Date   

Re: 409 Series "R" lathe from roughly about 1937

greenzx9rr@...
 

Allen, how do i measure that?  

On Mon, Nov 11, 2013 at 4:56 AM, <greenzx9rr@...> wrote:
 

Hi Bob! Ths for your information. Can youmake more pics for me please all arround the lathe?


I found this to and its like mine, execpt the gearbox.

 http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/south-bend-lathes/new-lathe-1935-sb-480-a-172122/


 
--
"The truth is an offense, but not a sin"


Re: Need to make a universal joint type coupler for project don't have design idea?

David Rysdam <david@...>
 

Terry Williamson <theideashoppe@yahoo.com> writes:
I am building a home project that  requires a coupling between two
3/4" I'd pipes that will give an adjustable movement of say 10 degrees
right and left and 15 degrees up and down.  I am using aluminum. 
Can't think of how to limit travel and still have movement.  Ideally I
would like to separate the coupling easily to take apart for storage.
Ball and socket. Making the socket slot as wide in each direction as you
want to allow movement. But do you need to be able to make it rigid
after adjustment?


Need to make a universal joint type coupler for project don't have design idea?

Terry Williamson
 

I am building a home project that requires a coupling between two 3/4" I'd pipes that will give an adjustable movement of say 10 degrees right and left and 15 degrees up and down. I am using aluminum. Can't think of how to limit travel and still have movement. Ideally I would like to separate the coupling easily to take apart for storage.

Terry

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android


Re: 409 Series "R" lathe from roughly about 1937

m. allan noah
 

I think the 409 without the gearbox is the 407. Can you take a measurement of how wide the headstock covers are? Probably a center-to-center measurement of the mounting holes. Then we can see if it matches up with a 10L. Your end cover will probably have to be a modified 10L double tumbler cover. I doubt you will ever find the original.

allan


On Mon, Nov 11, 2013 at 4:56 AM, <greenzx9rr@...> wrote:
 

Hi Bob! Ths for your information. Can youmake more pics for me please all arround the lathe?


I found this to and its like mine, execpt the gearbox.

 http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/south-bend-lathes/new-lathe-1935-sb-480-a-172122/


 
--
"The truth is an offense, but not a sin"


Re: 409 Series "R" lathe from roughly about 1937

greenzx9rr@...
 

Hi Bob! Ths for your information. Can youmake more pics for me please all arround the lathe?


I found this to and its like mine, execpt the gearbox.

 http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/south-bend-lathes/new-lathe-1935-sb-480-a-172122/

On Nov 11, 2013, at 3:53 AM, Robert Blodinger <w4npx@...> wrote:

 
I have a SB 409 YN.  The 409 has a single lever QCGB.  I  think that it's no gearbox twin is the Model 415.  If somebody wants to see pictures of mine, I can post a link.  It does have the wide bed and table top horizontal drive.

Bob 

2


On Nov 11, 2013, at 3:28 AM, <greenzx9rr@...> wrote:

 

hi Jim, so a NOT workshop lathe (like mine) means that it is not so good? Are the workshops lathes better ?

And why is that? What makes a workshop type better then the rest?


Actualy, i don't care, i was in love at the first time whenn i saw my SB lathe, it calls my name :-D

 



---In southbendlathe@..., <btdtrf@...> wrote:

what is the difference between a workshop and a NOT workshop lathe?  I'm a roekie. ;-)

Almost everything.
The workshop beds are narrower (there is one that's close) the spindles, tailstock , saddle, aprons ,head stocks are all different.



Jim B.


Re: 409 Series "R" lathe from roughly about 1937

Robert H. Blodinger
 

On Nov 11, 2013, at 3:53 AM, Robert Blodinger <w4npx@...> wrote:

 

I have a SB 409 YN.  The 409 has a single lever QCGB.  I  think that it's no gearbox twin is the Model 415.  If somebody wants to see pictures of mine, I can post a link.  It does have the wide bed and table top horizontal drive.

Bob 

2


On Nov 11, 2013, at 3:28 AM, <greenzx9rr@...> wrote:

 

hi Jim, so a NOT workshop lathe (like mine) means that it is not so good? Are the workshops lathes better ?

And why is that? What makes a workshop type better then the rest?


Actualy, i don't care, i was in love at the first time whenn i saw my SB lathe, it calls my name :-D

 



---In southbendlathe@..., wrote:

what is the difference between a workshop and a NOT workshop lathe?  I'm a roekie. ;-)

Almost everything.
The workshop beds are narrower (there is one that's close) the spindles, tailstock , saddle, aprons ,head stocks are all different.



Jim B.


Re: 409 Series "R" lathe from roughly about 1937

Robert H. Blodinger
 

I have a SB 409 YN.  The 409 has a single lever QCGB.  I  think that it's no gearbox twin is the Model 415.  If somebody wants to see pictures of mine, I can post a link.  It does have the wide bed and table top horizontal drive.

Bob 

2


On Nov 11, 2013, at 3:28 AM, <greenzx9rr@...> wrote:

 

hi Jim, so a NOT workshop lathe (like mine) means that it is not so good? Are the workshops lathes better ?

And why is that? What makes a workshop type better then the rest?


Actualy, i don't care, i was in love at the first time whenn i saw my SB lathe, it calls my name :-D

 



---In southbendlathe@..., wrote:

what is the difference between a workshop and a NOT workshop lathe?  I'm a roekie. ;-)

Almost everything.
The workshop beds are narrower (there is one that's close) the spindles, tailstock , saddle, aprons ,head stocks are all different.



Jim B.


Re: 409 Series "R" lathe from roughly about 1937

greenzx9rr@...
 

hi Jim, so a NOT workshop lathe (like mine) means that it is not so good? Are the workshops lathes better ?

And why is that? What makes a workshop type better then the rest?


Actualy, i don't care, i was in love at the first time whenn i saw my SB lathe, it calls my name :-D

 


Re: Introduction and a Restoration Project

soupy1951ca
 

To turn this into a VERY usable lathe is no problem and as far as hundreds of hours to make it a show piece, I don't agree. But that's the nice thing about opinions, we all have one!!! Go as far with the project as YOU are comfortable going and don't forget to enjoy the fruits of your labour.
 
Mike from Canada


On Sun, Nov 10, 2013 at 9:17 PM, Ken <kbergen@...> wrote:
 

Welcome to the group.

Making that into a usable lathe is likely doable.
Making it into show piece unless you're willing to spend hundreds of hours not
so much.

Ken from Canada.



On November 10, 2013 05:47:13 PM you wrote:
> Guys I'm new to the SB area but been a member over on the Atlas group.A
> friend who has a SB 10L ask me to go completely through it and turn it into
> a usable show piece.I have never seen a SB until yesterday and I agree with
> the heading when I first look at the group "Best lathe ever made" dang that
> thing is built like a tank.Having the cabinet w/3 drawers is nice.Spent
> yesterday taking it almost all apart,till I got to the chip pan,spent all
> day today trying to remove the pan.Welded in several places,but guys it
> took my engine host to remove that beastly motor and under carriage(don't
> know if thats the correct term) Anyway guys rambling on,this is new to me
> restoring a SB,no pewter metal here.LOL Thanks for letting me join,guys I
> am no computer person and its hard to find my way around here to
> pics,files,etc Thanks kroll
> http://imageshack.us/a/img837/5857/0gon.jpg
>




--

“People that know they are important think about others, people that think they are important, think about themselves.” – Hans F. Hansen

 

Learn from the mistakes of others, you might not live long enough to make them all yourself!!!


Re: Introduction and a Restoration Project

Ken
 

Welcome to the group.

Making that into a usable lathe is likely doable.
Making it into show piece unless you're willing to spend hundreds of hours not
so much.

Ken from Canada.

On November 10, 2013 05:47:13 PM you wrote:
Guys I'm new to the SB area but been a member over on the Atlas group.A
friend who has a SB 10L ask me to go completely through it and turn it into
a usable show piece.I have never seen a SB until yesterday and I agree with
the heading when I first look at the group "Best lathe ever made" dang that
thing is built like a tank.Having the cabinet w/3 drawers is nice.Spent
yesterday taking it almost all apart,till I got to the chip pan,spent all
day today trying to remove the pan.Welded in several places,but guys it
took my engine host to remove that beastly motor and under carriage(don't
know if thats the correct term) Anyway guys rambling on,this is new to me
restoring a SB,no pewter metal here.LOL Thanks for letting me join,guys I
am no computer person and its hard to find my way around here to
pics,files,etc Thanks kroll
http://imageshack.us/a/img837/5857/0gon.jpg


Introduction and a Restoration Project

karoc1954@...
 

Guys I'm new to the SB area but been a member over on the Atlas group.A friend who has a SB 10L ask me to go completely through it and turn it into a usable show piece.I have never seen a SB until yesterday and I agree with the heading when I first look at the group "Best lathe ever made" dang that thing is built like a tank.Having the cabinet w/3 drawers is nice.Spent yesterday taking it almost all apart,till I got to the chip pan,spent all day today trying to remove the pan.Welded in several places,but guys it took my engine host to remove that beastly motor and under carriage(don't know if thats the correct term) Anyway guys rambling on,this is new to me restoring a SB,no pewter metal here.LOL Thanks for letting me join,guys I am no computer person and its hard to find my way around here to pics,files,etc Thanks kroll

[IMG]http://imageshack.us/a/img837/5857/0gon.jpg[/IMG]


Re: 409 Series "R" lathe from roughly about 1937

Jim B. <btdtrf@...>
 

what is the difference between a workshop and a NOT workshop lathe?  I'm a roekie. ;-)

Almost everything.
The workshop beds are narrower (there is one that's close) the spindles, tailstock , saddle, aprons ,head stocks are all different.



Jim B.


Re: C to B 9" workshop conversion.

john kling
 


You say past 1938 is unlikely to be a fitting problem. Is early 1938 not in the low problem group/set?


From: Steve Wells
To: southbendlathe@...
Sent: Saturday, November 9, 2013 9:13 PM
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] Re: C to B 9" workshop conversion.

 

John, It depends on the year of the C saddle, anything past 1938 and it should slide right in there.
with the A/B gear /handle blank and the acme blank you can make a complete screw for $45.00 
 
Steve
 
 acme blank you can make a ----- Original Message -----
From: armne@...
Sent: Saturday, November 09, 2013 4:38 AM
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] Re: C to B 9" workshop conversion.

 
 
             The Lord is a strong hold in the Day of trouble, and he
                            knoweth
  them that trust in him )(


From: "armne@..." <armne@...>
To: "southbendlathe@..." <southbendlathe@...>
Sent: Saturday, November 9, 2013 1:34 AM
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] Re: C to B 9" workshop conversion.

 Not to bad removing the .400 done in one pass on a Bridgeport.
Alec


From: john kling
To: "southbendlathe@..."
Sent: Friday, November 8, 2013 5:01 PM
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] Re: C to B 9" workshop conversion.

 
So far I have not found an a or B crossfeed  screw.

I follow your clear discussion of replacing the threaded portion of a cross feed screw.    Would cutting a C screw and splicing in the gear work in a similar fashion.?
Somewhere I read that as much as 1/2 ''  might need to milled in fitting the a/b apron to the c saddle.  The parts have not  yet arrived so I am not sure with what I am dealing with - but this really sounds extreme.


From: Steve Wells
To: southbendlathe@...
Sent: Sunday, November 3, 2013 3:55 PM
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] Re: C to B 9" workshop conversion.

 

John, if you are referring to the apron lead screw, there were three specs: standard; tool room and military. the military spec being the best.
these were sorted as they were ran in production. If you are referring to the 7/16 LH acme for the cross feed, the normal (old way) was measurement over 3 wires to an SBL internal spec for back lash with the nut and or assembly. On a 7/16 acme you would use .05164 wires
and the internal spec was .451 +.000 and -.003. So .003 backlash was allowed.  The stock for the  screw on a non ground crossfeed was turned to .4375/.4370. on a ground screw, the turn was .4475/.4455 and then ground to .4375/.4370. South bend didn't use a standard Q9000
screw standard such as 4G or 5G (rub fit) the screw fell in-between those numbers but was listed on the control sheets as 4G.
A 3G screw if roll threaded will make it into the back lash specs just fine. My screw material is roll threaded 3G, and I'm almost out of stock, but I will soon be running the original South bend automatic screw machine that made these cross feed screws, I have the only one left from the factory thanks to Ted. and I have it running, but need to set up the collet for the blank stock and set the cutter blocks up, I have the finish tool block done, I need to do the rougher bit now. Just takes a lot of time...
 
Steve Wells
----- Original Message -----
From: john kling
Sent: Saturday, November 02, 2013 7:15 PM
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] Re: C to B 9" workshop conversion.

 
Varying accuracy are claimed for different models of SB lathes lead screws. Also the different suppliers of  acme  stock makes assertions about high accuracy. What is involved and how is accuracy  measured for threads?
I guess I am asking for some one to put on a pedogogue's hat.


From: "armne@..." <armne@...>
To: "southbendlathe@..."
Sent: Saturday, November 2, 2013 1:27 PM
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] Re: C to B 9" workshop conversion.

 
  Thank you Jim,
  I have cut acme threads to fit a worm amce cast iron nut on my tail stock.
Alec Ryals


From: Jim B.
To: southbendlathe@...
Sent: Saturday, November 2, 2013 8:41 AM
Subject: RE: [southbendlathe] Re: C to B 9" workshop conversion. [2 Attachments]

 
Steve Wells has some very special, accurate and polished 7/16-10 LH stock for rebuilding cross feeds.
The compound is 3/8-10 RH
You can find accurate stock for that here.
 
http://www.roton.com/
 
MSC also carries some stock but they are expensive.
Here is some leadscrew rod.
 
http://www.mscdirect.com/product/01206184
 
Of course you can roll your own. You only need some rod and to grind an ACME threading tool.
I have made some for my Burke Mill in/out feed and its been good for 5 years now.
This also gives you the ability to “fit” the thread to a worn nut.
 
Jim B.

.
 
 
Were do I buy accurate amce thread stock.
Thank You
Alec














Re: 409 Series "R" lathe from roughly about 1937

greenzx9rr@...
 

Hi Jim , thanks for your advice! Ans i will listen! Thats why i'm here now!


But lets begin at the start. :

what is the difference between a workshop and a NOT workshop lathe?  I'm a roekie. ;-)


Re: 409 Series "R" lathe from roughly about 1937

Jim B. <btdtrf@...>
 

South bend made FIVE different series of 9” lathes.

 

Your lathe is NOT a Workshop 9” lathe.

Do not purchase anything that states it’s for a Workshop or 10K lathe.

 

Parts labeled as coming from a “Wide Bed” or a South Bend 9” Junior” may fir but you need to be cautious about them.

Before you buy anything again check with the members of this group. Many members are wide bed owners and can steer you in the correct direction.

 

Jim B.


Re: 409 Series "R" lathe from roughly about 1937

greenzx9rr@...
 

 i bought a countershaft drive lever handle and i realized that my lathe has no hole to fit it? see picture in my album.

http://www.ebay.de/itm/370918844811?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1439.l2649


On Sunday, 10 November 2013, 21:55, ninja-san <greenzx9rr@...> wrote:
 
Hi Allen , how do i post some pics?
Stevie 
 


On Sunday, 10 November 2013, 21:31, m. allan noah <kitno455@...> wrote:
 

Stevie- Why don't you attach some pictures, and also give a list of exactly what you need. Some of us have some wide-bed 9 inch parts sitting around.

allan


On Sun, Nov 10, 2013 at 1:56 PM, <greenzx9rr@...> wrote:
 
Hi, i'm stevie from Belgium and last year i bought a south bend lathe . This  "thing" was not complete and  after hours and hours surching on the net i thought it was a 9" lathe. and i bought a fieuw parts but they don't fit! So , i sent many people a mail for there advice?
Yesderday i received an mail from Steve..

"Hi Stevie and thanks for your note and photos. They were very helpful. You have a 409 Series "R" lathe from roughly about 1937. I found a similar one in the attached photo except it has the quick change gearbox, otherwise it looks very similar. The one you have is rather unique and I've never seen many of them but then the "unique" is what is giving you the problem on finding parts. The design is actually closer to the early Heavy 10 lathes and the later industrial version lathes so some of those parts may actually interchange with some small modifications. Look for early 10L parts. It looks like you have bolts in the top of the spindle bearing caps. There should be oil fill cups there to feed oil to the spindle I believe unless that has been modified. This lathe came out before the "workshop" lathes in the later 1930's. The takeup bearing will not work for you obviously so it's no problem just to return it to me and I'll be glad to refund your money. You might try searching wswells.com as they quite a bit of information on the 1930's lathes on that site. "

so , is here anyone how heve parts for this type af lathe? at first i'm looking for the oil fill cups....ect ect, little things
Sorry for my bad englisch!
Kind regards,
Stevie

I can sent pictures ..



--
"The truth is an offense, but not a sin"





Lathe on E-Bay

Nelson Collar
 

There is a South Bend Lathe on E-Bay. It is an "A" model, no other info. Has a reserve which is not met. 


 Its not the best looking lathe to me, looks canablized


Re: 409 Series "R" lathe from roughly about 1937

ninja-san <greenzx9rr@...>
 

Allen , i made an album, tell me what you see on the pics ;-)

Stevie 
 


On Sunday, 10 November 2013, 21:55, ninja-san wrote:
 
Hi Allen , how do i post some pics?
Stevie 
 


On Sunday, 10 November 2013, 21:31, m. allan noah wrote:
 

Stevie- Why don't you attach some pictures, and also give a list of exactly what you need. Some of us have some wide-bed 9 inch parts sitting around.

allan


On Sun, Nov 10, 2013 at 1:56 PM, <greenzx9rr@...> wrote:
 
Hi, i'm stevie from Belgium and last year i bought a south bend lathe . This  "thing" was not complete and  after hours and hours surching on the net i thought it was a 9" lathe. and i bought a fieuw parts but they don't fit! So , i sent many people a mail for there advice?
Yesderday i received an mail from Steve..

"Hi Stevie and thanks for your note and photos. They were very helpful. You have a 409 Series "R" lathe from roughly about 1937. I found a similar one in the attached photo except it has the quick change gearbox, otherwise it looks very similar. The one you have is rather unique and I've never seen many of them but then the "unique" is what is giving you the problem on finding parts. The design is actually closer to the early Heavy 10 lathes and the later industrial version lathes so some of those parts may actually interchange with some small modifications. Look for early 10L parts. It looks like you have bolts in the top of the spindle bearing caps. There should be oil fill cups there to feed oil to the spindle I believe unless that has been modified. This lathe came out before the "workshop" lathes in the later 1930's. The takeup bearing will not work for you obviously so it's no problem just to return it to me and I'll be glad to refund your money. You might try searching wswells.com as they quite a bit of information on the 1930's lathes on that site. "

so , is here anyone how heve parts for this type af lathe? at first i'm looking for the oil fill cups....ect ect, little things
Sorry for my bad englisch!
Kind regards,
Stevie

I can sent pictures ..



--
"The truth is an offense, but not a sin"





Re: 409 Series "R" lathe from roughly about 1937

greenzx9rr@...
 

last week i bought this and , ra ra ra  it wil not fit, ....

 http://www.ebay.de/itm/151148123659?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1439.l2649



On Sunday, 10 November 2013, 21:31, m. allan noah <kitno455@...> wrote:
 

Stevie- Why don't you attach some pictures, and also give a list of exactly what you need. Some of us have some wide-bed 9 inch parts sitting around.

allan


On Sun, Nov 10, 2013 at 1:56 PM, <greenzx9rr@...> wrote:
 
Hi, i'm stevie from Belgium and last year i bought a south bend lathe . This  "thing" was not complete and  after hours and hours surching on the net i thought it was a 9" lathe. and i bought a fieuw parts but they don't fit! So , i sent many people a mail for there advice?
Yesderday i received an mail from Steve..

"Hi Stevie and thanks for your note and photos. They were very helpful. You have a 409 Series "R" lathe from roughly about 1937. I found a similar one in the attached photo except it has the quick change gearbox, otherwise it looks very similar. The one you have is rather unique and I've never seen many of them but then the "unique" is what is giving you the problem on finding parts. The design is actually closer to the early Heavy 10 lathes and the later industrial version lathes so some of those parts may actually interchange with some small modifications. Look for early 10L parts. It looks like you have bolts in the top of the spindle bearing caps. There should be oil fill cups there to feed oil to the spindle I believe unless that has been modified. This lathe came out before the "workshop" lathes in the later 1930's. The takeup bearing will not work for you obviously so it's no problem just to return it to me and I'll be glad to refund your money. You might try searching wswells.com as they quite a bit of information on the 1930's lathes on that site. "

so , is here anyone how heve parts for this type af lathe? at first i'm looking for the oil fill cups....ect ect, little things
Sorry for my bad englisch!
Kind regards,
Stevie

I can sent pictures ..



--
"The truth is an offense, but not a sin"



Re: 409 Series "R" lathe from roughly about 1937

greenzx9rr@...
 

i made a foto album  , enjoy the pics  en please anyone who think he has missing parts for me, just tell me.

Last week i bought a 9" gear cover and an end gear guard , and it wont fit ... :-(


http://www.ebay.de/itm/221299371559?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1439.l2649


So i need a gear cover for my lathe...



On Sunday, 10 November 2013, 21:31, m. allan noah <kitno455@...> wrote:
 

Stevie- Why don't you attach some pictures, and also give a list of exactly what you need. Some of us have some wide-bed 9 inch parts sitting around.

allan


On Sun, Nov 10, 2013 at 1:56 PM, <greenzx9rr@...> wrote:
 
Hi, i'm stevie from Belgium and last year i bought a south bend lathe . This  "thing" was not complete and  after hours and hours surching on the net i thought it was a 9" lathe. and i bought a fieuw parts but they don't fit! So , i sent many people a mail for there advice?
Yesderday i received an mail from Steve..

"Hi Stevie and thanks for your note and photos. They were very helpful. You have a 409 Series "R" lathe from roughly about 1937. I found a similar one in the attached photo except it has the quick change gearbox, otherwise it looks very similar. The one you have is rather unique and I've never seen many of them but then the "unique" is what is giving you the problem on finding parts. The design is actually closer to the early Heavy 10 lathes and the later industrial version lathes so some of those parts may actually interchange with some small modifications. Look for early 10L parts. It looks like you have bolts in the top of the spindle bearing caps. There should be oil fill cups there to feed oil to the spindle I believe unless that has been modified. This lathe came out before the "workshop" lathes in the later 1930's. The takeup bearing will not work for you obviously so it's no problem just to return it to me and I'll be glad to refund your money. You might try searching wswells.com as they quite a bit of information on the 1930's lathes on that site. "

so , is here anyone how heve parts for this type af lathe? at first i'm looking for the oil fill cups....ect ect, little things
Sorry for my bad englisch!
Kind regards,
Stevie

I can sent pictures ..



--
"The truth is an offense, but not a sin"


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