Date   

Re: Where are you located?

Walter Kucharski
 

Wally in Montreal,Quebec,     A heavy 10 in my home shop.  Add to the map please.


Re: A question about motors

william B. Mispel
 

Hi Nelson
A few pix.
I have no idea of what you have for a motor or controls.
DC voltage think has to be compatable with your motor/control.
Mine is 90 v from a tread mill and I got the control from
Surplus Center item 11-2269.
Bruce

On 12/5/2013 10:46 AM, Nelson Collar wrote:
 

Bruce
I would like to have a look see at that. I have a 2 1/2 hp and anticipate converting.
Nelson Collar
--------------------------------------------
On Thu, 12/5/13, Bruce wrote:

Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] A question about motors
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Date: Thursday, December 5, 2013, 3:26 PM
















 












Hi Brian,

Works just fine.

Converted mine a few years ago.

Cost about $100.00 ,

You need ,

Controller

Fan

Switches

And a box from radio shack

for all the above.

Most of which you can get from

Surplus Supply

Email me for pix.

Bruce









On 12/4/2013
10:19 AM, Brian Geffre
wrote:



 





I have heard
that a person can
convert an old tread mill motor into a
variable speed
motor for a lathe.  Has anyone done
this?  I would like
to know what problems might arise. 
Does a 2hp DC motor
from a tread mill have the same umph as
other motors? 
How slow can I run the motor and still get
real work
done?  I am just wondering if it is
worth the time and
effort.

Brian
Glyndon
MN 

Confidentiality Notice: This e-mail message and
any
attachments are for the sole use of the intended
recipient
and may contain confidential and privileged
information. Any
unauthorized review, use, disclosure,
distribution or
copying is prohibited. If you are not the
intended
recipient, please contact the sender by replying
to this
e-mail and destroy/delete all copies of this
e-mail message.


































Re: A question about motors

Walter Kucharski
 

Regarding DC motors I bought a 1 hp 90 volt brushed DC motor from fleabay. To control it I found also on fleabay a dc controller rated at 1 hp at 110volt input or 2 hp at 220 Volt.  To set the speed it has a potentiometer from 0 to top speed.   This was attached to a lathe that was missing its drive unit so I machined a V pulley that matched the one on the headstock spindle and made a 1 to 1 ratio with a link belt.  It works beautifully and has plenty of power I just had to add a power cord and a on/off/reverse switch.  Total cost about $200. Canadian. 


Porsche driver


Re: A question about motors

soupy1951ca
 

I'd love to see the conversion. I have been contemplating this also. It beats a treadle and my 1/8 HP legs!! LOL
 
Mike from Canada


On Thu, Dec 5, 2013 at 10:26 AM, Bruce <misltoe2@...> wrote:
 

Hi Brian,
Works just fine.
Converted mine a few years ago.
Cost about $100.00 ,
You need ,
Controller
Fan
Switches
And a box from radio shack
for all the above.
Most of which you can get from
Surplus Supply
Email me for pix.
Bruce




On 12/4/2013 10:19 AM, Brian Geffre wrote:
 

I have heard that a person can convert an old tread mill motor into a variable speed motor for a lathe.  Has anyone done this?  I would like to know what problems might arise.  Does a 2hp DC motor from a tread mill have the same umph as other motors?  How slow can I run the motor and still get real work done?  I am just wondering if it is worth the time and effort.

Brian

Glyndon MN 

Confidentiality Notice: This e-mail message and any attachments are for the sole use of the intended recipient and may contain confidential and privileged information. Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure, distribution or copying is prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender by replying to this e-mail and destroy/delete all copies of this e-mail message.




--

“People that know they are important think about others, people that think they are important, think about themselves.” – Hans F. Hansen

 

Learn from the mistakes of others, you might not live long enough to make them all yourself!!!


Re: A question about motors

Nelson Collar
 

Bruce
I would like to have a look see at that. I have a 2 1/2 hp and anticipate converting.
Nelson Collar
--------------------------------------------

On Thu, 12/5/13, Bruce <misltoe2@ne.rr.com> wrote:

Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] A question about motors
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@yahoogroups.com
Date: Thursday, December 5, 2013, 3:26 PM
















 












Hi Brian,

Works just fine.

Converted mine a few years ago.

Cost about $100.00 ,

You need ,

Controller

Fan

Switches

And a box from radio shack

for all the above.

Most of which you can get from

Surplus Supply

Email me for pix.

Bruce









On 12/4/2013
10:19 AM, Brian Geffre
wrote:



 





I have heard
that a person can
convert an old tread mill motor into a
variable speed
motor for a lathe.  Has anyone done
this?  I would like
to know what problems might arise. 
Does a 2hp DC motor
from a tread mill have the same umph as
other motors? 
How slow can I run the motor and still get
real work
done?  I am just wondering if it is
worth the time and
effort.

Brian
Glyndon
MN 

Confidentiality Notice: This e-mail message and
any
attachments are for the sole use of the intended
recipient
and may contain confidential and privileged
information. Any
unauthorized review, use, disclosure,
distribution or
copying is prohibited. If you are not the
intended
recipient, please contact the sender by replying
to this
e-mail and destroy/delete all copies of this
e-mail message.


Re: A question about motors

william B. Mispel
 

Hi Brian,
Works just fine.
Converted mine a few years ago.
Cost about $100.00 ,
You need ,
Controller
Fan
Switches
And a box from radio shack
for all the above.
Most of which you can get from
Surplus Supply
Email me for pix.
Bruce




On 12/4/2013 10:19 AM, Brian Geffre wrote:
 

I have heard that a person can convert an old tread mill motor into a variable speed motor for a lathe.  Has anyone done this?  I would like to know what problems might arise.  Does a 2hp DC motor from a tread mill have the same umph as other motors?  How slow can I run the motor and still get real work done?  I am just wondering if it is worth the time and effort.

Brian

Glyndon MN 

Confidentiality Notice: This e-mail message and any attachments are for the sole use of the intended recipient and may contain confidential and privileged information. Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure, distribution or copying is prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender by replying to this e-mail and destroy/delete all copies of this e-mail message.


Re: A question about motors

Terry Williamson
 

A heavy duty lamp type dimmer will work
Terry

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android



From: Jim B. ;
To: ;
Subject: RE: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] A question about motors
Sent: Wed, Dec 4, 2013 6:09:11 PM

 

No a rheostat will not control the speed of an AC motor.

The speed of an AC motor is controlled by the design of the motor (the number of poles) and the FREQUENCY of the AC power into the motor.

Not the value of the voltage or current

 

Jim B.


 

 

. A rheostat could be used to vary the RPMs.
                                                                Tom



Re: A question about motors

Terry Williamson
 

Years ago I had a Logan lathe that I put a DC motor on. I had a heavy duty speed controller, like a lamp dimmer that I made. My major problem was the relays that applied the current. I had to use large relays that had big plastic cases mounted upside down so I could put transformer oil inside to brake the arc when the motor stopped.
Today they make motor controllers that can do that, they are expensive.
It can be done, you may need pulleys to reduce the speed to increase the toque.
Terry

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android



From: Brian Geffre ;
To: southbendlathe@... ;
Subject: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] A question about motors
Sent: Wed, Dec 4, 2013 3:19:44 PM

 

I have heard that a person can convert an old tread mill motor into a variable speed motor for a lathe.  Has anyone done this?  I would like to know what problems might arise.  Does a 2hp DC motor from a tread mill have the same umph as other motors?  How slow can I run the motor and still get real work done?  I am just wondering if it is worth the time and effort.

Brian

Glyndon MN 

Confidentiality Notice: This e-mail message and any attachments are for the sole use of the intended recipient and may contain confidential and privileged information. Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure, distribution or copying is prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender by replying to this e-mail and destroy/delete all copies of this e-mail message.


Re: Where are you located?

Erik
 

Hello Bill,
This is Erik in Cheyenne WY and I have a 1928 South Bend 8" lathe. It is just a fun little lathe. I would let you add me to the map.
Thanks



On Wednesday, December 4, 2013 11:37 AM, "blibecap@..." wrote:
 
just a reminder



Re: A question about motors

Paolo Amedeo
 

There are different designs of DC motors as well (one of which closely resembles 3ph motors), therefore it is impossible to generalize. However, most of the DC motors have the great advantage of providing high torque at low RPM, whereas controlling a 3ph motor with a VFD results into proportionally-reduced power at frequencies lower than the nominal frequency of the motor. VFD have built-in protections, limiting current to the motor. Therefore, even at higher than rated frequency, the maximum output is very close to the nominal output of the 3ph motor.
In general, motors with wound rotor and brushes (both AC and DC) have extremely good torque characteristics at low speeds and their speed can be controlled varying the current. That's the reason why your hand drill is powered by such kind of motors and not an induction motor.
I don't know if there would be any need of high torque at start-up in a treadmill, therefore, I cannot guarantee that any treadmill motor would have such characteristics. Most of the DC motor controllers monitor and limit the current delivered to the motor (and consequently the torque) and that's the reason many people have the impression that such motors are rather weak.

Paolo

On 12/04/2013 02:28 PM, 913fred@... wrote:
 

VFD and Variable Speed DC motors are constant torque designs.  Pulley, gear speed reductions, etc are constant horsepower.  Simply using a VFD or DC controller probably won't work....you still need step pulleys, etc.  On a treadmill motor, check the motor HP and the speed at which that HP is rated- you may find the treadmill motor has much lower torque at speeds you want to run the lathe at.  

 

Best plan is a slightly oversized motor rated at 1750-1800rpm with a VFD or DC drive ( depending on the motor ).Then continue to use the lathe step pulleys for coarse speed adjustment and the VS drive for fine speed adjustment. 

 

I once heard of a person trying to use a 7.5HP 3 phase motor with a VFD on a Clausing lathe ( originally 1 1/2 or 2 HP ) so he could eliminate step pulleys.  Neaver heard how that turned out......

 

There has been much discussion on this subject over the past years on "www.practicalmachinist.com

_


Re: lead screw heavy. and work shops.

john kling
 

At the moment there seem to be more heavy 10 screws available.



From: Nelson Collar
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Sent: Wednesday, December 4, 2013 1:55 PM
Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] lead screw heavy. and work shops.

 
It could be cheaper to buy an "A or B" screw.
Nelson Collar
--------------------------------------------
On Wed, 12/4/13, Gregg Eshelman wrote:

Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] lead screw heavy. and work shops.
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Date: Wednesday, December 4, 2013, 6:17 AM
















 









On 12/3/2013 2:20 PM, john kling wrote:

>

>

> I am converting a c to an a. It has a 3 foot bed. I
bought a lead screw

> on Ebay. I asked the seller if it was sloted. He said
yes. Apparently he

> was referring to a keyway and not to the near end to
end slot needed for

> an A or B. My plan was to go from C to B. I have now
purchased a gear

> box. I now have many (complete set of) change gears
that were acquired a

> few at a time (not a wise strategy).



Find a shop with a big horizontal mill and have a keyway cut
the length

of your leadscrew to convert it from the B type to the A
type.





























Re: A question about motors

fwhite913
 

VFD and Variable Speed DC motors are constant torque designs.  Pulley, gear speed reductions, etc are constant horsepower.  Simply using a VFD or DC controller probably won't work....you still need step pulleys, etc.  On a treadmill motor, check the motor HP and the speed at which that HP is rated- you may find the treadmill motor has much lower torque at speeds you want to run the lathe at.  

 

Best plan is a slightly oversized motor rated at 1750-1800rpm with a VFD or DC drive ( depending on the motor ).Then continue to use the lathe step pulleys for coarse speed adjustment and the VS drive for fine speed adjustment. 

 

I once heard of a person trying to use a 7.5HP 3 phase motor with a VFD on a Clausing lathe ( originally 1 1/2 or 2 HP ) so he could eliminate step pulleys.  Neaver heard how that turned out......

 

There has been much discussion on this subject over the past years on "www.practicalmachinist.com


Re: A question about motors

Thomas G Brandl
 

Ed,
        I bought a place or more like acreage in WV last month. I was cleaning out clothes and other stuff. I came across an old sewing machine. It was a Brothers. It was like the old black Singers, electric motor. I was at the local Catholic charities. I ask the woman about donating the clothes and if anyone wanted a sewing machine. I told her what it was. She pointed to herself. She wanted it for quilts. Most of the new ones don't hold up, according to her. She did offer money, but I was happy to give it away. She does donate quilts for local raffles.
        I did talk to my mom. She does some quilts and other sewing. Her Berdina does fine on quilts. Don't know what one cost though.
                                                                                                        Tom



From:        Ed S <eschwerkolt@...>
To:        SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Date:        12/04/2013 01:43 PM
Subject:        Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] A question about motors
Sent by:        SOUTHBENDLATHE@...




 

My old Singer (1940 model 16, AC brush motor, 1/8 hp) sewing machine
has a foot pedal for speed. But it gets hot (carbon pile) as you use
it. I do not think you would want to run a large motor that way. I
did buy a new electronic version, I don't think it gets as hot; has
better speed control.

Yes guys I sew.... vinyl seat covers and canvas boat cover... my
wife would not let me use her good machine. But this singer will sew
through a cow.

Ed S



This email has been scanned for Malware.
______________________________________________________________________


Re: lead screw heavy. and work shops.

Nelson Collar
 

It could be cheaper to buy an "A or B" screw.
Nelson Collar
--------------------------------------------

On Wed, 12/4/13, Gregg Eshelman <g_alan_e@YAHOO.COM> wrote:

Subject: Re: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] lead screw heavy. and work shops.
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@yahoogroups.com
Date: Wednesday, December 4, 2013, 6:17 AM
















 









On 12/3/2013 2:20 PM, john kling wrote:

>

>

> I am converting a c to an a. It has a 3 foot bed. I
bought a lead screw

> on Ebay. I asked the seller if it was sloted. He said
yes. Apparently he

> was referring to a keyway and not to the near end to
end slot needed for

> an A or B. My plan was to go from C to B. I have now
purchased a gear

> box. I now have many (complete set of) change gears
that were acquired a

> few at a time (not a wise strategy).



Find a shop with a big horizontal mill and have a keyway cut
the length

of your leadscrew to convert it from the B type to the A
type.


Re: A question about motors

Flash Gordon
 

My old Singer (1940 model 16, AC brush motor, 1/8 hp) sewing machine has a foot pedal for speed. But it gets hot (carbon pile) as you use it. I do not think you would want to run a large motor that way. I did buy a new electronic version, I don't think it gets as hot; has better speed control.

Yes guys I sew.... vinyl seat covers and canvas boat cover... my wife would not let me use her good machine. But this singer will sew through a cow.

Ed S


Re: Where are you located?

Bill Libecap
 

Hi Everyone

I have created this map. If you care to put your appropriate location on it, it may be easier to find people.  Please do not put you exact street address on the map. 


https://www.zeemaps.com/South_Bend_Lathe_Owners_Map


Bill in Cincy oh


Re: OT: The good old days - Barnes treadle lathe in action

Nick Jonkman
 

Here is a picture of my 18" swing Barnes. Still using it all the time..
Nick

On 04/12/13 10:29 AM, m. allan noah wrote:
�
WF&J Barnes was active from the late 1800's thru 1930's. They primarily marketed to farm and repair shops in rural areas prior to electrification (though they did make some bigger, lineshaft powered machines). These smaller ones were rather unlikely to be used in a production setting.

allan


Re: A question about motors

john kling
 

I am almost certain that the rheostat was on a 220 single phase set up.


From: "Thomas.G.Brandl@..."
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Sent: Wednesday, December 4, 2013 1:19 PM
Subject: RE: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] A question about motors

 
        I was wondering. We had a smaller Bridgeport mill, that was sent out for a rebuild. It came back with a 'rheostat' to vary the RPMs of the motor. Others in the shop didn't like it. Others just didn't like the mill, as no power feeds and no power draw bar. I liked it as no one else used it. So, it didn't do a bunch of fly cutting with insert tooling etc. Basically, it stayed in good shape. Unfortunately, that was one of the mills that went out the door. I found the knob easier to use than the dial on the J heads.
                                                                                Tom



From:        "Jim B. " <btdtrf@...>
To:        SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Date:        12/04/2013 01:11 PM
Subject:        RE: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] A question about motors
Sent by:        SOUTHBENDLATHE@...




 
I should have been a bit more specific.
The previous post is true for synchronous motors.
A universal wound motor, the kind with brushes, can use a rheostat.
 
Jim B.


This email has been scanned for Malware.
______________________________________________________________________



Re: A question about motors

john kling
 

My father had a photograph dryer ( a big canvas belt on it) with a rheostat to vary the speed. I was under the impression that power (like horse power) was reduced as the speed was cut.


From: "Thomas.G.Brandl@..."
To: SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Sent: Wednesday, December 4, 2013 1:19 PM
Subject: RE: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] A question about motors

 
        I was wondering. We had a smaller Bridgeport mill, that was sent out for a rebuild. It came back with a 'rheostat' to vary the RPMs of the motor. Others in the shop didn't like it. Others just didn't like the mill, as no power feeds and no power draw bar. I liked it as no one else used it. So, it didn't do a bunch of fly cutting with insert tooling etc. Basically, it stayed in good shape. Unfortunately, that was one of the mills that went out the door. I found the knob easier to use than the dial on the J heads.
                                                                                Tom



From:        "Jim B. "
To:        SOUTHBENDLATHE@...
Date:        12/04/2013 01:11 PM
Subject:        RE: [SOUTHBENDLATHE] A question about motors
Sent by:        SOUTHBENDLATHE@...




 
I should have been a bit more specific.
The previous post is true for synchronous motors.
A universal wound motor, the kind with brushes, can use a rheostat.
 
Jim B.


This email has been scanned for Malware.
______________________________________________________________________



Re: Where are you located?

Bill Libecap
 

just a reminder

19821 - 19840 of 106357