Date   

Re: plates

Dennis Turk <dennis.turk2@...>
 

Hi Chris

With all the SB tags and legend plates I have played with over the
years and also the time I spent at Tektronix in Beaverton Oregon were
they had an extensive chem. mill facility. The older SB plates were
or appeared to be chemically milled to create the raised detail. I
say chem. mill rather than stamped because if they were stamped there
would be impressions on the back side of the plate and I have never
seen any on a SB plate.

Also at least the pre war data plates were not painted rather they
were enameled. This was a process much like powder coating. The dry
powder is applied to the recess areas of the plate and then they
went through a baking process. That is what made them so durable.
As this was done while the plate was dead flat after baking they went
through a burnishing process to brighten the raised detail of the
plate. I dont thing SB made any of there own tags and legend plats
as there would have been companies that specialized in this area of
manufacturing.

Dalton and Flather used the same company in Ma. to make there tags.
The only difference in the two company's tags is the company name and
address the tags are identical

Just like threading lead screws. SB never made any of there own
except for the 405 left hand screw. All others were sourced from a
sub contractor.

Some of the plates I see in the Amsted era are in fact just flat
brass plates that have been silk screened. These did not hold up
well.

Just some thoughts and observations.

Turk


Re: plates

ChristopherS
 

The original SB brass plates were embossed. Even if the paint wore off, the data is still there. Either SB stamped the plates or rolled them though a die prior to coloring them.
 
Chris


bripaul67 wrote:

I can see on the original plate the letters are raised a bit. Randy
told me the raised letters are produced with acid and then screen
printed. Is there anyone in this group that actually worked at South
Bend that would know where they were made originally? In house?



Re: Light 10 buying decision opinions wanted

BOB WRIGHT
 

Or you can buy a regular 1/2 hp electric motor from grizzly.com for 89
bucks. G2901 Motor 1/2 HP Single-Phase 1725 RPM Open 110V/220V or a
3/4 hp from them for 99.00. I priced a mexican made ge at my local
farm store for 133 bucks for a 3/4 hp and i can get it right off the
shelf. I have a 1/2 hp ge on my 10k and will be upgrading to a 3/4 hp
soon....Bob
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/southbend10k/

--- In southbendlathe@..., Chris Strazzeri <cjstrazz@...>
wrote:

For $300.00 bucks you CAN'T go wrong! You can get that much just for
the lever collet closer without the collets! A $150.00 VFD will solve
your 3PH motor problem. The T slot Cross Slide is nice (many members
here like them) but I don't see any provision to mount the compound on
that one?

Chris
machinists look it over and it was pronounce to be in very good


Re: Light 10 buying decision opinions wanted

ChristopherS
 

For $300.00 bucks you CAN'T go wrong! You can get that much just for the lever collet closer without the collets! A $150.00 VFD will solve your 3PH motor problem. The T slot Cross Slide is nice (many members here like them) but I don't see any provision to mount the compound on that one?
 
Chris


imarelicz28 wrote:

I've always wanted a small lathe for my workshop. The company I
work for is selling some excess equipment to the employees, by
closed bid. A small South Bend lathe is being sold, that was part
of a "lot" of equipment brought in from another company after an
aquistion, thus I don't know about its past. I've had a couple of
our machinists look it over and it was pronounce to be in very good
condition. They believe it spent most of its days cutting bushings
out of tube stock held by the collets. Here a link to some pic's I
took of it.

http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v224/imarelic/south%20bend%20lathe/

After a couple of hours of seaching, I'm fairly certain its a "light
10"

Plus's:
It's a South Bend!
It's basically sound and tight
Small enough that I can disassembly to move to my basement workshop
Large assortment of collets come with it
Nice heavy duty table
It's very similar to SB lathes I learned on in High School and
college.

Minus's:
No tooling other than the collets and tailstock jacobs chuck
no compound rest or tool post
missing head stock cover
motor looks to be 220 3 phase, I don't have 3 phase.

I think that around $300 would buy it. I was really hoping to pick
up a lathe complete with some tooling. If I get this one, I'll need
to find tooling where ever I can, and buy a 220 single phase motor.

Is there some major pitfall to this outfit, that I haven't thought
about? I've got to turn in my bid by Monday the 12th. What would
you do if you were me?

Thanks



Re: plates

bripaul67
 

I can see on the original plate the letters are raised a bit. Randy
told me the raised letters are produced with acid and then screen
printed. Is there anyone in this group that actually worked at South
Bend that would know where they were made originally? In house?


Turning Acrylic

woodsmit <woodsmit@...>
 

Can anyone pass on their expericence with turning acrylic? What is the
best way to proceed in terms of tool bits, RPM and feeds. Are there
any tricks worth knowing? I don't have a CNC lathe just a 1946 13"
South Bend.

Thank you for your help.


Taper attachment doesn't work

woodsmit <woodsmit@...>
 

The taper attachment on my 1946 13" South Bend Lathe doesn't work. How
can I access the compound lead screw nut, I have taken most of the
parts off and I still can't take the compound base off. Does the taper
attachment have to come off to pull the lead screw? And then how do
you take the compound base off?

Thank you for your help.


Re: Light 10 buying decision opinions wanted

nwinblad
 

If you could pick up this lathe for $300 you would be getting a steal of a deal in my opinion.
 
Neal
 

-------------- Original message --------------
From: "imarelicz28"

I've always wanted a small lathe for my workshop. The company I
work for is selling some excess equipment to the employees, by
closed bid. A small South Bend lathe is being sold, that was part
of a "lot" of equipment brought in from another company after an
aquistion, thus I don't know about its past. I've had a couple of
our machinists look it over and it was pronounce to be in very good
condition. They believe it spent most of its days cutting bushings
out of tube stock held by the collets. Here a link to some pic's I
took of it.

http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v224/imarelic/south%20bend%20lathe/

After a couple of hours of seaching, I'm fairly certain its a "light
10"

Plus's:
It's a South Bend!
It's basically sound and tight
Small enough that I can disassembly to move to my basement workshop
Large assortm ent of collets come with it
Nice heavy duty table
It's very similar to SB lathes I learned on in High School and
college.

Minus's:
No tooling other than the collets and tailstock jacobs chuck
no compound rest or tool post
missing head stock cover
motor looks to be 220 3 phase, I don't have 3 phase.

I think that around $300 would buy it. I was really hoping to pick
up a lathe complete with some tooling. If I get this one, I'll need
to find tooling where ever I can, and buy a 220 single phase motor.

Is there some major pitfall to this outfit, that I haven't thought
about? I've got to turn in my bid by Monday the 12th. What would
you do if you were me?

Thanks


Re: Light 10 buying decision opinions wanted

wlw19958
 

Hi There,

You don't want that one. Tell me where it is and I'll take it. ;)

Seriously, if you can get it for $300, buy it!

Good Luck!
-Blue Chips-
Webb


Re: Light 10 buying decision opinions wanted

Jeff Beck
 

Thats a nice lathe. The double slotted cross slide is very desirable
by many people. Plus it has the lever collet closer and collets. The
mic stop alone is worth about $125-150 on ebay. $300 would be an
absolute steal. In fact if you could buy just the rack of collets for
$300 you got a good deal.
Jeff

--- In southbendlathe@..., "imarelicz28"
<imarelicz28@...> wrote:

I've always wanted a small lathe for my workshop. The company I
work for is selling some excess equipment to the employees, by
closed bid. A small South Bend lathe is being sold, that was part
of a "lot" of equipment brought in from another company after an
aquistion, thus I don't know about its past. I've had a couple of
our machinists look it over and it was pronounce to be in very good
condition. They believe it spent most of its days cutting bushings
out of tube stock held by the collets. Here a link to some pic's I
took of it.

http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v224/imarelic/south%20bend%
20lathe/

After a couple of hours of seaching, I'm fairly certain its
a "light
10"

Plus's:
It's a South Bend!
It's basically sound and tight
Small enough that I can disassembly to move to my basement workshop
Large assortment of collets come with it
Nice heavy duty table
It's very similar to SB lathes I learned on in High School and
college.


Minus's:
No tooling other than the collets and tailstock jacobs chuck
no compound rest or tool post
missing head stock cover
motor looks to be 220 3 phase, I don't have 3 phase.

I think that around $300 would buy it. I was really hoping to pick
up a lathe complete with some tooling. If I get this one, I'll
need
to find tooling where ever I can, and buy a 220 single phase motor.

Is there some major pitfall to this outfit, that I haven't thought
about? I've got to turn in my bid by Monday the 12th. What would
you do if you were me?

Thanks


Re: plates

David J. Young
 

Brian,

I have a Word document that explains how a DIY can do a brass
nameplate that I got off the Internet a while back. If you want it,
send me an e-mail (so that I can get your e-mail address) I'll reply
to you with a copy. My e-mail address is daveyoung@....

Dave

--- In southbendlathe@..., "bripaul67" <bryp@...> wrote:

It's a good thing I emailed Randy the exact picture of the data plate
for my 13" SB. He told me that he has the plates for the earlier
model 13" lathes and promptly refunded me. So I'm still in search for
this plate. Randy did refer me to check seller millermachinesales on
Ebay so hopefully he'll reply with good news. In the meantime, I'm
assuming these plates are made by screen printing it on the aluminum??
Does anyone know are are these plates are actually produced?


Re: plates

bripaul67
 

It's a good thing I emailed Randy the exact picture of the data plate
for my 13" SB. He told me that he has the plates for the earlier
model 13" lathes and promptly refunded me. So I'm still in search for
this plate. Randy did refer me to check seller millermachinesales on
Ebay so hopefully he'll reply with good news. In the meantime, I'm
assuming these plates are made by screen printing it on the aluminum??
Does anyone know are are these plates are actually produced?


Spindle removal

Greg Coffin <gpcoffin@...>
 

Can someone please tell me specifically where to find the info on
removing the spindle from a 10K? I've looked in the files and can't
find it.

Thanks much,
Greg


24 in. Electronic Horizontal DRO

Wm Mader <hillbrook@...>
 

I have a new 24 in horizontal electronic dro , can be used on a lathe
or mill. If anyone needs one $79.00 + $11.00 shipping.
Bill
hillbrook@...


Re: Opinions on this SB Lathe...

Dennis Turk <dennis.turk2@...>
 

Hi Eric

Yes these spindles are available all the time on eBay. I also have a
couple of extra ones on the shelf as I am sure Jeff Beck tools4cheap
does or some of the other regular SB eBay sellers.

Turk

--- In southbendlathe@..., "ericgagnon1957" <eric@...>
wrote:

Dennis:

Thanks very much for taking a look, and for your comments and advice
on my lathe. I'll be sure to check the bearing journals and spindle,
as well as the oiling and felt setup.

Are the hardened spindles you mentioned available from any supplier
these days, or is this something to look for on eBay?

Thanks again,
Eric

--- In southbendlathe@..., "Dennis Turk"
<dennis.turk2@> wrote:

Hi Eric

I just took a look at your lathe picture. The lathe you
purchased is
a pre 1939 catalog number 415 RA. Remember the A B and C model
workshop lathes were first offered in late 1938 or very early 39
so
your lathe is a top oilier 415 workshop. The C model was a front
oilier and had the hardened and micro polished spindle. Your
lathe
will have the soft spindle and the first thing you wont to do is
pull
the head stock down for a good inspection cleaning and
replacement of
the felt wicks that are in a key-way at to very top of your
bearing
journals.

In doing so you may find that the spindle and the head stock
bearing
journals are scored. If you still have a fair amount of clean
bearing bore that is not damaged you can replace your 415 spindle
with a later hardened ground and micro polished from a later
model
lathe. If the bearing journals are badly scored you can replace
the
complete head stock with a later one as most have done when they
have
found there head stocks to be damaged.

I hope you find that your head stock is in great shape and you
are
one of the lucky ones.

Turk


Re: Opinions on this SB Lathe...

ericgagnon1957
 

Dennis:

Thanks very much for taking a look, and for your comments and advice
on my lathe. I'll be sure to check the bearing journals and spindle,
as well as the oiling and felt setup.

Are the hardened spindles you mentioned available from any supplier
these days, or is this something to look for on eBay?

Thanks again,
Eric

--- In southbendlathe@..., "Dennis Turk"
<dennis.turk2@...> wrote:

Hi Eric

I just took a look at your lathe picture. The lathe you purchased is
a pre 1939 catalog number 415 RA. Remember the A B and C model
workshop lathes were first offered in late 1938 or very early 39 so
your lathe is a top oilier 415 workshop. The C model was a front
oilier and had the hardened and micro polished spindle. Your lathe
will have the soft spindle and the first thing you wont to do is pull
the head stock down for a good inspection cleaning and replacement of
the felt wicks that are in a key-way at to very top of your bearing
journals.

In doing so you may find that the spindle and the head stock bearing
journals are scored. If you still have a fair amount of clean
bearing bore that is not damaged you can replace your 415 spindle
with a later hardened ground and micro polished from a later model
lathe. If the bearing journals are badly scored you can replace the
complete head stock with a later one as most have done when they have
found there head stocks to be damaged.

I hope you find that your head stock is in great shape and you are
one of the lucky ones.

Turk


Light 10 buying decision opinions wanted

imarelicz28 <imarelicz28@...>
 

I've always wanted a small lathe for my workshop. The company I
work for is selling some excess equipment to the employees, by
closed bid. A small South Bend lathe is being sold, that was part
of a "lot" of equipment brought in from another company after an
aquistion, thus I don't know about its past. I've had a couple of
our machinists look it over and it was pronounce to be in very good
condition. They believe it spent most of its days cutting bushings
out of tube stock held by the collets. Here a link to some pic's I
took of it.

http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v224/imarelic/south%20bend%20lathe/

After a couple of hours of seaching, I'm fairly certain its a "light
10"

Plus's:
It's a South Bend!
It's basically sound and tight
Small enough that I can disassembly to move to my basement workshop
Large assortment of collets come with it
Nice heavy duty table
It's very similar to SB lathes I learned on in High School and
college.


Minus's:
No tooling other than the collets and tailstock jacobs chuck
no compound rest or tool post
missing head stock cover
motor looks to be 220 3 phase, I don't have 3 phase.

I think that around $300 would buy it. I was really hoping to pick
up a lathe complete with some tooling. If I get this one, I'll need
to find tooling where ever I can, and buy a 220 single phase motor.

Is there some major pitfall to this outfit, that I haven't thought
about? I've got to turn in my bid by Monday the 12th. What would
you do if you were me?

Thanks


1936 415 Workshop

Rob Samson <azrobby@...>
 

Hi Guys

I recently picked up a 1936 (based on serial #) 9" Top Oiler I
believe
is a 415 Workshop. It has a separate 9A Gearbox and screw that
came with it. It would appear someone wanted to convert it to a
Quick Change. Is that possible to convert a 9" 415 Workshop to
a Quick Change using a 9A Gearbox? What are the problems and
would it be like trying to convert a 9C?

I also have a complete 1950's 9A that was my first lathe I purchased
just a couple of years ago so I am still learning on it.

Most of my chip making is related to my hobby which is sport planes
kit and plans built. I currently have a 2/3rd Scale Replica of the
Curtiss
JN4D "Jenny" and working on a RANS S6 Super. Both are to be
powered with auto conversions using the Subaru EA81 1800cc engine
With adapter plates and gearbox for reduction to allow for proper RPM
for propellers which falls in the 1800 - 2200 RPM range. Building
your
own parts is not only cheaper but gives great satisfaction and
confidence
because you know what it is made of and how.

Thanks for any help on the 415 Workshop

Rob Samson
Phoenix, Arizona


Re: Lever Action Collet Closer

tetramachine
 

Bills answer is spot on. I'd add that a tool that I think is handier
is a square, and hex block collet holder. With the blocks you can
mount them in the vise quicker than bolting the closer to the table,
then with you part still fixed in the collet, chuck it in you lathe,
do whatever, then back to the mill, still indexed to the block, darn
handy.

--- In southbendlathe@..., Thomas.G.Brandl@... wrote:

Bill,
These are great if you do a lot of work held in collets.
There in
a adjustment collar to set tension on the collet for the part to be
held.
It should be on a thread. This also allows changing the collets.
The lever
is pushed forward or towards the lathe to release the part. It is
pushed
back to close the collet and clamp the part in the collet. If you
set up a
collet stop in the collet, it can make cettain types of cut
repeatable on
a series of parts. If the diameter of the part varies, then the
position
of the part will change. There are collets that will control this,
but I
don't think in the 5C size. Hope this explanation helps.
Tom



Wm Mader <hillbrook@...>
Sent by: southbendlathe@...
02/06/2007 10:54 AM
Please respond to
southbendlathe@...


To
southbendlathe@...
cc

Subject
[southbendlathe] Lever Action Collet Closer








Could someone explain how this is used?
Bill


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Re: Looking for a 10K tailstock...

BOB WRIGHT
 

Check with Fred imsteamer21@... ...Bob
--- In southbendlathe@..., "sirthadious" <sirthadious@...>
wrote:

I have recently purchased a SB 10K of the late 1970's era and the
darn
thing doesn't have a tailstock. Does anyone know where one can be
had
for reasonable or have a worn low level one (I have the ability to
repour a cast iron base and remachine if absolutley necessary), but
I
do need it to be somewhat complete. Any assistance would be greatly
appreciate!

Cheers,
Ted

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