Date   

Re: Carbide Bids

BOB WRIGHT
 

I use carbide 99% of the time on my 10K and i don't run it any faster or change the feed rate but thats just how i do it. I ran carbide inserts for 8 years on an 1899 18" lathe the same way and it ran production 8 hrs a day 5 days a week. So expeirment and see what suits you best...Bob


Re: Carbide Bids

Gene Horr
 

I'm guessing that you haven't used carbide before on this lathe. If
this assumption is not correct then ignore this post <g>.

Carbide works best with a heavy cut and a machine that can produce a
lot of force. It is really for mass production in larger machines.
For the lighter/smaller machines plain old HSS actually works best for
most people.

Gene

On Tue, Dec 8, 2009 at 11:25 AM, "Scrubby" <steamlocoengr@...> wrote:



I just bought some 1/4" carbide tool cutter bits from Enco and I'm not having any luck in turning. I'm using a straight bit holder that is level with the bed, not the 16 1/2 degree holder and I just can't turn at all with these Enco bits.


Re: Carbide Bids

Rich Dean <toolman8@...>
 

Brian,
you don't give much info, but if the tools are similar to what I got,
1/4" IC triangle unmarked imported, they are indeed junk.
For 1" cold rolled steel, 1/4 tips are too small and fragile.
Also they are hard to find metric sizes.
The biggest problem is the holders have only one shoulder to retain the insert.
In use the tiny clamp screw cannot hold the insert steady and it walks around.
Inserts are ready to use, but can be reground a little. Diamond is really the only way.
The cut must be at least near the tip radius in depth and run at higher speeds
than HSS.
I gave up on the holders and made my own 2 sided pocketed ones with a decent
screw. Found loads of the inderts on Feebay for cheap. Still 1/4" inserts are very
fragile for heavy work.
-=RichD=-


"Scrubby" wrote:

I just bought some 1/4" carbide tool cutter bits from Enco and I'm not having any luck in turning. I'm using a straight bit holder that is level with the bed, not the 16 1/2 degree holder and I just can't turn at all with these Enco bits. Do they have to be ground more with the green grinding wheel for the correct angels? I'm assuming that these $30.00 bits from Enco are ready to use. What RPM should I be using when turning 1" stock?
Brian
------------------------------------


Re: Carbide Bids

Michael Schetterer <finegrainmetal@...>
 

Well, carbide certainly thrives under obscene SFPM and healthy feeds, but it doesn't need them. I've used a wide variety of carbide, from El Cheapo brazed to super-duper polycoated inserts, under a wide variety of DOC, feed, and SFPM. I just finished a job opening a bore to 2", with carbide, taking .0005" DOC cuts at the end, at modest SFPM (OK, it was 1144SP :-) ).
 
I think it has more to do with geometry than material. Carbide can "take the heat" of a serious cut in steel at wicked speeds, but not if the edge is sharp. So, a blunt edge is desirable for high MRR. But, a blunt edge is a problem if you're going for a nice finish on smudgy materials like 1018 or A36.
 
Now, if you set up for a healthy DOC and feed with a brazed insert, you're going to run into a new problem -- long, jagged-edged, hot swarf wrapping itself all over everything. What a nighmare! Make sure you don't reach in there and try to clear those nasty stringers, as you WILL slice yourself. If you want to go down this road, PLZ look into inserted carbide with a proper chipbreaker that breaks up the stringers into little curly-Q's.
 
Regards.
 
Mike


To: southbendlathe@...
From: btdtrf@...
Date: Tue, 8 Dec 2009 12:52:56 -0500
Subject: RE: [southbendlathe] Carbide Bids

 

First:

Did you buy the Enco Brand or “Made in the USA”?

Enco brand stuff is less than desirable.

Second Carbide needs a deep cut and a high rate of RPM.

Set your lathe on fastest RPMS and take at least 1/32” depth of cut. 1/16 is better.

 

Jim B.


From: southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com [mailto:southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of "Scrubby"
Sent: Tuesday, December 08, 2009 12:26 PM
To: southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [southbendlathe] Carbide Bids

 

 

I just bought some 1/4" carbide tool cutter bits from Enco and I'm not having any luck in turning. I'm using a straight bit holder that is level with the bed, not the 16 1/2 degree holder and I just can't turn at all with these Enco bits. Do they have to be ground more with the green grinding wheel for the correct angels? I'm assuming that these $30.00 bits from Enco are ready to use. What RPM should I be using when turning 1" stock?
Brian




Get gifts for them and cashback for you. Try Bing now.


Re: Carbide Bids

w keith griffith
 

Boy,,, the initial message sounded more like the tool is above center and rubbing instead of cutting.  I use carbide inserts, and some no name brazed bits and seem to do ok even at really odd slow speeds and fine cuts.

So,,, turn off the lathe, and trap a steel rule between the cutting point of the tool bit and the material that's chucked up ready for turning.  Somewhere there's a nice picture of this,,, but the rule should be vertical.  If you raise the tool bit above center,,, the rule top will lean away from you, if you lower the tool bit below center the rule will lean into you.  Once you trap the rule,,, look from the tailstock toward the chuck,,, you'll see what I mean about the rule leaning.  If you really look,,, if the tool bit is above center very much, it's possible to see the front face of the tool, and not the point actually in contact with the material you want to turn.  Then all it does is just "skid" instead of cutting.


-----Original Message-----
From: "Jim B."
Sent: Dec 8, 2009 9:52 AM
To: southbendlathe@...
Subject: RE: [southbendlathe] Carbide Bids



First:

Did you buy the Enco Brand or “Made in the USA”?

Enco brand stuff is less than desirable.

Second Carbide needs a deep cut and a high rate of RPM.

Set your lathe on fastest RPMS and take at least 1/32” depth of cut. 1/16 is better.

 

Jim B.


From: southbendlathe@... [mailto:southbendlathe@...] On Behalf Of "Scrubby"
Sent: Tuesday, December 08, 2009 12:26 PM
To: southbendlathe@...
Subject: [southbendlathe] Carbide Bids

 

 

I just bought some 1/4" carbide tool cutter bits from Enco and I'm not having any luck in turning. I'm using a straight bit holder that is level with the bed, not the 16 1/2 degree holder and I just can't turn at all with these Enco bits. Do they have to be ground more with the green grinding wheel for the correct angels? I'm assuming that these $30.00 bits from Enco are ready to use. What RPM should I be using when turning 1" stock?
Brian




Re: Carbide Bids

Jim B. <btdtrf@...>
 

First:

Did you buy the Enco Brand or “Made in the USA”?

Enco brand stuff is less than desirable.

Second Carbide needs a deep cut and a high rate of RPM.

Set your lathe on fastest RPMS and take at least 1/32” depth of cut. 1/16 is better.

 

Jim B.


From: southbendlathe@... [mailto:southbendlathe@...] On Behalf Of "Scrubby"
Sent: Tuesday, December 08, 2009 12:26 PM
To: southbendlathe@...
Subject: [southbendlathe] Carbide Bids

 

 

I just bought some 1/4" carbide tool cutter bits from Enco and I'm not having any luck in turning. I'm using a straight bit holder that is level with the bed, not the 16 1/2 degree holder and I just can't turn at all with these Enco bits. Do they have to be ground more with the green grinding wheel for the correct angels? I'm assuming that these $30.00 bits from Enco are ready to use. What RPM should I be using when turning 1" stock?
Brian


Re: Carbide Bids

Scott McGrath <mcgrath@...>
 

For carbide the work needs to run much faster than HSS so check your speeds you'll find that there are separate speed recommendations for HSS and Carbide. A Machinery Handbook is a good starting place

"Scrubby" wrote:

I just bought some 1/4" carbide tool cutter bits from Enco and I'm not having any luck in turning. I'm using a straight bit holder that is level with the bed, not the 16 1/2 degree holder and I just can't turn at all with these Enco bits. Do they have to be ground more with the green grinding wheel for the correct angels? I'm assuming that these $30.00 bits from Enco are ready to use. What RPM should I be using when turning 1" stock?
Brian



------------------------------------


Carbide Bids

Brian
 

I just bought some 1/4" carbide tool cutter bits from Enco and I'm not having any luck in turning. I'm using a straight bit holder that is level with the bed, not the 16 1/2 degree holder and I just can't turn at all with these Enco bits. Do they have to be ground more with the green grinding wheel for the correct angels? I'm assuming that these $30.00 bits from Enco are ready to use. What RPM should I be using when turning 1" stock?
Brian


Re: Want to change to 220V - 3 phase motor

Stephen Arnold <sarnold@...>
 

I agree with Ed.  Bigger fans can be acquired from electronic surplus houses for cheap.  I bought a 5” 240V AC fan that hooks right into a VFD control point so that the fan is running whenever the motor is running regardless of speed.  The fan cost me <$20 and I fashioned a baffle out of a new (empty) plastic paint can purchased at the local hardware store for <$5.  That fan moves a LOT of air, 100% of it through the motor (more than the integral fan does) so that I can run the motor pretty darn slow.  I have been  somewhat cavalier with the 3 phase motor since it cost me “only” $75 and was brand new at the time.  I have run it from effectively stall (<20 rpm) all the way up to 110% of its rated speed.  Torque is a problem at the lower end of that speed range – not much to work with.  The squealing belt lets me know when I am pushing the limits too far.

 

Steve A

 

From: southbendlathe@... [mailto:southbendlathe@...] On Behalf Of eng4turns
Sent: Tuesday, December 08, 2009 10:11 AM
To: southbendlathe@...
Subject: [southbendlathe] Re: Want to change to 220V - 3 phase motor

 

 

This comment is intended for those who are trying to get by for the least amount of money or to use what you got and is not intended to be a recommendation for the technically "best" way to do it. Now that the disclaimer is done:

If you want to go with a VFD but already have a 3-phase motor you want to use or do not want to oversize your VFD and/or motor to account for overheating at low speeds or overheating due to harmonics, then you can use an electronics muffin fan to assist with your motor cooling. Set it up at the bell end so that it blows in the same direction as the motor's fan. It should be big enough make a difference, get the 5" fan, not the little 2" or 3" ones. They can be had in everything from low voltage DC up to 120VAC. I use them for cooling my VFD enclosures, complete with air filters to keep the shop dust out.

Ed in Florida

--- In southbendlathe@..., "jdoerp" wrote:
>
> You might consider buying a new or used 1 HP motor that is rated by the motor manufacturer as an inverter duty motor. They typically have much better and higher temperature rated insulation that will stand up to the high carrier frequency used by the inverter to reduce noise or hum. Typically you would not want to operate below 30 Hz. or half speed for extended periods as the motors cooling fan is turning slower and will not cool as well. Then you need to decide if your motor and drive combination is going to be an older V/f type or a cutting edge sensorless vector control type. Most new drives can be configured as either V/f or vector control. A few Google searches on VFD motor drives will provide plenty of reading information and learning opportunities.
>
> John
>
> --- In southbendlathe@..., "whitey" wrote:
> >
> > You will Love it. Whitey
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > From: All Thumbz
> > To: southbendlathe@... ; southbend10L@...
> > Sent: Monday, December 07, 2009 5:11 PM
> > Subject: [southbendlathe] Want to change to 220V - 3 phase motor
> >
> >
> >
> > In order to use a VFD for control, I'm contemplating replacing the reliance 115V motor that came with my 10L, contacter and push button switch box with a 220V 3 phase motor that is controlled by a VFD that converts my 220V 1 phase house current to 220V 3 phase output.
> >
> > Would a motor such as this one work? It seems to be the correct HP (.75) and speed for my 1970's H10L.
> >
> > http://cgi.ebay.com/South-Bend-Lathe-Heavy-10-Motor-and-Frame-Assembly_W0QQitemZ280401895133QQcmdZViewItemQQptZLH_DefaultDomain_0?hash=item4149415edd
> >
> >
> > Nelson
> >
>


Re: Want to change to 220V - 3 phase motor

eng4turns
 

This comment is intended for those who are trying to get by for the least amount of money or to use what you got and is not intended to be a recommendation for the technically "best" way to do it. Now that the disclaimer is done:

If you want to go with a VFD but already have a 3-phase motor you want to use or do not want to oversize your VFD and/or motor to account for overheating at low speeds or overheating due to harmonics, then you can use an electronics muffin fan to assist with your motor cooling. Set it up at the bell end so that it blows in the same direction as the motor's fan. It should be big enough make a difference, get the 5" fan, not the little 2" or 3" ones. They can be had in everything from low voltage DC up to 120VAC. I use them for cooling my VFD enclosures, complete with air filters to keep the shop dust out.

Ed in Florida

--- In southbendlathe@..., "jdoerp" <ok3fan@...> wrote:

You might consider buying a new or used 1 HP motor that is rated by the motor manufacturer as an inverter duty motor. They typically have much better and higher temperature rated insulation that will stand up to the high carrier frequency used by the inverter to reduce noise or hum. Typically you would not want to operate below 30 Hz. or half speed for extended periods as the motors cooling fan is turning slower and will not cool as well. Then you need to decide if your motor and drive combination is going to be an older V/f type or a cutting edge sensorless vector control type. Most new drives can be configured as either V/f or vector control. A few Google searches on VFD motor drives will provide plenty of reading information and learning opportunities.

John

--- In southbendlathe@..., "whitey" <whanson@> wrote:

You will Love it. Whitey
----- Original Message -----
From: All Thumbz
To: southbendlathe@... ; southbend10L@...
Sent: Monday, December 07, 2009 5:11 PM
Subject: [southbendlathe] Want to change to 220V - 3 phase motor



In order to use a VFD for control, I'm contemplating replacing the reliance 115V motor that came with my 10L, contacter and push button switch box with a 220V 3 phase motor that is controlled by a VFD that converts my 220V 1 phase house current to 220V 3 phase output.

Would a motor such as this one work? It seems to be the correct HP (.75) and speed for my 1970's H10L.

http://cgi.ebay.com/South-Bend-Lathe-Heavy-10-Motor-and-Frame-Assembly_W0QQitemZ280401895133QQcmdZViewItemQQptZLH_DefaultDomain_0?hash=item4149415edd


Nelson


South bend 9" for sale

bartholomewrichard949
 

Hallo,
I am posting this for an elderly friend who doesn't have a computer.
He wishes to sell his very clean SB complete with two chucks, faceplate, 1/2hp motor, etc, etc.

He lives in Cheshunt just north of London near the M25.

Please contact me for further details,
Thanks,
Richard (01842-819969 - Evenings)


Re: Want to change to 220V - 3 phase motor

All Thumbz <im_all_thumbz@...>
 

The shipping to my house would be over $260, according to the estimate on Ebay, which, of course, is ridiculous. Perhaps it would be less if I only asked him to sell me and ship me the motor.  My only hesitancy is that the name "worldwide electric" as opposed to Baldor is not recognizeable to me.
 


--- On Mon, 12/7/09, Jim B. wrote:

From: Jim B.
Subject: RE: [southbendlathe] Want to change to 220V - 3 phase motor
To: southbendlathe@...
Date: Monday, December 7, 2009, 4:51 PM

 

You would be paying a premium for the 10L parts that come with it that you already have.

In addition the shipping to my house, not far from yours, is $ 235,

Look here:

https://www. surpluscenter. com/item. asp?UID=20091207 18405829&item=10-2384&catname=electric

$100 plus $41.55 shipping

Or

https://www. surpluscenter. com/item. asp?UID=20091207 18405829&item=10-2385&catname=electric

 

$113 plus $43.15

Now I am not sure about the shaft size you need. They are both 5/8 but 7/8 motors are available.

 

Jim B.


From: southbendlathe@ yahoogroups. com [mailto: southbendlathe@ yahoogroups. com ] On Behalf Of All Thumbz
Sent: Monday, December 07, 2009 7:11 PM
To: southbendlathe@ yahoogroups. com ; southbend10L@ yahoogroups. com
Subject: [southbendlathe] Want to change to 220V - 3 phase motor

 

 

In order to use a VFD for control, I'm contemplating replacing the reliance 115V motor that came with my 10L, contacter and push button switch box with a 220V 3 phase motor that is controlled by a VFD that converts my 220V 1 phase house current to 220V 3 phase output.

 

 

 

Nelson

 


Re: Newbie Here

Rusty <thebrassbasher@...>
 

Bob:
Thanks so much for the info.
Rusty

--- In southbendlathe@..., "Bob Wright" <aametalmaster@...> wrote:

Well your sn means its a 1962 9"...Bob

--- In southbendlathe@..., "Rusty" <thebrassbasher@> wrote:

I just acquired a used (new for me) lathe. it is a South Bend 9 inch. the serial number is 49730NKX9. All I know is that the serial number is suppose to mean something.


Re: Newbie Here

BOB WRIGHT
 

Well your sn means its a 1962 9"...Bob

--- In southbendlathe@..., "Rusty" <thebrassbasher@...> wrote:

I just acquired a used (new for me) lathe. it is a South Bend 9 inch. the serial number is 49730NKX9. All I know is that the serial number is suppose to mean something.


Re: Thread Cutting Oil

Brian
 

Thanks Rich for the info. I'll get the right cutting oil and I'll reduce the size of the tip alittle.
Brian

--- In southbendlathe@..., Rich Dean <toolman8@...> wrote:

Brian,
a threading tool tip should never be ground left with a sharp V tip.
Each thread size requires a tip flatted to near 1/8 of the pitch.
A little narrower is ok.
Be sure the side clearance angle is sufficient especially the left side.
Straight lubricants are not cutting fluids as they lack the ability to penetrate
the microscopic crack at the tool tip as the material is cut away.
Sulfer added to oil helps as found in "threading oil".
Tricloroetheylene is the best, but really bad for health. Now banned.
Newer proprietary formulations are ok, not still not that good.
I use mostly dark sulferized oil.
RichD

"Scrubby" wrote:
Hi,
I have access to a 55 gal drum of 600w which is basicly animal fat (tallo).
I usethis oil on our steam locomotives. ie... cross heads, cylinders, air compressor,

and rods. I've tried it when cutting threads, but I'm having problems of the bit making

rough cuts. Like gouging cuts. So I tried the thread cutting tool and it did the same

thing. Does the cutter bit and thread tool have a the tip grounded off alittle or leave it sharp?

But back to the oil, would it be ok use the 600w steam cylinder oil? I just noticed in the

South Bend book that tallow was top of the list of cutting oils.
Brian


Newbie Here

Rusty <thebrassbasher@...>
 

I just acquired a used (new for me) lathe. it is a South Bend 9 inch. the serial number is 49730NKX9. All I know is that the serial number is suppose to mean something. i brought it home and immediately discovered that the lathe has running problems. It has a start/stop push button switch with a speed control dial. It is a GE Statortrol DC motor with a large control box mounted between the cabinet under the head stock where the motor is and the three drawers that are to the right. It barely turns over when the flat bet tensioner is engaged. The head stock pulleys are free turning and so is the jackshaft underneath. When I take off the A belt from the motor pulley it spins just fine. Not knowing what I really am doing i decided to order a new Baldor 1/2 HP motor. i also ordered a new drum switch from McMaster-Carr
I think I got a decent deal for the money though. It has a Aloris AXA with 6 tool holders that has never been used. A new turret that goes where the tail stock goes and has not yet been set up, no holes in the big hex where the tooling goes. I did get a normal tail stock.
5 each 3C collets in 1/32 Hardinge (they were new). Also a set of RSB in 1/16 inch up to 1/2 inch, used but look okay. In researching the internet I think that these are called RedArrow by SouthBend, they do have an arrow going through all the letters. I also received Armstrong tool holders but no wedges, They have a 1/2 inch wide opening. I did get a lot of armstrong 1/4 inch tool holders though.
One of the drawers on the cabinet is missing part of the lock assembly. I had the inside part with the latch but not the lock with the tumbler or the outside knob. I just bought 3 of the knurled knobs on eBay and I only need one of them. I will be putting the other two back up on eBay after I receive them. What I need is the keyed tumbler that goes inside the lock.
I would also like to know something about what I have. I decided that I have had it with the Chinese import junk. I have a bench top drill press that just about jumps off the bench every time I turn it on. Every thing, and I mean every thing on the machine is out of balance really bad.


Rusty


Re: Want to change to 220V - 3 phase motor

jdoerp
 

You might consider buying a new or used 1 HP motor that is rated by the motor manufacturer as an inverter duty motor. They typically have much better and higher temperature rated insulation that will stand up to the high carrier frequency used by the inverter to reduce noise or hum. Typically you would not want to operate below 30 Hz. or half speed for extended periods as the motors cooling fan is turning slower and will not cool as well. Then you need to decide if your motor and drive combination is going to be an older V/f type or a cutting edge sensorless vector control type. Most new drives can be configured as either V/f or vector control. A few Google searches on VFD motor drives will provide plenty of reading information and learning opportunities.

John

--- In southbendlathe@..., "whitey" <whanson@...> wrote:

You will Love it. Whitey
----- Original Message -----
From: All Thumbz
To: southbendlathe@... ; southbend10L@...
Sent: Monday, December 07, 2009 5:11 PM
Subject: [southbendlathe] Want to change to 220V - 3 phase motor



In order to use a VFD for control, I'm contemplating replacing the reliance 115V motor that came with my 10L, contacter and push button switch box with a 220V 3 phase motor that is controlled by a VFD that converts my 220V 1 phase house current to 220V 3 phase output.

Would a motor such as this one work? It seems to be the correct HP (.75) and speed for my 1970's H10L.

http://cgi.ebay.com/South-Bend-Lathe-Heavy-10-Motor-and-Frame-Assembly_W0QQitemZ280401895133QQcmdZViewItemQQptZLH_DefaultDomain_0?hash=item4149415edd


Nelson


Re: A tale of two center gages or don't buy junk! [2 Attachments

Jim B. <btdtrf@...>
 

H&H Industrial Products

www.hhip.com

 

 

Jim B.


From: southbendlathe@... [mailto:southbendlathe@...] On Behalf Of viajoaquin@...
Sent: Monday, December 07, 2009 7:59 PM
To: southbendlathe@...
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] A tale of two center gages or don't buy junk! [2 Attachments

 

 

Oh boy! You can lead a horse to water but...
Who is HHIP so I can avoid them?
Thanks to your post about Wholesale Tool having 15% off on 11/30 I got
some decent hex and square 5C collets. They were the same Chinese crap
everybody else sells but cheaper. (Even Shars!) They must draw from
different suppliers because I got boxed ones like from Enco and I got
the ones in the red cylinders like from Grizzly as well as the square
plastic container, a silver box and one in a ziplock bag!
BakoRoy

-----Original Message-----
From: Jim B. <btdtrf@verizon.net>
To: southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Mon, Dec 7, 2009 4:39 pm
Subject: [southbendlathe] A tale of two center gages or don't buy junk!
[2 Attachments]

I wanted to grind a threading tool for Whitworth/BSF threads.
I needed a 55 degree center gage. Now this s not a tool you use every
day. I
looked in the MSC BIJ
book and they had a made in the USA one, Starrett I think, for around
$20 plus
shipping. I looked on
eBay for a few days but none showed up. I suppose I could have waited.
I found a
cheepie both at
ENCO and at HHIP. I decided to order the HHIP one at $3.55 since I have
not
ordered from them
lately. I was disappointed in the last order.
When it came I was disappointed again. The gage was poorly made (Made
in China).
Just stamped out,
barely tumbled and the markings were poor. A few days later I found
another one
at "Victor Machinery
Exchange" It appeared, from the picture, to be much better quality. It
was
$4.50. I thought I would
try again. It arrived today. To some extend the quality was better,
nicely
finished, hardened and
stainless steel, made in India. But the design is faulty. The scales,
usually
used to measure TPI's
are metric. The Whitworth/BSF threads are INCH!!!!. There is no way
they will
match up with the
metric scale which makes that feature useless. Then there is the chart
of
double depths, these are
for American Standard 60 degree threads not the Whitworth 55 degree
threads.
Useless again!

There is an attachment showing the two gages together, front and back.

Well so far, with shipping I have paid as much as it would have cost to
get the
Starrett in the
first place and I am still not happy. Yes both are usable and in fact I
finished
grinding the tool
with the very crummy one from HHIP.

Second attachment.

It's just that I keep doing this. Spending good money for imported crap
with
which I am not happy.
Every time I do I promise never again and then go and break my promise.

Jim B.

------------------------------------

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Re: A tale of two center gages or don't buy junk! [2 Attachments

viajoaquin@...
 

Oh boy! You can lead a horse to water but...
Who is HHIP so I can avoid them?
Thanks to your post about Wholesale Tool having 15% off on 11/30 I got
some decent hex and square 5C collets. They were the same Chinese crap
everybody else sells but cheaper. (Even Shars!) They must draw from
different suppliers because I got boxed ones like from Enco and I got
the ones in the red cylinders like from Grizzly as well as the square
plastic container, a silver box and one in a ziplock bag!
BakoRoy

-----Original Message-----
From: Jim B. <btdtrf@...>
To: southbendlathe@...
Sent: Mon, Dec 7, 2009 4:39 pm
Subject: [southbendlathe] A tale of two center gages or don't buy junk!
[2 Attachments]


I wanted to grind a threading tool for Whitworth/BSF threads.
I needed a 55 degree center gage. Now this s not a tool you use every
day. I
looked in the MSC BIJ
book and they had a made in the USA one, Starrett I think, for around
$20 plus
shipping. I looked on
eBay for a few days but none showed up. I suppose I could have waited.
I found a
cheepie both at
ENCO and at HHIP. I decided to order the HHIP one at $3.55 since I have
not
ordered from them
lately. I was disappointed in the last order.
When it came I was disappointed again. The gage was poorly made (Made
in China).
Just stamped out,
barely tumbled and the markings were poor. A few days later I found
another one
at "Victor Machinery
Exchange" It appeared, from the picture, to be much better quality. It
was
$4.50. I thought I would
try again. It arrived today. To some extend the quality was better,
nicely
finished, hardened and
stainless steel, made in India. But the design is faulty. The scales,
usually
used to measure TPI's
are metric. The Whitworth/BSF threads are INCH!!!!. There is no way
they will
match up with the
metric scale which makes that feature useless. Then there is the chart
of
double depths, these are
for American Standard 60 degree threads not the Whitworth 55 degree
threads.
Useless again!

There is an attachment showing the two gages together, front and back.

Well so far, with shipping I have paid as much as it would have cost to
get the
Starrett in the
first place and I am still not happy. Yes both are usable and in fact I
finished
grinding the tool
with the very crummy one from HHIP.

Second attachment.

It's just that I keep doing this. Spending good money for imported crap
with
which I am not happy.
Every time I do I promise never again and then go and break my promise.


Jim B.




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Re: Want to change to 220V - 3 phase motor

Jim B. <btdtrf@...>
 

You would be paying a premium for the 10L parts that come with it that you already have.

In addition the shipping to my house, not far from yours, is $ 235,

Look here:

https://www.surpluscenter.com/item.asp?UID=2009120718405829&item=10-2384&catname=electric

$100 plus $41.55 shipping

Or

https://www.surpluscenter.com/item.asp?UID=2009120718405829&item=10-2385&catname=electric

 

$113 plus $43.15

Now I am not sure about the shaft size you need. They are both 5/8 but 7/8 motors are available.

 

Jim B.


From: southbendlathe@... [mailto:southbendlathe@...] On Behalf Of All Thumbz
Sent: Monday, December 07, 2009 7:11 PM
To: southbendlathe@...; southbend10L@...
Subject: [southbendlathe] Want to change to 220V - 3 phase motor

 

 

In order to use a VFD for control, I'm contemplating replacing the reliance 115V motor that came with my 10L, contacter and push button switch box with a 220V 3 phase motor that is controlled by a VFD that converts my 220V 1 phase house current to 220V 3 phase output.

 

Would a motor such as this one work? It seems to be the correct HP (.75) and speed for my 1970's H10L.

http://cgi.ebay.com/South-Bend-Lathe-Heavy-10-Motor-and-Frame-Assembly_W0QQitemZ280401895133QQcmdZViewItemQQptZLH_DefaultDomain_0?hash=item4149415edd

 

 

Nelson

 

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