Date   

Re: 9a Reverse Gear Shaft Stuck

Steve Wells
 


I'm in this thread late, but let me clarify a few things for the posters. first I did not write the rebuild books, nor do I sell
them on e-bay, that is Steve Brooks, although our eBay user names are similar and my website must be used for
references, there is no connection between us. As for the question, if his book does not list the wicks in the reverse tumbler
studs or reverse shaft for the 9A Workshop, it is an error, they indeed have felts. the older Workshops used part number
256 x 7 which is a 3/16 round in the studs, the newer used a 256 x 1 which is 1/16 x 1/8, the reverse shaft uses a 256 x 3,
which is a 3/32 x 3/16. I stock both the 1 and the 3, they are $3.00 each, being 24 inches long, so there is enough to do the apron
also. On the older ones you can substitute the 3 for the 7. attached pictures of the reverse shaft and oil hole.
Yes, the shaft is hard to remove after time, DO NOT push or beat on the threads. Make a bushing that slips over the threads
and use this to press with, support the bracket close to the shaft on the reverse side with another bushing, don't spread out the force
on the cast iron.
 
Steve Wells  
 
 
 
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, May 22, 2014 10:53 PM
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Re: 9a Reverse Gear Shaft Stuck

 

There are felts in my old-style bolt-type reverse lever assembly.

The two tumbler gear shafts (the gears that take turns engaging the teeth on the end of the spindle) have an off-center hole in the outside end. This hole actually angles in to the center of the shaft, where it intersects a cross-wise hole that should have a felt in it (3/16 diameter round, I seem to recall). Oil goes from your can into the angled hole, which saturates the cross-wise felt that caries the oil to the inside of the gear.

I'm not sure that I would understand that explanation if I hadn't written it myself.

My felts were so solid with varnish from 60 years of oil that I had to drill them out with a drill bit spun between my thumb and fore finger.

Like you, I was unable to press out the stud-gear shaft. I soaked the whole assembly in carburetor  cleaner. This cleaned it up (including all the paint). I'm pretty sure that I can see the end of a length-wise rectangular felt on the stud gear shaft. I'm not 100% sure without getting the shaft out, which my arbor press won't do either. I'm not sure how oil gets to it.

The other hidden  or non-obvious feature is a pair of screws at either end of the bolt-slot so that forward and reverse gear mesh can be adjusted.

On 5/22/2014 9:27 PM, mosak@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] wrote:
 

I really appreciate the advice and Jim B thanks for the photo. So, just to make sure, contrary to the (fantastic) Wells book which uses a newer plunger style as the example, it appears that there are no internal wicks or channels in this old style Reverse Bracket? Thus, there is no need to remove the shaft because there is nothing that needs to be accessed?  Is this all correct?

 

There is a hole above the handle, which appears to be the place to oil the shaft, or is there supposed to be a wick here?  Finally, is the only place for wicks and on the entire thing just the shafts of the twin gears, with an oiling hole on their back?   Thank you so much.


Re: chuck

Nick Jonkman
 

Mark
Tubal Cain has a good video at <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CP6tW2ge2xs> on dis-assembly, cleaning and lubricating of a 3 jaw chuck. Worth watching.
Nick

On 23/05/14 6:33 PM, markfrazier16137@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] wrote:
 

my six inch scroll chuck is pretty dirty and I disassembled to clean. What should I lube it with when reassembling? oil, grease, or something else? I don't want a bunch of lube flying out when I rev it up. I assume it should be lubed sparingly. It was full of fine chips and many years of crud, but appeared to have had a little grease in it.


Thanks ,

Mark


Re: bolt

markfrazier16137@...
 

Thank you for the print it looks excellent. I'm going to make 3, in case I screw one up in the process. I should end up with one or three , depending on how it goes. will make from drill rod and heat treat.


Thank you,

Mark


chuck

markfrazier16137@...
 

my six inch scroll chuck is pretty dirty and I disassembled to clean. What should I lube it with when reassembling? oil, grease, or something else? I don't want a bunch of lube flying out when I rev it up. I assume it should be lubed sparingly. It was full of fine chips and many years of crud, but appeared to have had a little grease in it.


Thanks ,

Mark


Re: milling vice question

Davis Johnson
 

Quite similar in concept to what is known in the wood working world as  a "pattern maker's vise".

On 5/23/2014 1:39 PM, jaustin@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] wrote:
 

We used a similar set-up in some of the shops I've worked at. Usually using a dowel pin or pins, tooling ball, or whatever worked to hold the first surface against the fixed vice jaw. This has the advantage of not having to use a thin parallel or other such method to hold the 'pusher' up while the jaws are closed. Looks like a good project.











Re: milling vice question

shadetree1962
 

We used a similar set-up in some of the shops I've worked at. Usually using a dowel pin or pins, tooling ball, or whatever worked to hold the first surface against the fixed vice jaw. This has the advantage of not having to use a thin parallel or other such method to hold the 'pusher' up while the jaws are closed. Looks like a good project.


Re: milling vice question

Mark E. Frazier <markfrazier16137@...>
 

Theirs is for a six inch vise I think. I don't know if they make different sizes. There is a link to the maker and more info on the eBay site I think.

Mark


From: Edward Draper eddie.draper@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]
Sent: ‎5/‎23/‎2014 12:06 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Re: milling vice question

 

It looks like a very good idea.  See http://quadrallel.com/
 
Couple of rectangular bars with dimples at the centre, a ball and a couple of springs to stop it falling apart.
 
Of course, theirs won't fit all vices and machines...
 
Eddie
 
 

From: "Soupy51 soupy51@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]"
To: "southbendlathe@..."
Sent: Friday, May 23, 2014 3:55 PM
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Re: milling vice question
 
Spelling is absolutely correct and it looks like an awesome item.
 
Mike from Canada​
On Fri, May 23, 2014 at 10:39 AM, Nelson Collar nel2lar@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:
 
Mark
I don't know but I think your spelling might be wrong?
Nelson Collar
On Friday, May 23, 2014 12:40 AM, "markfrazier16137@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:
 
i saw a thing on the internet called a " quadrallel " for your vice. anyone seen this or used one. The idea looks good.

Mark
--
“People that know they are important think about others, people that think they are important, think about themselves.” – Hans F. Hansen
 
Learn from the mistakes of others, you might not live long enough to make them all yourself!!!


Re: milling vice question

Mark E. Frazier <markfrazier16137@...>
 

No, spelling is right. I saw it on eBay.

Mark


From: Nelson Collar nel2lar@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]
Sent: ‎5/‎23/‎2014 10:46 AM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Re: milling vice question

 

Mark
I don't know but I think your spelling might be wrong?
Nelson Collar
On Friday, May 23, 2014 12:40 AM, "markfrazier16137@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" wrote:


 
i saw a thing on the internet called a " quadrallel " for your vice. anyone seen this or used one. The idea looks good.

Mark



Re: milling vice question

eddie.draper@btinternet.com
 

It looks like a very good idea.  See http://quadrallel.com/
 
Couple of rectangular bars with dimples at the centre, a ball and a couple of springs to stop it falling apart.
 
Of course, theirs won't fit all vices and machines...
 
Eddie
 
 

From: "Soupy51 soupy51@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]"
To: "southbendlathe@..."
Sent: Friday, May 23, 2014 3:55 PM
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Re: milling vice question
 
Spelling is absolutely correct and it looks like an awesome item.
 
Mike from Canada​
On Fri, May 23, 2014 at 10:39 AM, Nelson Collar nel2lar@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:
 
Mark
I don't know but I think your spelling might be wrong?
Nelson Collar
On Friday, May 23, 2014 12:40 AM, "markfrazier16137@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:
 
i saw a thing on the internet called a " quadrallel " for your vice. anyone seen this or used one. The idea looks good.

Mark
--
“People that know they are important think about others, people that think they are important, think about themselves.” – Hans F. Hansen
 
Learn from the mistakes of others, you might not live long enough to make them all yourself!!!


Re: milling vice question

soupy1951ca
 

Spelling is absolutely correct and it looks like an awesome item.
 
Mike from Canada​


On Fri, May 23, 2014 at 10:39 AM, Nelson Collar nel2lar@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:
 

Mark
I don't know but I think your spelling might be wrong?
Nelson Collar
On Friday, May 23, 2014 12:40 AM, "markfrazier16137@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:


 
i saw a thing on the internet called a " quadrallel " for your vice. anyone seen this or used one. The idea looks good.

Mark





--

“People that know they are important think about others, people that think they are important, think about themselves.” – Hans F. Hansen

 

Learn from the mistakes of others, you might not live long enough to make them all yourself!!!


Re: milling vice question

Nelson Collar
 

Mark
I don't know but I think your spelling might be wrong?
Nelson Collar

On Friday, May 23, 2014 12:40 AM, "markfrazier16137@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" wrote:


 
i saw a thing on the internet called a " quadrallel " for your vice. anyone seen this or used one. The idea looks good.

Mark



Re: Picked up a SB 10

m. allan noah
 

That's a Light 10, also called the 10K, it was made in 1979.

allan


On Fri, May 23, 2014 at 8:38 AM, atomictow@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...> wrote:
 

I just picked up a South Bend 10 and I am interested in getting more info on it.

The numbers on the table are;

DDB-101NK

35369K


Thanks




--
"The truth is an offense, but not a sin"


Picked up a SB 10

Paul
 

I just picked up a South Bend 10 and I am interested in getting more info on it.

The numbers on the table are;

DDB-101NK

35369K


Thanks


Re: milling vice question

markfrazier16137@...
 

i saw a thing on the internet called a " quadrallel " for your vice. anyone seen this or used one. The idea looks good.

Mark


Re: bolt

Nelson Collar
 

Mark
Here is the print of the South Bend Bolt. Let me know how it works for you.
Nelson Collar

On Thursday, May 22, 2014 10:21 PM, "markfrazier16137@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE]" wrote:


 
Just for fun,  I am going to make a couple of the square head bolts to fit the saddle clamp on my 9 inch lathe. If someone has one would you tell me some of the specs. the length , thread length, and diameter of the round shoulder under the square head. ( yea , I could figure all this out , but I just want to save a couple brain cells )

thanks,

Mark



Re: 9a Reverse Gear Shaft Stuck

Davis Johnson
 

There are felts in my old-style bolt-type reverse lever assembly.

The two tumbler gear shafts (the gears that take turns engaging the teeth on the end of the spindle) have an off-center hole in the outside end. This hole actually angles in to the center of the shaft, where it intersects a cross-wise hole that should have a felt in it (3/16 diameter round, I seem to recall). Oil goes from your can into the angled hole, which saturates the cross-wise felt that caries the oil to the inside of the gear.

I'm not sure that I would understand that explanation if I hadn't written it myself.

My felts were so solid with varnish from 60 years of oil that I had to drill them out with a drill bit spun between my thumb and fore finger.

Like you, I was unable to press out the stud-gear shaft. I soaked the whole assembly in carburetor  cleaner. This cleaned it up (including all the paint). I'm pretty sure that I can see the end of a length-wise rectangular felt on the stud gear shaft. I'm not 100% sure without getting the shaft out, which my arbor press won't do either. I'm not sure how oil gets to it.

The other hidden  or non-obvious feature is a pair of screws at either end of the bolt-slot so that forward and reverse gear mesh can be adjusted.

On 5/22/2014 9:27 PM, mosak@... [SOUTHBENDLATHE] wrote:
 

I really appreciate the advice and Jim B thanks for the photo. So, just to make sure, contrary to the (fantastic) Wells book which uses a newer plunger style as the example, it appears that there are no internal wicks or channels in this old style Reverse Bracket? Thus, there is no need to remove the shaft because there is nothing that needs to be accessed?  Is this all correct?

 

There is a hole above the handle, which appears to be the place to oil the shaft, or is there supposed to be a wick here?  Finally, is the only place for wicks and on the entire thing just the shafts of the twin gears, with an oiling hole on their back?   Thank you so much.


Re: milling vice question

Paul Alciatore
 

To fight this problem you need to understand it. This drawing shows what is happening. The moving vise jaw is not actually lifting off the vise base, it is rotating and the pivot point is on that base.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v55/EPAIII/ViseLift.jpg


I hope the picture comes through; if not, follow the link.  


The first thing you can do is add a spacer at the bottom of the jaws that is the same width as the work piece. This will almost completely eliminate this problem.

Using parallels is the next step, not the first. Parallels will give you a reference plane that is parallel to the vise base and you can use a hammer to tap the work down against this plane as you gradually tighten the vise jaws. This is of limited use if the jaw still rotates so you need to use the spacer I suggested above FIRST.

As for the vises that tighten in a downward direction, they are called screwless vises or toolmakers vises. I have one like this:

Enco - Guaranteed Lowest Prices on Machinery, Tools and Shop Supplies

It's jaw does not rotate and the work stays parallel to the base. They are ground on all faces so they are quite accurate. I still recommend using parallels with them and the hammer to tap the part down while tightening the jaws. Prices on them can vary from $50 or so for import models on sale to several hundred.

The other option is a real milling vise. They start at several hundred dollars and go up from there. I haven't had to buy one yet, but I am sure I will reach that point sometime in the future.

 


Re: milling vice question

jlotdots
 

Perhaps I did not phrase that question correctly! Just yesterday there was a procedure described regarding making a block in a four jaw chuck under the heading "milling vise question", #90571 and a follow up message #90573 "I should have included this picture". No pictures showed up for me in those messages. Does that make more sense?

Thanks, Jim O.


Re: milling vice question

Jim B. <btdtrf@...>
 

I don't recall posting vise pictures!
Jim B

Sent from my RAZR.


bolt

markfrazier16137@...
 

Just for fun,  I am going to make a couple of the square head bolts to fit the saddle clamp on my 9 inch lathe. If someone has one would you tell me some of the specs. the length , thread length, and diameter of the round shoulder under the square head. ( yea , I could figure all this out , but I just want to save a couple brain cells )


thanks,


Mark

15781 - 15800 of 105851