Date   

Re: grand new york collet chuck

ChristopherS
 

Usually revolving chucks are intended for use in the TS. I have a Bison 3 jaw revolving chuck mounted on an MT2 spindle shaft. Could you please post a photo so we can see what you're describing?
 
Chris


bigjimmyd1946 wrote:

I just purchased a workshop 9 inch with only a collet chuck and
one 1/2 inch collet in it. The chuck has me baffled. It's name
is "Grand New York" model 210 and on the tag it also says "modern
germany" There is a grease fitting on it. as the spindle turns
the outside of the chuck is free wheeling. How does it come off?
thanks
jim



Re: A little SB history

ChristopherS
 

Dennis Turk (member here) can supply you with copious amounts of SB history. Some of it will burst many romantic bubbles; if you have any.
 
Chris


Greg Coffin wrote:

Where can I find out more about the South Bend history? It sounds
like a fascinating story.

Greg

----- Original Message -----
From: Dennis Turk <dennis.turk2@verizon.net>
To: <southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Tuesday, January 30, 2007 10:15 AM
Subject: [southbendlathe] A little SB history

Hi Clive

Actually SB built all their head and tail stocks in this manner.
The boring bar was held in the head stock and centered in the tail
stock. The head or tail stock casting was secured to a fixture on
the saddle. These machines were built on mid teens 15 inch lathes
and were still in use in 1998 when South West industries were
contemplating purchasing South Bend. At that time two of my friends
worked for SW and went to the factory as technical advisor's. John
and Hauns told me some real horror stories about the factory. In
the main manufacturing area there were right at 850 machines 50 or
less still functioned. The ones that did had plastic pipe frames
built over them with blue plastic tarps to keep the rain and the
bird droppings off the machines. John said the place was a bird
aviary as there were few windows left in the building. The roof
leaked like a sieve. Hauns told me there were a row of 10 small SB
shapers still in use making parts. They had fixtures in each shaper
and the operator just moved the part from machine to machine and at
the end it was done. The stories go on and on so its no wonder SB
folded as they did. If you read the history of SB and the fact that
it was the very first ESOP or Employee purchased company and what
happened in 1991 you could see they were doomed.

AS I understand the story and please don't quote me. SB or rather
the company that owned them at the time who I think was AMF was
going to shut SB down. This I think was in the late seventies.
There were some contract deals made were the employees took some
wage and benefit cuts. They hired some upper management types and
by 1991 the company was again profitable. At that time as I
understand it the wage and benefit concessions were to be returned
to the employees. The company management wonted to take the
accumulated profits and modernize a portion of the factory but the
employees just wonted the money and so they got what they were owed
but it spelled the doom of SB. One thing I read was at a meeting a
comment was made. We have been making these lathes this way for the
last 85 years and we can keep making them the same way we wont our
money. End of company.

Turk

--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, Clive Foster
...> wrote:
>
> It may be of interest to note that Myford switched from top feed
> oiling, via proper drip feed & sight glass oilers, to SouthBend
style
> underneath wick feed from a small sump when they introduced the
Super
> 7 series lathe to complement and eventually replace the ML 7.
> Although I'm no fan of Myfords, for reasons that have more to do
with
> personal engineering asethetic appreciation than rational
analysis,
> both the ML 7 and Super 7 head-stocks approach SouthBend
durability
> standards. Officially the change was part of the re-development
to
> cope with the higher speed capability of the Super 7.
>
> Concerning Bobs' problem it wouldn't therefore be unreasonable to
> bore out the damaged bearing and replace it with a bronze sleeve.
I
> seem to recall seeing somewhere a description of doing this sort
of
> job in situ using a live boring bar with one end running in the
rear
> head-stock bearing and the other in bearings supported by the tail-

> stock. As I recall things the feed was from the tail-stock so
> presumably that end of the bar was fixed into bearings carried by
a
> sleeve clamped to the outside of the tail-stock ram. I've no
memory
> of how the bar was driven, from the era I suspect the lathe
carried
> some form of overhead drive for accessory spindles which would do
the
> deed. An "after many years service I had to remake the head
stock
> bearings on my lathe" type article. Was probably in JEWs' ME
article
> archives!
>
> One of the Village Press publications did what looked to be a
good
> article on fixing a similar problem. Reprinted in Projects 4 or 5
I
> think, I shall have to look it out for Bob.
>
> Alternatively there are thin steel sleeves made for this sort of
> repair job on plain bearings. The original being bored out and
the
> shaft ground down to accommodate the sleeve. If a standard
sleeve
> whose internal diameter matches the mandrel outside diameter this
> might be an acceptable repair.
>
> Clive
>

--
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Re: My very amateur Model_C_ restoration and a new lesson in what not to do

Dennis Turk <dennis.turk2@...>
 

Hi Neil

OK first is your motor pulley a single step or a double step? if its
a single than any pulley the correct diameter will work find as long
as you get one for the correct belt size. SB used a B section belt
but I find that 5L belts work just fine. Its the width of the inner
diameter that is important as it rides on the smooth counter shaft
pulley. An A section or a 4L is a little to narrow and may slip under
load.

If you have a double step SB pulley there are two different ones.
Your early lathe will take the smaller of the two

Owe by the way a model C was not built till 1939 so if your lathe is
a 1937 its a 415 not a C. There are differences. If you add oil to
the spindle bearings from the top of the head stock its a 415 if the
oilers are on the side of the head stock its a model C but still
carried the catalog number 415. 515 being a model B and a 615 being
an A model. These were base catalog numbers and different drives and
bench or floor mount would alter this number.

Turk




--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, Neil Bristol <neil_ljl@...>
wrote:

Hello:

I have not posted more than one or two questions here but I want to
share an embarrassing moment with all of you and ask for help.

I recently got my first lathe (a 1937(ish) Model "C"). It was
sitting unused for the last 30+ years under a tarp in a room with a
forge..encrusted in soot and gear-oil but workable. I haven't used a
lathe since about 1974 but it was a South Bend and I always wanted
one since my first experience in Shop class.

I found this one and it was like the "Charlie Brown Christmas
tree": It needed me.

It was(is)

1) Terribly forlorn and unused

2) Pitifully filthy/rusty

3) Wiring wrong and dangerously degraded

4) (Most Importantly) Fixable and Affordable

So home it went with me just before Christmas....

On with the story: Professional Scientist & Intrepid "Tom Swift
Wanna-be" - I rewired it "The Right Way": proper grounding, the
correct gage wire, cleaned and polished the connections, carefully
dissembled and rebuilt the switch, etc.

I tested all the connections and Motor with a multi-meter, etc,etc.

Then the moment of truth and.. an incredible moment of
stupidity...: I set the motor on the bench and turned it on.. all
good then I tried the reverse and too late realized it was very near
the edge. It "leapt off" the bench and fell 3 feet to the floor.

It landed on the pulley assembly which broke into about 10 pieces.
(surprisingly ( too me) it is (was) made from cast iron).

Anyway...all is well with the 60year(+) old GE motor (turns out
that GE made a few well built-long, lasting products before Jack
Welsh came along) Sorry about that.

At any rate if anyone knows the right place to get a pulley for the
motor that would be a help. (I don't want to try contacting LeBlond
as my experience with them is "heart-stopping sticker shock" I
suppose something from McMaster-Carr will work, just need a little
guidance and a catalog #)

Thanks (and sorry for the long story),

Neil





---------------------------------
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Re: My very amateur Model_C_ restoration and a new lesson in what not to do

M. Walter <m.walter1@...>
 

Pulleys can be obtained almost anywhere but it would be a good idea to stay with either steel or cast iron because aluminum or other soft metal will wear in time and leave you with just a hub and you will be looking for a pulley again.  Grainger, Wholesale tool (WWW.WTTOOL.COM ), just about any hardware store or machine supply should have a good pulley.
 
I've had a 'C' for over 50 years and got tired of changing the gear train to cut threads.  Back when I bought the lathe, I wrote SB about adding a quick change gear box.  It took them quite a while but they finally wrote back and said, 'Forget it.  It isn't worth it'.  I finally bought an "A", light 10, a couple of months ago.  Now, I'm happy.  There's quite a bit of difference between the two lathes, mainly in their lube systems and, of course, in their gear changing. 

----- Original Message -----
From: CAL
Sent: Sunday, February 04, 2007 8:37 AM
Subject: Re: [southbendlathe] My very amateur Model_C_ restoration and a new lesson in what not to do

Ebay has lots of them all sizes and shapes. Found one that worked for me.
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, February 03, 2007 10:57 PM
Subject: [southbendlathe] My very amateur Model_C_ restoration and a new lesson in what not to do

Hello:

I have not posted more than one or two questions here but I want to share an embarrassing moment with all of you and ask for help.

I recently got my first lathe (a 1937(ish) Model "C"). It was sitting unused for the last 30+ years under a tarp in a room with a forge..encrusted in soot and gear-oil but workable. I haven't used a lathe since about 1974 but it was a South Bend and I always wanted one since my first experience in Shop class.

I found this one and it was like the "Charlie Brown Christmas tree":  It needed me.

It was(is)

     1) Terribly forlorn and unused

     2)  Pitifully filthy/rusty

     3)  Wiring wrong and dangerously degraded

     4)  (Most Importantly) Fixable and Affordable

So home it went with me just before Christmas....

On with the story:  Professional Scientist & Intrepid "Tom Swift Wanna-be" - I rewired it "The Right Way": proper grounding, the correct gage wire, cleaned and polished the connections, carefully dissembled and rebuilt the switch, etc.

 I tested all the connections and Motor with a multi-meter, etc,etc.

Then the moment of truth and.. an incredible moment of stupidity...: I set the motor on the bench and turned it on.. all good then I tried the reverse and too late realized it was very near the edge. It "leapt off" the bench and fell 3 feet to the floor.

It landed on the pulley assembly  which broke into about 10 pieces. (surprisingly ( too me) it is (was) made from cast iron).

Anyway...all is well with the 60year(+) old GE motor (turns out that GE made  a few well built-long, lasting products before Jack Welsh came along) Sorry about that.

At any rate if anyone knows the right place to get a pulley for the motor that would be a help. (I don't want to try contacting LeBlond as my experience with them is "heart-stopping sticker shock" I suppose something from McMaster-Carr  will work, just need a little guidance and a catalog #)

Thanks (and sorry for the long story),

Neil




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Re: My very amateur Model_C_ restoration and a new lesson in what not to do

Steve Wells
 

Neil,
Sorry, I thought you needed the countershaft pully.

Steve

--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "Neil" <neil_ljl@...> wrote:

Thanks Bob and Steve:

There is a pulley from McMaster car that appears to have the same
dimensions, etc for about $8.00. [McMaster Carr Part#6204K111]

For 8 bucks I'm going to give it a try. I will let you know if it
works or not.

Neil


Re: My very amateur Model_C_ restoration and a new lesson in what not to do

Neil <neil_ljl@...>
 

Thanks Bob and Steve:

There is a pulley from McMaster car that appears to have the same
dimensions, etc for about $8.00. [McMaster Carr Part#6204K111]

For 8 bucks I'm going to give it a try. I will let you know if it
works or not.

Neil


Re: My very amateur Model_C_ restoration and a new lesson in what not to do

CAL <cal@...>
 

Ebay has lots of them all sizes and shapes. Found one that worked for me.

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, February 03, 2007 10:57 PM
Subject: [southbendlathe] My very amateur Model_C_ restoration and a new lesson in what not to do

Hello:

I have not posted more than one or two questions here but I want to share an embarrassing moment with all of you and ask for help.

I recently got my first lathe (a 1937(ish) Model "C"). It was sitting unused for the last 30+ years under a tarp in a room with a forge..encrusted in soot and gear-oil but workable. I haven't used a lathe since about 1974 but it was a South Bend and I always wanted one since my first experience in Shop class.

I found this one and it was like the "Charlie Brown Christmas tree":  It needed me.

It was(is)

     1) Terribly forlorn and unused

     2)  Pitifully filthy/rusty

     3)  Wiring wrong and dangerously degraded

     4)  (Most Importantly) Fixable and Affordable

So home it went with me just before Christmas....

On with the story:  Professional Scientist & Intrepid "Tom Swift Wanna-be" - I rewired it "The Right Way": proper grounding, the correct gage wire, cleaned and polished the connections, carefully dissembled and rebuilt the switch, etc.

 I tested all the connections and Motor with a multi-meter, etc,etc.

Then the moment of truth and.. an incredible moment of stupidity...: I set the motor on the bench and turned it on.. all good then I tried the reverse and too late realized it was very near the edge. It "leapt off" the bench and fell 3 feet to the floor.

It landed on the pulley assembly  which broke into about 10 pieces. (surprisingly ( too me) it is (was) made from cast iron).

Anyway...all is well with the 60year(+) old GE motor (turns out that GE made  a few well built-long, lasting products before Jack Welsh came along) Sorry about that.

At any rate if anyone knows the right place to get a pulley for the motor that would be a help. (I don't want to try contacting LeBlond as my experience with them is "heart-stopping sticker shock" I suppose something from McMaster-Carr  will work, just need a little guidance and a catalog #)

Thanks (and sorry for the long story),

Neil




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Re: My very amateur Model_C_ restoration and a new lesson in what not to do

BOB WRIGHT
 

Neil, You could have someone here make you a pulley if you have some
dimentions left from your broken one or you can rig up a temp pulley
about the same size and make one...Bob


Re: My very amateur Model_C_ restoration and a new lesson in what not to do

Steve Wells
 

Neil,
Can you tell me the size and bore, I have an original 12"
with 7/8 bore, maybe send me a picture of the broken pully.
I also have a new smaller 10" Browning 3/4 bore it's an AL104 x
3/4.
off list is fine.

Steve
wswells@earthlink.net








--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, Neil Bristol <neil_ljl@...>
wrote:

Hello:

I have not posted more than one or two questions here but I want to
share an embarrassing moment with all of you and ask for help.

I recently got my first lathe (a 1937(ish) Model "C"). It was
sitting unused for the last 30+ years under a tarp in a room with a
forge..encrusted in soot and gear-oil but workable. I haven't used a
lathe since about 1974 but it was a South Bend and I always wanted
one since my first experience in Shop class.

I found this one and it was like the "Charlie Brown Christmas
tree": It needed me.

It was(is)

1) Terribly forlorn and unused

2) Pitifully filthy/rusty

3) Wiring wrong and dangerously degraded

4) (Most Importantly) Fixable and Affordable

So home it went with me just before Christmas....

On with the story: Professional Scientist & Intrepid "Tom Swift
Wanna-be" - I rewired it "The Right Way": proper grounding, the
correct gage wire, cleaned and polished the connections, carefully
dissembled and rebuilt the switch, etc.

I tested all the connections and Motor with a multi-meter, etc,etc.

Then the moment of truth and.. an incredible moment of
stupidity...: I set the motor on the bench and turned it on.. all
good then I tried the reverse and too late realized it was very near
the edge. It "leapt off" the bench and fell 3 feet to the floor.

It landed on the pulley assembly which broke into about 10 pieces.
(surprisingly ( too me) it is (was) made from cast iron).

Anyway...all is well with the 60year(+) old GE motor (turns out
that GE made a few well built-long, lasting products before Jack
Welsh came along) Sorry about that.

At any rate if anyone knows the right place to get a pulley for the
motor that would be a help. (I don't want to try contacting LeBlond
as my experience with them is "heart-stopping sticker shock" I
suppose something from McMaster-Carr will work, just need a little
guidance and a catalog #)

Thanks (and sorry for the long story),

Neil





---------------------------------
Want to start your own business? Learn how on Yahoo! Small Business.


My very amateur Model_C_ restoration and a new lesson in what not to do

Neil Bristol <neil_ljl@...>
 

Hello:

I have not posted more than one or two questions here but I want to share an embarrassing moment with all of you and ask for help.

I recently got my first lathe (a 1937(ish) Model "C"). It was sitting unused for the last 30+ years under a tarp in a room with a forge..encrusted in soot and gear-oil but workable. I haven't used a lathe since about 1974 but it was a South Bend and I always wanted one since my first experience in Shop class.

I found this one and it was like the "Charlie Brown Christmas tree":  It needed me.

It was(is)

     1) Terribly forlorn and unused

     2)  Pitifully filthy/rusty

     3)  Wiring wrong and dangerously degraded

     4)  (Most Importantly) Fixable and Affordable

So home it went with me just before Christmas....

On with the story:  Professional Scientist & Intrepid "Tom Swift Wanna-be" - I rewired it "The Right Way": proper grounding, the correct gage wire, cleaned and polished the connections, carefully dissembled and rebuilt the switch, etc.

 I tested all the connections and Motor with a multi-meter, etc,etc.

Then the moment of truth and.. an incredible moment of stupidity...: I set the motor on the bench and turned it on.. all good then I tried the reverse and too late realized it was very near the edge. It "leapt off" the bench and fell 3 feet to the floor.

It landed on the pulley assembly  which broke into about 10 pieces. (surprisingly ( too me) it is (was) made from cast iron).

Anyway...all is well with the 60year(+) old GE motor (turns out that GE made  a few well built-long, lasting products before Jack Welsh came along) Sorry about that.

At any rate if anyone knows the right place to get a pulley for the motor that would be a help. (I don't want to try contacting LeBlond as my experience with them is "heart-stopping sticker shock" I suppose something from McMaster-Carr  will work, just need a little guidance and a catalog #)

Thanks (and sorry for the long story),

Neil




Check out the all-new Yahoo! Mail beta - Fire up a more powerful email and get things done faster.


My very amateur Model_C_ restoration and a new lesson in what not to do

Neil Bristol <neil_ljl@...>
 

Hello:

I have not posted more than one or two questions here but I want to share an embarrassing moment with all of you and ask for help.

I recently got my first lathe (a 1937(ish) Model "C"). It was sitting unused for the last 30+ years under a tarp in a room with a forge..encrusted in soot and gear-oil but workable. I haven't used a lathe since about 1974 but it was a South Bend and I always wanted one since my first experience in Shop class.

I found this one and it was like the "Charlie Brown Christmas tree":  It needed me.

It was(is)

     1) Terribly forlorn and unused

     2)  Pitifully filthy/rusty

     3)  Wiring wrong and dangerously degraded

     4)  (Most Importantly) Fixable and Affordable

So home it went with me just before Christmas....

On with the story:  Professional Scientist & Intrepid "Tom Swift Wanna-be" - I rewired it "The Right Way": proper grounding, the correct gage wire, cleaned and polished the connections, carefully dissembled and rebuilt the switch, etc.

 I tested all the connections and Motor with a multi-meter, etc,etc.

Then the moment of truth and.. an incredible moment of stupidity...: I set the motor on the bench and turned it on.. all good then I tried the reverse and too late realized it was very near the edge. It "leapt off" the bench and fell 3 feet to the floor.

It landed on the pulley assembly  which broke into about 10 pieces. (surprisingly ( too me) it is (was) made from cast iron).

Anyway...all is well with the 60year(+) old GE motor (turns out that GE made  a few well built-long, lasting products before Jack Welsh came along) Sorry about that.

At any rate if anyone knows the right place to get a pulley for the motor that would be a help. (I don't want to try contacting LeBlond as my experience with them is "heart-stopping sticker shock" I suppose something from McMaster-Carr  will work, just need a little guidance and a catalog #)

Thanks (and sorry for the long story),

Neil




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Re: A little SB history

BOB WRIGHT
 

Here is some more SB history from Tonys site.
http://www.lathes.co.uk/southbend/page15.html You can hunt and peck
around on his site for days studing lathes and machines and Tony does
an excellant job on his site. Hit HOME after that page and see some
more SB stuff he has there. Tony is a member here also and hat's off
to him...Bob


Re: A little SB history

BOB WRIGHT
 

--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "Greg Coffin" <gpcoffin@...>
wrote:
Turk, I think you meant Amsted not AMF. AMF owned Harley Davidson for
a while. I have some flyers from an auction in 2000 at the old SB
plant with some pictures of the machines they used and sold off. Had
it not been for Amsted i wouldn't have the job i have now as i was
waiting for Amsted to call me to work Marathon Oil found my resume at
the employment office and called first. We have an Amsted (American
Steel Foundry) 13 miles away...Bob
Hi Clive

Actually SB built all their head and tail stocks in this manner.
The boring bar was held in the head stock and centered in the tail
stock. The head or tail stock casting was secured to a fixture on
the saddle. These machines were built on mid teens 15 inch lathes
and were still in use in 1998 when South West industries were
contemplating purchasing South Bend. At that time two of my friends
worked for SW and went to the factory as technical advisor's. John
and Hauns told me some real horror stories about the factory. In
the main manufacturing area there were right at 850 machines 50 or
less still functioned. The ones that did had plastic pipe frames
built over them with blue plastic tarps to keep the rain and the
bird droppings off the machines. John said the place was a bird
aviary as there were few windows left in the building. The roof
leaked like a sieve. Hauns told me there were a row of 10 small SB
shapers still in use making parts. They had fixtures in each shaper
and the operator just moved the part from machine to machine and at
the end it was done. The stories go on and on so its no wonder SB
folded as they did. If you read the history of SB and the fact that
it was the very first ESOP or Employee purchased company and what
happened in 1991 you could see they were doomed.

AS I understand the story and please don't quote me. SB or rather
the company that owned them at the time who I think was AMF was
going to shut SB down. This I think was in the late seventies.
There were some contract deals made were the employees took some
wage and benefit cuts. They hired some upper management types and
by 1991 the company was again profitable. At that time as I
understand it the wage and benefit concessions were to be returned
to the employees. The company management wonted to take the
accumulated profits and modernize a portion of the factory but the
employees just wonted the money and so they got what they were owed
but it spelled the doom of SB. One thing I read was at a meeting a
comment was made. We have been making these lathes this way for the
last 85 years and we can keep making them the same way we wont our
money. End of company.

Turk


Re: Chuck back plates

BOB WRIGHT
 

Yes i would machine it on all sides and that is what i was getting at,
the newer weights didn't have enough area to do that with without
running into the voids. But check around for different weight mfg's. I
looked at least in a half dozen places and finally had some plates
cast to my specs...Bob
--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "tetramachine"
<Tetrawheels@...> wrote:
If I was to make a backplate out of barbell weights, The casting
would
be machined on all surfaces, wouldn't you.


Re: reboring headstock

tetramachine
 

If you check the Miller Machine website they should how they do this
type of work. Straight forward job, its the setup where the time and
money is.

-- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "JohnW" <John.Walker@...> wrote:

There is an article on dotng this in the last issue of either home
shop machinist or machinist workshop.

JohnW

--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, Clive Foster <clive_foster@>
wrote:


Concerning Bobs' problem it wouldn't therefore be unreasonable
to
bore out the damaged bearing and replace it with a bronze
sleeve.
I
seem to recall seeing somewhere a description of doing this sort
of
job in situ using a live boring bar with one end running in the
rear
head-stock bearing and the other in bearings supported by the
tail-
stock. As I recall things the feed was from the tail-stock so
presumably that end of the bar was fixed into bearings carried by
a
sleeve clamped to the outside of the tail-stock ram. I've no
memory


Re: Chuck back plates

tetramachine
 

--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "BOB WRIGHT"
<aametalmaster@...> wrote:

I have seen some good weight plates and some bad ones, most have
casted letters or numbers and will throw the plate out of balance, or
are thin in the middle and thick on the edges or thin altogether with
a giant hole in the middle. The real good ones i saw were the real
heavy plates.
You might as well buy good cast blanks from Scott Logan at
http://www.lathe.com for 25 bucks each and have a quailty plate that
will last for years...Bob
If I was to make a backplate out of barbell weights, The casting would
be machined on all surfaces, wouldn't you.


Buck Chuck Jaws

Frank Trozzo
 

I have a 6" 3 jaw Buck 3634 with one piece jaws. I'm looking for a
set of reverse step jaws. Anyone have a source or link?


Re: A little SB history

Greg Coffin <gpcoffin@...>
 

Where can I find out more about the South Bend history? It sounds
like a fascinating story.

Greg

----- Original Message -----
From: Dennis Turk <dennis.turk2@verizon.net>
To: <southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Tuesday, January 30, 2007 10:15 AM
Subject: [southbendlathe] A little SB history


Hi Clive

Actually SB built all their head and tail stocks in this manner.
The boring bar was held in the head stock and centered in the tail
stock. The head or tail stock casting was secured to a fixture on
the saddle. These machines were built on mid teens 15 inch lathes
and were still in use in 1998 when South West industries were
contemplating purchasing South Bend. At that time two of my friends
worked for SW and went to the factory as technical advisor's. John
and Hauns told me some real horror stories about the factory. In
the main manufacturing area there were right at 850 machines 50 or
less still functioned. The ones that did had plastic pipe frames
built over them with blue plastic tarps to keep the rain and the
bird droppings off the machines. John said the place was a bird
aviary as there were few windows left in the building. The roof
leaked like a sieve. Hauns told me there were a row of 10 small SB
shapers still in use making parts. They had fixtures in each shaper
and the operator just moved the part from machine to machine and at
the end it was done. The stories go on and on so its no wonder SB
folded as they did. If you read the history of SB and the fact that
it was the very first ESOP or Employee purchased company and what
happened in 1991 you could see they were doomed.

AS I understand the story and please don't quote me. SB or rather
the company that owned them at the time who I think was AMF was
going to shut SB down. This I think was in the late seventies.
There were some contract deals made were the employees took some
wage and benefit cuts. They hired some upper management types and
by 1991 the company was again profitable. At that time as I
understand it the wage and benefit concessions were to be returned
to the employees. The company management wonted to take the
accumulated profits and modernize a portion of the factory but the
employees just wonted the money and so they got what they were owed
but it spelled the doom of SB. One thing I read was at a meeting a
comment was made. We have been making these lathes this way for the
last 85 years and we can keep making them the same way we wont our
money. End of company.

Turk


--- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, Clive Foster
<clive_foster@...> wrote:

It may be of interest to note that Myford switched from top feed
oiling, via proper drip feed & sight glass oilers, to SouthBend
style
underneath wick feed from a small sump when they introduced the
Super
7 series lathe to complement and eventually replace the ML 7.
Although I'm no fan of Myfords, for reasons that have more to do
with
personal engineering asethetic appreciation than rational
analysis,
both the ML 7 and Super 7 head-stocks approach SouthBend
durability
standards. Officially the change was part of the re-development
to
cope with the higher speed capability of the Super 7.

Concerning Bobs' problem it wouldn't therefore be unreasonable to
bore out the damaged bearing and replace it with a bronze sleeve.
I
seem to recall seeing somewhere a description of doing this sort
of
job in situ using a live boring bar with one end running in the
rear
head-stock bearing and the other in bearings supported by the tail-
stock. As I recall things the feed was from the tail-stock so
presumably that end of the bar was fixed into bearings carried by
a
sleeve clamped to the outside of the tail-stock ram. I've no
memory
of how the bar was driven, from the era I suspect the lathe
carried
some form of overhead drive for accessory spindles which would do
the
deed. An "after many years service I had to remake the head
stock
bearings on my lathe" type article. Was probably in JEWs' ME
article
archives!

One of the Village Press publications did what looked to be a
good
article on fixing a similar problem. Reprinted in Projects 4 or 5
I
think, I shall have to look it out for Bob.

Alternatively there are thin steel sleeves made for this sort of
repair job on plain bearings. The original being bored out and
the
shaft ground down to accommodate the sleeve. If a standard
sleeve
whose internal diameter matches the mandrel outside diameter this
might be an acceptable repair.

Clive



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Re: Chuck back plates

BOB WRIGHT
 

I have seen some good weight plates and some bad ones, most have
casted letters or numbers and will throw the plate out of balance, or
are thin in the middle and thick on the edges or thin altogether with
a giant hole in the middle. The real good ones i saw were the real
heavy plates.
You might as well buy good cast blanks from Scott Logan at
http://www.lathe.com for 25 bucks each and have a quailty plate that
will last for years...Bob


Re: Lathe Parts

amvskd
 

Not sure if this will help but worth a look

http://boston.craigslist.org/bmw/tls/272942404.html






- In southbendlathe@yahoogroups.com, "vjm2001" <vjm2001@...> wrote:

I need a lathe bed (with rack gear & leadscrew) and a tailstock
for a
10" heavy sbl.
I have all the other parts needed to assemble a 10" heavy lathe.
I have a couple headstocks & spindles (2-1/4x8thd), carriage,
compound,
cross slide, taper attachment, steady rest, tool holders, tools,
gears,
many chucks, wrenches, faceplates, centers, dogs, drills, reamers,
collets and drawbars and drawers full of other parts I can't
remember.
I'm in Southern Calif.
Thanks, Vince McKinley

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