Date   

Re: My last post

Jack Dinan <jdinan@...>
 

Uh, Ed in Florida: My '66 Karmann Ghia 'vert does just fine as a daily driver during the summer here in VA. I'm ok with vintage stuff on the road. Gosh, that's why I bought my lathe and mill ............. to shape replacement parts. Weekly. ;-)
Jack

Turk;

I am a member here to learn, so I have no problem when unvarnished
truth gets posted in a civil manner. Thanks for your continued
interest.

As an analogy: One of the guys at work showed up in his mom's 1967
Dodge Dart with three-on-the-tree, no AC, manual steering and
brakes. Fun to wax nostalgic over these old things, but would
anyone really want to drive one today?

Ed in Florida


Re: adding photos

Steve Wells
 

Chris,
Another one I love to use is Ctrl-F for searching a page,
this makes short work of reading the whole text on a web page.

SW


need a part for heavy 10

marty_meyers <marty_meyers@...>
 

I NEED THE BRASS OR BRONZE BEARING SPREADER AND THE PIECE OF FELT THAT
FITS IN THE SPINDLE BEARING CAP ON THE RIGHT HAND SIDE NEAREST THE END
THE CHUCK GOES ON.
I NEEDED TO TAKE MY SPINDLE OUT TO REPLACE THE BULL GEAR AND THE
SPREADER WAS MISSING. I WOULDN'T HAVE KNOWN IT WAS MISSING BUT THERE
WAS ONE IN THE LEFT HAND CAP, SO I GOT OUT MY EXPLODED HEADSTOCK VIEW
AND REALIZED IT WAS GONE. I DON'T KNOW WHEN ANY ONE OF THE PREVIOUS
OWNERS PUT IT TOGETHER LIKE THIS, BUT IT RAN FINE AND ALMOST TRUE FOR
AN OLD MACHINE. THE SPINDLE JOURNALS LOOK PRETTY GOOD IN SPITE OF THE
PIECE BEING GONE.


Re: adding photos

ChristopherS
 

Yes, that's a good one too!
 
Chris


Steve Wells wrote:

Chris,
Another one I love to use is Ctrl-F for searching a page,
this makes short work of reading the whole text on a web page.

SW



Re: My last post

ChristopherS
 

This is a thoughtful synopsis of of this topic & reflects (my opinion) exactly our attraction to these old machines. V belts were a great improvement over flat leather belts. They simply transfer power more efficiently. That said, my flat belt is a large part of the charm of my 10L and would not change it if could. Denny's perspective is a professional view of reality. Few of us are in this for efficiency or production though. In the end none of us are going to dump our old SB's as a result of Denny's post.
 
I made a point of not responding to Denny's post until we received a substantial amount of feedback. In the end I'm grateful to the group for not jumping all over Denny. I have been one of the few that knew his views and have kept it to my self. As it turns out, the decorum of all of you has once again shown why this group is so successful. No hysteria, no flaming and no "Why the hell are you here then?" We know a great asset when we see it, and Denny is most unequivocally that!
 
Chris


Stephen Benson wrote:

Hi
I ride old British bikes built in the fifties and when you compare them to modern bikes their defects are very obvious to all but most bigoted . But which would I rather ride its no contest its my old AJS or Sunbeam every time. Would I pay more for a perfect condition Southbend  than a modern efficient lathe built China yes I would because I would have no pride of ownership on the Chinese lathe.
I take enjoyment by just looking at my old motorcycles they have a look that's not found in the modern world and I view my 1941 9 inch SB in the same way.
The standard of work an old lathe can produce is almost entirely due to the skill of the operator I replaced a modern Chinese lathe with my SB and do not regret it. I do not run my lathe in an production environment so I want a lathe that I enjoy using nor do I feel stupid in making that choice.
Regards Steve     
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, March 26, 2007 5:54 AM
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] My last post

Turk,

Genuine honesty is never offensive. Yours is the voice of experience,
which is much more valuable than mere opinion.

Greg

----- Original Message -----
From: "Chris Strazzeri" <cjstrazz@yahoo.com>
To: <southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, March 25, 2007 5:31 PM
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] My last post

OK guys, this is an excellent example of what I told Cal yesterday
about the difference between "Reply" & "Reply ALL", as it pertains to
yahoo group mail.... There is NO difference! If you click reply you
must delete the yahoo address and type in or paste the recipient in
the "To" box. Of course you can also select "Forward" which is safer,
with less chance of this kind of mistake.

Sorry Denny.

Chris

Dennis Turk <dennis.turk2@verizon.net> wrote:
Hi all

Sorry the email to Chuck I thought I was only going to his personal
email address. That message was not for public viewing and was a
private message. I apologize for such a message being made public as
this is not the forum for such communication.

Again I am sorry that it showed up on this site.

I know some may find it offensive and stirring controversy was not my
intent. I will not respond back to any post concerning this email from
the group as it was not intended for all of you. Again I apologize for
it being made public.

Dennis Turk



Re: adding photos

Steve Wells
 

Group,
Ok, here's little key board short cut that I use....
when replying to a group e-mail and if you don't want
the prior mail text to show in your message.
after you hit the reply button your cursor will be setting
in the text body of the message, just press Ctrl-A
which will select all the post text, then hit the delete key.
and your ready to to type.

Want another one?
When you are browsing the Internet and you want to open another
page to search for something or what ever, like when your on e-bay
and you don't want to loose the page, but need to look up the item
your looking at....just hit Ctrl-N

Steve


Re: Lath manufacture dates

Steve Wells
 

Cal, yep, I'll do the whole thing for you...just give me a few days to learn how to
reduce the PDF file...I started it and the page files are huge...It has color in the pages
and I was trying to get a really good reproduction of them for printing. It's in the large format,
8.5 x 11. It would take me forever to upload it from home on dial up, so I'll do it
from work when done. Maybe another group member can help me out here, cut down
my learning curve time with the pdf's.
Ha, while you were thinking about bidding, I talked him into a buy-it-now....hehe..
but now you'll get it for free.....:)

Steve


Re: My last post

eng4turns
 

Turk;

I am a member here to learn, so I have no problem when unvarnished
truth gets posted in a civil manner. Thanks for your continued
interest.

As an analogy: One of the guys at work showed up in his mom's 1967
Dodge Dart with three-on-the-tree, no AC, manual steering and
brakes. Fun to wax nostalgic over these old things, but would
anyone really want to drive one today?

Ed in Florida

--- In southbendlathe@..., "Dennis Turk"
<dennis.turk2@...> wrote:

Hi all

Sorry the email to Chuck I thought I was only going to his
personal
email address. That message was not for public viewing and was a
private message. I apologize for such a message being made public
as
this is not the forum for such communication.

Again I am sorry that it showed up on this site.

I know some may find it offensive and stirring controversy was not
my
intent. I will not respond back to any post concerning this email
from
the group as it was not intended for all of you. Again I
apologize for
it being made public.

Dennis Turk


Re: adding photos

ChristopherS
 

What Steve describes with "Control N" is actually a command to create a new instance of the page your already on. Right clicking the mouse will usually bring up a menu that will include "Open In New Window". This is handier when clicking a link but want to keep the current page loaded.
 
Chris


Steve Wells wrote:

Group,
Ok, here's little key board short cut that I use....
when replying to a group e-mail and if you don't want
the prior mail text to show in your message.
after you hit the reply button your cursor will be setting
in the text body of the message, just press Ctrl-A
which will select all the post text, then hit the delete key.
and your ready to to type.

Want another one?
When you are browsing the Internet and you want to open another
page to search for something or what ever, like when your on e-bay
and you don't want to loose the page, but need to look up the item
your looking at....just hit Ctrl-N

Steve



Re: Replace 405 thrust washer with 9A-B-C thrust bearing

Tom Boergert
 

Hi Dennis,

I had read the posts about replacing the outboard thrust washer with
needle bearings and wondered if it could be done with my inboard
washer, too. I'll give it go and post the pictures.

I'll probably make a new washer of the correct thickness instead and
save the original for fall-back and I guess posterity.

Tom

--- In southbendlathe@..., "Dennis Turk"
<dennis.turk2@...> wrote:

Hi Tom

You do have an alternative to the standard SB ball thrust bearing.

If you reduce the thickness of your current .375 thick thrust
washer
to .235 you may then install a set of needle thrust bearings.

These maybe gotten from MSC.

You will need 1 each bearing p/n 03380979 $3.37. You will need
two
each thrust washer 03381159 $1.26 each.

If you do this may I suggest that you get two sets of them and
replace your fiber thrust washer under you thrust adjusting nut
with
the second set. You will be amazed at the improvement.

Turk


Re: Looking for a lathe

ratedspeed
 

Dennis,
I for one hope that you're around long enough to finish all those old machines and tell us about them too.
regards,
Don

From: "Dennis Turk" <dennis.turk2@...>
Reply-To: southbendlathe@...
To: southbendlathe@...
Subject: [southbendlathe] Re: Looking for a lathe
Date: Mon, 26 Mar 2007 02:20:14 -0000

Hi Chris

I have my systems gal working on our web page for the company. In
the future there will be a tab that links you to the virtual Turk
Works antique machine museum. Not really but I will be able to put
up photos of all the machines I have. You guys have only seen a
small part of them. I hope next week to have a planer on the way to
me so my goal is to show in miniature the machine tool technology of
the late 1800's to the early 20Th century. With over sixty machines
and less than half restored I have a lot of work ahead of me. Just
hope I live long enough to finish what I have started.

Turk


--- In southbendlathe@..., Chris Strazzeri <cjstrazz@...>
wrote:

Denny, are we going to have a "coming out" party at your place?

Chris


speakerme1 <Speakerme@...> wrote:
Hello Dennis,

I am not offended in any way. Than ks for your comments, I will
look
into Jet a little further, What does the Birmingham YCL 1340 strike
you
as?


Re: My last post

Stephen Benson
 

Hi
I ride old British bikes built in the fifties and when you compare them to modern bikes their defects are very obvious to all but most bigoted . But which would I rather ride its no contest its my old AJS or Sunbeam every time. Would I pay more for a perfect condition Southbend  than a modern efficient lathe built China yes I would because I would have no pride of ownership on the Chinese lathe.
I take enjoyment by just looking at my old motorcycles they have a look that's not found in the modern world and I view my 1941 9 inch SB in the same way.
The standard of work an old lathe can produce is almost entirely due to the skill of the operator I replaced a modern Chinese lathe with my SB and do not regret it. I do not run my lathe in an production environment so I want a lathe that I enjoy using nor do I feel stupid in making that choice.
Regards Steve     

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, March 26, 2007 5:54 AM
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] My last post

Turk,

Genuine honesty is never offensive. Yours is the voice of experience,
which is much more valuable than mere opinion.

Greg

----- Original Message -----
From: "Chris Strazzeri" <cjstrazz@yahoo.com>
To: <southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, March 25, 2007 5:31 PM
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] My last post

OK guys, this is an excellent example of what I told Cal yesterday
about the difference between "Reply" & "Reply ALL", as it pertains to
yahoo group mail.... There is NO difference! If you click reply you
must delete the yahoo address and type in or paste the recipient in
the "To" box. Of course you can also select "Forward" which is safer,
with less chance of this kind of mistake.

Sorry Denny.

Chris

Dennis Turk <dennis.turk2@verizon.net> wrote:
Hi all

Sorry the email to Chuck I thought I was only going to his personal
email address. That message was not for public viewing and was a
private message. I apologize for such a message being made public as
this is not the forum for such communication.

Again I am sorry that it showed up on this site.

I know some may find it offensive and stirring controversy was not my
intent. I will not respond back to any post concerning this email from
the group as it was not intended for all of you. Again I apologize for
it being made public.

Dennis Turk


Re: My last post

Greg Coffin <gpcoffin@...>
 

Turk,

Genuine honesty is never offensive. Yours is the voice of experience,
which is much more valuable than mere opinion.

Greg

----- Original Message -----
From: "Chris Strazzeri" <cjstrazz@...>
To: <southbendlathe@...>
Sent: Sunday, March 25, 2007 5:31 PM
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] My last post


OK guys, this is an excellent example of what I told Cal yesterday
about the difference between "Reply" & "Reply ALL", as it pertains to
yahoo group mail.... There is NO difference! If you click reply you
must delete the yahoo address and type in or paste the recipient in
the "To" box. Of course you can also select "Forward" which is safer,
with less chance of this kind of mistake.

Sorry Denny.

Chris


Dennis Turk <dennis.turk2@...> wrote:
Hi all

Sorry the email to Chuck I thought I was only going to his personal
email address. That message was not for public viewing and was a
private message. I apologize for such a message being made public as
this is not the forum for such communication.

Again I am sorry that it showed up on this site.

I know some may find it offensive and stirring controversy was not my
intent. I will not respond back to any post concerning this email from
the group as it was not intended for all of you. Again I apologize for
it being made public.

Dennis Turk


Re: Looking for a lathe

Bill Wattson
 

When I went looking for a lathe, I wasn't looking for an SB. I didn't
think that much of them and like Dennis said, it was hard to find one
that had held up all that well as most in my range didn't have
hardened beds. All in all, I'd pretty much decided that if I
couldn't find a Clausing in good shape, I was going to go the import
route.

As it happened, I was looking for a vertical mill and was really
thinking again that I'd go with an import Rong-Fu style mill-drill
when I saw a Bridgeport advertised at a large local machine shop. I
made arrangements to go see the mill and ended up getting a two hour
tour of the entire operation by the toolroom manager.

We talked about all the really neat equipment they ran in the
operation. Pretty much all of it imported and all CNC. Toward the
end of the conversation I told the guy that I was interested at
getting a smaller lathe at some point and wondered what he would
recommend.

He told me that the most popular lathe in the shop was an old South
Bend Heavy 10 and walked me over to it. It was a really old lathe
with a collet head and a rack of collets. It didn't even look like
it belonged in the place. He said it was actually an embarrassment
to management and he had been pressured multiple times to get rid of
it but it always dodged the bullet by getting moved to a less
conspicuous place in the toolroom. They didn't use it for anything
more complicated than straight turning as the CNC machines did
threading and such more easily. He said that that Heavy 10 saw more
use than any other lathe in the operation.

I found an old tech school 13" a few months later and bought it. The
bed was dinged up from all the students that didn't know how heavy a
chuck was and dropped it. The guy I bought it from had gone through
it and replaced anything that wasn't working but it's a 50 year old
machine and has the battle scars to prove it. Oddly enould, as bad as
the bed looks, it's actually not worn that much and the lathe is
pretty accurate.

I probably wouldn't buy a 50 year old lathe if I was starting a
business and had to rely on it for a living. I think Rose and the
folks at SB as well as the LeBlond guys are doing a good job keeping
these things going but it's a lot more of a hobby type deal at
premium prices. It's sort of like most of the old stuff I've got
around here in the way of old tractors, old crawlers, and old machine
tools. I do it because I enjoy it and the older equipment is easier
for me to make parts for because it's simplier.

I think the Chinese turned the corner a while back and have improved
greatly on quality. All the tooling I own is Chinese or Taiwanese
made and I haven't got any complaints. If I was shopping a new lathe,
I think the Jet version of the Chinese stuff would be a good way to
go. On the other hand, I've come across some smoking deals in used
equipment with the collapse of the tool and die industry here in the
Milwaukee area and for the home shop, an old SB and an old Bridgeport
are working out just fine and I still have less in the whole deal
than the cost of small Jet lathe.


--- In southbendlathe@..., "Dennis Turk"
<dennis.turk2@...> wrote:

Hi Chris

I have my systems gal working on our web page for the company. In
the future there will be a tab that links you to the virtual Turk
Works antique machine museum. Not really but I will be able to put
up photos of all the machines I have. You guys have only seen a
small part of them. I hope next week to have a planer on the way
to
me so my goal is to show in miniature the machine tool technology
of
the late 1800's to the early 20Th century. With over sixty
machines
and less than half restored I have a lot of work ahead of me.
Just
hope I live long enough to finish what I have started.

Turk


--- In southbendlathe@..., Chris Strazzeri <cjstrazz@>
wrote:

Denny, are we going to have a "coming out" party at your place?

Chris


speakerme1 <Speakerme@> wrote:
Hello Dennis,

I am not offended in any way. Than ks for your comments, I will
look
into Jet a little further, What does the Birmingham YCL 1340
strike
you
as?


Re: Looking for a lathe

TRACY STEWART
 

Denny , I'm glad yoyr response made it to the group, thanks. I always read your responses , good to have someone with your knowledge around, thanks again, Tracy Mack


Re: Looking for a lathe

Dave Mucha
 


If you really wont an actuate machine that will last longer than you
will ever live dont get a SB. If your interested in nostalgia and
restoration and tinkering with some old machine then they are just
fine. If you really wont something that is accurate and will really
perform its not a SB.

OK, I have two 9x20 SB lathes in light duty work for home/hobby work.
I am happy with them, the accuracy is good for my needs, but I can
see they are not nearly as strong as the big Iron I had run in my
production shop days. But then again a Warner and Swasey 14 inch
turret lathe was a freaking HUGE pile of iron. The best anology is a
motorscycle next to a F-150 I think the bed was 2 inches thick at the
thing points. Real monsters.

our 24 inch was light duty in comparison.

Anyway, if you were to recomend a home machine, around 12 inch swing,
what would you put on your list ?

Remember, Grizzly sells a 9x20 for under $1,000 so $2,500 is pretty
steep for new in the hobby market.

Dave


Re: Looking for a lathe

Dennis Turk <dennis.turk2@...>
 

Hi Chris

I have my systems gal working on our web page for the company. In
the future there will be a tab that links you to the virtual Turk
Works antique machine museum. Not really but I will be able to put
up photos of all the machines I have. You guys have only seen a
small part of them. I hope next week to have a planer on the way to
me so my goal is to show in miniature the machine tool technology of
the late 1800's to the early 20Th century. With over sixty machines
and less than half restored I have a lot of work ahead of me. Just
hope I live long enough to finish what I have started.

Turk


--- In southbendlathe@..., Chris Strazzeri <cjstrazz@...>
wrote:

Denny, are we going to have a "coming out" party at your place?

Chris


speakerme1 <Speakerme@...> wrote:
Hello Dennis,

I am not offended in any way. Than ks for your comments, I will
look
into Jet a little further, What does the Birmingham YCL 1340 strike
you
as?


Re: adding photos

ChristopherS
 

where is the info on starting an album or adding pictures to a message.
I found instructions in the "help" sections but cannot find the place
on Posts or Albums where to do it??

Thanks,
Duane (Garagehermit)



Re: Lath manufacture dates

CAL <cal@...>
 

Yeah I believe you beat me out on that one. Any chance of photo copies of the catalog?
I found the bed date number of my lathe , under the head stock. Will send to you when I figure how to read without stripping the whole thing.

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, March 23, 2007 9:07 PM
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] Re: Lath manufacture dates

Cal, Denny
Here are some December 1935 shots of the new "improved" 1936 Workshop
These are from the Workshop Catalog 15-R page 14 and 15.
Denny, end door shots of threading plate...I think you have one of the lathes they 
did the art work from...haha  and....the elusive 415RF...the F being Floor Legs.
First time I've seen the F listed.
This is a pretty good catalog...hmmm, glad I won this one..:))
 
Steve


Re: Looking for a lathe

ChristopherS
 

Denny, are we going to have a "coming out" party at your place?
 
Chris


speakerme1 wrote:

Hello Dennis,

I am not offended in any way. Than ks for your comments, I will look
into Jet a little further, What does the Birmingham YCL 1340 strike you
as?


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