Date   

Re: 10K cluch knob / worm gear and cluch shoe removal proceedure

JohnW <John.Walker@...>
 

Bob
Disassembly is pretty straight forward but I can't recall the
details. I jest kept taking things off until I had it all apart.

One thing you do need to know is that the screw on the clutch knob is
left hand thread.

JohnW

--- In southbendlathe@..., "imarelicz28"
<imarelicz28@...> wrote:

I decided to start cleaning up and inspecting my newly aquired
horizontal drive 10K. I'd been reading some recent posts about
apron
removal and it sounded simple enough. I removed the head stock
from
the bed. I removed the quick change gear box, with my son
supporting
the weight of the power feed shaft, as I pulled it out through the
apron. Then I detached the apron from the saddle. I'm in the
process
of using mineral spirits and a deep pan, to remove all the
accumulated
crap that's packed inside the saddle. There's a sump area, that's
behind the worm driven gear with the cluch shoes, that I can't get
at,
without removing this gear. I looked at the exploded view in the
US
Army SB parts list, and it looks like there's quite a few pieces-
parts, including a spring, that make up this assy. If I remove the
screw from the apron clutch knob, will I then be able to remove the
cluch shoes and pull this gear out? Is anything going to fly
across
the room? Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Thanks

Bob


Need 48 tooth change gear for 9 inch

Steve Obert
 

I am looking for a 48 tooth change gear. Will purchase or swap other parts.
Contact me off list at obert001 at snet dot net.


southbend rework

ChristopherS
 

Hey Denny, you have a fan!
 
Chris


Ron Maxwell wrote:

From: "Ron Maxwell"
To:
Subject: southbend rework
Date: Sun, 25 Feb 2007 21:50:03 -0500

Hello,
 
   I noticed in the files section in the yahoo southbend forum there area articles from Dennis Turk on rebuilding lathes.  Does he still do this.  How can one get in contact with him. 
 
Thanks,
Ron (ronnew  on forum)


was Gib missing from compound rest base NOW where is serial number?

Joe R
 

 
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, February 25, 2007 8:26 AM
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] Gib missing from compound rest base

Mike.
 
It's stamped into the top of the right side of the bed between the front inverted "V" and the flat surface where the tail stock rides.
 
Joe Romas
 
 


I am having trouble locating a serial Number---Im looking for it
Mike


Re: 9 in.

Joe R
 

Bill.
 
I have 3 locks but they don't work for my lathe. Look at your drawers and see if the center hole where the knob goes is off center toward the left mounting screw. If it is then I have what you need complete with keys. (they all use the same key) I got then on ebay and they won't fit my 1942 war baby 10L I let
 
Joe Romas
 

----- Original Message -----
From: Wm Mader
Sent: Sunday, February 25, 2007 10:09 AM
Subject: [southbendlathe] 9 in.

I have started to clean and paint a 9 in with the motor in the
cabinet.It came with a compleat extra taper attachment. All the numbers
I have found on the quick change are cat # I or 1 344AD 4 ft bed. On
end of the lathe bed under the tail stock are 57004 NKR9. On the head
stock under the reversing lever is VDH119N. This lathe has all large
dials, large cabinet wih chip tray and 3 drawers on the right side. All
that is missing is the locks on the 3 drawers. Where can I find them.It
also has a lot of scraping still on the bed. Can anyone tell me the
year or any other info on this lathe. One other thing the color is a
med grey. Any name or paint no.
Bill


Re: Counter shaft box's

Steve Wells
 

Yo D...
The Simplex hangers are 721's and not the same as the DFC
107 hangers, but the boxs interchange, correct-o? Have you
ever seen a set of the 720 legs? I have not. That would look
cool with the flat belt drive.
I have the 107's, but those are the ones I said someone took a
hammer and knocked off the shipper rod mounts...the fools.

Steve Wells






--- In southbendlathe@..., "Dennis Turk"
<dennis.turk2@...> wrote:

Hi Steve

Yes they are for the early simplex drive. They are just like the
ones to my complete set of parts I have.

If anyone is interested in a complete setup for an early Simplex
drive I have it. Motor pulley,large drive pulley, bearings, bearing
standards, and shaft with cone pulley for a 9 inch Series lathe.

I would sell this setup unless someone has the long cast standards
that bolted to a bench and then supported all of this above the
lathe.

Turk

--- In southbendlathe@..., "Steve Wells" <wswells@>
wrote:

I'm getting ready to list these on fleabay, and I'll offer them
here
first.
I have a set of countershaft boxs I've been holding on to way to
long.
They are really in great condition, and I am picky, do not have
felts
for them. They are part number 106 of the double friction
countershaft
in the catalogs, they also may fit the simplex motor drive, flat
belt
style. The 7/8 shaft fit is perfect, with the felts in, I would
say
it
would be "As Shipped SBLW". If you are restoring a countershaft,
and
want new boxs, you just found them. I have posted
pictures and frames from the 35 parts catalog on this link:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/stevewells/

Back line for price @ wswells@

Steve Wells


Re: Counter shaft box's

Dennis Turk <dennis.turk2@...>
 

Hi Steve

Yes they are for the early simplex drive. They are just like the
ones to my complete set of parts I have.

If anyone is interested in a complete setup for an early Simplex
drive I have it. Motor pulley,large drive pulley, bearings, bearing
standards, and shaft with cone pulley for a 9 inch Series lathe.

I would sell this setup unless someone has the long cast standards
that bolted to a bench and then supported all of this above the lathe.

Turk

--- In southbendlathe@..., "Steve Wells" <wswells@...>
wrote:

I'm getting ready to list these on fleabay, and I'll offer them
here
first.
I have a set of countershaft boxs I've been holding on to way to
long.
They are really in great condition, and I am picky, do not have
felts
for them. They are part number 106 of the double friction
countershaft
in the catalogs, they also may fit the simplex motor drive, flat
belt
style. The 7/8 shaft fit is perfect, with the felts in, I would say
it
would be "As Shipped SBLW". If you are restoring a countershaft,
and
want new boxs, you just found them. I have posted
pictures and frames from the 35 parts catalog on this link:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/stevewells/

Back line for price @ wswells@...

Steve Wells


Countershaft boxs

Steve Wells
 

I'm getting ready to list these on fleabay, and I'll offer them here
first.
I have a set of countershaft boxs I've been holding on to way to long.
They are really in great condition, and I am picky, do not have felts
for them. They are part number 106 of the double friction countershaft
in the catalogs, they also may fit the simplex motor drive, flat belt
style. The 7/8 shaft fit is perfect, with the felts in, I would say it
would be "As Shipped SBLW". If you are restoring a countershaft, and
want new boxs, you just found them. I have posted
pictures and frames from the 35 parts catalog on this link:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/stevewells/

Back line for price @ wswells@...

Steve Wells


Drawer Locks

Wm Mader <hillbrook@...>
 

Found two drawer locks .Still need one more for a three drawer cabinet.
Bill


10K cluch knob / worm gear and cluch shoe removal proceedure

imarelicz28 <imarelicz28@...>
 

I decided to start cleaning up and inspecting my newly aquired
horizontal drive 10K. I'd been reading some recent posts about apron
removal and it sounded simple enough. I removed the head stock from
the bed. I removed the quick change gear box, with my son supporting
the weight of the power feed shaft, as I pulled it out through the
apron. Then I detached the apron from the saddle. I'm in the process
of using mineral spirits and a deep pan, to remove all the accumulated
crap that's packed inside the saddle. There's a sump area, that's
behind the worm driven gear with the cluch shoes, that I can't get at,
without removing this gear. I looked at the exploded view in the US
Army SB parts list, and it looks like there's quite a few pieces-
parts, including a spring, that make up this assy. If I remove the
screw from the apron clutch knob, will I then be able to remove the
cluch shoes and pull this gear out? Is anything going to fly across
the room? Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Thanks

Bob


Re: Opinions on this SB Lathe...

ericgagnon1957
 

Hi Dennis:

I followed your instructions and the spindle came out fine. In fact,
the pulley, bull gear and everything else stayed in place in the
headstock, so I'm just leaving them there for now.Hopefully they will
stay there when I put the spindle back in!

The split collar on the gear end (left side facing headstock) actually
was threaded and turned off the gear end of the spindle--I wasn't
expecting that but it worked out fine so far.

I inspected the spindle and bearing surfaces. Facing the headstock,
the smaller left-hand side bearing surfaces are perfect. The larger,
right-hand side bearing surfaces show what I would estimate to be
galling on no more than 10% of their total surface area.

Also, I checked the felts and they look almost perfect, but I will
replace just to make sure.

While there are lines across the bearing surface on the right-side
bearing surface, there is still a lot of smooth bearing surface left,
so I think I can replace with a newer hardened spindle. What do you think?

Also, do the standard oil types for SB lathes apply to this earlier model?

Thanks,and also thanks very much for those excellent instructions!
Eric



--- In southbendlathe@..., "Dennis Turk"
<dennis.turk2@...> wrote:

Hi Eric

Actually this is a very easy spindle removal.

First locate and loosen the lock screw on the thrust collar on the
left side of the head stock. Then unscrew it and remove it from
the spindle. If it is tight you can take a little small blade screw
driver and insert into the slot or split in the adjusting collar and
then rotate the spindle to take the collar off. Some of the early
lathes did not have a split collar. If your lathe has the solid
collar and its tight use a rubber strap wrench to hold it. Please no
channel locks or pipe wrenches. God I hate people that used these
tools on a machine tool."-((((((

Second you will need to tap the spindle from left to right facing the
head stock. Use a soft face hammer or a block of wood. The spindle
is only being held buy the close fit of the bull gear and its
woodruff key.

Now as you tap the spindle to the right be very careful to not let
the ball thrust bearings drop on the floor. When the bull gear comes
free the spindle will be free to slide out. If you get a little
over exuberant with your tapping on the end of the spindle when the
bull gear comes free the spindle can slide right out unexpectedly.
So just take your time and be gentle with the hammer. You will have
to fist ketch the ball thrust bearings and then the cone pulley. The
last is the bull gear and your home free.

Owe one other thing. The woodruff key on the spindle can damage or
scratch the front bearing journal so be aware of that and not let it
drag across the bearing. AS I start to remove a spindle I like to
look and see were the key is and then rotate the spindle so the key
is at the top this way when the bull gear comes free the key will not
drop down onto the bearing journal.

Now see that was not to hard was it."-))))))

Turk

--- In southbendlathe@..., "ericgagnon1957" <eric@>
wrote:

Hi Dennis:

No, you are correct, guess I wasn't clear enough--there is only one
bolt and there are no removable caps. Also, the gear end appears to
be
machined from the spindle, not a separate pressed on gear.

How easily does the spindle slide out? Does this require some light
"persuasion" with a brass mallet? Also, how does the pulley/cone
unit
and large gear come off the spindle--any help you can provide is
appreciated!

Thanks,
Eric

--- In southbendlathe@..., "Dennis Turk"
<dennis.turk2@> wrote:

Hi Eric

Do I read this correct that you have two bolts holding the
spindle
bearing caps down?? Workshop lathes only have one bolt and no
removable cap. On these lathes the spindle slides out from left
to
right. Also does you spindle have the end gear cut right into
the
spindle or is it a separate gear that is pressed on? Just
clarifying
what lathe you have.

Turk

--- In southbendlathe@..., "ericgagnon1957" <eric@>
wrote:

Hi Dennis:

Thanks for your previous comments and suggestions (below) on
the
lathe
I recently purchased.

I have it moved into my shop, and wanted to remove the spindle
to
inspect it and the bearing surfaces for wear, and replace the
felts
based on your suggestion.

Since this is the older 415 model ("1936" is printed under the
tailstock, which sounds close to the year it was probably
made), it
looks like the spindle needs to slide vertically out of either
the
collet side, or the gear side, instead of lifting out if the
headstock
had four bolts on top instead of two screws.

Do you have some quick instructions or advice you can give me
for
removing the spindle? I see a collar on the gear side with a
screw
that can be removed, and assume that the pulley cone and the
rest of
the pieces on the spindle in the headstock slide off, but I
need to
ask someone who knows first.

Thanks,
Eric


--- In southbendlathe@..., "Dennis Turk"
<dennis.turk2@> wrote:

Hi Eric

I just took a look at your lathe picture. The lathe you
purchased is
a pre 1939 catalog number 415 RA. Remember the A B and C
model
workshop lathes were first offered in late 1938 or very early
39
so
your lathe is a top oilier 415 workshop. The C model was a
front
oilier and had the hardened and micro polished spindle. Your
lathe
will have the soft spindle and the first thing you wont to do
is
pull
the head stock down for a good inspection cleaning and
replacement of
the felt wicks that are in a key-way at to very top of your
bearing
journals.

In doing so you may find that the spindle and the head stock
bearing
journals are scored. If you still have a fair amount of
clean
bearing bore that is not damaged you can replace your 415
spindle
with a later hardened ground and micro polished from a later
model
lathe. If the bearing journals are badly scored you can
replace
the
complete head stock with a later one as most have done when
they
have
found there head stocks to be damaged.

I hope you find that your head stock is in great shape and
you
are
one of the lucky ones.

Turk


Williams Threading tool pics

Bill Kuehsel
 

Below are some pics of the Williams threading tool holder and the Enco
turret toolpost. As I indicated earlier, I am interested in swapping this stuff
for metric transposing gears for my Southbend 10K and/or W20 collects. Please
feel free to contact me if interested.

Regards,

Bill Kuehsel
Cold Spring, NY

http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a155/WKuehsel/trade1.jpg

http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a155/WKuehsel/trade2.jpg

http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a155/WKuehsel/trade3.jpg

<BR><BR><BR>**************************************<BR> AOL now offers free
email to everyone. Find out more about what's free from AOL at
http://www.aol.com.


Re: unfinished castings

ToadJammer
 

A genltemen by the name of Stephab Thomas has some for sale also. I
as well as Forrest can assure you of Stephens product and
repectability. Here is the link
http://www.practicalmachinist.com/ubb/ultimatebb.php/topic/25/1842.ht
ml

--- In southbendlathe@..., "Dennis Turk"
<dennis.turk2@...> wrote:

Hi all

My buddy the Ratshooter told me there was someone that had
unfinished
castings for scraping standards. I know there had been some talk
about
cross slides and such but does anyone know of these and who has
them
for sale. After Forrest Addy's class I fee confident that I can
make
my own standard flats and dovetail for some of the work I am
doing.

Also the Ratshooter is working on two scraper hones for keeping a
keen
edge on your scraper. Forrest had a rather crud one he had made
but it
worked great. One thing I did find at the class was Biax scraping
tools hold up better than any other brands that were there. Even
the
ones Forrest made and were for sale. Ratshooter told me he is
photo
documenting the hone project so expect it in the home shop
machinist
magazine in the future. Tim Clarke is his real name and he has
done
several articles for the magazine. The only way we would get him
on
this list is if I give him a SB lathe. Owe trust me he will be
getting
several of them when I kick off."-)))))

Turk


Re: Opinions on this SB Lathe...

Dennis Turk <dennis.turk2@...>
 

Hi Eric

Actually this is a very easy spindle removal.

First locate and loosen the lock screw on the thrust collar on the
left side of the head stock. Then unscrew it and remove it from
the spindle. If it is tight you can take a little small blade screw
driver and insert into the slot or split in the adjusting collar and
then rotate the spindle to take the collar off. Some of the early
lathes did not have a split collar. If your lathe has the solid
collar and its tight use a rubber strap wrench to hold it. Please no
channel locks or pipe wrenches. God I hate people that used these
tools on a machine tool."-((((((

Second you will need to tap the spindle from left to right facing the
head stock. Use a soft face hammer or a block of wood. The spindle
is only being held buy the close fit of the bull gear and its
woodruff key.

Now as you tap the spindle to the right be very careful to not let
the ball thrust bearings drop on the floor. When the bull gear comes
free the spindle will be free to slide out. If you get a little
over exuberant with your tapping on the end of the spindle when the
bull gear comes free the spindle can slide right out unexpectedly.
So just take your time and be gentle with the hammer. You will have
to fist ketch the ball thrust bearings and then the cone pulley. The
last is the bull gear and your home free.

Owe one other thing. The woodruff key on the spindle can damage or
scratch the front bearing journal so be aware of that and not let it
drag across the bearing. AS I start to remove a spindle I like to
look and see were the key is and then rotate the spindle so the key
is at the top this way when the bull gear comes free the key will not
drop down onto the bearing journal.

Now see that was not to hard was it."-))))))

Turk

--- In southbendlathe@..., "ericgagnon1957" <eric@...>
wrote:

Hi Dennis:

No, you are correct, guess I wasn't clear enough--there is only one
bolt and there are no removable caps. Also, the gear end appears to
be
machined from the spindle, not a separate pressed on gear.

How easily does the spindle slide out? Does this require some light
"persuasion" with a brass mallet? Also, how does the pulley/cone
unit
and large gear come off the spindle--any help you can provide is
appreciated!

Thanks,
Eric

--- In southbendlathe@..., "Dennis Turk"
<dennis.turk2@> wrote:

Hi Eric

Do I read this correct that you have two bolts holding the
spindle
bearing caps down?? Workshop lathes only have one bolt and no
removable cap. On these lathes the spindle slides out from left
to
right. Also does you spindle have the end gear cut right into
the
spindle or is it a separate gear that is pressed on? Just
clarifying
what lathe you have.

Turk

--- In southbendlathe@..., "ericgagnon1957" <eric@>
wrote:

Hi Dennis:

Thanks for your previous comments and suggestions (below) on
the
lathe
I recently purchased.

I have it moved into my shop, and wanted to remove the spindle
to
inspect it and the bearing surfaces for wear, and replace the
felts
based on your suggestion.

Since this is the older 415 model ("1936" is printed under the
tailstock, which sounds close to the year it was probably
made), it
looks like the spindle needs to slide vertically out of either
the
collet side, or the gear side, instead of lifting out if the
headstock
had four bolts on top instead of two screws.

Do you have some quick instructions or advice you can give me
for
removing the spindle? I see a collar on the gear side with a
screw
that can be removed, and assume that the pulley cone and the
rest of
the pieces on the spindle in the headstock slide off, but I
need to
ask someone who knows first.

Thanks,
Eric


--- In southbendlathe@..., "Dennis Turk"
<dennis.turk2@> wrote:

Hi Eric

I just took a look at your lathe picture. The lathe you
purchased is
a pre 1939 catalog number 415 RA. Remember the A B and C
model
workshop lathes were first offered in late 1938 or very early
39
so
your lathe is a top oilier 415 workshop. The C model was a
front
oilier and had the hardened and micro polished spindle. Your
lathe
will have the soft spindle and the first thing you wont to do
is
pull
the head stock down for a good inspection cleaning and
replacement of
the felt wicks that are in a key-way at to very top of your
bearing
journals.

In doing so you may find that the spindle and the head stock
bearing
journals are scored. If you still have a fair amount of
clean
bearing bore that is not damaged you can replace your 415
spindle
with a later hardened ground and micro polished from a later
model
lathe. If the bearing journals are badly scored you can
replace
the
complete head stock with a later one as most have done when
they
have
found there head stocks to be damaged.

I hope you find that your head stock is in great shape and
you
are
one of the lucky ones.

Turk


Re: Opinions on this SB Lathe...

ericgagnon1957
 

Hi Dennis:

No, you are correct, guess I wasn't clear enough--there is only one
bolt and there are no removable caps. Also, the gear end appears to be
machined from the spindle, not a separate pressed on gear.

How easily does the spindle slide out? Does this require some light
"persuasion" with a brass mallet? Also, how does the pulley/cone unit
and large gear come off the spindle--any help you can provide is
appreciated!

Thanks,
Eric

--- In southbendlathe@..., "Dennis Turk"
<dennis.turk2@...> wrote:

Hi Eric

Do I read this correct that you have two bolts holding the spindle
bearing caps down?? Workshop lathes only have one bolt and no
removable cap. On these lathes the spindle slides out from left to
right. Also does you spindle have the end gear cut right into the
spindle or is it a separate gear that is pressed on? Just clarifying
what lathe you have.

Turk

--- In southbendlathe@..., "ericgagnon1957" <eric@>
wrote:

Hi Dennis:

Thanks for your previous comments and suggestions (below) on the
lathe
I recently purchased.

I have it moved into my shop, and wanted to remove the spindle to
inspect it and the bearing surfaces for wear, and replace the felts
based on your suggestion.

Since this is the older 415 model ("1936" is printed under the
tailstock, which sounds close to the year it was probably made), it
looks like the spindle needs to slide vertically out of either the
collet side, or the gear side, instead of lifting out if the
headstock
had four bolts on top instead of two screws.

Do you have some quick instructions or advice you can give me for
removing the spindle? I see a collar on the gear side with a screw
that can be removed, and assume that the pulley cone and the rest of
the pieces on the spindle in the headstock slide off, but I need to
ask someone who knows first.

Thanks,
Eric


--- In southbendlathe@..., "Dennis Turk"
<dennis.turk2@> wrote:

Hi Eric

I just took a look at your lathe picture. The lathe you
purchased is
a pre 1939 catalog number 415 RA. Remember the A B and C model
workshop lathes were first offered in late 1938 or very early 39
so
your lathe is a top oilier 415 workshop. The C model was a front
oilier and had the hardened and micro polished spindle. Your
lathe
will have the soft spindle and the first thing you wont to do is
pull
the head stock down for a good inspection cleaning and
replacement of
the felt wicks that are in a key-way at to very top of your
bearing
journals.

In doing so you may find that the spindle and the head stock
bearing
journals are scored. If you still have a fair amount of clean
bearing bore that is not damaged you can replace your 415 spindle
with a later hardened ground and micro polished from a later
model
lathe. If the bearing journals are badly scored you can replace
the
complete head stock with a later one as most have done when they
have
found there head stocks to be damaged.

I hope you find that your head stock is in great shape and you
are
one of the lucky ones.

Turk


Re: Opinions on this SB Lathe...

Dennis Turk <dennis.turk2@...>
 

Hi Eric

Do I read this correct that you have two bolts holding the spindle
bearing caps down?? Workshop lathes only have one bolt and no
removable cap. On these lathes the spindle slides out from left to
right. Also does you spindle have the end gear cut right into the
spindle or is it a separate gear that is pressed on? Just clarifying
what lathe you have.

Turk

--- In southbendlathe@..., "ericgagnon1957" <eric@...>
wrote:

Hi Dennis:

Thanks for your previous comments and suggestions (below) on the
lathe
I recently purchased.

I have it moved into my shop, and wanted to remove the spindle to
inspect it and the bearing surfaces for wear, and replace the felts
based on your suggestion.

Since this is the older 415 model ("1936" is printed under the
tailstock, which sounds close to the year it was probably made), it
looks like the spindle needs to slide vertically out of either the
collet side, or the gear side, instead of lifting out if the
headstock
had four bolts on top instead of two screws.

Do you have some quick instructions or advice you can give me for
removing the spindle? I see a collar on the gear side with a screw
that can be removed, and assume that the pulley cone and the rest of
the pieces on the spindle in the headstock slide off, but I need to
ask someone who knows first.

Thanks,
Eric


--- In southbendlathe@..., "Dennis Turk"
<dennis.turk2@> wrote:

Hi Eric

I just took a look at your lathe picture. The lathe you
purchased is
a pre 1939 catalog number 415 RA. Remember the A B and C model
workshop lathes were first offered in late 1938 or very early 39
so
your lathe is a top oilier 415 workshop. The C model was a front
oilier and had the hardened and micro polished spindle. Your
lathe
will have the soft spindle and the first thing you wont to do is
pull
the head stock down for a good inspection cleaning and
replacement of
the felt wicks that are in a key-way at to very top of your
bearing
journals.

In doing so you may find that the spindle and the head stock
bearing
journals are scored. If you still have a fair amount of clean
bearing bore that is not damaged you can replace your 415 spindle
with a later hardened ground and micro polished from a later
model
lathe. If the bearing journals are badly scored you can replace
the
complete head stock with a later one as most have done when they
have
found there head stocks to be damaged.

I hope you find that your head stock is in great shape and you
are
one of the lucky ones.

Turk


Re: Gib missing from compound rest base

Dennis Turk <dennis.turk2@...>
 

Hi Steve

The gibs were made of mild steel. Just old 1020 cold rolled steel. I
make up new ones form low carbon flat ground stock I get from MSC.
You can purchase a length in dimensions very close to what you need.

Turk



--- In southbendlathe@..., "Steve" <mkegt6@...> wrote:

Hello All. Short of buying a replacement gib, PT221NK1, for the
compound rest base from a manufacturer or EAuctin. What can I make
one
out of? I was thinking of a planer blade from my Delta 12" planer?
Someone also suggested a bronze strip? Hardened steel vrs bronze.
What
ideas do you have?
Thanks for any ideas.

Steve
Milwaukee, WI
SB9 18592NAR9
http://profiles.yahoo.com/mkegt6


Re: Gib missing from compound rest base

Clive Foster
 

I agree with Jim that any ordinary steel will be just fine for Home
Shop use.
Select a bit with a good surface finish and as thick as can be
slid into the gap.
Preferably you only want the adjusters to take up a few thou of
clearance, less than 10 really. Better to start off a bit to thick
and lap or linish it down to size however if you use a cold worked
material working on the thickness is likely to release stresses and
cause the material to bend. Not good. From preference I use what
is called Gauge Plate in the UK. This is a hardenable steel supplied
in accurate thicknesses. Tougher than ordinary MS but still OK to
work with normal tools having a satin finish ideal for oil retention.
Obviously take pains to do the little extras which make the
difference between OK it works and a real good job (as discussed
recently) including adding a slide lock.

(Puts hobby horse back in stable!!)

Clive


Re: Parting Out 2 9-inch Underdrive Units

CAL <cal@...>
 

Sorry my bad. I didn't get the subject, Just the message when I was going through all the email messages.

----- Original Message -----
From: CAL
Sent: Sunday, February 25, 2007 7:59 AM
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] Parting Out 2 9-inch Underdrive Units

A little, hell!  a lot more information would help us know what you are talking about and help us decide if we might be interested.
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, February 25, 2007 7:46 AM
Subject: [southbendlathe] Parting Out 2 9-inch Underdrive Units

Hey All:

Never had any interest in these as complete units, so I am going to
part them out. Each has pretty much everything: motor mount, 3-step
pulley, countershaft, countershaft pulley, etc.

I will be putting parts on eBay. If anybody needs a particular part,
contact me off-list and we can work out a deal before I auction it.

Thanks,
Wally


Re: Parting Out 2 9-inch Underdrive Units

CAL <cal@...>
 

A little, hell!  a lot more information would help us know what you are talking about and help us decide if we might be interested.

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, February 25, 2007 7:46 AM
Subject: [southbendlathe] Parting Out 2 9-inch Underdrive Units

Hey All:

Never had any interest in these as complete units, so I am going to
part them out. Each has pretty much everything: motor mount, 3-step
pulley, countershaft, countershaft pulley, etc.

I will be putting parts on eBay. If anybody needs a particular part,
contact me off-list and we can work out a deal before I auction it.

Thanks,
Wally

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