Date   

Re: POTD (OT)

Jim B. <btdtrf@...>
 

>What a beautiful little car! From the time I was a child, when a friend of my Dad had one, I wanted one of those. Now that I am old enough to afford one, I can't get in and out of them anymore, because they are too low to the ground. (sigh...)

Well done! Good luck with the rest of the project.

>Chet

I don’t fit well either, but I can get in with some effort.

 

Jim B.
Owner
http://finance.groups.yahoo.com/group/southbendheavy10/
http://finance.groups.yahoo.com/group/southbendheavy10files/
co-owner.
NJ_LoganLatheOwners@...
moderator
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/southbendlathe/
Projects_For_Home_Shop_Metal_Fabricators

 


Re: POTD (OT) [2 Attachments]

Chester Bishop
 

What a beautiful little car! From the time I was a child, when a friend of my Dad had one, I wanted one of those. Now that I am old enough to afford one, I can't get in and out of them anymore, because they are too low to the ground. (sigh...)
 
Well done! Good luck with the rest of the project.
 
Chet

On Fri, May 24, 2013 at 7:15 AM, Jim B. <btdtrf@...> wrote:
 
[Attachment(s) from Jim B. included below]

>But, but....I wanna see the CAR! :-)

>Chester Bishop

 

The car is in an on going state of restoration. It has been for 45 years.

In the past few months I have not been too active for some medical reasons. I am trying to get things ready to start the engine. That was rebuilt about 26 years ago.

Attached are two pictures, a before and one form late December of 2012.

The before dates from 1967. The body is sheet metal over a wooden frame. Both the frame and the wood needed a lot of work.

Since the Dec 2012 picture, the full bonnet had been installed but the bumpers and head lights are off again.

The doors and fuel tank are still in prime.

I am in the process of running the fuel line.

 

 

Jim B.

 



Re: POTD

Jim B. <btdtrf@...>
 

I said pressure washer, it was a steam cleaner.
Jim B
Sent from my DROID RAZR MAXX


Re: POTD

Jim B. <btdtrf@...>
 

>Jim B,

>What is in that big tank behind the car frame on the two wheeler.

 

That was an LNG tank. I had rented a pressure washer to clean up the frame and engine.

BTW that picture was when I lived in Lake Park Florida.

 

Jim B.
Owner
http://finance.groups.yahoo.com/group/southbendheavy10/
http://finance.groups.yahoo.com/group/southbendheavy10files/
co-owner.
NJ_LoganLatheOwners@...
moderator
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/southbendlathe/
Projects_For_Home_Shop_Metal_Fabricators

 


Re: POTD

Flash Gordon
 

Jim B,

What is in that big tank behind the car frame on the two wheeler. First I thought it was acetylene, but it looks like a liquid hose attached.

The Morris Garage looks great. When you get it done I will come visit and you can take us for a ride.

Maybe I will drive my Mustang there.

Ed S


Re: POTD (OT) [2 Attachments]

Mark Hofer
 

Truly a labor of love and looking great!  Good luck with the restart!
M


On May 24, 2013, at 10:15 AM, Jim B. wrote:

 

>But, but....I wanna see the CAR! :-)

>Chester Bishop

 

The car is in an on going state of restoration. It has been for 45 years.

In the past few months I have not been too active for some medical reasons. I am trying to get things ready to start the engine. That was rebuilt about 26 years ago.

Attached are two pictures, a before and one form late December of 2012.

The before dates from 1967. The body is sheet metal over a wooden frame. Both the frame and the wood needed a lot of work.

Since the Dec 2012 picture, the full bonnet had been installed but the bumpers and head lights are off again.

The doors and fuel tank are still in prime.

I am in the process of running the fuel line.

 

 

Jim B.

 




Re: POTD (OT)

Jim B. <btdtrf@...>
 

>But, but....I wanna see the CAR! :-)

>Chester Bishop

 

The car is in an on going state of restoration. It has been for 45 years.

In the past few months I have not been too active for some medical reasons. I am trying to get things ready to start the engine. That was rebuilt about 26 years ago.

Attached are two pictures, a before and one form late December of 2012.

The before dates from 1967. The body is sheet metal over a wooden frame. Both the frame and the wood needed a lot of work.

Since the Dec 2012 picture, the full bonnet had been installed but the bumpers and head lights are off again.

The doors and fuel tank are still in prime.

I am in the process of running the fuel line.

 

 

Jim B.

 


Re: HEAVY 10 ASSEMBLY

ALAN WHEATLEY
 

Hi Alec

The locating pin does not have to be a precision fit in the bed and the headstock. It's purpose is simply to keep the headstock in alignment with the gears on the banjo and the gearbox -- this saves you a few minutes of assembly time.

Alan

On 23/05/2013 20:52, armne@... wrote:
 

Hello All,
Well I'm finially putting my South Bend heavy 10 back together and need to know about the pin that locates the headstock to the bed, I must of lost it in the last year, I measaured the bed and the hole is ~ .312" while the headstock hole is .350" is there a stepped pin or is there meant to be like this.
Thank You for any help
Sincerely
Alec Ryals



Re: POTD

Chester Bishop
 

But, but....I wanna see the CAR! :-)


On Thu, May 23, 2013 at 5:21 PM, Jim B. <btdtrf@...> wrote:
 

This is my first project in a long time. I hope the text and links are OK. Flckr is giving me grief. I think I will go back to Photobucket.

 

MG TD SIDE CURTAIN DOOR SOCKETS.

 

On the TD doors there are a set of sockets used to anchor the side curtains. These hare 1-3/8” long, with a 9/16-20 55 degree thread (BSS) and they have a BSF 3/8 hex. I don’t have a match set. The ones I have appear to be non magnetic but not brass. Perhaps pot metal, chrome plated. I could get some for about $7 each but I have been warned that the after market ones are not very good.

I have been looking at this job for over a month now but just have not been up to it until the last two days.

 

Since I had a piece of 7/8 303, long enough for the job I decided to make two.

 

Starting with the Heavy 10, and using a 7/8 collet, I left about 2” of stock sticking out.

I first turned the bar to 11/16 OD for a distance of 1-3/8”

 

 http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5468/8806721948_69d681cebd_o.jpg

 

Note that (lower left) I am using a shop made way mounted dial indicator with 2” of travel to measure the step length.

 

Next I turn a 9/16” by 1-3/16” step.

 

 http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5348/8796141969_8e643b4337_o.jpg

  

Using the same approach.

I will need to chase the thread next but first I add a thread relief with a 0.070 wide parting tool.

 

 http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7431/8796142119_28dda2eb7f_o.jpg

 

With the relief in I can start threading but I also add a bevel on the starting end

 

 http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3775/8806723090_81e1441fef_o.jpg

 

The first pass was 0.010 ( at 29.5 degrees) deep. The second was the same. Next came a free pass. The third 0.005” and the 4 was 0.004” I then advanced the cross slide 0.0005 and took a finish cut. In the above picture you will note the tool is colored RED. That’s how I tell my BS/Whitworth cutting tools.

 

  http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3805/8806722792_8da0bd22bd_o.jpg

 

I measured the thread using shop made thread wires and compared it to the original I am copying. I adjusted the depth so that the threads match.

 

With the thread finished I want to drill out the body to 25/64. I start by using a center drill.

 

 http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7400/8806723800_cf0bc290c1_o.jpg

 

Then I drill 1-3/16 deep using ¼” 3/8” and 25/64 drills.

 http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3701/8796143333_1ac8a3f6ee_o.jpg

 

I have not drilled the full length of the socket. There is still about 1/8 or so of material. I am trying to save on material and I will drill form the other end after parting.

I can now part the socket off.

 

 http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3671/8806722410_c4fe0cc7c8_o.jpg

 

Since I am making several of these I am switching to the 9” Workshop. My Workshop uses 6K collets and I can hold up to 5/8” stock. (This is a shop modification).

I face of the hex end of the socket.

 

 http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8541/8796143031_0fc63aab31_o.jpg

 

And then center drill through.

 

 http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8124/8806723634_7fb9e5fed9_o.jpg

 

 

And then drill through the entire socket with a 13/32 drill.

 

 http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3759/8796143173_51507d76d4_o.jpg

 

 

Finally I need an internal relief or bevel and I use a countersink.

 

 http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8546/8796143871_f054e9d99a_o.jpg

 

Now I move to the mill. This is a Burke #4 with a vertical head. I really prefer it in the horizontal mode but it was partially set up this way. My index head takes 3C collets which normally only go to ½ OD stock. However Jeff Beck sells a nice 9/16 3C where the 9/16 portion is about 1” or more deep. I hold the socket in that, Now I need to hold the endmill in the vertical head. That also takes 3C collets. I have a ½” carbide endmill but its too long to fit. The vertical head uses a lot of room. I find a 7/16 Cobalt endmill with a 1/2 “shank. But it’s left handed.

I mill two opposite flats and zero in on the proper width, (0.600).

 

 http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2852/8806724386_64f440e220_o.jpg

 

 

Then I mill all the flats.

 

 http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8261/8796142763_c201037c47_o.jpg

 

Finally I need to put a bevel on the hex to finish off the looks.

 

 http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8280/8796143991_70144a4c96_o.jpg

 

That finished one and I repeated the same process for the second one.

Here are the finished sockets.

 

 http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3807/8806722670_c7159bbfeb_o.jpg

 

 

 http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3772/8806722542_9725e3a93a_o.jpg

 

 

Jim B.

 



Re: SB9 crossfeed and compound handle nut thread

Jim B. <btdtrf@...>
 

thread seems a tad larger than 10-24 and smaller than 12-24. Does anyone know their size?
It is a #12.
We need to know if your spindle uses Cast Iron or Bronze bearings, but there are shims setting the fit of the spindle. Look in the files section for the procedure.
Jim B
Sent from my DROID RAZR MAXX


Re: SB9 crossfeed and compound handle nut thread

Marti
 

Mine are both 12-24 on a 1945 9A

For spindle bearing adjustments, here is a good video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oS0DQusUR0w


SB9 crossfeed and compound handle nut thread

David
 

I acquired a SB9a lathe in pieces and trying to get it back together to begin learning basic machining (I'm brand new at it). The handles were off the crossfeed and compound shafts and as a result sometime in their history the 3 or 4 treads got mashed. There's enough to work with but the thread seems a tad larger than 10-24 and smaller than 12-24. Does anyone know their size?

Also I can feel movement in the Spindle predominately in the up/down direction. This lathe has but one tightening bolt front/back and shims and I don't see any bushings on the parts list. I know I can adjust the shims to takeout some of the clearance but what about if there's unequal wear?


Re: POTD

Jim B. <btdtrf@...>
 

Thank you Nelson
Jim B
Sent from my DROID RAZR MAXX


Re: POTD

Nelson Collar
 

Jim 
Very nice work, it makes all the difference in the world to make compared to buy someones knock-off. Yours will go more than a couple of life times. A turret set up with the right tooling would make it a profitable venture. As is a labor of love is different. 
Thanks for sharing.
Nelson Collar 


From: Jim B.
To: southbendlathe@...
Sent: Thursday, May 23, 2013 8:21 PM
Subject: [southbendlathe] POTD

 
This is my first project in a long time. I hope the text and links are OK. Flckr is giving me grief. I think I will go back to Photobucket.
 
MG TD SIDE CURTAIN DOOR SOCKETS.
 


POTD

Jim B. <btdtrf@...>
 

This is my first project in a long time. I hope the text and links are OK. Flckr is giving me grief. I think I will go back to Photobucket.

 

MG TD SIDE CURTAIN DOOR SOCKETS.

 

On the TD doors there are a set of sockets used to anchor the side curtains. These hare 1-3/8” long, with a 9/16-20 55 degree thread (BSS) and they have a BSF 3/8 hex. I don’t have a match set. The ones I have appear to be non magnetic but not brass. Perhaps pot metal, chrome plated. I could get some for about $7 each but I have been warned that the after market ones are not very good.

I have been looking at this job for over a month now but just have not been up to it until the last two days.

 

Since I had a piece of 7/8 303, long enough for the job I decided to make two.

 

Starting with the Heavy 10, and using a 7/8 collet, I left about 2” of stock sticking out.

I first turned the bar to 11/16 OD for a distance of 1-3/8”

 

 http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5468/8806721948_69d681cebd_o.jpg

 

Note that (lower left) I am using a shop made way mounted dial indicator with 2” of travel to measure the step length.

 

Next I turn a 9/16” by 1-3/16” step.

 

 http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5348/8796141969_8e643b4337_o.jpg

  

Using the same approach.

I will need to chase the thread next but first I add a thread relief with a 0.070 wide parting tool.

 

 http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7431/8796142119_28dda2eb7f_o.jpg

 

With the relief in I can start threading but I also add a bevel on the starting end

 

 http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3775/8806723090_81e1441fef_o.jpg

 

The first pass was 0.010 ( at 29.5 degrees) deep. The second was the same. Next came a free pass. The third 0.005” and the 4 was 0.004” I then advanced the cross slide 0.0005 and took a finish cut. In the above picture you will note the tool is colored RED. That’s how I tell my BS/Whitworth cutting tools.

 

  http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3805/8806722792_8da0bd22bd_o.jpg

 

I measured the thread using shop made thread wires and compared it to the original I am copying. I adjusted the depth so that the threads match.

 

With the thread finished I want to drill out the body to 25/64. I start by using a center drill.

 

 http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7400/8806723800_cf0bc290c1_o.jpg

 

Then I drill 1-3/16 deep using ¼” 3/8” and 25/64 drills.

 http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3701/8796143333_1ac8a3f6ee_o.jpg

 

I have not drilled the full length of the socket. There is still about 1/8 or so of material. I am trying to save on material and I will drill form the other end after parting.

I can now part the socket off.

 

 http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3671/8806722410_c4fe0cc7c8_o.jpg

 

Since I am making several of these I am switching to the 9” Workshop. My Workshop uses 6K collets and I can hold up to 5/8” stock. (This is a shop modification).

I face of the hex end of the socket.

 

 http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8541/8796143031_0fc63aab31_o.jpg

 

And then center drill through.

 

 http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8124/8806723634_7fb9e5fed9_o.jpg

 

 

And then drill through the entire socket with a 13/32 drill.

 

 http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3759/8796143173_51507d76d4_o.jpg

 

 

Finally I need an internal relief or bevel and I use a countersink.

 

 http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8546/8796143871_f054e9d99a_o.jpg

 

Now I move to the mill. This is a Burke #4 with a vertical head. I really prefer it in the horizontal mode but it was partially set up this way. My index head takes 3C collets which normally only go to ½ OD stock. However Jeff Beck sells a nice 9/16 3C where the 9/16 portion is about 1” or more deep. I hold the socket in that, Now I need to hold the endmill in the vertical head. That also takes 3C collets. I have a ½” carbide endmill but its too long to fit. The vertical head uses a lot of room. I find a 7/16 Cobalt endmill with a 1/2 “shank. But it’s left handed.

I mill two opposite flats and zero in on the proper width, (0.600).

 

 http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2852/8806724386_64f440e220_o.jpg

 

 

Then I mill all the flats.

 

 http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8261/8796142763_c201037c47_o.jpg

 

Finally I need to put a bevel on the hex to finish off the looks.

 

 http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8280/8796143991_70144a4c96_o.jpg

 

That finished one and I repeated the same process for the second one.

Here are the finished sockets.

 

 http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3807/8806722670_c7159bbfeb_o.jpg

 

 

 http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3772/8806722542_9725e3a93a_o.jpg

 

 

Jim B.

 


Re: HEAVY 10 ASSEMBLY

armne@sbcglobal.net <armne@...>
 

Thank You Very Much.
Alec Ryals

--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, Latheman <latheman2@...> wrote:

No step. Snug in the bed, loose in the head.

Ted

On May 23, 2013, at 3:52 PM, "armne@..." <armne@...> wrote:

Hello All,
Well I'm finially putting my South Bend heavy 10 back together and need to know about the pin that locates the headstock to the bed, I must of lost it in the last year, I measaured the bed and the hole is ~ .312" while the headstock hole is .350" is there a stepped pin or is there meant to be like this.
Thank You for any help
Sincerely
Alec Ryals


Re: HEAVY 10 ASSEMBLY

armne@sbcglobal.net <armne@...>
 



             The Lord is a strong hold in the Day of trouble, and he
                            knoweth
  them that trust in him )(


--- On Thu, 5/23/13, Latheman wrote:

From: Latheman
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] HEAVY 10 ASSEMBLY
To: "southbendlathe@..."
Date: Thursday, May 23, 2013, 3:30 PM

 

No step. Snug in the bed, loose in the head.

Ted

On May 23, 2013, at 3:52 PM, "armne@..." <armne@...> wrote:

 

Hello All,
Well I'm finially putting my South Bend heavy 10 back together and need to know about the pin that locates the headstock to the bed, I must of lost it in the last year, I measaured the bed and the hole is ~ .312" while the headstock hole is .350" is there a stepped pin or is there meant to be like this.
Thank You for any help
Sincerely
Alec Ryals


South Bend Lathe draw tube length

mattsix@ymail.com
 

I recently added a south bend 13" lathe to my way to many lathes.A 1926 south bend 22XB second op lathe,1929 80 series south bend with overhead drive and taper,1922 11" with Qcgb,1928 south bend Junior with the enclosed(mail box)drive,7" Flather,rivett 608,rivett 507 amongst others.The 13" was in great condition but i had a specific question.The 13" came with 3 draw tubes,1 was for the 13" but the other 2 are longer.1 has south bend on the handle end the other says royal on it.Does anyone know the length of the draw tubes from the larger south bends(14" and up)?trying to id the other 2 draw tubes and thought they probably went to larger south bends.both are 5c draw tubes.Thanks for any help....Matt


Re: HEAVY 10 ASSEMBLY

sblatheman
 

No step. Snug in the bed, loose in the head.

Ted

On May 23, 2013, at 3:52 PM, "armne@..." <armne@...> wrote:

 

Hello All,
Well I'm finially putting my South Bend heavy 10 back together and need to know about the pin that locates the headstock to the bed, I must of lost it in the last year, I measaured the bed and the hole is ~ .312" while the headstock hole is .350" is there a stepped pin or is there meant to be like this.
Thank You for any help
Sincerely
Alec Ryals


Re: HEAVY 10 ASSEMBLY

Flash Gordon
 

What pin? I have never disassembled a heavy 10.... but my 9" and my 9" "wide" ...which has a heavy 10 bed does not have a locating pin. The head stock slides on the ways and can be bolted down anywhere.

Ed S

At 03:52 PM 5/23/2013, you wrote:


Hello All,
Well I'm finially putting my South Bend heavy 10 back together and need to know about the pin that locates the headstock to the bed, I must of lost it in the last year, I measaured the bed and the hole is ~ .312" while the headstock hole is .350" is there a stepped pin or is there meant to be like this.
Thank You for any help
Sincerely
Alec Ryals

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