Date   

Re: Back Gear Pops out of Mesh - 9" Lathe

Keith Bowers
 

On Monday 19 March 2007 22:42, Rich Dean wrote:
Alex,
unseen, just behind the right side of the headstock casting is a
square head setscrew to apply drag on the backgear shaft.
Tighten this just enough to keep it engaged.
RichD
The setscrew at the gear end sets engagement.

If you can't get enought drag, pull the screw and check the brass plug that
<should> be under it. If someone has lost it, you won't be able to tighten
the setscrew enough to get any drag at all. And how did I learn
this? ........ 8o)

--
Keith Bowers - Thomasville, NC


Re: Adding more machines

jesse Brennan <jkbrennan@...>
 

You are in luck!! 

 these are the ones.
I bought 2 or 3 and have one still in the box.  It was a point of sale impulse type purchase that won't be where I bought them  a few years ago.
between $10 and $20  no more than that  probably  more like $10 since  I bought more than 1.

jesse


On Mar 20, 2007, at 8:19 AM, Jack Dinan wrote:


Jesse: I'd like to adopt your laser pointer approach. I've not seen
magnetic versions in catalogs. Can you tell us about yours and where
you bought it?
Jack



.



Re: 1927 Junior Shifter Restore

Dennis Turk <dennis.turk2@...>
 

Boy you should have seen how far back I had to crank the time machine
for the last one I got. Pre Civil War and maybe as far back as
1840. Could be a Fitchburg or a Putnam. If its the Putnam it could
be even older. Very nice condition with a full set of change gears
and two original chucks and a steady rest. Also one very nice
counter shaft of the ceiling mount type.

Turk



Steve, Very nice. Looks new or better. Denny keeps finding all these
lathes that are relics. I think he has a time machine.
Tom



Steve Wells <wswells@...>
Sent by: southbendlathe@...
03/20/2007 01:17 PM
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[southbendlathe] 1927 Junior Shifter Restore






Tom,
Here's the link to the shifter photos, this is for Denny's 1927
Junior.
He's the Teacher, so I don't think he will mind if his Student shows
the in progress work, I still have to brush down the final japanning
coats and rub it out one one more time. If my product ever arrives,
been waiting 2 weeks on it. Hope to see it before the weekend.
This is after baking the last coats of epoxy sealer, sanding and a
rub
down with compound.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/stevewells/

Steve


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Beautiful 9A on eBay

sandykt2
 

Item number 120099870588 Sandy


Re: 1927 Junior Shifter Restore

Thomas G Brandl
 


Steve,
        Very nice. Looks new or better. Denny keeps finding all these lathes that are relics. I think he has a time machine.
                                                Tom


Steve Wells
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03/20/2007 01:17 PM

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[southbendlathe] 1927 Junior Shifter Restore





Tom,
Here's the link to the shifter photos, this is for Denny's 1927 Junior.
He's the Teacher, so I don't think he will mind if his Student shows
the in progress work, I still have to brush down the final japanning
coats and rub it out one one more time. If my product ever arrives,
been waiting 2 weeks on it. Hope to see it before the weekend.
This is after baking the last coats of epoxy sealer, sanding and a rub
down with compound.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/stevewells/

Steve


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1927 Junior Shifter Restore

Steve Wells
 

Tom,
Here's the link to the shifter photos, this is for Denny's 1927 Junior.
He's the Teacher, so I don't think he will mind if his Student shows
the in progress work, I still have to brush down the final japanning
coats and rub it out one one more time. If my product ever arrives,
been waiting 2 weeks on it. Hope to see it before the weekend.
This is after baking the last coats of epoxy sealer, sanding and a rub
down with compound.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/stevewells/

Steve


Re: Adding more machines dealers w/ horizontals

Thomas G Brandl
 


What he really needs is a Lucas Mill (ebay 200090136276). Just kidding. Or there is a DeVlieg for $13K. More kidding. There are a couple of Trekker-Kerneys with the vertical head (160095203228). There are two Brown & Sharpes (270099044074). One has a vertical head. There are two benchtop Atlas horizontal mills (280094611386 and 200091174016). I think Burke might make something in that size too. The B&S looks about Bridgeport size, maybe a bit smaller. With a vertical head, it would be sweet. Also, Hardinge make some horizontal mills, vertical too. They look to be smaller sized. I'm not sure if they make a vertical head for the horizontal. I think they goe for a bit though.
                                                                        Tom


Re: Adding more machines dealers w/ horizontals

rudd long
 

Try searching "used machinery" and "baltimore", there was a dealer
there that had a couple of nice ones, asking 500. I know Bibb
machinery in Macon Ga. has a sheldon-vernon #0, but I've heard he is
pretty proud of his machines... he told me to "make him an offer"
on that one, about the time I found mine on ebay.
There were alot of little manufacturers of these things you've prob.
never heard of, like the Vernon Machine Tool Co. of Los Angeles,
later taken over by Sheldon. Check out tony's lathes uk site to find
more info on any particular model.

Ah, here's a link - scroll down to used machinery.

http://www.cams-club.org/resources/index.html

--- In southbendlathe@..., Dennis Conway <dconway00@...>
wrote:

Rudd

Where are these dealers with the small horizontals?

Dennis


Re: feed handles hitting ea. other.

Clive Foster
 

Rudd

Pretty much a normal feature on all small and many not so small lathes.
Simply not enough vertical room for decent size handle clearance.
Usual solution is to set the top slide at a suitable angle, like Walt
mine is set at around 28 or 29 degrees ready for threading.
Very few jobs need the top-slide at 0 and these are usually a bit
special with other problems to cope with.
Only cure is an offset geared top-slide feed al la DSG, Holbrook,
Smart & Brown etc.
The George Thomas design for a Myford could be adapted but its
lots of work.

Less of a pain to me than the stupidly short travel on the
topslide and tailstock poppet. At leas an inch too little.

Clive

"rudd long" <rudd135@...> wrote:


I've got a '42 vintage 13" machine. If the compound is set at 0
degrees, the compound and cross feed screw handles will interefere w/
ea other. I have the small dials FWIW - has anyone else run into this?
Quite annoying.


Re: Adding more machines

Jack Dinan <jdinan@...>
 

Thank you. You don't happen to have a photo of your setup that you could post, do you?

Seems like there three approaches to the problem. buy pointer,magnet and glue or go to Ebay and buy a magnetic laser level or a combination snake light / pointer with a magnetic base.

----- Original Message -----
From: <mailto:jdinan@...>Jack Dinan
To: <mailto:southbendlathe@...>southbendlathe@...
Sent: Tuesday, March 20, 2007 6:19 AM
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] Re: Adding more machines

Jesse: I'd like to adopt your laser pointer approach. I've not seen
magnetic versions in catalogs. Can you tell us about yours and where
you bought it?
Jack

I bought a Rong Fu more than a few years ago. Don't have room for a
BP . but wish I had a square column.
I did pin the height adjusting rack to the column by carefully
squaring it to the column an, drilling and fastening with roll
pins. Easy to remove.
I did not do the additional step of shimming out he rack pinion to
reduce turning more. I have been able to work with the fixed rack
height I used.
I verify and keep head rotation to a minimum with a magnetic laser
pointer pointed at a fixed spot on a wall about 10 feet away. not
totally perfect but I get by with this. I did switch later to an
ER collet system from Tormach which keeps vertical movement to a
minimum too,. A good thing to do early on to save on initial
tooling cost. If you can live with a small mill you might
consider a small Sieg SX3 But get on the group site
(<mailto:<mailto:SIEG-SX3-C6B%40yahoogroups.com>SIEG-SX3-C6B@...><mailto:SIEG-SX3-C6B%40yahoogroups.com>SIEG-SX3-C6B@...)
and be careful before jumping. Big is better.

jesse


Re: Adding more machines

CAL <cal@...>
 

Seems like there three approaches to the problem. buy pointer,magnet and glue or go to Ebay and buy a magnetic laser level or a combination snake light / pointer with a magnetic base.

----- Original Message -----
From: Jack Dinan
Sent: Tuesday, March 20, 2007 6:19 AM
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] Re: Adding more machines

Jesse: I'd like to adopt your laser pointer approach. I've not seen
magnetic versions in catalogs. Can you tell us about yours and where
you bought it?
Jack

>I bought a Rong Fu more than a few years ago. Don't have room for a
>BP . but wish I had a square column.
>I did pin the height adjusting rack to the column by carefully
>squaring it to the column an, drilling and fastening with roll
>pins. Easy to remove.
>I did not do the additional step of shimming out he rack pinion to
>reduce turning more. I have been able to work with the fixed rack
>height I used.
>I verify and keep head rotation to a minimum with a magnetic laser
>pointer pointed at a fixed spot on a wall about 10 feet away. not
>totally perfect but I get by with this. I did switch later to an
>ER collet system from Tormach which keeps vertical movement to a
>minimum too,. A good thing to do early on to save on initial
>tooling cost. If you can live with a small mill you might
>consider a small Sieg SX3 But get on the group site
>(SIEG-SX3-C6B@yahoogroups.com>SIEG-SX3-C6B@yahoogroups.com)
> and be careful before jumping. Big is better.
>
>jesse


Re: Adding more machines

Jim B. <eeengineer@...>
 

Add to the List The Burke #4 horizontal.
These are frequently listed on e-bay. I bought mine for less than $300.
I needed to make an RPC (add another $100) There are also OEM Heads that make it a vertical machine.
There is a Burke Group
If you are interested.
 

Jim B.

"Any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex.... It takes a touch of genius -- and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction"

Albert Einstein/ EF Schumacher (ATCMB)

 


From: southbendlathe@... [mailto:southbendlathe@...] On Behalf Of Thomas.G.Brandl@...
Sent: Tuesday, March 20, 2007 8:23 AM
To: southbendlathe@...
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] Re: Adding more machines


You might look on E-Bay, trader papers in your area, machinery dealers. I haven't run horizontals a lot. Still, I think for their size, they tend to be a bit stouter than vertical mills. There are some that are near table top size, Baker is one of them. They are actually sought after. I think $500-800. Sajo and Cincinatti have some that are about Bridgeport sized. I think they go for around $800-1000. I think a lot of shops make a mistake by not having a horizontal mill around. They are a lot better at roughing out stock (another good use for the Federal or other planner/Shaper). Also, some setups are easier on a horizontal than a vertical.
        Grizzly sells a combination mill, with horizontal and vertical capabilities. I think its a copy of a Rockwell, Wells or Cincinatti. Not sure how well they work though.
                                                                Tom


ROBERT JACKSON
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03/20/2007 07:14 AM

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Re: [southbendlathe] Re: Adding more machines



Re: Adding more machines

Jack Dinan <jdinan@...>
 

Jesse: I'd like to adopt your laser pointer approach. I've not seen magnetic versions in catalogs. Can you tell us about yours and where you bought it?
Jack

I bought a Rong Fu more than a few years ago. Don't have room for a BP . but wish I had a square column.
I did pin the height adjusting rack to the column by carefully squaring it to the column an, drilling and fastening with roll pins. Easy to remove.
I did not do the additional step of shimming out he rack pinion to reduce turning more. I have been able to work with the fixed rack height I used.
I verify and keep head rotation to a minimum with a magnetic laser pointer pointed at a fixed spot on a wall about 10 feet away. not totally perfect but I get by with this. I did switch later to an ER collet system from Tormach which keeps vertical movement to a minimum too,. A good thing to do early on to save on initial tooling cost. If you can live with a small mill you might consider a small Sieg SX3 But get on the group site (<mailto:SIEG-SX3-C6B@...>SIEG-SX3-C6B@...) and be careful before jumping. Big is better.

jesse


Re: Adding more machines

Thomas G Brandl
 


You might look on E-Bay, trader papers in your area, machinery dealers. I haven't run horizontals a lot. Still, I think for their size, they tend to be a bit stouter than vertical mills. There are some that are near table top size, Baker is one of them. They are actually sought after. I think $500-800. Sajo and Cincinatti have some that are about Bridgeport sized. I think they go for around $800-1000. I think a lot of shops make a mistake by not having a horizontal mill around. They are a lot better at roughing out stock (another good use for the Federal or other planner/Shaper). Also, some setups are easier on a horizontal than a vertical.
        Grizzly sells a combination mill, with horizontal and vertical capabilities. I think its a copy of a Rockwell, Wells or Cincinatti. Not sure how well they work though.
                                                                Tom


ROBERT JACKSON
Sent by: southbendlathe@...

03/20/2007 07:14 AM

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Re: [southbendlathe] Re: Adding more machines





Dear Rudd,

I should like to know the same qustion that Dennis poses....where do get these Mills from?
Robert.

----- Original Message ----
From: rudd long
To: southbendlathe@...
Sent: Monday, 19 March, 2007 8:28:54 PM
Subject: [southbendlathe] Re: Adding more machines

I recently picked up a sheldon vernon #0 horiz. mill for 200 bux. I
have a drill press, therefore, mill-drill is covered.
And I *LIKE* thinking sideways. And it's small. And rigid.
I have heard few good reviews on the import mill-drills. And my south
bend has some nice company in the shop at night that speaks the same
language.
I saw a bunch of nice small horizontals at dealers for 500 bux asking
price. You can put in a collet, stick in an endmilluse an angle plate
and do most anything a non-quilled vert. will do, plus, the chip fall
OUT of the hole rather than sitting down there dulling your cutter.
I've run bridgies, this is alot more bang for the buck.


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Re: feed handles hitting ea. other.

walter peterson <walt4711@...>
 

I have found the same thing on my 9" machine, but
since a person normally uses the cross feed for
faceing, I normally keep my compound at 29 degrees as
if I'm threading.
Walt


--- rudd long <rudd135@...> wrote:

I've got a '42 vintage 13" machine. If the compound
is set at 0
degrees, the compound and cross feed screw handles
will interefere w/
ea other. I have the small dials FWIW - has anyone
else run into this?
Quite annoying.




test'; ">


Re: feed handles hitting ea. other.

eng4turns
 

Yeah, my '40s 13" does the same thing as does my '30s 415. It's
inherent and is avoided by angling the compound off zero.

If you want to eliminate it, you must re-manufacture your cross-feed
screw and bushing to move the handle further out by quite a bit. Is
the annoyance factor worth it? OTOH, you could make this your
opportunity to make and install large dials :)

Ed in Florida

--- In southbendlathe@..., "rudd long" <rudd135@...> wrote:

I've got a '42 vintage 13" machine. If the compound is set at 0
degrees, the compound and cross feed screw handles will interefere
w/
ea other. I have the small dials FWIW - has anyone else run into
this?
Quite annoying.


Re: Adding more machines

robert735950
 

Dear Rudd,
I should like to know the same qustion that Dennis poses....where do get these Mills from?
Robert.

----- Original Message ----
From: rudd long
To: southbendlathe@...
Sent: Monday, 19 March, 2007 8:28:54 PM
Subject: [southbendlathe] Re: Adding more machines

I recently picked up a sheldon vernon #0 horiz. mill for 200 bux. I
have a drill press, therefore, mill-drill is covered.
And I *LIKE* thinking sideways. And it's small. And rigid.
I have heard few good reviews on the import mill-drills. And my south
bend has some nice company in the shop at night that speaks the same
language.
I saw a bunch of nice small horizontals at dealers for 500 bux asking
price. You can put in a collet, stick in an endmilluse an angle plate
and do most anything a non-quilled vert. will do, plus, the chip fall
OUT of the hole rather than sitting down there dulling your cutter.
I've run bridgies, this is alot more bang for the buck.



Re: Adding more machines

Dennis Conway <dconway00@...>
 

Rudd

Where are these dealers with the small horizontals?

Dennis

rudd long wrote:

I recently picked up a sheldon vernon #0 horiz. mill for 200 bux. I
have a drill press, therefore, mill-drill is covered.
And I *LIKE* thinking sideways. And it's small. And rigid.
I have heard few good reviews on the import mill-drills. And my south
bend has some nice company in the shop at night that speaks the same
language.
I saw a bunch of nice small horizontals at dealers for 500 bux asking
price. You can put in a collet, stick in an endmilluse an angle plate
and do most anything a non-quilled vert. will do, plus, the chip fall
OUT of the hole rather than sitting down there dulling your cutter.
I've run bridgies, this is alot more bang for the buck.



Re: Back Gear Pops out of Mesh - 9" Lathe

John S. Phillips <phillijs@...>
 

--- In southbendlathe@..., "ameade01" <ameade01@...> wrote:

Hello all: I'm a new member of this list. I've had a 9" South Bend
for about a year. I think it's a "Model A" - it's the one with the
change gears built it. It dates to 1945. Everything works fine and
seems to be tight, except that recently I've noticed that when I'm
using the back gear - I hope I'm calling it by the right name, it's
the lever-actuated pair of gears that are engaged for low speed - the
back gear unit will disengage under load when the lathe is running in
the forward direction. It seems to happen more when the lathe is
cold. Gear teeth look OK. I can keep it from disengaging by just
applying a very light hand pressure on the lever. Any advice ?

Thanks !

Alex
Hi Alex,

On the back gear, on the end opposite the handle you will find a set
screw that sets the tension on the back gear bushing. This needs to be
set a bit tighter. The SB manual states "Tighten the screw so tension
on the bushing is enough to hold gears in mesh on heavy cuts, but not
so thight that the eccentric shaft lever is hard to operate." The
handle on the back gear shoud not feel too free otherwise it will work
itself out as you described.

Hope this helps,

John


Re: Back Gear Pops out of Mesh - 9" Lathe

Rich Dean <cmsteam@...>
 

Alex,
unseen, just behind the right side of the headstock casting is a
square head setscrew to apply drag on the backgear shaft.
Tighten this just enough to keep it engaged.
RichD

ameade01 wrote:

Hello all: I'm a new member of this list. I've had a 9" South Bend for about a year. I think it's a "Model A" - it's the one with the change gears built it. It dates to 1945. Everything works fine and seems to be tight, except that recently I've noticed that when I'm using the back gear - I hope I'm calling it by the right name, it's the lever-actuated pair of gears that are engaged for low speed - the back gear unit will disengage under load when the lathe is running in the forward direction. It seems to happen more when the lathe is cold. Gear teeth look OK. I can keep it from disengaging by just applying a very light hand pressure on the lever. Any advice ?
Thanks !
Alex

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