Date   

Re: 1923 63A 11"SB Drive question

D. Schuyler <web22hsz@...>
 

Gary,
I am old enough to remember the local Blacksmith / Machine shop had an upgraded system, still using the line shafts up above, but they also used a Model A Ford transmission
to slow the lathe down even farther plus it added several speeds without the belt changing.
I also remember they did not shut down the shaft to change belts they just had a long wood
rake like apparatus they used to literally shove the flat belt back and forth over the several different sized pulley's I seem to remember the line shaft also ran a Hammer and a very early horizontal mill. As well as a big old shopmade table saw, and band saw.
They kept most farmers around here tractors and machinery up and running just fine.
The building is still standing but with the dirt floors is un rentable now.
D
 
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, February 16, 2007 9:00 PM
Subject: RE: [southbendlathe] 1923 63A 11"SB Drive question

Gary,

Yup, the old shops had line shafts running the length of the shop
driving the machinery. Common power source was steam or water power.
The Henry Ford museum in Greenfield Village has a shop with steam power
and all the powered machines (lathes, mills, radial drills, etc.) were
powered from the overhead shaft. Speeds were changed by using a lever
or pole to move the belts from one set of pulleys to another set for
each machine.

My 2 year old Delta cabinet saw has a 3 HP motor and it uses the motors
weight to tension the pulleys so it still seems to be an acceptable
solution. You might want to check that the mounts are secure and have
minimal slop.

George

-----Original Message-----
From: southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Gary
Sent: Friday, February 16, 2007 4:29 PM
To: southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [southbendlathe] 1923 63A 11"SB Drive question

I am the new owner of an 1923 SB lathe and I was curious about how it
was originally driven. It now has a crudely fashioned motormount
bolted to the rear leg, using the weight of the motor to tension both
the v belt and the flat belt off of the jackshaft. Since it doesnt
appear to have a factory made motor mount location, I was curious how
it was driven back in the "Day". I was told by the previous owner that
it was run from a leather belt , off a common shaft in a factory, but
I didnt know if that was true. I thought someone here might know the
answer.
I was also wondering if tensioning the belt with the motors weight
was a generally accepted practice or if it was unsafe.

Thanks, Gary

--
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Re: 1923 63A 11"SB Drive question

George Taylor, IV
 

Gary,

Yup, the old shops had line shafts running the length of the shop
driving the machinery. Common power source was steam or water power.
The Henry Ford museum in Greenfield Village has a shop with steam power
and all the powered machines (lathes, mills, radial drills, etc.) were
powered from the overhead shaft. Speeds were changed by using a lever
or pole to move the belts from one set of pulleys to another set for
each machine.

My 2 year old Delta cabinet saw has a 3 HP motor and it uses the motors
weight to tension the pulleys so it still seems to be an acceptable
solution. You might want to check that the mounts are secure and have
minimal slop.

George

-----Original Message-----
From: southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Gary
Sent: Friday, February 16, 2007 4:29 PM
To: southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [southbendlathe] 1923 63A 11"SB Drive question

I am the new owner of an 1923 SB lathe and I was curious about how it
was originally driven. It now has a crudely fashioned motormount
bolted to the rear leg, using the weight of the motor to tension both
the v belt and the flat belt off of the jackshaft. Since it doesnt
appear to have a factory made motor mount location, I was curious how
it was driven back in the "Day". I was told by the previous owner that
it was run from a leather belt , off a common shaft in a factory, but
I didnt know if that was true. I thought someone here might know the
answer.
I was also wondering if tensioning the belt with the motors weight
was a generally accepted practice or if it was unsafe.

Thanks, Gary



--
Web: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/southbendlathe/
More pix: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SouthBendLathePix/
Newbie guide: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SouthBendLathePix/ Files
area
FAQ:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/southbendlathe/files/SouthBendLatheFAQ.htm
l
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Re: Cheese heads

ChristopherS
 

My point is that if an impact driver isn't doing the job for Cal, then it's doubtful that a screwdriver with wrench assist is going to be any more effective for him.
 
Chris


'Grif' wrote:

I didn't get that the screwdriver was in any way superior, the way I read it, was just as another method.  I've done much the same thing with a hex bit in a drill press using it as a press and turning the bit with a wrench.  Mostly with screws that are really not that rusted in, and a real desire not to mouse up the screw head.  Keeps everything in line way better than my eye and arms.


-----Original Message-----
From: Chris Strazzeri
Sent: Feb 15, 2007 7:08 PM
To: southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] Re: Cheese heads

So much for ASCII art! It didn't look like that when I sent it.
 
Chris


Chris Strazzeri com> wrote:
This my personal opinion but, it's the opinion of someone who has owned and worked on salt water boats all my adult life. I've had more than my share of frozen hardware. I simply do not see how a wrench assisted screwdriver is going to be superior to the impact driver that Cal is using. For one thing, they come with a good assortment of blades that fit the slot better than most screwdrivers. They taper much less than most screwdrivers and are nearly straight for the first 1/4'' or so. The shanks are usually 1/4 or 3/8" Hex, so Cal could use a box end wrench with it. That said, I still think the hammer action of the driver is far more effective than wrench assist. I certainly don't disagree with the application of pinpoint heat though.
Mike Miller ng.com> wrote:
I bought a size huge screwdriver with a square profile shaft. Attached a wrench to the shaft, leaned heavy on it, and levered it off. 

The screwdriver has to be a tight fit.


1923 63A 11"SB Drive question

Gary
 

I am the new owner of an 1923 SB lathe and I was curious about how it
was originally driven. It now has a crudely fashioned motormount
bolted to the rear leg, using the weight of the motor to tension both
the v belt and the flat belt off of the jackshaft. Since it doesnt
appear to have a factory made motor mount location, I was curious how
it was driven back in the "Day". I was told by the previous owner that
it was run from a leather belt , off a common shaft in a factory, but
I didnt know if that was true. I thought someone here might know the
answer.
I was also wondering if tensioning the belt with the motors weight
was a generally accepted practice or if it was unsafe.

Thanks, Gary


Re: Cheese heads

Ed Feuer
 


To keep the screwdriver from coming out of the slot smear a little med or fine valve grinding paste on it. really works even on chewed up heads.  regards to all---Ed.


Re: Cheese heads

w keith griffith
 

I didn't get that the screwdriver was in any way superior, the way I read it, was just as another method.  I've done much the same thing with a hex bit in a drill press using it as a press and turning the bit with a wrench.  Mostly with screws that are really not that rusted in, and a real desire not to mouse up the screw head.  Keeps everything in line way better than my eye and arms.


-----Original Message-----
From: Chris Strazzeri
Sent: Feb 15, 2007 7:08 PM
To: southbendlathe@...
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] Re: Cheese heads

So much for ASCII art! It didn't look like that when I sent it.
 
Chris


Chris Strazzeri wrote:
This my personal opinion but, it's the opinion of someone who has owned and worked on salt water boats all my adult life. I've had more than my share of frozen hardware. I simply do not see how a wrench assisted screwdriver is going to be superior to the impact driver that Cal is using. For one thing, they come with a good assortment of blades that fit the slot better than most screwdrivers. They taper much less than most screwdrivers and are nearly straight for the first 1/4'' or so. The shanks are usually 1/4 or 3/8" Hex, so Cal could use a box end wrench with it. That said, I still think the hammer action of the driver is far more effective than wrench assist. I certainly don't disagree with the application of pinpoint heat though.
Mike Miller ng.com> wrote:
I bought a size huge screwdriver with a square profile shaft. Attached a wrench to the shaft, leaned heavy on it, and levered it off. 

The screwdriver has to be a tight fit.


Re: Cheese heads

w keith griffith
 

We have several hardware stores that sell stove bolts, fence posts and barbed wire.  It's weird what an agricultural area has and doesn't have.  A real mixed bag.


-----Original Message-----
From: CAL
Sent: Feb 15, 2007 4:31 PM
To: southbendlathe@...
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] Re: Cheese heads


About that to HF no HD But we do have a Best Hardware. LOL
----- Original Message -----
From: 'Grif'
Sent: Thursday, February 15, 2007 9:12 AM
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] Re: Cheese heads

You've never been to a machinist desert till you've been to Yakima, WA.
 
It's 1:15 to a harbor freight.  We do have a HomeDespot however.


-----Original Message-----
From: CAL
Sent: Feb 15, 2007 8:03 AM
To: southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] Re: Cheese heads

Because both Kroil and probably PB [haven't looked yet] are unavailable in this machinist desert where I live, I will need to order.
One other project I have is rebuilding a set of tractor discs. Will the Kroil work on the rusty disc parts as well as frozen parts or should I find a place to order the PB also?


Re: Cheese heads

CAL <cal@...>
 

Chris
I never thought about heating the head to heat the threads all I could picture was heating the apron where the threads were, like heating a frozen nut on a bolt. I rejected that because of the problems that could arise. Think outa da box Cal DUH!!

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, February 15, 2007 7:08 PM
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] Re: Cheese heads

So much for ASCII art! It didn't look like that when I sent it.
 
Chris


Chris Strazzeri <cjstrazz@yahoo.com> wrote:
This my personal opinion but, it's the opinion of someone who has owned and worked on salt water boats all my adult life. I've had more than my share of frozen hardware. I simply do not see how a wrench assisted screwdriver is going to be superior to the impact driver that Cal is using. For one thing, they come with a good assortment of blades that fit the slot better than most screwdrivers. They taper much less than most screwdrivers and are nearly straight for the first 1/4'' or so. The shanks are usually 1/4 or 3/8" Hex, so Cal could use a box end wrench with it. That said, I still think the hammer action of the driver is far more effective than wrench assist. I certainly don't disagree with the application of pinpoint heat though.
 
Cal, if you're apprehensive about applying a torch to the screw then consider an indirect method. Fabricate a steel rod to fit the screw slot. Then heat the rod and sink the heat into the screw. Make the blade short, so the --
 
      ------------------------------
                                         I__
                                          __I
                                         I
     -------------------------------
     
shoulder is resting on the head of the screw.
 
Good luck,
Chris
 
 
 


Mike Miller ng.com> wrote:
I bought a size huge screwdriver with a square profile shaft. Attached a wrench to the shaft, leaned heavy on it, and levered it off. 

The screwdriver has to be a tight fit.


On Feb 15, 2007, at 11:40 AM, JEFFREY BOOTZ wrote:

I used Kroil and a hand impact (Snap-On) on my 1924 18" x 10' gap bed SB. getting through all the old paint was the hardest part. I've tried about everything else and Kroil just plain works. 

Bill Wattson <wwattso@mindspring.com> wrote:

My guess would be it's being held more by tension than rust and heat
will be more effective than penetrating oil. A good tight fitting
screwdriver with good pressure might get it (had a similar problem on
my 13" SB). My welding torch is really good at something like this
because you can actually heat up the head of a screw to red hot
without heating much of the metal around it if you use a small tip.
That causes the screw to "grow" a little and releases the bind on the
head.

--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "krueger_cal" wrote:
>
> Need a bright idea on the removal of the "cheese head"screws holding
> the apron and carriage together on a SB9.
> Soaked with penetrating oil for over a week then used a impact
driver
> with discretion. No go.
> Cal
>






Re: Cheese heads

ChristopherS
 

So much for ASCII art! It didn't look like that when I sent it.
 
Chris


Chris Strazzeri wrote:

This my personal opinion but, it's the opinion of someone who has owned and worked on salt water boats all my adult life. I've had more than my share of frozen hardware. I simply do not see how a wrench assisted screwdriver is going to be superior to the impact driver that Cal is using. For one thing, they come with a good assortment of blades that fit the slot better than most screwdrivers. They taper much less than most screwdrivers and are nearly straight for the first 1/4'' or so. The shanks are usually 1/4 or 3/8" Hex, so Cal could use a box end wrench with it. That said, I still think the hammer action of the driver is far more effective than wrench assist. I certainly don't disagree with the application of pinpoint heat though.
 
Cal, if you're apprehensive about applying a torch to the screw then consider an indirect method. Fabricate a steel rod to fit the screw slot. Then heat the rod and sink the heat into the screw. Make the blade short, so the --
 
      ------------------------------
                                         I__
                                          __I
                                         I
     -------------------------------
     
shoulder is resting on the head of the screw.
 
Good luck,
Chris
 
 
 


Mike Miller ng.com> wrote:
I bought a size huge screwdriver with a square profile shaft. Attached a wrench to the shaft, leaned heavy on it, and levered it off. 

The screwdriver has to be a tight fit.


On Feb 15, 2007, at 11:40 AM, JEFFREY BOOTZ wrote:

I used Kroil and a hand impact (Snap-On) on my 1924 18" x 10' gap bed SB. getting through all the old paint was the hardest part. I've tried about everything else and Kroil just plain works. 

Bill Wattson <wwattso@mindspring.com> wrote:

My guess would be it's being held more by tension than rust and heat
will be more effective than penetrating oil. A good tight fitting
screwdriver with good pressure might get it (had a similar problem on
my 13" SB). My welding torch is really good at something like this
because you can actually heat up the head of a screw to red hot
without heating much of the metal around it if you use a small tip.
That causes the screw to "grow" a little and releases the bind on the
head.

--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "krueger_cal" wrote:
>
> Need a bright idea on the removal of the "cheese head"screws holding
> the apron and carriage together on a SB9.
> Soaked with penetrating oil for over a week then used a impact
driver
> with discretion. No go.
> Cal
>






Re: Cheese heads

ChristopherS
 

This my personal opinion but, it's the opinion of someone who has owned and worked on salt water boats all my adult life. I've had more than my share of frozen hardware. I simply do not see how a wrench assisted screwdriver is going to be superior to the impact driver that Cal is using. For one thing, they come with a good assortment of blades that fit the slot better than most screwdrivers. They taper much less than most screwdrivers and are nearly straight for the first 1/4'' or so. The shanks are usually 1/4 or 3/8" Hex, so Cal could use a box end wrench with it. That said, I still think the hammer action of the driver is far more effective than wrench assist. I certainly don't disagree with the application of pinpoint heat though.
 
Cal, if you're apprehensive about applying a torch to the screw then consider an indirect method. Fabricate a steel rod to fit the screw slot. Then heat the rod and sink the heat into the screw. Make the blade short, so the --
 
      ------------------------------
                                         I__
                                          __I
                                         I
     -------------------------------
     
shoulder is resting on the head of the screw.
 
Good luck,
Chris
 
 
 


Mike Miller wrote:

I bought a size huge screwdriver with a square profile shaft. Attached a wrench to the shaft, leaned heavy on it, and levered it off. 

The screwdriver has to be a tight fit.


On Feb 15, 2007, at 11:40 AM, JEFFREY BOOTZ wrote:

I used Kroil and a hand impact (Snap-On) on my 1924 18" x 10' gap bed SB. getting through all the old paint was the hardest part. I've tried about everything else and Kroil just plain works. 

Bill Wattson <wwattso@mindspring.com> wrote:

My guess would be it's being held more by tension than rust and heat
will be more effective than penetrating oil. A good tight fitting
screwdriver with good pressure might get it (had a similar problem on
my 13" SB). My welding torch is really good at something like this
because you can actually heat up the head of a screw to red hot
without heating much of the metal around it if you use a small tip.
That causes the screw to "grow" a little and releases the bind on the
head.

--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "krueger_cal" wrote:
>
> Need a bright idea on the removal of the "cheese head"screws holding
> the apron and carriage together on a SB9.
> Soaked with penetrating oil for over a week then used a impact
driver
> with discretion. No go.
> Cal
>





Re: Does anyone have a parts breakdown for a 9" South Bend model 415?

CAL <cal@...>
 

Steve gotta link??

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, February 15, 2007 6:05 PM
Subject: [southbendlathe] Re: Does anyone have a parts breakdown for a 9" South Bend model 415?

Ok, I found the pdf, I do have a parts list for a 415,
that would be the horizontal drive 9" workshop from
the Nov 1935 Bulletin No. 19-B.

Steve


Re: Does anyone have a parts breakdown for a 9" South Bend model 415?

Steve Wells
 

Ok, I found the pdf, I do have a parts list for a 415,
that would be the horizontal drive 9" workshop from
the Nov 1935 Bulletin No. 19-B.

Steve


Re: Does anyone have a parts breakdown for a 9" South Bend model 415?

Steve Wells
 

I have a Nov 1935 parts book comming from ebay in a day or two,
what year is it?

Steve


Re: Cheese heads

CAL <cal@...>
 

Thanks Joe, Don't have those stores around here but will check the parts stores we do have.

----- Original Message -----
From: Joe R
Sent: Thursday, February 15, 2007 11:10 AM
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] Re: Cheese heads

Cal.
 
PB Blaster is at just about any auto parts store. (advanced autoparts, autozone and more)
 
Joe Romas
 
----- Original Message -----
From: CAL
Sent: Thursday, February 15, 2007 11:03 AM
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] Re: Cheese heads

Because both Kroil and probably PB [haven't looked yet] are unavailable in this machinist desert where I live, I will need to order.
One other project I have is rebuilding a set of tractor discs. Will the Kroil work on the rusty disc parts as well as frozen parts or should I find a place to order the PB also?
Also I see they have Kroil and Silikroil made with silicone. Any preferences?
You guys sure have opened my eyes. There is a world beyond Liquid Wrench.LOL
Thanks
----- Original Message -----
From: Joe R
Sent: Thursday, February 15, 2007 3:51 AM
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] Re: Cheese heads

PB is good for rusty parts like on jeeps :=} Kroil is fantastic for frozen parts and it smells good..
 
Joe
 
----- Original Message -----
From: wlw19958
Sent: Wednesday, February 14, 2007 9:10 PM
Subject: [southbendlathe] Re: Cheese heads

--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "Dave & Donna Johnson"
.> wrote:
>
> PB Blaster is a good substitue for Kroil. It is usually available
at hardwares and Tractor Supply stores.
>
> Dave J.

Hi There,

I second that. Koil and AeroKroil (the aerosol version) are the best.
PB Blaster is good (not quite as good as Koil). Liquid Wrench,
especially the newer stuff, isn't worth buying IMHO.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: Does anyone have a parts breakdown for a 9" South Bend model 415?

CAL <cal@...>
 

He is interested in a SB 415 not a SB 9 c Some parts are different.

----- Original Message -----
From: Joe R
Sent: Thursday, February 15, 2007 11:13 AM
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] Does anyone have a parts breakdown for a 9" South Bend model 415?

Earl.
 
In the files section of this or one of the other SB groups there's a Army Technical Manual that has all the parts for 10k, 9 a, b, and c.
 
Joe Romas
 
----- Original Message -----
From: Earl White
Sent: Thursday, February 15, 2007 9:57 AM
Subject: [southbendlathe] Does anyone have a parts breakdown for a 9" South Bend model 415?

I looked on the UK website and I could find the 405, but there is a 415
model which I think I have that is slightly different. I am looking
specifically for the Carriage lock details. This is different from the
later Model C.


Re: Cheese heads

CAL <cal@...>
 


About that to HF no HD But we do have a Best Hardware. LOL

----- Original Message -----
From: 'Grif'
Sent: Thursday, February 15, 2007 9:12 AM
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] Re: Cheese heads

You've never been to a machinist desert till you've been to Yakima, WA.
 
It's 1:15 to a harbor freight.  We do have a HomeDespot however.


-----Original Message-----
From: CAL
Sent: Feb 15, 2007 8:03 AM
To: southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] Re: Cheese heads

Because both Kroil and probably PB [haven't looked yet] are unavailable in this machinist desert where I live, I will need to order.
One other project I have is rebuilding a set of tractor discs. Will the Kroil work on the rusty disc parts as well as frozen parts or should I find a place to order the PB also?
Also I see they have Kroil and Silikroil made with silicone. Any preferences?
You guys sure have opened my eyes. There is a world beyond Liquid Wrench.LOL
Thanks
----- Original Message -----
From: Joe R
Sent: Thursday, February 15, 2007 3:51 AM
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] Re: Cheese heads

PB is good for rusty parts like on jeeps :=} Kroil is fantastic for frozen parts and it smells good..
 
Joe
 
----- Original Message -----
From: wlw19958
Sent: Wednesday, February 14, 2007 9:10 PM
Subject: [southbendlathe] Re: Cheese heads

--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "Dave & Donna Johnson"
.> wrote:
>
> PB Blaster is a good substitue for Kroil. It is usually available
at hardwares and Tractor Supply stores.
>
> Dave J.

Hi There,

I second that. Koil and AeroKroil (the aerosol version) are the best.
PB Blaster is good (not quite as good as Koil). Liquid Wrench,
especially the newer stuff, isn't worth buying IMHO.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: Cheese heads

Gene Horr
 

Even the impact wrench didn’t work on mine (and yes, it is scary swinging a sledge hammer towards the bed of one’s lathe.)  I wound up just drilling a hole in the bolt and then using one of those square bolt extractors.  It worked  just fine.

 

Gene Horr

 


Re: Does anyone have a parts breakdown for a 9" South Bend model 415?

Joe R
 

Earl.
 
In the files section of this or one of the other SB groups there's a Army Technical Manual that has all the parts for 10k, 9 a, b, and c.
 
Joe Romas
 

----- Original Message -----
From: Earl White
Sent: Thursday, February 15, 2007 9:57 AM
Subject: [southbendlathe] Does anyone have a parts breakdown for a 9" South Bend model 415?

I looked on the UK website and I could find the 405, but there is a 415
model which I think I have that is slightly different. I am looking
specifically for the Carriage lock details. This is different from the
later Model C.


Re: Cheese heads

Joe R
 

Cal.
 
PB Blaster is at just about any auto parts store. (advanced autoparts, autozone and more)
 
Joe Romas
 

----- Original Message -----
From: CAL
Sent: Thursday, February 15, 2007 11:03 AM
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] Re: Cheese heads

Because both Kroil and probably PB [haven't looked yet] are unavailable in this machinist desert where I live, I will need to order.
One other project I have is rebuilding a set of tractor discs. Will the Kroil work on the rusty disc parts as well as frozen parts or should I find a place to order the PB also?
Also I see they have Kroil and Silikroil made with silicone. Any preferences?
You guys sure have opened my eyes. There is a world beyond Liquid Wrench.LOL
Thanks
----- Original Message -----
From: Joe R
Sent: Thursday, February 15, 2007 3:51 AM
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] Re: Cheese heads

PB is good for rusty parts like on jeeps :=} Kroil is fantastic for frozen parts and it smells good..
 
Joe
 
----- Original Message -----
From: wlw19958
Sent: Wednesday, February 14, 2007 9:10 PM
Subject: [southbendlathe] Re: Cheese heads

--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "Dave & Donna Johnson"
.> wrote:
>
> PB Blaster is a good substitue for Kroil. It is usually available
at hardwares and Tractor Supply stores.
>
> Dave J.

Hi There,

I second that. Koil and AeroKroil (the aerosol version) are the best.
PB Blaster is good (not quite as good as Koil). Liquid Wrench,
especially the newer stuff, isn't worth buying IMHO.

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: Cheese heads

Mike Miller <mike@...>
 

I bought a size huge screwdriver with a square profile shaft. Attached a wrench to the shaft, leaned heavy on it, and levered it off. 

The screwdriver has to be a tight fit.


On Feb 15, 2007, at 11:40 AM, JEFFREY BOOTZ wrote:

I used Kroil and a hand impact (Snap-On) on my 1924 18" x 10' gap bed SB. getting through all the old paint was the hardest part. I've tried about everything else and Kroil just plain works. 

Bill Wattson <wwattso@...> wrote:

My guess would be it's being held more by tension than rust and heat
will be more effective than penetrating oil. A good tight fitting
screwdriver with good pressure might get it (had a similar problem on
my 13" SB). My welding torch is really good at something like this
because you can actually heat up the head of a screw to red hot
without heating much of the metal around it if you use a small tip.
That causes the screw to "grow" a little and releases the bind on the
head.

--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "krueger_cal" wrote:
>
> Need a bright idea on the removal of the "cheese head"screws holding
> the apron and carriage together on a SB9.
> Soaked with penetrating oil for over a week then used a impact
driver
> with discretion. No go.
> Cal
>



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