Date   

10K spindle removal

Greg Coffin <gpcoffin@...>
 

Is there anything difficult about removing the spindle on a 10K? I
need to clean out the bearing oilers. My lathe has only one bearing
bolt on the operator side of the bearings, and 2 small screws on the
back gear side.

Any replies would be greatly appreciated.
Greg


Re: Converting a Junior to a "B" configuration?

Dennis Turk <dennis.turk2@...>
 

Hi Barry

OK you have an S series lathe Barry and so you can bolt an S series
tool room or engine lathe apron onto your 22 Jr. saddle. That and
the cross slide lead screw with gear you have and a threading lead
screw with the key-way and your good to go.

What length lead screw do you need or what is your bed length as I
may have a lead screw that will work for your lathe.

You can not put a heavy ten apron on an S series lathe but you can on
a R or T series from the mid to late twenties.

I don't happen to have an extra apron right now but keep a watch on
eBay as they show up from time to time. They are identifiably buy
the two knurled knobs that sit at the bottom of the apron. If you
need a picture of what one looks like let me know at dennis.Turk at
horizon.net and I will send you a catalog image as well as a picture
of one.

Turk

--- In southbendlathe@..., "Barry Marsh" <bmarsh1402@...>
wrote:

I have a 9 X 3 foot Junior Model 22YC s/n 38591 (I think that makes
it
a 1928 model, but not sure).

I would really like to convert it to model "B" specs with a power
cross feed. The cross feed screw already has a gear on it, I don't
know if a previous owner added it or if they all came that way.

I know I will need to replace the solid lead drive screw with a
later
grooved version, but what about replacing the apron?

Later model A & B aprons do not fit the Juniors, I was once told
that
a heavy 10 apron would fit, but that also appears to not be the
case.

This is pretty old equipment so I am guessing I would need a pre
1940
apron (pre 1930?)Seems like SB made a lot of model changes back
then.

Anybody got any ideas on what is needed to make this possible? Do I
need an early single wall apron? Any leads on what models (years)
might provide parts for a conversion, Model O, N, R, T?

I'd really like to keep this old machine running and appreciate any
inputs from the rest of the group. Having power cross feed would be
really nice. Thanks!

Barry


Re: Light 10 buying decision opinions wanted

JohnW <John.Walker@...>
 

Neal
Depending upon how the saddle is worn it may or not need scraping. I
suspect that it shouldn't need it but......

From the photo's the cross slide looks a lot thicker than a regular
one. Mounting a compound on top of it might put the tool too high
with any standard tool post.

Just a couple of thinks to consider.

Other than that, if we knew where this lathe was there would be no
way he would get it for $300!!!

JohnW

--- In southbendlathe@..., "Neal Winblad" <nwinblad@...>
wrote:

John,

I don't understand why a new cross slide would have to be scraped
in.
Wouldn't you just be able to adjust it to the saddle with the gibs?
The
height of the tool is adjustable with the toolpost. So, what part
needs
scraping?

Neal

-----Original Message-----
From: southbendlathe@...
[mailto:southbendlathe@...] On Behalf Of JohnW
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2007 11:34 AM
To: southbendlathe@...
Subject: [southbendlathe] Re: Light 10 buying decision opinions
wanted

A tool post could be mounted directly on the cross slide. You won't
be able to do short tapers like you can with a compound.

X slides and compounds are available on ebay but the x slide might
have to be scraped in to fit. A friendly machinist could probably
help to do this. Alternatively a hold could be bored in the
existing
x slide for the compound but it looks like it may end up too high.

The collets are great for working with small round stock, much
preferable to a chuck. If you were to turn around and sell the
collet chuck you but a 3 jaw, a 4 jaw, probably a good toolpost and
have lots left over.

JohnW
--- In southbendlathe@ <mailto:southbendlathe%40yahoogroups.com>


Converting a Junior to a "B" configuration?

Barry J. Marsh
 

I have a 9 X 3 foot Junior Model 22YC s/n 38591 (I think that makes it
a 1928 model, but not sure).

I would really like to convert it to model "B" specs with a power
cross feed. The cross feed screw already has a gear on it, I don't
know if a previous owner added it or if they all came that way.

I know I will need to replace the solid lead drive screw with a later
grooved version, but what about replacing the apron?

Later model A & B aprons do not fit the Juniors, I was once told that
a heavy 10 apron would fit, but that also appears to not be the case.

This is pretty old equipment so I am guessing I would need a pre 1940
apron (pre 1930?)Seems like SB made a lot of model changes back then.

Anybody got any ideas on what is needed to make this possible? Do I
need an early single wall apron? Any leads on what models (years)
might provide parts for a conversion, Model O, N, R, T?

I'd really like to keep this old machine running and appreciate any
inputs from the rest of the group. Having power cross feed would be
really nice. Thanks!

Barry


Re: Taper attachment doesn't work

ChristopherS
 

Are you certain that you have both the rear bedway clamp tight and the tapering handle (the one in the slot on the rear of the CS) locked?
 
Chris


woodsmit wrote:

The taper attachment on my 1946 13" South Bend Lathe doesn't work. How
can I access the compound lead screw nut, I have taken most of the
parts off and I still can't take the compound base off. Does the taper
attachment have to come off to pull the lead screw? And then how do
you take the compound base off?

Thank you for your help.



Saddle Screw Error Adjustment

hardtoguess03 <hardtoguess03@...>
 

My saddle screw (sb13) appears to have around .020 of play in it
between the forward and reverse directions. In other words if I turn
it one way until the saddle actually moves and then turn the other way
until the saddle is about to move, the dial has indicated .020 and the
saddle hasn't moved.

Is this something I need to live with, or is there an adjustment that I
missed?

Regards,
Eric


Re: QC on SB 13

hardtoguess03 <hardtoguess03@...>
 

I will reply to my own post, since I finally figured it out. There
is a 1 1/8 nut (regular threads) that needs to be removed -- it
pushes the bushing out as it goes, so the bushing retaining screw
must be removed first. That is of course unless the nut would drive
the shaft out on its own -- I didn't try it that way.

The next shaft in the QC box is now confusing me -- the one with the
clutch dog on it. There only appears to be one pin which I suspect
rides in a groove on the shaft since that (pinned) gear spins free.
The pin seems all bent in there, so it looks like it's going to be a
bear to remove. If I remove that pin, can I just tap the shaft out?
It does appear that the two gears that need it have relief for the
key to pass through.

Wow, this is going to be a good job done, once it's behind me. I am
dreading the apron now more than ever.

-Eric


--- In southbendlathe@..., "hardtoguess03"
<hardtoguess03@...> wrote:

I finally got some time to work on my project lathe. I
successfully
disassembled, cleaned and reassembled the Headstock & saddle
assy's.

Next up is the QC gearbox. I removed the lead screw, QC lever and
the
gear it rides on. Now I am trying to remove the main cluster of
gears. The parts diagram leads me to believe that if I drive out
the .125 pin near the smallest pinion, the shaft will slide out the
other end of the case. Not so in my case. I drove out the pin and
tapping (understatement) doesn't seem to budge it relative to the
gear
cluster.

What am I doing wrong here? is there another pin that I don't
see? I
really don't feel like I should be hitting it much harder than I
already am.

Any help would be appreciated.

Eric


Re: plates

ChristopherS
 

Thanks Denny. That's a big surprise! I didn't give a thought to the fact that they may have etched the background away. That's quite a bit of metal to etch away, but hey.... what ever works.
 
Chris


Dennis Turk wrote:

Hi Chris

With all the SB tags and legend plates I have played with over the
years and also the time I spent at Tektronix in Beaverton Oregon were
they had an extensive chem. mill facility. The older SB plates were
or appeared to be chemically milled to create the raised detail. I
say chem. mill rather than stamped because if they were stamped there
would be impressions on the back side of the plate and I have never
seen any on a SB plate.

Also at least the pre war data plates were not painted rather they
were enameled. This was a process much like powder coating. The dry
powder is applied to the recess areas of the plate and then they
went through a baking process. That is what made them so durable.
As this was done while the plate was dead flat after baking they went
through a burnishing process to brighten the raised detail of the
plate. I dont thing SB made any of there own tags and legend plats
as there would have been companies that specialized in this area of
manufacturing.

Dalton and Flather used the same company in Ma. to make there tags.
The only difference in the two company's tags is the company name and
address the tags are identical

Just like threading lead screws. SB never made any of there own
except for the 405 left hand screw. All others were sourced from a
sub contractor.

Some of the plates I see in the Amsted era are in fact just flat
brass plates that have been silk screened. These did not hold up
well.

Just some thoughts and observations.

Turk



QC on SB 13

hardtoguess03 <hardtoguess03@...>
 

I finally got some time to work on my project lathe. I successfully
disassembled, cleaned and reassembled the Headstock & saddle assy's.

Next up is the QC gearbox. I removed the lead screw, QC lever and the
gear it rides on. Now I am trying to remove the main cluster of
gears. The parts diagram leads me to believe that if I drive out
the .125 pin near the smallest pinion, the shaft will slide out the
other end of the case. Not so in my case. I drove out the pin and
tapping (understatement) doesn't seem to budge it relative to the gear
cluster.

What am I doing wrong here? is there another pin that I don't see? I
really don't feel like I should be hitting it much harder than I
already am.

Any help would be appreciated.

Eric


Re: Light 10 buying decision opinions wanted

Jeff Beck
 

I wouldnt worry about those other items, you can easily find them all
on ebay or elsewhere. I would seriously not hesitate to grab that at
the price if you are at all serious about a lathe like this. If you
were closer to me and decided you didnt want it, id ask you to pick
it up for $300 and id give you $800 for it in a second.
Jeff
--- In southbendlathe@..., "imarelicz28"
<imarelicz28@...> wrote:

Thanks for your comments. I know from a value standpoint that $300
buck would be a steal. But, I'm not buying it to turn around and
sell
it. I need to make sure it's something that "I" can actually use.
A
couple of you have said that the T slot Cross Slide is a desirable
feature, but you don't see any provisions to mount the compound
rest?
What is the advantage to the T slot arrangment? The only thing I
have
any experience with is the typical compound rest and tool post. If
a
compound rest won't fit on it, what will I need in the way of tool
holders to be able to turn and thread with this lathe?

Also, is the collet holder something that can be removed quickly to
install a 3 or 4 jaw chuck?

http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v224/imarelic/south%20bend%
20lathe/

I really appreciate your comments


Re: Light 10 buying decision opinions wanted

BOB WRIGHT
 

I added an Earl Bower machined MLA aftermarket crosslide to my 10K
and it was a bolt on job. I have a spare crosslide i will never
use...Bob
--- In southbendlathe@..., "Neal Winblad" <nwinblad@...>
wrote:

John,

I don't understand why a new cross slide would have to be scraped
in.
Wouldn't you just be able to adjust it to the saddle with the gibs?
The
height of the tool is adjustable with the toolpost. So, what part
needs
scraping?

Neal

-----Original Message-----
From: southbendlathe@...
[mailto:southbendlathe@...] On Behalf Of JohnW
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2007 11:34 AM
To: southbendlathe@...
Subject: [southbendlathe] Re: Light 10 buying decision opinions
wanted

A tool post could be mounted directly on the cross slide. You won't
be able to do short tapers like you can with a compound.

X slides and compounds are available on ebay but the x slide might
have to be scraped in to fit. A friendly machinist could probably
help to do this. Alternatively a hold could be bored in the
existing
x slide for the compound but it looks like it may end up too high.

The collets are great for working with small round stock, much
preferable to a chuck. If you were to turn around and sell the
collet chuck you but a 3 jaw, a 4 jaw, probably a good toolpost and
have lots left over.

JohnW
--- In southbendlathe@ <mailto:southbendlathe%40yahoogroups.com>
yahoogroups.com, "imarelicz28"
<imarelicz28@> wrote:

Thanks for your comments. I know from a value standpoint that
$300
buck would be a steal. But, I'm not buying it to turn around and
sell
it. I need to make sure it's something that "I" can actually use.
A
couple of you have said that the T slot Cross Slide is a
desirable
feature, but you don't see any provisions to mount the compound
rest?
What is the advantage to the T slot arrangment? The only thing I
have
any experience with is the typical compound rest and tool post.
If
a
compound rest won't fit on it, what will I need in the way of
tool
holders to be able to turn and thread with this lathe?

Also, is the collet holder something that can be removed quickly
to
install a 3 or 4 jaw chuck?

http://smg.photobuc
<http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v224/imarelic/south%20bend%25>
ket.com/albums/v224/imarelic/south%20bend%
20lathe/

I really appreciate your comments


Re: Light 10 buying decision opinions wanted

nwinblad
 

John,

I don't understand why a new cross slide would have to be scraped in.
Wouldn't you just be able to adjust it to the saddle with the gibs? The
height of the tool is adjustable with the toolpost. So, what part needs
scraping?

Neal

-----Original Message-----
From: southbendlathe@...
[mailto:southbendlathe@...] On Behalf Of JohnW
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2007 11:34 AM
To: southbendlathe@...
Subject: [southbendlathe] Re: Light 10 buying decision opinions wanted

A tool post could be mounted directly on the cross slide. You won't
be able to do short tapers like you can with a compound.

X slides and compounds are available on ebay but the x slide might
have to be scraped in to fit. A friendly machinist could probably
help to do this. Alternatively a hold could be bored in the existing
x slide for the compound but it looks like it may end up too high.

The collets are great for working with small round stock, much
preferable to a chuck. If you were to turn around and sell the
collet chuck you but a 3 jaw, a 4 jaw, probably a good toolpost and
have lots left over.

JohnW
--- In southbendlathe@ <mailto:southbendlathe%40yahoogroups.com>
yahoogroups.com, "imarelicz28"
<imarelicz28@...> wrote:

Thanks for your comments. I know from a value standpoint that $300
buck would be a steal. But, I'm not buying it to turn around and
sell
it. I need to make sure it's something that "I" can actually use.
A
couple of you have said that the T slot Cross Slide is a desirable
feature, but you don't see any provisions to mount the compound
rest?
What is the advantage to the T slot arrangment? The only thing I
have
any experience with is the typical compound rest and tool post. If
a
compound rest won't fit on it, what will I need in the way of tool
holders to be able to turn and thread with this lathe?

Also, is the collet holder something that can be removed quickly to
install a 3 or 4 jaw chuck?

http://smg.photobuc
<http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v224/imarelic/south%20bend%25>
ket.com/albums/v224/imarelic/south%20bend%
20lathe/

I really appreciate your comments


Re: plates

Steve Wells
 

Here's a link to a forum for making plates by the
chemically milled process that Denny described,
you might contact Mike Burdick from this group.
the second link describes how to make a plate.

http://bbssystem.com/viewforum.php?f=15

http://www.gasenginemagazine.com/archive/0403/0403_feature1.html


Steve


Re: Light 10 buying decision opinions wanted

Dennis Turk <dennis.turk2@...>
 

Hey great purchase and if you check your bed with a file I think you
will find you have found also one of the elusive flame hardened beds.
If it is the bed alone is worth what you paid for the complete lathe.

Turk

--- In southbendlathe@..., "Neal Winblad" <nwinblad@...>
wrote:

Not to worry about what it may be missing. Parts for South Bends
show up
all the time on eBay. You will be able find a cross slide / compound
very easily. Most people would prefer the T-slot I think except when
threading. So, you could have both and decide on a job by job basis
which to use. I believe the collet nose adapter comes off and chucks
screw on but I will let someone who knows for sure answer that one.
My
point is at $300 you have a lot of money left over (compared to
buying a
fully equipped lathe) to buy all the accessories you need. The fact
that
this lathe comes with all those collets is very desirable. They run
much
more true than work in a three jaw chuck. So, you will only need a
chuck
for larger work. The fact that this lathe is a model A, having a
quick
change gearbox means you don't have to mess with rather cumbersome
process of putting on change gears. That is very desirable. The fact
that this lathe has a fairly long bed is desirable as you can turn
longer work. I also has a micrometer stop on the ways. That is a
nice
feature. The three phase motor is probably a good thing as others
have
said. You just need to buy a small VFD and then you have a variable
speed lathe. One of the areas where this can come in handy is if
you are
threading to a shoulder. If you put the lathe in the slowest gear
and
put the back gear on it still is a bit fast for some of us to back
off
the cross slide at the end of the cut. But, if you could slow it
down
even more (by a factor of 10, say) then at the end of the thread
cut you
would have time to back out the cutter. I think you cannot go wrong
in
putting in a $300 bid on this lathe.

Neal

-----Original Message-----
From: southbendlathe@...
[mailto:southbendlathe@...] On Behalf Of imarelicz28
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2007 9:00 AM
To: southbendlathe@...
Subject: [southbendlathe] Light 10 buying decision opinions wanted

Thanks for your comments. I know from a value standpoint that $300
buck would be a steal. But, I'm not buying it to turn around and
sell
it. I need to make sure it's something that "I" can actually use. A
couple of you have said that the T slot Cross Slide is a desirable
feature, but you don't see any provisions to mount the compound
rest?
What is the advantage to the T slot arrangment? The only thing I
have
any experience with is the typical compound rest and tool post. If
a
compound rest won't fit on it, what will I need in the way of tool
holders to be able to turn and thread with this lathe?

Also, is the collet holder something that can be removed quickly to
install a 3 or 4 jaw chuck?

http://smg.photobuc
<http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v224/imarelic/south%20bend%
20lathe/>
ket.com/albums/v224/imarelic/south%20bend%20lathe/

I really appreciate your comments


Re: Light 10 buying decision opinions wanted

JohnW <John.Walker@...>
 

A tool post could be mounted directly on the cross slide. You won't
be able to do short tapers like you can with a compound.

X slides and compounds are available on ebay but the x slide might
have to be scraped in to fit. A friendly machinist could probably
help to do this. Alternatively a hold could be bored in the existing
x slide for the compound but it looks like it may end up too high.

The collets are great for working with small round stock, much
preferable to a chuck. If you were to turn around and sell the
collet chuck you but a 3 jaw, a 4 jaw, probably a good toolpost and
have lots left over.

JohnW
--- In southbendlathe@..., "imarelicz28"
<imarelicz28@...> wrote:

Thanks for your comments. I know from a value standpoint that $300
buck would be a steal. But, I'm not buying it to turn around and
sell
it. I need to make sure it's something that "I" can actually use.
A
couple of you have said that the T slot Cross Slide is a desirable
feature, but you don't see any provisions to mount the compound
rest?
What is the advantage to the T slot arrangment? The only thing I
have
any experience with is the typical compound rest and tool post. If
a
compound rest won't fit on it, what will I need in the way of tool
holders to be able to turn and thread with this lathe?

Also, is the collet holder something that can be removed quickly to
install a 3 or 4 jaw chuck?

http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v224/imarelic/south%20bend%
20lathe/

I really appreciate your comments


Re: Light 10 buying decision opinions wanted

nwinblad
 

Not to worry about what it may be missing. Parts for South Bends show up
all the time on eBay. You will be able find a cross slide / compound
very easily. Most people would prefer the T-slot I think except when
threading. So, you could have both and decide on a job by job basis
which to use. I believe the collet nose adapter comes off and chucks
screw on but I will let someone who knows for sure answer that one. My
point is at $300 you have a lot of money left over (compared to buying a
fully equipped lathe) to buy all the accessories you need. The fact that
this lathe comes with all those collets is very desirable. They run much
more true than work in a three jaw chuck. So, you will only need a chuck
for larger work. The fact that this lathe is a model A, having a quick
change gearbox means you don't have to mess with rather cumbersome
process of putting on change gears. That is very desirable. The fact
that this lathe has a fairly long bed is desirable as you can turn
longer work. I also has a micrometer stop on the ways. That is a nice
feature. The three phase motor is probably a good thing as others have
said. You just need to buy a small VFD and then you have a variable
speed lathe. One of the areas where this can come in handy is if you are
threading to a shoulder. If you put the lathe in the slowest gear and
put the back gear on it still is a bit fast for some of us to back off
the cross slide at the end of the cut. But, if you could slow it down
even more (by a factor of 10, say) then at the end of the thread cut you
would have time to back out the cutter. I think you cannot go wrong in
putting in a $300 bid on this lathe.

Neal

-----Original Message-----
From: southbendlathe@...
[mailto:southbendlathe@...] On Behalf Of imarelicz28
Sent: Sunday, February 11, 2007 9:00 AM
To: southbendlathe@...
Subject: [southbendlathe] Light 10 buying decision opinions wanted

Thanks for your comments. I know from a value standpoint that $300
buck would be a steal. But, I'm not buying it to turn around and sell
it. I need to make sure it's something that "I" can actually use. A
couple of you have said that the T slot Cross Slide is a desirable
feature, but you don't see any provisions to mount the compound rest?
What is the advantage to the T slot arrangment? The only thing I have
any experience with is the typical compound rest and tool post. If a
compound rest won't fit on it, what will I need in the way of tool
holders to be able to turn and thread with this lathe?

Also, is the collet holder something that can be removed quickly to
install a 3 or 4 jaw chuck?

http://smg.photobuc
<http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v224/imarelic/south%20bend%20lathe/>
ket.com/albums/v224/imarelic/south%20bend%20lathe/

I really appreciate your comments


Light 10 buying decision opinions wanted

imarelicz28 <imarelicz28@...>
 

Thanks for your comments. I know from a value standpoint that $300
buck would be a steal. But, I'm not buying it to turn around and sell
it. I need to make sure it's something that "I" can actually use. A
couple of you have said that the T slot Cross Slide is a desirable
feature, but you don't see any provisions to mount the compound rest?
What is the advantage to the T slot arrangment? The only thing I have
any experience with is the typical compound rest and tool post. If a
compound rest won't fit on it, what will I need in the way of tool
holders to be able to turn and thread with this lathe?

Also, is the collet holder something that can be removed quickly to
install a 3 or 4 jaw chuck?

http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v224/imarelic/south%20bend%20lathe/

I really appreciate your comments


Re: plates

Dennis Turk <dennis.turk2@...>
 

Hi Chris

With all the SB tags and legend plates I have played with over the
years and also the time I spent at Tektronix in Beaverton Oregon were
they had an extensive chem. mill facility. The older SB plates were
or appeared to be chemically milled to create the raised detail. I
say chem. mill rather than stamped because if they were stamped there
would be impressions on the back side of the plate and I have never
seen any on a SB plate.

Also at least the pre war data plates were not painted rather they
were enameled. This was a process much like powder coating. The dry
powder is applied to the recess areas of the plate and then they
went through a baking process. That is what made them so durable.
As this was done while the plate was dead flat after baking they went
through a burnishing process to brighten the raised detail of the
plate. I dont thing SB made any of there own tags and legend plats
as there would have been companies that specialized in this area of
manufacturing.

Dalton and Flather used the same company in Ma. to make there tags.
The only difference in the two company's tags is the company name and
address the tags are identical

Just like threading lead screws. SB never made any of there own
except for the 405 left hand screw. All others were sourced from a
sub contractor.

Some of the plates I see in the Amsted era are in fact just flat
brass plates that have been silk screened. These did not hold up
well.

Just some thoughts and observations.

Turk


Re: plates

ChristopherS
 

The original SB brass plates were embossed. Even if the paint wore off, the data is still there. Either SB stamped the plates or rolled them though a die prior to coloring them.
 
Chris


bripaul67 wrote:

I can see on the original plate the letters are raised a bit. Randy
told me the raised letters are produced with acid and then screen
printed. Is there anyone in this group that actually worked at South
Bend that would know where they were made originally? In house?



Re: Light 10 buying decision opinions wanted

BOB WRIGHT
 

Or you can buy a regular 1/2 hp electric motor from grizzly.com for 89
bucks. G2901 Motor 1/2 HP Single-Phase 1725 RPM Open 110V/220V or a
3/4 hp from them for 99.00. I priced a mexican made ge at my local
farm store for 133 bucks for a 3/4 hp and i can get it right off the
shelf. I have a 1/2 hp ge on my 10k and will be upgrading to a 3/4 hp
soon....Bob
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/southbend10k/

--- In southbendlathe@..., Chris Strazzeri <cjstrazz@...>
wrote:

For $300.00 bucks you CAN'T go wrong! You can get that much just for
the lever collet closer without the collets! A $150.00 VFD will solve
your 3PH motor problem. The T slot Cross Slide is nice (many members
here like them) but I don't see any provision to mount the compound on
that one?

Chris
machinists look it over and it was pronounce to be in very good

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