Date   

Re: Repair or replace motor on SB 9 model A

Pat/Juke/Whatever... <chefjuke@...>
 

Nelson,

 

That might be one way to go, but I am just leaning towards a straightforward new engine, if only to have a clean, brand new warranted motor driving the lathe.  Might be more economical to go the other way, but I have the wherewithal to invest in one, and seems like there wouldn’t be a downside to getting a good new motor…other than the expense which I’ve already set aside money for.

 

-Chef Juke

www.chefjuke.com

"EVERYbody eats when they come to MY house!"

 

From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... [mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@...] On Behalf Of nfwood@...
Sent: Wednesday, March 26, 2014 5:24 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Repair or replace motor on SB 9 model A

 

 

Chef Juke,  

 

Why not remove the motor and wiring from your lathe and take it to the closest electrical motor shop or pump shop, have them test it for continuity, status of the electronics, determent whether the bearings are still OK or need to be replaced.  They can test either 120 or 220 very quickly.

 

Will take about 10 minutes and you will know if there is anything major that needs to be done before you begin to run it.  Bearings tend to be relatively inexpensive  Rollers/ball bearings up to $50 and oilite bushings $10 and the shop will do the work for you. 

 

I have had testing done for free in one shop and $20 in another.  Worth the price to know.

 

If you are still not satisfied, then look for a new or used motor. Follow for sale ads or garage sales and you will find electric motors for sale--but don't buy a 3250 RPM motor when your lathe calls for 1725. 

 

Regards,

 

Nelson W.

 



-----Original Message-----
From: oscar kern <kernbigo@...>
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE <SOUTHBENDLATHE@...>
Sent: Wed, Mar 26, 2014 7:43 pm
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Another Newbie with a motor question... [2 Attachments]

[Attachment(s) from oscar kern included below]

Here are 2 options i sent to Britt

 


From: Pat/Juke/Whatever... <chefjuke@...>
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Sent: Wednesday, March 26, 2014 4:11 PM
Subject: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Another Newbie with a motor question...

 

 

Hi there,

 

So I too, like Britt, am a newbie to the group and a new Lathe owner and new to machining.

 

I recently bought a 1944 South Bend 9a lathe which I am in the process of tearing down, stripping, painting, then rebuilding.  So far things are moving along well and I am certainly getting to know the tool inside and out.

 

The one question I am interested in getting some advice on is a new motor.  The lathe came with a Rockwell ½ horsepower motor that has seen better days. While it may be workable for the time being, I am considering getting a brand new motor just to start on a good footing.

 

I have been searching the  archives of the group and looking on other forums as well and THINK I’m on the right track with wanting a ¾ HP, TEFC motor with a 56 frame.

 

Does that sound about right to folks?

 

Two that I have been looking at are a Grizzly and  a Leeson, not because of any particular information, they’ve just been the ones that have come up first in my looking for motors with the above specs.

 

Here are the two specific motors I am looking at.

 

Grizzly H5377 Motor 3/4 HP Single-Phase 1725 RPM TEFC 110V/220V

 

Leeson 10-1025 ¾ 115/230 10.8/5.4 1725 56 ⅝˝ 28 lbs. $204.95

 

Any thoughts, guidance or just plain telling me what I don’t know would be greatly appreciated.

 

Sincerely,

 

-Chef Juke

"EVERYbody eats when they come to MY house!"

 

 

 


Re: Another Newbie with a motor question...

Pat/Juke/Whatever... <chefjuke@...>
 

Hi Lance,

 

I may run it on the original motor, although with it opened up at the moment I’m seeing some stuff (wiring failing, bearing looking and feeling a little sketchy)) that may indicate it’s time has come…and rather than put the whole thing back together with old motor, just to swap it out…well, rather just get a fresh one).

 

I’m starting to lean towards a ½ hp motor now as it seems that isn’t a clear benefit to a higher HP motor at the moment, and I’m no longer too worried that it will might be underpowered or otherwise less beneficial in some way..

 

 

-Chef Juke

www.chefjuke.com

"EVERYbody eats when they come to MY house!"

 

From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... [mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@...] On Behalf Of Lance Eggleston
Sent: Wednesday, March 26, 2014 5:08 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Another Newbie with a motor question...

 

 

Like most things, there are many related variables 

as to how ..would affect me, one way or another."

 

There are many vendors who make VFD's that run 110VAC in and 220 VAC out.

 

These VFDs will run motors 1/2, 3/4 maybe 1 HP just fine.

 

TECO and Minaric are two vendors.

 

Too much HP is a problem if the system is tight, no slip.

If you have a chuck crash, a gear jam or other mechanical 

bind up, the extra HP breaks things that might not have broken

with less power applied to them.

 

It's a matter of price, performance, looks, smoothness of cut.

Why not run the lathe with its original motor for a while and see

how it performs. Then you'll have a basis for knowing what you need.

 

lance

++++

 

On Mar 26, 2014, at 5:40 PM, Pat/Juke/Whatever... wrote:



What would be the downside of ‘too much’ hp?

 

Right now I am at single phase 110 volts..could upgrade to 1ph 220  if necessary…but not sure I see the benefits yet (remember, I’m a newbie, so I haven’t done more than basic testing the machine before purchasing it).

 

I’d be fine going for the ½ HP if I had a clear sense of how the difference in strength would affect me, one way or another.

 


Re: Another Newbie with a motor question...

john kling
 


Thanks.


From: Gary Jones
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Sent: Wednesday, March 26, 2014 9:51 PM
Subject: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Re: Another Newbie with a motor question...

 
 
 
I am confused on how to order obtain a serpentine belt for a workshop lathe. Most of the listings seem to only give the type of cars they fit nor have I figured out the numbering system.
Posted by:
 
 
John
 
I got my belt from McMaster Carr. The one I used was Ultra-Flex J-Section Neoprene Belt, 10 Ribs, Trade Size 460J10, 46.5" Outer Circle. You can find it in there online catalog here.
 http://www.mcmaster.com/#catalog/120/1075/=r9oi8o
 
Hope this helps......
 
Gary
AE5VO
 



Re: Another Newbie with a motor question...

john kling
 

This seems to shock most of us when we first came across it. My lathe was in pieces and I assumed somebody had the wrong part. But it is not unique to south bend lathes of that period. Logan also ran v belts on a large flat counter shaft pulley. 


From: Jack Dinan
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Sent: Wednesday, March 26, 2014 10:29 PM
Subject: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Re: Another Newbie with a motor question...

 
> Now I'm confused. These are listed as V-belts, apparently meant to
>engage the idler pulleys just above them in the catalog. Yet the
>surface of the belt looks flat. How is that?

>
>
>
>I am confused on how to order obtain a serpentine belt for a
>workshop lathe. Most of the listings seem to only give the type of
>cars they fit nor have I figured out the numbering system.
>
>Posted by:
>
>"john
>kling" jkling222
>
>
>
>John
>
>I got my belt from McMaster Carr. The one I used was Ultra-Flex
>J-Section Neoprene Belt, 10 Ribs, Trade Size 460J10, 46.5" Outer
>Circle. You can find it in there online catalog here.
>
>http://www.mcmaster.com/#catalog/120/1075/=r9oi8o
>
>Hope this helps......
>
>Gary
>AE5VO
>
>
>




Re: Another Newbie with a motor question...

Jack Dinan <jdinan@...>
 

Now I'm confused. These are listed as V-belts, apparently meant to engage the idler pulleys just above them in the catalog. Yet the surface of the belt looks flat. How is that?





I am confused on how to order obtain a serpentine belt for a workshop lathe. Most of the listings seem to only give the type of cars they fit nor have I figured out the numbering system.

Posted by:

<mailto:jkling222@yahoo.com?subject=Re%3A%20Another%20Newbie%20with%20a%20motor%20question%2E%2E%2E>"john kling" jkling222



John

I got my belt from McMaster Carr. The one I used was Ultra-Flex J-Section Neoprene Belt, 10 Ribs, Trade Size 460J10, 46.5" Outer Circle. You can find it in there online catalog here.
<http://www.mcmaster.com/#catalog/120/1075/=r9oi8o>http://www.mcmaster.com/#catalog/120/1075/=r9oi8o

Hope this helps......

Gary
AE5VO



Re: Another Newbie with a motor question...

Gary Jones <gmj@...>
 

 
 
I am confused on how to order obtain a serpentine belt for a workshop lathe. Most of the listings seem to only give the type of cars they fit nor have I figured out the numbering system.
Posted by:
 
 
John
 
I got my belt from McMaster Carr. The one I used was Ultra-Flex J-Section Neoprene Belt, 10 Ribs, Trade Size 460J10, 46.5" Outer Circle. You can find it in there online catalog here.
 
Hope this helps......
 
Gary
AE5VO
 


Re: Repair or replace motor on SB 9 model A

Nfwood
 

Chef Juke,  

Why not remove the motor and wiring from your lathe and take it to the closest electrical motor shop or pump shop, have them test it for continuity, status of the electronics, determent whether the bearings are still OK or need to be replaced.  They can test either 120 or 220 very quickly.

Will take about 10 minutes and you will know if there is anything major that needs to be done before you begin to run it.  Bearings tend to be relatively inexpensive  Rollers/ball bearings up to $50 and oilite bushings $10 and the shop will do the work for you. 

I have had testing done for free in one shop and $20 in another.  Worth the price to know.

If you are still not satisfied, then look for a new or used motor. Follow for sale ads or garage sales and you will find electric motors for sale--but don't buy a 3250 RPM motor when your lathe calls for 1725. 

Regards,

Nelson W.




-----Original Message-----
From: oscar kern
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE
Sent: Wed, Mar 26, 2014 7:43 pm
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Another Newbie with a motor question... [2 Attachments]

[Attachment(s) from oscar kern included below]

Here are 2 options i sent to Britt


From: Pat/Juke/Whatever... <chefjuke@...>
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Sent: Wednesday, March 26, 2014 4:11 PM
Subject: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Another Newbie with a motor question...

 
Hi there,
 
So I too, like Britt, am a newbie to the group and a new Lathe owner and new to machining.
 
I recently bought a 1944 South Bend 9a lathe which I am in the process of tearing down, stripping, painting, then rebuilding.  So far things are moving along well and I am certainly getting to know the tool inside and out.
 
The one question I am interested in getting some advice on is a new motor.  The lathe came with a Rockwell ½ horsepower motor that has seen better days. While it may be workable for the time being, I am considering getting a brand new motor just to start on a good footing.
 
I have been searching the  archives of the group and looking on other forums as well and THINK I’m on the right track with wanting a ¾ HP, TEFC motor with a 56 frame.
 
Does that sound about right to folks?
 
Two that I have been looking at are a Grizzly and  a Leeson, not because of any particular information, they’ve just been the ones that have come up first in my looking for motors with the above specs.
 
Here are the two specific motors I am looking at.
 
Grizzly H5377 Motor 3/4 HP Single-Phase 1725 RPM TEFC 110V/220V
 
Leeson 10-1025 ¾ 115/230 10.8/5.4 1725 56 ⅝˝ 28 lbs. $204.95
 
Any thoughts, guidance or just plain telling me what I don’t know would be greatly appreciated.
 
Sincerely,
 
-Chef Juke
"EVERYbody eats when they come to MY house!"
 





Re: Another Newbie with a motor question...

Lance Eggleston <lance.eggleston@...>
 

Like most things, there are many related variables 
as to how ..would affect me, one way or another."

There are many vendors who make VFD's that run 110VAC in and 220 VAC out.

These VFDs will run motors 1/2, 3/4 maybe 1 HP just fine.

TECO and Minaric are two vendors.

Too much HP is a problem if the system is tight, no slip.
If you have a chuck crash, a gear jam or other mechanical 
bind up, the extra HP breaks things that might not have broken
with less power applied to them.

It's a matter of price, performance, looks, smoothness of cut.
Why not run the lathe with its original motor for a while and see
how it performs. Then you'll have a basis for knowing what you need.

lance
++++

On Mar 26, 2014, at 5:40 PM, Pat/Juke/Whatever... wrote:

What would be the downside of ‘too much’ hp?

 

Right now I am at single phase 110 volts..could upgrade to 1ph 220  if necessary…but not sure I see the benefits yet (remember, I’m a newbie, so I haven’t done more than basic testing the machine before purchasing it).

 

I’d be fine going for the ½ HP if I had a clear sense of how the difference in strength would affect me, one way or another.



Re: Another Newbie with a motor question...

oscar kern <kernbigo@...>
 

Here are 2 options i sent to Britt


From: Pat/Juke/Whatever...
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Sent: Wednesday, March 26, 2014 4:11 PM
Subject: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Another Newbie with a motor question...

 
Hi there,
 
So I too, like Britt, am a newbie to the group and a new Lathe owner and new to machining.
 
I recently bought a 1944 South Bend 9a lathe which I am in the process of tearing down, stripping, painting, then rebuilding.  So far things are moving along well and I am certainly getting to know the tool inside and out.
 
The one question I am interested in getting some advice on is a new motor.  The lathe came with a Rockwell ½ horsepower motor that has seen better days. While it may be workable for the time being, I am considering getting a brand new motor just to start on a good footing.
 
I have been searching the  archives of the group and looking on other forums as well and THINK I’m on the right track with wanting a ¾ HP, TEFC motor with a 56 frame.
 
Does that sound about right to folks?
 
Two that I have been looking at are a Grizzly and  a Leeson, not because of any particular information, they’ve just been the ones that have come up first in my looking for motors with the above specs.
 
Here are the two specific motors I am looking at.
 
Grizzly H5377 Motor 3/4 HP Single-Phase 1725 RPM TEFC 110V/220V
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00012XBXK/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pC_S_ttl?_encoding=UTF8&colid=1SII8DX42Y23Q&coliid=IIM4SF9YRE2S4
 
Leeson 10-1025 ¾ 115/230 10.8/5.4 1725 56 ⅝˝ 28 lbs. $204.95
http://www.surpluscenter.com/Electrical/AC-Motors/AC-Motors-Base-Mount/3-4-HP-115-230-VAC-1725-RPM-MOTOR-10-1025.axd
 
Any thoughts, guidance or just plain telling me what I don’t know would be greatly appreciated.
 
Sincerely,
 
-Chef Juke
www.chefjuke.com
"EVERYbody eats when they come to MY house!"
 



Re: Auto Threading transmission "a la HLV"

Jim B. <btdtrf@...>
 

The threading dial presents almost no load. I would not worry.

I used a Threading dial with a wrong handed gear for 5 years, (before I noticed it) and it caused on harm.

 

Jim B.


From

 

I recently purchased a threading dial for my model A 9" lathe. I did a lot of threading with the half nuts engaged and in back gear, flipping that drum switch back n forth in the past. I'm working on some things that are threaded internally to mate with a detail  that is threaded externally. The dial makes it a lot easier but here is my question. If you have a threading dial on your machine is it positioned square to the apron boss and parallel to the ways. The one I purchased is nicely finished but the pivot hole was drilled in such a fashion that the threading dial is canted in toward the ways. I don't like the fit it seems that it would place added stress on the lead screw / gear engagement causing premature wear. Every threading dial that I have seen on a lathe always has been parallel to to ways. What is your take on this situation.

 


Re: Another Newbie with a motor question...

Jim B. <btdtrf@...>
 

I have been running my Cat #405 early 9” lathe for over 25 years with a ¾ HP motor and no ill effects AND I have had a serpentine belt on it for about 10 years now.

 

Jim B.


Juke,
In theory, having too much power, you run the risk that you put the lathe under more stress that it was designed for without the motor bulging. Practically, this could be a concern only if your lathe is equipped with a V-belt, instead of the traditional flat belt. With flat belts the too much power could result in the belt jumping off more frequently under heavy cuts.
A 3PH motor runs generally smoother than a 1PH equivalent and that could be more or less reflected in the finish. However, the main advantages of using a 3PH motor today is that you get them relatively cheap, definitely cheaper than 1PH ones, and by using a VFD, you have the ability of infinite variations in speed, programming a softer start (that could help with belt tracking too, on the top of reducing the in-rush current), electric braking instead of just coasting, and many other nice features.
On eBay you can get a VFD+motor combo for less than $200 (e.g. http://www.ebay.com/itm/360866808497).

Paolo
Damascus, MD


Re: Another Newbie with a motor question...

phillip <pepolk@...>
 

The automotive parts suppliers, your local parts store has a belt measuring tool that can convert the length of the belt to a part number. Some manufacturers and belt companies seem to like to make the part number with no reference to pitch, grooves, groove width or length. I utilize an old multi groove belt and loop it around the pulleys and mark it, then utilizing the parts store belt length tool , I place the belt on it, tension it while aligning the previously made mark, and read the scale, wala, a part number. If you get a belt you like and it fits and works properly, then cross reference it backwards to find it's most popular application, and from that day forward refer to it as "Alt/PS belt for 2003 mazda 626 or whatever"  Have fun  !



To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
From: jkling222@...
Date: Wed, 26 Mar 2014 14:56:30 -0700
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Another Newbie with a motor question...

 

I am confused on how to order obtain a serpentine belt for a workshop lathe. Most of the listings seem to only give the type of cars they fit nor have I figured out the numbering system.


From: Pat/Juke/Whatever...
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Sent: Wednesday, March 26, 2014 5:40 PM
Subject: RE: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Another Newbie with a motor question...

 
What would be the downside of ‘too much’ hp?
 
Right now I am at single phase 110 volts..could upgrade to 1ph 220  if necessary…but not sure I see the benefits yet (remember, I’m a newbie, so I haven’t done more than basic testing the machine before purchasing it).
 
I’d be fine going for the ½ HP if I had a clear sense of how the difference in strength would affect me, one way or another.
 
-Chef Juke
www.chefjuke.com
"EVERYbody eats when they come to MY house!"
 
From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... [mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@...] On Behalf Of Lance Eggleston
Sent: Wednesday, March 26, 2014 2:36 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Another Newbie with a motor question...
 
 
In my opinion 3/4 HP is too much for a 9", 
unless it were a 3/4 HP 3 phase 220 VAC 
connected to a VFD.
Then the extra HP would give more torque at lower speeds.
 
Also, the VFD will make the machine more easily useable.
 
Consider upgrading to a serpentine belt for better power transfer.
 
lance
++++
On Mar 26, 2014, at 5:11 PM, Pat/Juke/Whatever... wrote:


 have been searching the  archives of the group and looking on other forums as well and THINK Im on the right track with wanting a ¾ HP, TEFC motor with a 56 frame.
 
Does that sound about right to folks?
 
 




Re: Another Newbie with a motor question...

Gregg Eshelman
 

On 3/26/2014 3:40 PM, Pat/Juke/Whatever... wrote:


What would be the downside of �too much� hp?

Right now I am at single phase 110 volts..could upgrade to 1ph 220 if
necessary�but not sure I see the benefits yet (remember, I�m a newbie,
so I haven�t done more than basic testing the machine before purchasing it).

I�d be fine going for the � HP if I had a clear sense of how the
difference in strength would affect me, one way or another.
Downsides. Motor costs more, uses more electricity, bigger, heavier. Easier to break things, temptation to try deeper cuts than the lathe can handle - leading to jams, belt slipping, breaking things.

A motor over 1/2 HP on a 9~10" lathe is like the path to the dark side of the force... ;)

*Bigger/heavier/more electricity dependent on the modernity of the motor. Newer motors are typically smaller/lighter/more efficient than vintage ones.


Re: Another Newbie with a motor question...

Gregg Eshelman
 

On 3/26/2014 3:39 PM, phillip wrote:


Keep your eye open for a Baldor, they are American made and they have
been the power of choice in my shop, powering my 9-C with 3/4HP ,1/4 HP
my die filing machine, 1/3 on my horizontal bandsaw, my Quincy 5 HP
compresser, the only exception is my 9A it still has a freshened GE
1/2hp and my old Beaver drill press has a commercial leeson 1/3 hp.
Baldor is actually rated properly rather than the Chi/com guestimate
method. Good luck in your searches.
Could be rated in metric horsepower. 1 horsepower is 745.7 watts or 550 ft lbf/s. 1 metric horsepower is 735.5 watts.

They use smaller horses in other countries. ;)


Re: Another Newbie with a motor question...

Gregg Eshelman
 

On 3/26/2014 3:11 PM, Pat/Juke/Whatever... wrote:

I have been searching the archives of the group and looking on other
forums as well and THINK I�m on the right track with wanting a � HP,
TEFC motor with a 56 frame.
1/3 or 1/2 horsepower is generally a better choice for a 9" lathe, especially with the flat belt drive.

3/4 HP can be a bit of a waste because most of the time you won't be able to use that much power.


Re: Auto Threading transmission "a la HLV"

john baird
 

yes- they are at the end of the thread, and i think you have to be a member to download them:

Southbend Screwcutting clutch

 
allan

Thank's Allan,  Will have a look.
jb


On Wednesday, 26 March 2014, 11:19, m. allan noah wrote:


yes- they are at the end of the thread, and i think you have to be a member to download them:

http://www.modelenginemaker.com/index.php?topic=3038.105

allan


On Wed, Mar 26, 2014 at 5:29 AM, john baird <alexandra.leaving@...> wrote:
 
Hi,  Were the clutch drawings, ever made available ??
Regards  jb



On Thursday, 13 February 2014, 11:19, "gerry.howarth@..." <gerry.howarth@...> wrote:


A southbend 9/10 owner has already built one of these and is posting the drawings this weekend I believe.
Gerry







--
"The truth is an offense, but not a sin"





Re: Auto Threading transmission "a la HLV"

Steven Karvelis
 

I recently purchased a threading dial for my model A 9" lathe. I did a lot of threading with the half nuts engaged and in back gear, flipping that drum switch back n forth in the past. I'm working on some things that are threaded internally to mate with a detail  that is threaded externally. The dial makes it a lot easier but here is my question. If you have a threading dial on your machine is it positioned square to the apron boss and parallel to the ways. The one I purchased is nicely finished but the pivot hole was drilled in such a fashion that the threading dial is canted in toward the ways. I don't like the fit it seems that it would place added stress on the lead screw / gear engagement causing premature wear. Every threading dial that I have seen on a lathe always has been parallel to to ways. What is your take on this situation.


Re: Another Newbie with a motor question...

john kling
 

I am confused on how to order obtain a serpentine belt for a workshop lathe. Most of the listings seem to only give the type of cars they fit nor have I figured out the numbering system.


From: Pat/Juke/Whatever...
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Sent: Wednesday, March 26, 2014 5:40 PM
Subject: RE: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Another Newbie with a motor question...

 
What would be the downside of ‘too much’ hp?
 
Right now I am at single phase 110 volts..could upgrade to 1ph 220  if necessary…but not sure I see the benefits yet (remember, I’m a newbie, so I haven’t done more than basic testing the machine before purchasing it).
 
I’d be fine going for the ½ HP if I had a clear sense of how the difference in strength would affect me, one way or another.
 
-Chef Juke
www.chefjuke.com
"EVERYbody eats when they come to MY house!"
 
From: SOUTHBENDLATHE@... [mailto:SOUTHBENDLATHE@...] On Behalf Of Lance Eggleston
Sent: Wednesday, March 26, 2014 2:36 PM
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] Another Newbie with a motor question...
 
 
In my opinion 3/4 HP is too much for a 9", 
unless it were a 3/4 HP 3 phase 220 VAC 
connected to a VFD.
Then the extra HP would give more torque at lower speeds.
 
Also, the VFD will make the machine more easily useable.
 
Consider upgrading to a serpentine belt for better power transfer.
 
lance
++++
On Mar 26, 2014, at 5:11 PM, Pat/Juke/Whatever... wrote:


 have been searching the  archives of the group and looking on other forums as well and THINK Im on the right track with wanting a ¾ HP, TEFC motor with a 56 frame.
 
Does that sound about right to folks?
 
 



Re: Another Newbie with a motor question...

Paolo Amedeo
 

Juke,
In theory, having too much power, you run the risk that you put the lathe under more stress that it was designed for without the motor bulging. Practically, this could be a concern only if your lathe is equipped with a V-belt, instead of the traditional flat belt. With flat belts the too much power could result in the belt jumping off more frequently under heavy cuts.
A 3PH motor runs generally smoother than a 1PH equivalent and that could be more or less reflected in the finish. However, the main advantages of using a 3PH motor today is that you get them relatively cheap, definitely cheaper than 1PH ones, and by using a VFD, you have the ability of infinite variations in speed, programming a softer start (that could help with belt tracking too, on the top of reducing the in-rush current), electric braking instead of just coasting, and many other nice features.
On eBay you can get a VFD+motor combo for less than $200 (e.g. http://www.ebay.com/itm/360866808497).

Paolo
Damascus, MD

On 03/26/2014 05:40 PM, Pat/Juke/Whatever... wrote:
 

What would be the downside of ‘too much’ hp?

 

Right now I am at single phase 110 volts..could upgrade to 1ph 220  if necessary…but not sure I see the benefits yet (remember, I’m a newbie, so I haven’t done more than basic testing the machine before purchasing it).

 

I’d be fine going for the ½ HP if I had a clear sense of how the difference in strength would affect me, one way or another.

 

-Chef Juke

www.chefjuke.com

"EVERYbody eats when they come to MY house!"

 




Re: New Member, New Lathe Owner, Newbie Machinist, Many Questions!

Gregg Eshelman
 

On 3/26/2014 7:08 AM, alco2350@yahoo.com wrote:


There's a price tag of 150.00
on the compound and I start dragging it out post-haste. The lady running
the place says that the tag is incorrect, that the actual sale price is
200.00.
Nice lathe you found!

Shoulda been a bit more squinty eyed (to hide the gleam) and wiped the big grin (and possibly drool) off your face before asking questions. Helps to avoid price inflation at estate sales if they don't see you virtually hopping with glee. ;D

16921 - 16940 of 105925