! I think because i didn't dampen the scarf surfaces. Second attempt successful. Foamed up real good and seems to be damn strong.

I put a Torrington bearing thrust bearing in the place of the phenolic washer in the headstock. and that really is sweet. The measured spindle bearing clearance came out to .0016" and precisely .001" thrust.

Now If I had a little bigger genset than the 2000 watt Yamaha, I could really get busy. The lathe runs but there is just not enough juice to make a decent cut more than 20 thou. That is the next project.

I'm really happy to have my lathe back in good order. I'm sure glad I resisted the urge to buy a chinese import.

I still need to slot the "C" leadscrew for the "B"style apron. I still thinking about how to set that up. The bridge port at work has 28 inches of travel. So, I'm thinking of 3 "v" blocks and clamps lined up using a ground 36 inch straight edge. First Indicate the straight edge on the table and clamp it. Then set up the blocks and clamp them and the leadscrew. I am thinking of using and endmill and shifting the center block as needed to do the overlap section. Or would cutting the slot with a woodruff key cutter be simpler?

Thanks for the advice all along the way!!!

mike


Re: Leveling a SB9; Again.

william twombley
 

I used a matched  pair of "v" blocks on the  "v" ways and a Starrett 199 master level on them. I leveled it out to 0 "ticks" on both ends and center.  The saddle is one tick high on the apron side and one tick high on the tailstock side.  the bed is dead level on every bearing surface. The Connelly book is absolutely worth it's weight in gold!!!!

Surprising how little torque on the pedestal fastening bolts is needed to get the level in... the final adjustment is literally a twelfth turn of the mounting hardware combo. 

I cut a test bar between centers and the taper was between 3 or 4 tenths.  Better than my eyes can see on my mic...way better than my best hopes.

Used Gorilla glue to bond the scarfed leather belt.  First attempt failed ! I think because i didn't dampen the scarf surfaces.  Second attempt successful.  Foamed up real good and seems to be damn strong.

I put a Torrington bearing thrust bearing in the place of the phenolic washer in the headstock. and that really is sweet.  The measured spindle bearing  clearance came out to .0016" and precisely .001" thrust. 

Now If I had a little bigger genset than the 2000 watt Yamaha, I could really get busy. The lathe runs but there is just not enough juice to make a decent cut more than 20 thou.  That is the next project. 

I'm really happy to have my lathe back in good order.  I'm sure glad I resisted the urge to buy a chinese import. 

I still need to slot the "C" leadscrew for  the "B"style apron.  I still thinking about how to set that up.  The bridge port at work has 28 inches of travel. So, I'm thinking of 3 "v"  blocks and  clamps lined up using  a ground 36 inch straight edge.  First Indicate the straight edge on the table  and clamp it. Then set up the blocks and clamp them and the leadscrew. I am thinking of using and endmill and shifting the center block as needed to do the overlap section.  Or would cutting the slot with a woodruff key cutter be simpler?

Thanks for the advice all along the way!!!

mike


Re: pinion gear for 9A, 1924 mfger. [5 Attachments]

m. allan noah
 

Of course buying Ted's NOS part is the answer if it fits. If not, you
might be able to replace the pinion portion with a 14 tooth, 14 DP,
14.5 PA gear, bored to fit over the stub.

allan

On Wed, Oct 22, 2014 at 10:21 AM, Stevan Yasgur steve@yazlaw.com
[SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
Allan, here are the critical dimensions, less any info on gear pitch.


length of assembly: 2.32”
teeth: 46 large gear
14 pinion gear
diameter: 2.4” large gear
1.134 pinion gear
shaft diameter: 0.810
gear width: 0.447” large
0.527 pinion

These are caliper measurements only, so . . .

Ted (latheman2@aol.com) sent a picture of an old complete assembly he has
for sale, which may provide an answer.

Thanks! Still interested in options!

Yaz







Stevan S. Yasgur
Suite 550
3300 Edinborough Way
Edina, MN 55435
952-893-9393
NOTICE: This E-mail (including attachments) is covered by the Electronic
Communications Privacy Act, 18 U.S.C. §§ 2510-2521, is confidential and may
be legally privileged. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby
notified that any retention, dissemination, distribution, or copying of this
communication is strictly prohibited. Please reply to the sender that you
have received the message in error, then delete it. This email is not, nor
shall it be deemed to be, legal advice or counsel, unless the recipient
already has an attorney-client relationship with the firm or me. This email
does not create an attorney-client relationship.
Thank you.

On Oct 21, 2014, at 4:29 PM, 'm. allan noah' kitno455@gmail.com
[SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Steven, there was no 9A in 1924. I'm wondering if you don't have a
Series O wide-bed 9 inch lathe? Why don't you measure the outer
diameter of the pinion, and we'll see if a repair part can be found.

allan

On Tue, Oct 21, 2014 at 5:15 PM, Stevan Yasgur steve@yazlaw.com
[SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Listmates—

I have the above lathe with one broken pinion gear tooth, and a second
tooth
mashed and about to be torn off. picture attached. The pictures I’ve seen
of replacement pinion gears/shafts don’t show the boss which is visible on
the ways side of the gear the pinion shaft passes through. I suspect this
construction is different from later models of the 9A apron as shown on a
parts list I have. The larger gear behind it is double-keyed to the shaft.
The big gear has 46 teeth.

I need to replace the pinion gear, but am not sure what configuration to
buy
if one comes up on ebay. I checked with Grizzly, and their inventory of
parts does not include that pinion gear. Further, it appears that the gear
itself is really a gear-and-shaft construction. The “shaft” showing in
this
end shot is really the shaft that the gear revolves around.

Any help enormously appreciated! Thanks!

Steve








Stevan S. Yasgur
Suite 550
3300 Edinborough Way
Edina, MN 55435
952-893-9393
NOTICE: This E-mail (including attachments) is covered by the Electronic
Communications Privacy Act, 18 U.S.C. §§ 2510-2521, is confidential and
may
be legally privileged. If you are not the intended recipient, you are
hereby
notified that any retention, dissemination, distribution, or copying of
this
communication is strictly prohibited. Please reply to the sender that you
have received the message in error, then delete it. This email is not, nor
shall it be deemed to be, legal advice or counsel, unless the recipient
already has an attorney-client relationship with the firm or me. This
email
does not create an attorney-client relationship.
Thank you.

--
"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge
of my hand"




--
"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge
of my hand"


Re: pinion gear for 9A, 1924 mfger.

Steve Yasgur
 

Allan, here are the critical dimensions, less any info on gear pitch.


length of assembly:  2.32”
teeth: 46 large gear
14 pinion gear
diameter: 2.4” large gear
1.134 pinion gear
shaft diameter: 0.810
gear width: 0.447” large
0.527 pinion

These are caliper measurements only, so . . .

Ted (latheman2@...) sent a picture of an old complete assembly he has for sale, which may provide an answer.

Thanks!  Still interested in options!

Yaz


Stevan S. Yasgur
Suite 550
3300 Edinborough Way
Edina, MN  55435
952-893-9393
NOTICE: This E-mail (including attachments) is covered by the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, 18 U.S.C. §§ 2510-2521, is confidential and may be legally privileged. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any retention, dissemination, distribution, or copying of this communication is strictly prohibited. Please reply to the sender that you have received the message in error, then delete it. This email is not, nor shall it be deemed to be, legal advice or counsel, unless the recipient already has an attorney-client relationship with the firm or me. This email does not create an attorney-client relationship. 
Thank you. 

On Oct 21, 2014, at 4:29 PM, 'm. allan noah' kitno455@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:

Steven, there was no 9A in 1924. I'm wondering if you don't have a
Series O wide-bed 9 inch lathe? Why don't you measure the outer
diameter of the pinion, and we'll see if a repair part can be found.

allan

On Tue, Oct 21, 2014 at 5:15 PM, Stevan Yasgur steve@...
[SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:
>
> Listmates—
>
> I have the above lathe with one broken pinion gear tooth, and a second tooth
> mashed and about to be torn off. picture attached. The pictures I’ve seen
> of replacement pinion gears/shafts don’t show the boss which is visible on
> the ways side of the gear the pinion shaft passes through. I suspect this
> construction is different from later models of the 9A apron as shown on a
> parts list I have. The larger gear behind it is double-keyed to the shaft.
> The big gear has 46 teeth.
>
> I need to replace the pinion gear, but am not sure what configuration to buy
> if one comes up on ebay. I checked with Grizzly, and their inventory of
> parts does not include that pinion gear. Further, it appears that the gear
> itself is really a gear-and-shaft construction. The “shaft” showing in this
> end shot is really the shaft that the gear revolves around.
>
> Any help enormously appreciated! Thanks!
>
> Steve
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Stevan S. Yasgur
> Suite 550
> 3300 Edinborough Way
> Edina, MN 55435
> 952-893-9393
> NOTICE: This E-mail (including attachments) is covered by the Electronic
> Communications Privacy Act, 18 U.S.C. §§ 2510-2521, is confidential and may
> be legally privileged. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby
> notified that any retention, dissemination, distribution, or copying of this
> communication is strictly prohibited. Please reply to the sender that you
> have received the message in error, then delete it. This email is not, nor
> shall it be deemed to be, legal advice or counsel, unless the recipient
> already has an attorney-client relationship with the firm or me. This email
> does not create an attorney-client relationship.
> Thank you.
>
>

-- 
"well, I stand up next to a mountain- and I chop it down with the edge
of my hand"



Re: Leveling a SB9; Again.

sblatheman
 

Good memory. 

Ted

On Oct 21, 2014, at 9:55 PM, "'Jim B.' btdtrf@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:

 

I remember a post from Ted, Latheman2@..., who worked at SB, stating that SB took pains to make the tops of the ways both flat and true to the ways.
Jim B
Pessimist sees the glass half empty.
Optimist sees the glass half full.
Engineer sees the glass twice as large as needed.

Sent from my RAZR.


Re: Leveling a SB9; Again.

Jack Dinan <jdinan@...>
 

Agreed that removing the twist is the goal and that it is an operation independent of leveling. And yet every instruction I've seen, including those from SB, has one begin the twist-removal process by leveling. Hmm.


This comes up often. In my opinion, making sure there in no TWIST is far more important. A lathe on a ship would never be level but could certainly be mounted with no twist. My lathe has no twist but is far from level and I have no trouble with accuracy. Just my humble opinion of course.

Mike from Canada

On Tuesday, October 21, 2014, <mailto:jdinan@cox.net>jdinan@cox.net [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <<mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@yahoogroups.com>SOUTHBENDLATHE@yahoogroups.com> wrote:



I'm about to level and align my 9A.


According to Bulletin H-3, one places a precision level on the tops of the bed ways to carry out the leveling process.

But in a long-ago message, Turk cautioned that for SB lathes manufactured during and after WWII the tops of the ways were produced early in the manufacturing process and that these surfaces were not reliable for leveling.

What is the latest thinking on this issue?






--
Sent from Gmail Mobile


Re: Leveling a SB9; Again.

soupy1951ca
 

This comes up often. In my opinion, making sure there in no TWIST is far more important. A lathe on a ship would never be level but could certainly be mounted with no twist. My lathe has no twist but is far from level and I have no trouble with accuracy. Just my humble opinion of course.

Mike from Canada


On Tuesday, October 21, 2014, jdinan@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:
 

I'm about to level and align my 9A.


According to Bulletin H-3, one places a precision level on the tops of the bed ways to carry out the leveling process.

But in a long-ago message, Turk cautioned that for SB lathes manufactured during and after WWII the tops of the ways were produced early in the manufacturing process and that these surfaces were not reliable for leveling. 

What is the latest thinking on this issue?






--


Re: Leveling a SB9; Again.

Jim B. <btdtrf@...>
 

I remember a post from Ted, Latheman2@AOL.com, who worked at SB, stating that SB took pains to make the tops of the ways both flat and true to the ways.
Jim B
Pessimist sees the glass half empty.
Optimist sees the glass half full.
Engineer sees the glass twice as large as needed.

Sent from my RAZR.


Leveling a SB9; Again.

jdinan@...
 

I'm about to level and align my 9A.

According to Bulletin H-3, one places a precision level on the tops of the bed ways to carry out the leveling process.

But in a long-ago message, Turk cautioned that for SB lathes manufactured during and after WWII the tops of the ways were produced early in the manufacturing process and that these surfaces were not reliable for leveling. 

What is the latest thinking on this issue?




13921 - 13940 of 105851